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id Mobile now games on sale for your iStuffs


Aug 13
// Nick Chester
In honor of QuakeCon 2011, id Software is dropping the prices of all of its mobile games for Apple’s iThings. That’s good news, considering saving money is rad, as are most (if not all) of the id Mobile titles ava...
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Arx Fatalis dev acquired by Zenimax Media


Aug 12
// Nick Chester
ZeniMax Media, the parent company of publisher Bethesda Software, has announced that it has acquired Arx Fatalis developer Arkane Studios. “We share so many creative values,” says Arkane creative director Raphael ...
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id's Rage headed to iPhone at 60 frames per second


Aug 12
// Nick Chester
During today’s QuakeCon keynote, id’s John Carmack officially revealed a new version of its upcoming shooter Rage… one for the iPhone. The game was demoed on an iPhone 4 unit, running at 60 frames per secon...
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id Software not planning new IP for about ten years


Aug 12
// Jim Sterling
If you're looking forward to something other than Quake, Doom or Rage from id Software, then you'll be waiting for about a decade according to John Carmack. It seems that the studio is content to stick with its stock of monos...
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id promising something 'neat,' 'unannounced' at QuakeCon


Aug 12
// Nick Chester
QuakeCon 2010 kicks off in only a few hours, with doors opening to crowds of folks at the Hilton Anatole in Dallas, Texas. What would a major event be without a major announcement? According to id founder and technical genius...
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Quake Live adds 'Premium' and 'Pro' subscriptions


Aug 06
// Jordan Devore
Quake Live has been down for maintenance recently -- now we know why. The free-to-play, browser-based game is getting two subscription tiers, which will exist alongside the current free version. The Premium sub ($1.99 per mon...
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QuakeCon premium package gets you cool stuff


Aug 03
// Nick Chester
Headed to QuakeCon next week? You might want to consider hooking yourself up with the premium registration package which id and Bethesda are calling "QuakeCon Done Quick."500 of these packages will be offered (available to Un...
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Bethesda re-launches online newsletter, 'In The 'Works'


Aug 02
// Nick Chester
Want to keep up with the latest Bethesda Softworks happenings? Well, you can just keep reading Destructoid, because we think its games are totally keen and will continue to cover them. But if you're looking for a little more,...
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Former Infinity Ward heads to talk at QuakeCon 2010


Jul 30
// Nick Chester
Bethesda Softworks and idSoftware have announced the presentation and panel line up for for QuakCon 2010 today. It features the expected guests, including a keynote from id genius John Carmack, as well as presentation showing...
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QuakeCon 2010 registration detailed


Jul 01
// Nick Chester
Headed out to QuakeCon this August? You'll want to know about the "new and improved registration process." The new process is entirely on-site, and is apparently designed to reduce the time attendees will have to wait in orde...
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E3 10: Rage to get first playable at QuakeCon 2010


Jun 15
// Nick Chester
id Software's impressive Rage is getting its first public console showing at E3 this year, but we won't be getting our hands on the sticks: it's not playable here at the show. It certainly is playable, however. The demo we've...
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Doom II brings imps, demons to Xbox LIVE Arcade this week


May 25
// Nick Chester
As many of you have pointed out, Major Nelson has confirmed that Doom II will be joining Voodoo Dice on Xbox LIVE Arcade this week. The cost to nail a cacodemon in its monstrous, floating puss with a shotgun will be 800 MS Po...
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Doom II XBLA available on Japanese marketplace now


May 24
// Nick Chester
Last I asked, Bethesda would only confirm with me that id Software's Doom II port was still headed to Xbox LIVE Arcade. Well, it's available now… but only in Japan. Yup, the game has made a sudden appearance on the Jap...
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id demos Rage on 360, promises smooth gaming on PS3


May 04
// Nick Chester
At a Bethesda Softworks press event last month, id Software brought out the latest build of its upcoming first-person shooter, Rage. Previously shown only running on a PC, the developer pulled out its Xbox 360 kits to demonst...
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Doom II Xbox LIVE Arcade 'still in the cards'


Mar 23
// Nick Chester
Reader Jim L. writes: Know what happened to the game Doom II that was supposed to come out on Xbox LIVE Arcade late last year? Is it still coming to Xbox LIVE? Any new info on a release date perhaps? We don't always have ...
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John Carmack to get Lifetime Achievement award at GDC


Feb 22
// Nick Chester
When it comes to videogames, John Carmack is kind of a big deal. Lead programmer of games like Doom and Quake, he's unarguably one of the folks that put first-person shooters on the map. So it seems fitting that Carmack will ...
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Quake Live gets a new look for the holidays


Dec 22
// Jordan Devore
No, Quake Live isn't out of beta yet, silly; we all know that isn't happening during our lifetime. What I'm here to talk about today is related to the holidays. Let's hope you aren't sick of this stuff, because there's bound ...
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RAGE to be published by Bethesda Softworks


Dec 15
// Brad Nicholson
EA Partners is no longer slated to publish id Software’s RAGE as was announced at E3 2008 -- Bethesda Softworks is now set to do the studio the honors of selling the videogame to the masses.In an official release blaste...
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The Videogame Show What I've Done: Quake


Dec 05
// Jim Sterling
This week's Videogame Show was a total nightmare to make, thanks to the fact that Quake is an absolute bitch to pull footage from. I've ended up with a stupid watermark on the captured footage because I stuffed up my Fraps d...
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Pitchford: id and Crytek are 'risking failure'


Nov 16
// Jim Sterling
Randy "Savage" Pitchford is at it again. The outspoken Gearbox Software president has moved on from criticizing Valve and is now focusing on id Software and Crytek, two of the biggest PC developers out there. Randy believes t...
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id Software's RAGE is not supporting dedicated servers


Nov 06
// Jim Sterling
Modern Warfare 2 infuriated the PC community with the news that it would scrap dedicated servers, then we had Rebellion ducking the subject and making it look as if Aliens vs. Predator might go the same way. Now we have anoth...
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id CEO believes Microsoft will bring next-gen first


Aug 24
// Dale North
It doesn't matter if there's a global recession and game and console sales are down. You know there has to be some behind-the-scenes work on next-generation consoles going on. If I were a betting man, I'd say that at least pr...

Review: Wolfenstein

Aug 23 // Destructoid Staff
Wolfenstein (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PC)Developer: Raven Software, Endrant Studios, id Software, Pi StudiosPublisher: ActivisionReleased: August 18, 2009MSRP: $59.99 (PS3/360) / $49.99 (PC) Jim Sterling (Xbox 360) Everybody knows that America single-handedly won World War II, which is why it's up to gum-chewing, stereotypical American soldier B.J Blazkowicz to save the fictional town of Isenstadt from an emerging Nazis threat. Teaming up with resistance troops, Blazkowicz must thwart Germany's latest occult dabbling, stopping them from harnessing the power of The Black Sun. Armed with a Thule Medallion that grants him special powers, Blazkowicz will liberate Isenstadt and save the world. I wish I was American!The story is lame but easy to ignore, with the focus being primarily on guns and glory. The majority of the German troops are little more than moving targets, more than happy to be blasted in the face by your highly effective arsenal of weapons. Raven Software has done a great job of creating a varied and satisfying range of weapons, from standard rifles and machine guns, to more eccentric particle cannons, Tesla guns and time-slowing energy cannons of ultimate deathness. Progression through the single player revolves around using Isenstadt as a hub, from which other areas can be traveled to. There was potential here for sandbox-style elements, multiple paths and a variety of subquests. Raven ignored all these opportunities, despite employing elements such as waypoints and quest-givers, which gives the illusion of a game that's far less linear than it actually is. Players can explore the map for gold which they can spend at the Black Market and upgrade their weapons. There are also hidden Intel items around each map which shed more light on the story and can unlock further upgrades. Wolfenstein starts off rather badly, with the first few sections of the game being rather boring and as cookie-cutter as an FPS can get. Surprisingly, the poor quality of the game is not consistent, and the more Wolfenstein's campaign goes, the better it gets. What begins as a dreary and dull experience slowly, surely becomes quite exciting and satisfying. Games usually end up the other way round, so it's a nice surprise that Wolfenstein actually improves over time. The game's main contrition is the aforementioned Thule Medallion, which confers a number of special abilities, unlocked during the course of the campaign. Blazkowicz starts off with a power that allows him to see the world through a supernatural haze and see enemies better, as well as pass through secret walls. Later on, he gets the obligatory time-slowing ability, then a shield, and finally a power that increases his damage and allows him to shoot through enemy shields. These powers can also be upgraded at the Black Market. These "Veil" powers are basically culled from other shooters and collected almost as a "best-of," but there's no denying that they become essential for some of the game's tougher sections. Wolfenstein is mostly balanced and fair, although there are a few lazy portions of the game where the developers felt that simply throwing a ridiculous amount of goons at you was an adequate way of making the game difficult. Having to face off against respawning, ridiculously fast Nazi skeletons that can murder you in a few hits is not very fun. Fortunately, most of the game is challenging without being cheap, and the variety of enemies, such as cannon-wielding armored foes and shield-generating scribes, makes for fun, slightly strategic battles.The game is solid, but plays it very "safe" from beginning to end. It sticks to the roots of a very standard, traditional FPS, sometimes to the point where you wonder why it was made. It's certainly not as epic as Halo, as gritty as Killzone or as tight as Call of Duty. However, it's good at what it does, and what it does is stick to the basics and provide plenty of Nazis to shoot in the head and throat. Yes, throat kills are in the game, and they're as sick and gurgly as you might expect.  The single-player is good at what it does, definitely. However, the multiplayer is another story. Worked on by Endrant and not Raven, it feels like a completely different game. The characters have no sense of weight, the combat is dull and repetitive, and the whole experience is slow, stuttering, laggy and simply badly made. Earning cash with kills to spend on upgrades is a nice touch, but ultimately there is no reason whatsoever to play it. Stick to the single player, complete it, and then consider Wolfenstein finished. That's the message I want to convey here. This iteration of the Wolfenstein series is a single-player game. The multiplayer is so tacked-on that it should be ignored completely. Fortunately, the single-player is good enough to stand on its own, and keep this game a worthwhile play. Whether its worth your actual cash is another story, but if you like shooters and hate Nazis, then there are far worse things you can do than spend time with this title.  Score: 7.0 Brad Nicholson (Xbox 360)This exists for the folks who think shattering Nazi faces and annihilating occult-powered creatures is a blast. Bordering on mindless, Wolfenstein takes narrative cues from a post-Return to Castle Wolfenstein universe and heaps chaotic combat on the player as if it were still the late '80s. Solid mechanics as well as the welcome addition of the Veil powers holds it above water in this shooter-saturated climate, but there’s nothing of substantial substance separating this from its brethren. The series’ hallmarks and general FPS tropes shackle it. If someone put a gun to my head and forced me to summarize this game critically in a few words -- and in this case, it's kind of like that (minus the gun) -- I would say: Wolfenstein is a bare-knuckle, mundane FPS with a bit of style and a few original and largely untapped features. Brimming with monster-closets, confined level structures, and the odd idea that almost every set-piece location needs to end with a dubious boss with an obvious environmental weakness, Wolfenstein fails to impress in the "Original Shooter" category. It exists and delivers within its basic shooter niche, and nothing more.   There are several interesting, but underdeveloped mechanics present. The open-world map system that allows the player to travel freely to objectives is bloated and flat. Isenstadt possesses no unarmed peoples and offers nothing to the player in terms of extras. It functions as just another level -- filled with respawning enemies, no less -- to traverse on the way to another level to kill things in. This same idea applies to the Veil powers, which operate as additional weaponry in the quest to kill every Nazi and creature walking the streets of the universe. There are a few puzzles to use some of the powers with, but the game tells you what to do and how to do it 90 percent of the time, leaving little to the imagination in terms of solving. The occult powers may have been more interesting if there were repercussions to slipping into the Veil or if usage was more limited in some fashion.Underneath the gibberish narrative -- complete with senseless progression -- and the simple gib-fest combat lies a competent shooter. Wolfenstein might not do anything special, but it does deliver some raucous fights and a type of frantic, old-school experience most current-gen titles have strayed from. The single-player component takes around seven hours to complete, but a decent-sized multiplayer portion offers some padding. Like Tides of War, it has three game modes: Objective, Stopwatch and Team Deathmatch. Objective is aptly titled: one team defends an objective -- usually some sort of coveted device or object -- from the opposing team’s grasp. Stopwatch is the same thing, except the teams switch offensive and defensive sides in timed intervals.In a curious move, Endrant streamlined the objective-based modes, allowing most objectives to be stolen without having to break down layers of environmental defensive structures like the wall. Engineers can still crack alternate entrances to the final objective, but their TNT role is largely ignored. And this is a shame: part of the team aspect was communicating on what needs to be done within the immediate objectives. Now it’s just a mad dash to whatever shiny trinket is supposedly being protected. Joining the Engineer are two additional character classes: the Medic and the Soldier. On top of handling explosives, the Engineer can dispense ammunition packs while the medic can fire off health packs as well as heal downed party members. The soldier just ... kills people with heavy stuff like the rocket-filled Panzerfaust. In terms of balance, it’s brilliant. Each class brings something unique to the table. But -- and there’s always a ‘but’ with this Wolfenstein -- the sprawling, occasionally misshapen levels (there are quite a few, actually) tend to discourage the close-knit team-based play that is needed for all the class benefits to have an effect. Finding an ammunition pack is rough work in the majority of the environments, even if you’re crying for one. And that also feeds into the player count -- this game is six-on-six maximum.The netcode struggles under the weight of the small player count. Every match will have some sort of latency, varying from impossible-to-play to discouraging. Perhaps knowing that the code base was bad, Raven Software pulled back the visuals in this mode, killing the sheen and the majority of the detail work on the character models. It looks so last-generation that I actually thought something was wrong with my console. Pixelated blood and frame-stripping is something we shouldn’t see in a non-retro FPS.On the upside, there are decent weapons and a Veil progression system behind the action. Killing foes and taking objectives yields cold, hard gold that can be spent on numerous upgrades. Spending cash requires an iron stomach. The frequent disconnects, poor visuals, and latency-ridden play soil an underwhelming mode, completely inferior to all the other Wolfenstein titles. It feels dated, just like the SP component, and while fun can be had, there isn’t much in terms of nuance. It's just a shooter.Score: 6.5 Overall Score: 7.0 -- Good (7s are solid games that definitely have an audience. Might lack replay value, could be too short or there are some hard-to-ignore faults, but the experience is fun.)
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Nobody likes Nazis. Apart from German people, obviously. That's why it's always so much fun to shoot them, and why you can't keep the Wolfenstein franchise down. id Software, Raven Software, Pi Studios and Endrant Studios all...

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Rage Xbox 360 may have multiplayer on separate disc


Aug 20
// Jim Sterling
You know those jokes everybody made about Xbox 360 games needing to ship on multiple discs because Blu-ray is ten billion times better than DVDs? Well, it looks like id might finally be the one to make those jokes come true, ...
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id promises Rage won't be full of 'monster closets'


Aug 17
// Jim Sterling
Cheap scares can work well in movies when done right, but when id attempted it for Doom 3, results were not exactly satisfying. The game was full of "monster closets" -- areas where enemies would hide and ambush the...
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Carmack talks up Zenimax purchase of id, three new titles


Aug 15
// Matthew Razak
When it was announced that Zenimax had bought id reactions were pretty positive... unless you were John Romero. It seems that the guys at id agree with the majority of us that being bought by Zenimax was a pretty good thing a...
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Wolfenstein is almost here, celebrate with a trailer


Aug 14
// Conrad Zimmerman
The latest Wolfenstein is hitting stores next week and we have been sent a positively gripping trailer for it. My knuckles are whiter than stock broker's nostril hairs after a three-day weekend. Nazis and giant bugs and all s...
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Quake Live to support Mac, Linux starting next Tuesday


Aug 14
// Jordan Devore
As revealed at this year's QuakeCon by id Software president Todd Hollenshead, the free-to-play, browser-based Quake Live will finally be available for non-Windows users to play.The new Quake Live clients for Mac and Linux ar...
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id Software says Doom 4 is coming next year! Maybe!


Aug 14
// Colette Bennett
I love announcements about announcements. For instance, at this year's QuakeCon, id Software spoke at the opening press conference and revealed that there would be no Doom 4 reveal ... at least, not this year. Giant Bomb repo...
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Bring on the apocalypse: Rage's shiny new QuakeCon trailer


Aug 13
// Jordan Devore
After seeing the latest trailer for Rage from QuakeCon, I feel as if the game is going in a completely different direction than what I had envisioned, sort of like what happen with Brutal Legend. That said, I was impressed by...

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