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Free-to-play

Xbox One  photo
Xbox One

Xbox boss: 'Xbox One preview is going to get interesting'


Also preview rewards!
Apr 07
// Jed Whitaker
When asked on Twitter what to expect in the upcoming Xbox One preview update, head of Microsoft's Xbox division Phil Spencer replied "Preview is going to get interesting in the next few months. The members do a great job wit...
Pokémon Rumble World photo
Pokémon Rumble World

Pokémon Rumble World free-to-play for 3DS April 8


Pokédiamonds for human dollars
Apr 01
// Jed Whitaker
Pokémon Rumble World is the next installment in the Rumble series and features over 700 Pokémon. Unlike the arena based combat in Pokémon Rumble U,  Pokémon Rumble World is more...
Shut down photo
Shut down

Sony shutting down Vita RPG Destiny of Spirits


Just over a year, in-game currency 'expiring'
Mar 27
// Steven Hansen
Sony's gotta-catch-'em-all Vita card game Destiny of Spirits will be shut down June 30. Apparently the "over one million downloads" were not enough to sustain the free-to-play Vita title and so Sony will be "ending service." ...
Halo Online photo
Halo Online

Halo Online doesn't look half bad in motion


Relatively speaking
Mar 26
// Jordan Devore
Yeah, this is about what I would expect from a free-to-play, multiplayer-only Halo game for Russia. That fast-forwarded run through the customization menu at 0:33 is telling -- rentable weapons, boosts, and "special offers."...

Dirty Bomb aims high with its focus on hardcore FPS action

Mar 26 // Alessandro Fillari
Dirty Bomb (PC)Developer: Splash DamagePublisher: Nexon Release date: March 26th 2015 (Open Access) "For us, we were kind of accustomed to shipping packaged products and retail games, so that within itself was a different mentality to production,"said Splash Damage co-founder and chief branding officer Richard Jolly while discussing their transition to developing a free-to-play title. "So you essentially get the game to what is considered open beta, which is pretty much the final game in most cases, and then the players will play it, release a few updates and a bit of DLC, and then you walk away from it. But with Dirty Bomb, we're kind of back to mod-making. It's constantly evolving, and the game we had in the alpha with our fans is completely different than what we had now. It's interesting to have that level of transparency with our fans, and that's really helped us because we're still actively developing the game." [embed]289520:57922:0[/embed] Set in near-future London, the city had been plunged into chaos after a mysterious "dirty bomb" released toxic gases and large amounts of radiation. In the years since, London is now an abandoned husk of its former self, and the only ones willing to venture into the decaying remains of England's capital city are mercenaries who see the opportunity where others do not. With valuables and other fortunes to find in London, those crazy enough to set foot inside will have to fight for their riches in order to make it out on top. While on the surface it feels like a grittier and more mature take on Team Fortress 2, there's certainly a lot more going on with Dirty Bomb than at first glance. In total, there are several unique characters with their own arsenals and backstories. While many of them share a similar archetype, such as the sniper, medic, and assault classes, they each have access to their own particular set of skills and weapons that are specific to them. There's a lot of humor and humanity found in Dirty Bomb, and the accompanying flavor text that describes each character and their motives for merc work did a lot to bring me in. When in battle, you can select a squad of three characters. These three are the characters you can switch off from during the game, so you'll have to choose wisely. I mostly stuck with Phoenix, Vassili, and Arty, a medic, sniper, and support group. Though I initially was confused on how exactly I could switch off between the character gear, I quickly picked it up after a few minutes of play. Essentially, the members of your squad are loadouts, similar to those in Call of Duty or Battlefield, and you'll have need to switch between them in order to stay ahead of your foes. During a match in the game mode Stopwatch, a neat mix between the standard demolition and capture the flag modes, I was able to switch off between the characters when they were needed. Set on the map Terminal, the attackers have to plants charges on a wall within the quarantine zone in order to gain access to the train station that houses valuable documents that the attackers need to destroy -- but of course, the data is being protected by another group of mercs who aim to keep them intact. Playing on both sides, I found that I needed to switch up my classes more often, as when I was attacking I had to stay healed more often. While on defense, I needed to pick off the oncoming threat from afar. I was really impressed with how the flow of the game motivated me to switch things up more often, as I usually just stick with one class in other titles. I felt I experimented more often in this title than in most other shooters. This aspect of experimentation was something that the developers wished they players would explore. "Games are always an evolution, right? Especially since we were making this for ourselves, before the publisher stepped in," said lead designer Neil Alphonso. "We wanted to really bring out the characters of the mercs. They look really cool, and we wanted to reflect that in the gameplay more. So far it's worked really well, we've had players come up with combinations that we would've never expected in closed testing that we never would've expected, and of course we're gonna have to keep adjusting to that." When you win matches and collect cash, you can purchase cases that yield merc cards that offer a different variation for each character. Spanning across different rarity types, each type of card will offer that specific character a new loadout and special perks. For instance, I found a found a bronze card for Vassili, which not only gave him a new sniper rifle with higher rate of fire, but also gave him the ability to throw his melee weapon. As you find rarer cards, you'll gain access to new abilities and weapons for your characters. Though lead and bronze cards are very common, silver and gold cards really change the game for your characters, as they turn your merc into an elite badass decked out with perks and other special gear. While it's possible to the find much of the content on your own without ever spending a dime by combining junk cards and turning them into rare ones -- there are many different options to take advantage of if you feel as though you want get content quicker. As credits can be acquired pretty easily, you can always be comfortable with what you have, and the developers were clear that Dirty Bomb is a game that will not be "pay-to-win." "If you're making a competitive shooter, something that's hardcore, then the first thing people want is a fair playing field," said Alphonso. "The way I look at it, and it's a bit idealistic, but you just have to make a game that people enjoy enough, that they want to give you money. Rather than they feel like they need you to in order to compete." It's not too often that we see a F2P title with so much openness and transparency from the developers. Generally, the free-to-play genre has somewhat of a bad reputation because of poor practices from certain titles. And while it's understandable that many players feel a bit apprehensive for upcoming ones, I can say that Dirty Bomb was a pretty rad title in the hours I spent with it. Though I kinda wished that the developers stuck with Brink's traversal system, because that'd be such a welcome fit for this game, I found the action in DB to be pretty hectic, bombastic, and super satisfying to take part in. Not only did I feel like I got in some great action moments, going on a seven-kill streak was pretty damn great, but I also felt like I was a pretty integral part of the team as a healer and support unit. With the game available on Steam, now's your chance to get involved with the game that's been in the works for quite some time. And since it's still an on-going process, the developers have continued plans to roll out new features and content in the coming months, such as new maps and other cool content. I had a blast (no pun intended), and the folks from Splash Damage haven't lost their touch for fast and frenetic FPS gameplay.
Dirty Bomb photo
Rule 1: Don't be a dick
The folks at Splash Damage have been busy over the last two years. Since the release of Brink and a stint on Batman: Arkham Origins' multiplayer, they figured it was time to return to their roots with a heavy focus on PC...

Final Fantasy: Record Keeper is out today, and it kicks the crap out of All the Bravest

Mar 26 // Chris Carter
Unlike Bravest's soulless narrative, Record Keeper's setup is actually kind of cute. Individuals in a mysterious realm are charged with protecting the records of countless lands, literally framed within various paintings. After an evil darkness descends upon the world the records have been seemingly lost, leaving it to you, a titular record keeper, to bring them back. Under normal circumstances, only a master would be allowed to tinker with said records, but a top Mog in the order grants you permission to save the day. Like I said, cute. So let's get right to it -- the game is free-to-play, but follows a much different strategy than the aforementioned disaster of a game. There is an energy system (stamina), and items can be purchased by way of microtransactions (IAP), but you can completely enjoy the game without having to resort to buying anything. The core of Record Keeper's success is that stamina refills at a pretty respectable rate, which keeps you playing more often than most titles with the same mechanic. Additionally, the premium currency can be earned in-game through normal play by doing well, and the story doesn't feel gated to goad you into paying to win. The experience itself is fanservice at its finest. You'll dive into various classic Final Fantasy titles, reliving key moments like the bombing of the Mako Reactor, leveling up, and acquiring new party members (like Cloud) and equipment. Keeper's active-time-based combat isn't just a swipe fest, as you can use magic and abilities, as well as defend and use limit breaks of sorts called Soul Breaks. Although it doesn't get as involved as the core series there's a bit of strategic depth to it with mechanics such as elemental weaknesses, and the tap-based controls are precise. [embed]289548:57917:0[/embed] The best part about the combat system is that it doesn't really feel unfair, to the point where if you play smart, you should be able to overcome most of the tasks placed in front of you. Square Enix could have easily sleazed this bit to get you to cough up some cash, but at least with this collaboration with DeNA (yep, that DeNA), it seems to have learned from its mistakes. The reward loop is generous for a free game, which should encourage players to want to spend money. It may not make as much cash as All the Bravest as a result, but it feels a lot less criminal. You can find Final Fantasy: Record Keeper on iOS and Android today if you want to give it a shot.
FF: Record Keeper photo
Great in short bursts
Final Fantasy: All the Bravest was a travesty. It played itself, it was pretty abrasive in its pandering, and the microtransactions were so pushy that it was hard to enjoy it without feeling like you were constantly being sold something. Final Fantasy: Record Keeper is another free-to-play game in the same vein, but it's a much better effort that doesn't feel straight-up insulting to fans.

Halo Online photo
Halo Online

Multiplayer-only Halo Online headed to Russia


You know what's good? Money
Mar 25
// Jordan Devore
Halo Online sounds like something you'd see scribbled on a homemade DVD complete with copyright-infringing cover art but, no, it's a proper PC game in development at Saber Interactive. Granted, it's a free-to-play, multiplaye...
Three-hour Dota match photo
Three-hour Dota match

Record breaking competitive Dota 2 match lasts over 3 hours


The last Hobbit movie was shorter (and less entertaining)
Mar 22
// Nic Rowen
Dota matches have a reputation for becoming grindy slogs, but I'm pretty sure they aren't supposed to resemble the intractable grind of WWI trench warfare. On Friday a qualifying match between competitive teams Cloud9 and SFZ...
Driver Speedboat Paradise photo
Driver Speedboat Paradise

Ubisoft brings Driver back as a speedboat racer


Mobile speedboat racing
Mar 20
// Jed Whitaker
  Ubisoft is bringing back the classic series Driver as a speedboat racing game for mobile devices in April. I'm not quite sure how the series developed from a game about a getaway driver to racing speedboats, but they can't just let an IP die a peaceful death -- it has to buried alive.
Conker photo
Conker

Conker returns in episodic form starting next month!


Inside of Project Spark
Mar 19
// Jed Whitaker
Great news, Conker fans: he is finally coming back in his own episodic game. Sort of. Remember when Microsoft announced Conker would be in Project Spark? Well, Conker makes his debut in Project Spark on April 23 for Windows ...
Nintendo mobile photo
Nintendo mobile

Nintendo talks NX, mobile game pricing, DeNA partnership


'Nintendo will continue its [console] business with even stronger passion'
Mar 18
// Jordan Devore
Nintendo is finally entering the mobile game space through a collaboration with DeNA. Why now? As CEO Satoru Iwata explained to TIME, "We have come to the stage where we can say that we will be able to develop and operate so...

Gigantic made me gigantic in the pants

Mar 16 // Jed Whitaker
Gigantic centers around two teams of five players battling to kill the opposing teams guardians. Guardians are gigantic monsters that will advance to attack the enemy guardian once powered up, temporarily stunning it to allow your team to attack. Powering up guardians is achieved by capturing locations on the map or by scoring kills. Each guardian has three sections of health and whichever team can take down the opposing team's guardian first is crowned the victor. Unlike other MOBA-style games, Gigantic doesn't have waves of enemies to kill and grind, nor does it have a store to buy items. All skill management is built into a tree-like leveling system. Need more damage? Then upgrade an ability that allows 20% more damage. You can earn XP from kills, assists and helping to capture points -- basically anything that helps the team. The short amount of hands-on I had with the game had me playing as Voden, a character that looks like a combination of a fox and a gazelle. Voden bounds around the map with ease as he not only has the default sprint and dodge that all characters have, but can also a super jump off the healing pools he can drop. Bow and arrows are Voden's main weapon. He also has a decoy he can drop that attacks, a pool of acid that damages enemies and allows him to shoot poison arrows, and giant roots that hold enemies in place for a brief period so teammates can deal damage. Bouncing around the map and poking enemies for damage was a ton of fun, and had me smiling the whole match even though we lost. I seriously can't wait to play the game again. I've been obsessively checking my email hoping for a closed alpha invite (which you can sign up for here). Gigantic is free to play and expected to launch later this year exclusively on Windows 10 and Xbox One. It will feature optional crossplay between platforms as Microsoft is publishing the game. For now I'm going back to refreshing my email, hoping developer Motiga hears my prayers.
Gigantic Preview photo
It has been far over four hours; I need a doctor and an alpha invite
At PAX East this year I walked past many of the larger booths and gave them little attention, as I am typically more interested in indie games. I got invited to a press-only demo for Gigantic -- a game I only knew of by ...

Gears of War creator photo
Gears of War creator

Cliffy B's sci-fi shooter Project BlueStreak running in Unreal 4


Gears of War creator's next arena shooter
Mar 10
// Steven Hansen
Clifford Bleszinski (Gears of War, Unreal Tournament) is working on a new sci-fi arena shooter, code named BlueStreak. While it still doesn't have a final name, it does have an engine. Bleszinski's Boss Key studio is wo...
Extrasolar photo
Extrasolar

Extrasolar's mobile interface got a slick update


Controlling an exoplanet rover on the go
Feb 26
// Darren Nakamura
Extrasolar has always been a tough sell for hardcore gamers, in my eyes. Though it was one of my top games of last year, most readers tune out when they see a description like "free-to-play science simulator," and going any f...
Pokémon Shuffle photo
Pokémon Shuffle

There's already a workaround to skirt Pokémon Shuffle's microtransactions


That didn't take long
Feb 25
// Brett Makedonski
Pokémon Shuffle isn't Nintendo's initial foray into the seedy underworld of free-to-play with microtransactions. Rusty's Real Deal Baseball did it first, but Shuffle is the first example that drew ire fr...
BlazBlue photo
BlazBlue

There's a new BlazBlue rhythm game and it's out now


Brace yourselves, anti-mobile and free-to-play comments are coming
Feb 25
// Kyle MacGregor
"This isn't the BlazBlue game you're looking for," he persuades you with a small wave of the hand. Okay, maybe it is. Maybe you're in the market for a "gluttonous" rhythm game where you "eat to the beat of BlazBlue." In that ...
World of Tanks photo
World of Tanks

World of Tanks coming to Xbox One this year


Boom goes the dynamite
Feb 19
// Robert Summa
Publisher and developer Wargaming has announced that their free-to-play title World of Tanks is rumbling onto the Xbox One in 2015. As long as you're a Gold member, the game will be free to download. So, let's use the term f...
Dragon's Dogma photo
Dragon's Dogma

Combat looks fun as ever in Dragon's Dogma Online


So thank goodness there will be microtransactions to put a damper on it
Feb 19
// Jordan Devore
There may not be publicly-disclosed plans to bring Dragon's Dogma Online to the West, but you can't stop me from watching this trailer, Capcom. Not even your corporate wolves can. (Yes, yes, I know they hunt in packs, Pawn. Shut up about it already.)

Review: Pokemon Shuffle

Feb 19 // Chris Carter
Pokémon Shuffle (3DS)Developer: Genius SonorityPublisher: NintendoReleased: February 18, 2015MSRP: Free, with microtransactions (the bad kind) To dispel the notion that Nintendo is entering entirely uncharted territory, it has already done free-to-play -- to great success, actually. Rusty's Real Deal Baseball was one of my favorite games of 2014, and implemented the scheme in an incredibly unique and very Nintendo way. Although I'm not a big fan of Steeldiver: Sub Wars' gameplay, the model is fantastic. What the company has done with Pokémon Shuffle is a complete 180 from its past triumphs, and frankly disappointing given that it's a child-oriented IP. I don't know if Nintendo, its board members, Genius Sonority, or The Pokémon Company is to blame, but any way you slice it it's not good. Presentation-wise, Pokémon Shuffle seems innocent -- it's vibrant, and all of the enemies you fight are represented by floating heads with no 3D effects to speak of. The general setup of the game is fantastic as a puzzler. It's a match-three, no mistake about it, but it's fast-paced and some stages are actually difficult (more on this later). It's remarkably easy to pick up since there are few restrictions as to where you can shift tiles. As long as you can make a match of three or higher, you can use your stylus to drag and drop. If you happen to get multiple matches in a row and more drop down to form more matches, you'll make combos. That's basically the gist, and it works. Most levels require you to defeat the enemy by scoring a certain amount of points within a certain turn limit. There are some nuances, like the ability to use different types of Pokémon to do more damage by way of a weakness system. Also, certain monsters will have specific powers like the "Power of Four" attack that does more damage when you match up four or more tiles. Some characters can even Mega Evolve, which gradually fills up a gauge while matching that monster, and unleashes a power move the rest of the game. It adds a bit of edge to each match, because you'll stop to think every so often and decide whether or not certain matches are worth it. [embed]287855:57404:0[/embed] That pick-up-and-play surface mixture with complex depth is fun for the first 10 or so tutorial stages, then the free-to-play gating starts. Initially, Pokémon Shuffle will graciously allow you to play the game, granting you "Hearts," "Jewels," and "Coins" freely. Wait, what? Three currency types? Yep, it gets very sticky from here on out. The core currency is Jewels, which function as the premium element and are available for purchase for $0.99 each, with a small discount for bulk shopping. You can exchange Jewels for Hearts, which let you play one level one time (win or lose), or Coins, a sub-currency that can buy one-use (of course) power-ups. The main problem with Shuffle derives from the Heart system. You'll start off with five at first, and then you'll have to wait 30 minutes for each one to refill, up to a maximum of five. To give you some perspective, levels generally take 30 seconds to one minute to complete. So after three or so minutes, you're waiting two and a half hours to play five more. Even if you only pick it up once per day it's still a tough prospect to swallow. But that's not the worst part. Power-ups are presented in such an underhanded way that they trump waiting for Hearts on the sleaze scale. After each level is completed, you have a chance to catch the Pokémon in question. At first your catch percentage is generally high, weighing in at 75% or more -- so catching that Charizard makes you feel good, but even if you don't catch it, spending a Heart to try again doesn't feel like a waste. As time goes on however, I've bottomed-out on common-level Pokémon at 3%, at which point my jaw actually dropped. After a capture failure if you happen to have 2,500 Coins handy (that's a ton, as each win only gives you 100 Coins), you can spring for a one-time use Great Ball, which enhances your chance slightly. It doesn't even guarantee success. Let me say that again -- some common-level Pokemon will have a 23% capture rate even if you literally pay for an item that costs roughly 75 cents in real-world money. It's outright disgusting when you think about it, especially since people are going to want to catch their favorites. If it happens to be anything under 50%, good luck to you. There's also insult to injury once you realize that you spent a Heart replaying a level to try to catch a Pokémon with a low percentage, only to find out that you have to wait over two more hours to truly try again. Oh, and each Pokémon has a miniature experience/level system too, so if you want to grind to increase your level for some of the tougher Expert or later stages, that's more Hearts. It's absolutely maddening. At one point I was having a lot of fun playing the game since I had purchased some Hearts. I blew through some stages and it was a blast. Quickly, I realized that I was playing Pokémon Shuffle, and the energy system kicked back in. I guess Nintendo thought that I didn't need to play for more than 30 minutes and needed a break. Nintendo allows you to gain extra currency by way of StreetPass, which I did test, but the gains are minimal. At best, you'll get to play an extra 30 minutes or so per day if you live with another 3DS owner before it's back to the waiting game. The other issue is that pretty much every power-up is oddly expensive outside of the clear-cut best value 800 Coin turn extender, which feels like a win button in some cases. No Play Coin support is another missed opportunity. Anything truly enjoyable about the game is ruined by the microtransactions. Apparently Nintendo is doling out random events, like the ability to fight Mew for three weeks after launch. I absolutely rocked him, and blew the challenge out of the water on the fifth attempt, using up all my allotted Hearts. It was a rush. I was greeted with a 30% chance to catch him with a Great Ball. I said to myself, "Why even try? Why even get excited at the prospect of catching a rare Pokémon when the game is literally pay to win?" Expert (EX) levels seek to mix things up by allowing unlimited moves in exchange for a time limit, but they follow the same principle -- you do a ton of work, beat the stage, and get nothing out of it outside of a paywall. In the interest of disclosure, I made it to level 100 (Nintendo states there are 160 in all), and used $4.99 of my own funds to purchase Jewels to continue playing. I didn't replay very many levels to see if I could recatch Pokémon, because frankly, it felt like a waste of time. I'm not inherently against free-to-play in the slightest. I actually have felt inspired to spend money on games I was having fun with, and many games like Dota 2 and Path of Exile actually feel legitimately free, with a purely cosmetic shop. The system can work. Maybe I sound like I'm trying to bargain with the devil, but if Pokémon Shuffle had even a 15-minute-per-Heart timer it would be a much stronger experience. For now, if you really want a 3DS Pokémon puzzle game, buy the flawed Pokémon Battle Trozei instead for $7.99. It's basically the same thing, but you can actually play it. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher ahead of launch. No microtransaction payments were provided.]
Pokémon Shuffle review photo
Micro-mon Mega Evolved
Nintendo takes on the world of microtransactions with Pokémon Shuffle. What could go wrong? A lot. 

Pokemon Shuffle photo
Pokemon Shuffle

Pokémon Shuffle's microtransactions are even worse than I thought


Initial impressions
Feb 17
// Chris Carter
I just obtained my review copy for the upcoming 3DS match-three puzzler Pokémon Shuffle, and man, is it rough to get on-board with this microtransaction scheme. If you want the full rundown of what to expect you c...
ESO cash shop details photo
ESO cash shop details

ZeniMax details The Elder Scrolls Online's upcoming pay-to-play store


The road to hell is paved with novelty skins
Feb 13
// Jason Faulkner
The latest MMO to go the pay-to-play route is The Elder Scrolls Online. Last month's announcement was a bit of a shocker to some, as going subscription free is an indicator of bad news for MMOs. However, ZeniMax is trying its...
AERENA photo
AERENA

Strategy game AERENA is moving away from free-to-play, says fans were 'put off' by it


There is hope!
Feb 11
// Chris Carter
I am not inherently against free-to-play games. While some of them are designed just like South Park describes, as sleazy bait and switch schemes, a number of F2P titles are fair, and you'll actually get a ton of playtim...
Capcom photo
Capcom

Capcom is working on ten online games at the moment...ten


Dragon’s Dogma Online currently Japan-only
Feb 09
// Chris Carter
Capcom Online Games is a thing, if you haven't heard about it already. It seems as if the publisher is tired of putting money into smaller franchises that don't make millions upon millions of dollars, so it's bumping up produ...
Dota 2 tournament photo
Dota 2 tournament

The Dota 2 Asian Championships now has the second highest prize pool in eSports history


Main event is underway now
Feb 06
// Patrick Hancock
The Dota 2 Asian Championships' (DAC) main event is underway now, and currently boasts a prize pool of just under $3,000,000. This brings it to the second highest prize pool ever, behind the 2014 Dota 2 Internationa...
Free Steam fighter photo
Free Steam fighter

Gundam Vs-like 2-on-2 arena fighter Rise of Incarnates on Steam


Early Acccess and free-to-play
Feb 04
// Steven Hansen
Namco took the format of Gundam Vs. and brought it west with a new IP, the free-to-play Rise of Incarnates.  After some time in beta, Rise of Incarnates is now in Early Access. And unlike some games ...
Dragon's Dogma Online photo
Dragon's Dogma Online

Here's your first look at Dragon's Dogma Online


C'mon, Capcom. Please? Be a pal.
Jan 29
// Kyle MacGregor
The headline pretty much gives you the full story. Capcom has released the debut footage of Dragon's Dogma Online, its newly announced free-to-play multiplayer role-playing game. The title is slated to launch in Japan later ...
Dragon's Dogma photo
Dragon's Dogma

Capcom: 'No plans' to release Dragon's Dogma Online in the West


Guess you don't have to worry about those microtransactions
Jan 28
// Chris Carter
Dragon's Dogma Online sounded sketchy from its the free-to-play scheme and microtransactions angle. But I'll give anything a shot once, and who knows -- maybe it could have been great, right?Well we probably won't get the cha...
Dragon's Dogma photo
Dragon's Dogma

Dragon's Dogma Online officially announced, with microtransactions


As if those trademarks weren't announcement enough
Jan 27
// Chris Carter
Capcom has been suspiciously filing trademarks for Dragon's Dogma Online left and right. They were pretty sneaky. But now we know the truth -- Dragon's Dogma Online exists, and it's been officially unveiled by way o...
Free this weekend photo
Free this weekend

Play Civilization: Beyond Earth, Saints Row IV for free on Steam


This weekend only
Jan 15
// Steven Hansen
Saint's Row IV and Civilization: Beyond Earth are both free to play on Steam this weekend. Both are good to go until Sunday, 1PM PST. Try 'em. If you like 'em, both are on sale over the weekend, too. $5 fo...
WWE Immortals photo
WWE Immortals

WWE Immortals looks like Mortal Kombat/Injustice meets wrestling


Great concept, less-than-great execution (because free-to-play mobile)
Jan 15
// Jordan Devore
I'm not into wrestling but, conceptually, I'm feeling WWE Immortals. It's a fighting game from Mortal Kombat studio NetherRealm and Phosphor Games that imagines real-world wrestlers in a fantastical alternate universe. Thin...

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