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Akiba's Trip photo
Akiba's Trip

XSEED dates Akiba's Trip, confirms PS4 version


Coming to PS3/Vita in August and PS4 this holiday season
Jul 23
// Kyle MacGregor
XSEED plans to release the PlayStation 4 version of Akiba's Trip: Undead & Undressed in North America this holiday season, the publisher confirmed today. The PS3 and Vita iterations of the vampire-husking RPG brawler will launch on August 12.

I'm going to miss tripping in Super Smash Bros. 4

Jul 12 // Jonathan Holmes
[embed]277959:54854:0[/embed] Tripping (also know as prat falling) was a new aspect of the Smash Bros. gameplay system added with Brawl, the third game in the series. When playing on solid ground (meaning not on ice or wet ground) you have a 1/100 chance of falling every time you go from a still position to a dash or a roll. Chances of tripping increase on ice and wetness. There are also attacks specifically designed to make others trip. After tripping, you'll remain vulnerable to attack for half a second.  This was enough to enrage many Smash Bros. fans. They took the inclusion of this mechanic as a personal attack -- as an intentional move to get them to enjoy Brawl less than other games. It wasn't the only reason they were upset with the game. Compared to Melee, the characters in Brawl generally move a little slower and have longer hang times after jumping. Throw tripping on top of all that, and it was just too much. This is despite the fact that most human beings wouldn't be able to see the difference in how the games play unless presented with a head to head comparison. Even then they may not be able to see it. Unless you're accustomed to the lightning fast pace of competitive Melee play, the differences may be undetectable.  [embed]277959:54855:0[/embed] So if the differences are minor, and tripping is a rarity, why did Brawl cause Melee devotees to feel so robbed? It's because contrary to what many may think, the core appeal of the series isn't watching a bunch of  Nintendo characters hit each other into space and then explode. The thing that really makes playing Smash Bros, particularly Melee, feel different than other fighting games is the absurd level of control that it allows you to take over your character.  Smash Bros. was created by Masahiro Sakurai. He also created Kirby, a series that was designed to be the philosophical opposite of Super Mario Bros. when it it comes to control and empowerment. Where Mario has to constantly weigh the rewards of running (increased jump distance and speed towards the end of the course) with the risks that come with it (decreased character control and potential to speed into a deathtrap), Kirby allows the player to move their character almost anywhere they want at all times, and at little cost. Kirby doesn't have to worry about getting a running start and jumping over the giant pit at the very last second. He'll just fly over the thing, with the spirit of "whatever" firmly planted on his face as he floats on by. Go up against an enemy that has an ability greater than yours? No need to cautiously approach and wait for just the right time to attack. Just swallow them whole and you're done. Just don't forget to make that "whatever" face. It's so alpha.  [embed]277959:54856:0[/embed] Smash Bros takes that "go anywhere, do anything anytime" edict and applies it to the fighting game genre. Every character has at least two jumps, can block in the air, and advance with invincibility while rolling. Almost all fighters have projectiles, attacks that strike in two or more directions at once, or help them to travel vertically to help them recover after a jump (or two). In Melee, there are even unintended abuses of the system (like L-canceling) that allow for even greater levels of power and safety. This is all without the prerequisite complex stick and button combinations that most fighting games require you perform before you do anything "special." Like in Kirby, Smash Bros. allows you to do the most amazing things without really trying.  When every character in a fighter has this many abilities, the game becomes not so much what strategies you choose, but how fast and efficient you are in implementing them. This eventually turned most high level Smash Bros. Melee play into a race to get in there then start a poke and fake routine until your opponent makes a mistake. Any sort of long distance game, alternating between closing in and backing off, or anything but fast, short range normal attacks has been mostly thrown out the window. The most statistically successful and commonly used characters (Fox, Sheik, Captain Falcon) all are all about speed and risk reduction, making the game a contest of reflexes and dexterity more than anything else. To put it bluntly, competitive Melee has become a game that attracts impatient control freaks who want full authority over their player character and their opponent at all times, leaving nothing to chance and no time to wait and see how a situation will unfold. [embed]277959:54857:0[/embed] This is why the inclusion of tripping in Smash Bros Brawl felt like a slap in the face to them. The idea of having a 1/100 chance of being vulnerable and out of control for even a split second is the exact opposite of what they wanted. In part due to fear of tripping, play-style culture in Brawl quickly became geared towards the static and defensive. Chatter in competitive circles told of horror story loses due to tripping. Videos of comically tragic trip fails spread across Youtube. The consensus began to preach that if you wanted to maximize your chances of winning at Brawl, you has to minimize your chance of tripping by dashing as little as possible. This lead the most dedicated Brawl players to master the art of playing defensively, while the majority of Smash Bros die-hard community just played Melee.  This return to the familiar happens in fighting games a lot. Time spent learning new characters and mechanics means time spent losing to less adventurous players who stick with the standbys. When Street Fighter 3: The New Challengers  [Edit: The game is actually called Street Fighter 3: New Generation. Error fixed. My apologies] (another game shunned for not rewarding aggressive players enough) was first released, it had replaced the entire cast of Street Fighter 2 with (you guessed it) new challengers, except for series mainstays Ken and Ryu. What Capcom and the fighting game community discovered is that most players cared more about winning than experiencing something new. Most Street Fighter 3 players played it safe and stuck with Ken or Ryu, robbing themselves of most of the new content that Capcom had dished up for them. The same is true today. Even on home consoles, where you don't have to worry about losing a quarter or two when you lose, Ken and Ryu are still the most played characters in the Street Fighter series across the board.  Tripping doesn't fit in a culture that values winning and being in control over experiencing new things and overcoming new problems. This is why I love it. Tripping forces the players and the spectators to remain on the edge of their seats all the time, watching and wondering if something "unfair" is about to happen, and what that will lead to. Tripping just means you can't just follow a series of recipes from the "How to win at Smash Bros" cookbook. It means you have to be ready for anything.  [embed]277959:54858:0[/embed] In Brawl, every dash is a test of character, a display of willingness to play the odds. That kind of acceptance of random elements is what elevates a game to a sport. When a pitcher stands on the mound, or the batter steps up to the plate, they aren't going to back down because there is a chance that wind, rain, or other random environmental variables may cause an "unfair" loss of control. If a fighter in the UFC accidentally slips on his or his opponents spit/sweat/blood, he or she wont demand that the rules of the game be changed so that "tripping is taken out". They're willing to face the fact that in sports and in real life, some amount of chaos and discomfort is inevitable. It's their love of the game and their passion for self improvement that pushes them to face their fear of the unknown.  Truly passionate athletes are playing more against themselves and less against their physical opponents. They know that losing is just an idea. The real game is in their own minds. Winning is maintaining optimism no matter the hardship, and achieving by your own standards, not just by the standards of a scoreboard. Losing "unfairly" just drives them to try harder, to plan their next game where they'll set the record straight. Real athletes don't quit a game just because they might trip. [embed]277959:54861:0[/embed]  That's part of why I'm sad that tripping has been reportedly removed from Smash Bros for the Wii U and the 3DS. While I respect that decision, I feel it would have been better to give players the decision to turn it on or off, or better yet, have the option to make the frequency of tripping even more likely. A game where 1/50, or even 1/5 dashes lead to a trip would be an exciting, hilarious decent into barbarism.  Even better than that would be a mode that punishes players for attacking an opponent after they've taken a random fall. We instituted a system like this back at my local arcade when Street Fighter 2 was new. Everyone who played in our town knew each other, and we all agreed that throws were against our rules, as they were "too cheap". If you accidentally threw your opponent, you would willingly agree to take your hands off the stick and the buttons and count to "three Mississippi" as a penalty. It may be hard to imagine that kind of sportsmanship in today's world of online rage quitting and near constant anonymous trash talk, but that's the way it was.  [embed]277959:54862:0[/embed] To have those kinds of rules built into the next Smash Bros could make for an extremely interesting dynamic. If you take a "cheap" hit on an opponent and a red or yellow card is thrown in, you're going to have to face consequences. Maybe the player who was fouled on would get a free Smash Ball attack in compensation, or worse, the offending player may be removed from the game. In Ice Hockey (both in real life and on the NES), those kinds of risks are taken regularly, sometimes as part of a larger strategy. It may be smarter to take out a particularly opposing player with a cheap shot, even if it means being taking out of the game with them. That kind of thing is a lot grosser in real life, as it's real people getting physically assaulted, but in Smash Bros, it's just a relatively harmless foray into calculated crime and punishment.  These types of risk vs. reward, self preservation vs. sacrifice, ethical vs. practical, law vs. chaos conflicts happen in sports all the time. That differs from eSports, where every effort is usually made to remove variables that detract from overall "fairness". I'd argue that valuing "fairness" too much only works to make games feel fake. All games, including sports, are based on the way we naturally order our lives. Consciously or subconsciously, we all conceive of arbitrary win states to strive for and rules to follow in order to make those wins "fair." We assess our capacity and our worth by our ability to obtain those wins "fairly." What makes that experience feel "real" is balancing those fixed rules and goals again the mushy, inconsistent nature of existence. Living things are not a series of ones and zeros. We're all amorphous, ever-shifting blobs, whether we like it or not. [embed]277959:54859:0[/embed] Personally, I prefer games that give me the opportunity to safely practice dealing with a flawed, unfair world and an even more flawed, fallible person (myself) than games that work to provide a perfect fantasy where I have total control and predictability. If that's what I was looking for, I'd just play Checkers. It's got the best balance, responsive controls, and is 100% free of unfairness. That's exactly why it's so boring. 
Smash Bros.  photo
Also, some Melee bouts from EVO 2014
[Art by Fallen Party] [Update: Some of you are pretty upset about the article! Sorry about that. Also, a few people pointed out a couple of mistakes I made. First, I wrote that you can block in the air in Smash Bros. Looks li...

Senran Kagura 2 photo
Senran Kagura 2

Senran Kagura 2 trailer sure is very Senran Kagura


That ground-pound also sure is something
Jul 05
// Kyle MacGregor
Marvelous is keeping its cheeky money-printing machine going strong with Senran Kagura 2: Deep Crimson. The latest effort from self-proclaimed "huge boob producer" Kenichiro Takaki is due to be unleashed in Japan starti...

Kyoto Wild is a quick but thoughtful Bushido brawler

Jun 20 // Brett Makedonski
The premise is simple. Each player tries to get to five kills. Once they hit that mark, they turn gold. After they turn gold, they must be the last player standing in a round to win the game. Upon winning, they grow to become a giant gold figure for just a few seconds to really rub in the achievement. The demo that we saw was a bit pared down from what Diefenbach projects for the final game. In our build, there were three maps on a constant rotation and swords were the only available weapon. When Kyoto Wild releases, every single respawn will equip players with a new set of weapons (such as rakes, knives, and paper fans), and each one will control differently. Although we only got to use swords, it did a fine job of showing off how Kyoto Wild won't just reward players that dash in and melee as quick as they can. There's a pronounced pause with every swing that ever so briefly opens the attacker up for an easy kill if he's reckless or just unlucky. That, combined with the prospect of being hit with a projectile, create an atmosphere where you never feel safe until you've won the round. The fact that Diefenbach hasn't put a ton of time into Kyoto Wild yet shows. Right now, it's a bit bulky with regard to the controls. It's the subtle weight that wouldn't matter much in most genres of games, but it's notable and makes all the difference in a Bushido brawler. Despite some roughness, I had a great time playing Kyoto Wild. Upon ending each match, it was only a matter of seconds until someone fired up a new one to everyone's delight. Once it's polished, it'll be a fine brawler -- the kind you and your friends can use to declare supremacy over one another over and over again.
Kyoto Wild preview photo
Murder, rinse, repeat
Teddy Diefenbach is a busy guy. He's one of the developers on the high-profile indie title Hyper Light Drifter, but when he isn't doing that, he's making more games. Kyoto Wild is his side-project, and Diefenbach says he...

Guacamelee! photo
Guacamelee!

Guacamelee! coming to Wii U, PS4, Xbox One, and Xbox 360 in early July


With the bigger and better Super Turbo Championship Edition
Jun 19
// Jordan Devore
DrinkBox Studios' Guacamelee! was part brawler, part platformer, and loads of fun. Enough so that double dipping isn't entirely out of the question -- far from it! The game is coming to new platforms soon with an expanded ver...
Senran Kagura 2 photo
Senran Kagura 2

Marvelous AQL reveals new Senran Kagura 2 gals


Introducing Daidouji and Rin!
Jun 01
// Kyle MacGregor
Senran Kagura 2: Deep Crimson is coming to Japan on August 7, and I'm sure we'll see the Nintendo 3DS brawler here sooner or later. In the meantime, Marvelous AQL has unveiled a couple faces that will be joining the titl...
Akiba's Trip 2 photo
Akiba's Trip 2

Hashtag all filters: Akiba's Trip 2 has a weird editor on PS4


Filter -> EVERYTHING GREEN
May 29
// Steven Hansen
Akiba's Trip 2 is being ported to PS4 in Japan in a couple months (we get it on PS3 and Vita in August) and Acquire has some videos full of swimsuits and bouncing breasts to show off (below). There's also a weird "visual editor" (above) that lets you change sky color and, for some reason, all color. I get the Instagram "vintage" filter, but what's with the EVERYTHING IS GREEN filter?
Akiba's Trip 2 photo
Akiba's Trip 2

Akiba's Trip 2 acquires a flashy PlayStation 4 trailer


But will XSEED publish it here?
May 13
// Kyle MacGregor
Akiba's Trip: Undead & Undressed is a game where you, erm, beat the clothes of vampires. You see, their skin is weak to sunlight, so forcibly removing their clothes makes perfect sense actually. Earlier this year, XSEED ...
Akiba's Trip photo
Akiba's Trip

Akiba's Trip: Undead & Undressed will feature dual audio tracks


Also, 'strip portraits' for male characters as well as the women!
May 09
// Brittany Vincent
Infiltrate virtual Akihabara in Akiba's Trip: Undead & Undressed, an upcoming brawler that XSEED Games has gone to great lengths to localize properly. XSEED announced today that beat-the-pants-off-of-your-enemy Akihabara ...
Shish keboob photo
Shish keboob

Senran Kagura 2 trailer is jiggly and embarrassing


Shish keboob
May 09
// Steven Hansen
But! Credit where credit is due, fighting with a giant, food-skewered kebab instead of a sword? That's up my alley. The rest of Senran Kagura 2: Deep Crimson? Not so much. Anyway, you may proceed in telling me how I hate anime and am closed-minded towards Japanese culture.
Senran Kagura Vita photo
Senran Kagura Vita

Senran Kagura: Shinovi Versus jiggles to North America this fall


And there will be a limited edition physical release
May 08
// Kyle MacGregor
Senran Kagura: Shinovi Versus is coming to PlayStation Vita in North America this autumn, XSEED Games announced today. The plot of Shinovi Versus unfolds shortly after the events of Senran Kagura Burst, revisiting t...
Croixleur Sigma! photo
Croixleur Sigma!

Croixleur Sigma is hard to pronounce, but fun to play


Devil May Cute returns, and is better than ever
May 05
// Kyle MacGregor
Doujin hack-and-slasher Croixleur debuted on western shores early last year, and it packed quite a punch. The game drew inspiration from the Devil May Cry series' Bloody Palace mode, pitting players against waves of...
Dynasty Warriors photo
Dynasty Warriors

Dynasty Warriors 8: Xtreme Legends Complete hits Steam this month


Launching May 13 for PC
May 02
// Jordan Devore
Tecmo Koei has honed in on the North American and European PC release date for Dynasty Warriors 8: Xtreme Legends Complete Edition -- it's coming to Steam on May 13, 2014. The publisher included a handful of screenshots along with the announcement, including a shot of the graphics menu if you'd like to see what settings are customizable. Find those below.
BloodRayne out now on PC photo
BloodRayne out now on PC

BloodRayne: Betrayal takes a bite out of Steam today


The dhampir femme fatale returns with an enhanced PC release
Apr 30
// Kyle MacGregor
Majesco is looking to lure in unsuspecting victims today, as BloodRayne: Betrayal sinks its teeth into the PC market with a Steam release. The polarizing WayForward side-scroller initially landed on PlayStation 3 an...
Yakuza Restoration photo
Yakuza Restoration

Yakuza Ishin came to PS3 & PS4 to do right by fans, just not western ones


Please understand
Apr 25
// Steven Hansen
Yakuza Ishin, released in concert with the PS4 in Japan as the best selling (not-bundled) software, is probably never releasing outside of Japan. SEGA sidestepped localizing Yakuza 5 to put all its efforts towards developing ...
Free Xbone photo
Free Xbone

Play this crappy Raid 2 brawler & you could win an Xbox One


The game sucks, but free is free
Apr 08
// Steven Hansen
The Raid is a great action film. It's sequel comes out this Friday. I assume it's also good. I saw a "making of" GIF where they pass a camera through a car window to the passenger seat, which is actually a disguised person, w...
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Doujin fighter Magical Battle Festa strikes PC today


Japanese indie multiplayer brawler localized for western audiences
Apr 08
// Kyle MacGregor
Magical Battle Festa is hitting PC today, courtesy of the localization team at Playism. Set in a future where mankind has averted crisis by harnessing the power of magic, this arena fighter pits up to four-players in an all-...

Review: The Powerpuff Girls: Defenders of Townsville

Mar 23 // Darren Nakamura
The Powerpuff Girls: Defenders of Townsville (Linux, Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: RadiangamesPublisher: Cartoon Network GamesReleased: March 14, 2014MSRP: $7.99Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit In standard fashion for the genre, the Powerpuff Girls lose all of their powers at the onset of the adventure. Mojo Jojo builds a device that erases their procedural memories, causing them to forget how to use all of their powers. He also kidnaps Blossom, Bubbles, and the Mayor, leaving Buttercup to try to save the day. At the beginning, Buttercup can do nothing more than walk left or right; she cannot even punch or jump. With robots on her tail, she has to stay on the run. It is sort of interesting to be so completely disempowered, but thankfully the section does not last long. One of the first memories Buttercup regains is how to punch. Shortly after that, she remembers how to fly and things really start to feel right for the Powerpuff Girls property. One design decision that comes off as slightly strange at first is that there are two attack buttons, with one for leftward attacks and the other for rightward attacks. It takes some getting used to, but it quickly becomes clear why it is the way it is: a short time into the game, Buttercup gains a projectile attack, and the control scheme acts as a sort of simplified twin-stick shooter. With independent attack directions, players can fly left while shooting right, or vice versa. [embed]272334:53091:0[/embed] At that point, what appeared to be a brawler becomes more of a shmup. Some enemies put out an unhealthy amount of glowing purple bullets. Though it never reaches the point where it would be called bullet hell, the girls do a fair amount of dodging and shooting from afar, in addition to their more powerful melee attacks when the situation calls for it. Eventually, Buttercup rescues Blossom and subsequently Bubbles, and the player can switch between the three at will with a quick button press. All three have most of the same basic abilities, but each has her own unique projectile attack. Buttercup has a wave beam-esque pulse that can pass through walls, Blossom throws fireballs that deal splash damage and melt ice, and Bubbles has an ice attack that has the widest spread and can freeze open certain barriers. The girls' unique abilities provides one of the avenues for blocking progress and backtracking, though other universal abilities are used for this as well. As far as these types of games go, Defenders of Townsville is more open than most, with multiple paths available at any given time, and not much direction on which path makes the most sense. This highlights one of the weaknesses of the game: the map is less helpful than it should be. With such a nonlinear environment and the backtracking that entails, the map gives no information on what was previously blocking progress. It does show whether a room has a powerup to find and whether it has been cleared of enemies, but little else. It ends up not being a huge deal, because the area to explore is not too large, and the girls' ability to fly makes traversing it a relatively quick endeavor, but it does seem to be a step back for the genre, which has taken steps in recent years to minimize wasted time and effort. After completing the first quest, a second one opens up, but the progression is a bit different. In Mojo's Key Quest, the Powerpuff Girls keep all of their regained memories, and sections of the map are locked off by collectible keys rather than by abilities. To compensate for starting almost fully powered up, the robots to fight are more numerous and more formidable than before. It is in this second quest that the combat really starts to get demanding. With some practice, players are able to fully utilize some of the cool abilities that show up late in the first quest. The girls can punch projectiles out of the sky, use defeated enemies as explosive weapons, and perform devastating charge attacks to drop the robots. Some may find the combat in the first quest to be too easy, but it becomes much more satisfying in the second quest. Mojo's Key Quest has its own map issues, despite the change in progression. While it does clearly distinguish locked and open doors, it is a larger area with certain doors acting as two-way teleporters. The big thing missing from the in-game map is which teleporters lead to one another, requiring a rote memory component for something that could have easily been represented on the map screen. Graphically, Defenders of Townsville matches the recent visual reimagining for The Powerpuff Girls, and while I hated it at first, I got used to it by the end of the first two-hour quest. However, series purists and those who cannot get over it have the option to use the classic, thick-outlined art style, which changes not only the character sprites, but also the whole environment. Otherwise, I experienced a bit of noticeable screen tearing, but nothing too distracting from the experience. The soundtrack is a decent chiptune collection, but it does not especially fit the franchise. It has a bit of a grungy sound to it, rather than the expected sugary pop that many associate with The Powerpuff Girls. It is not bad by any means, but it just does not match. All in all, I came out of The Powerpuff Girls: Defenders of Townsville pleasantly surprised. Not only does it nail the look and feel of flying around and beating up robots as a Powerpuff Girl, but it also stands in its own right as a unique take on the metroidvania genre. Where most focus on platforming as a means for getting around, the girls' constant flight and projectile arsenal puts an emphasis on shmup gameplay instead. Though it suffers from a few design oversights, Defenders of Townsville is a good, solid game. It handles the franchise well enough, but it would be good even without the Powerpuff Girls property. At about four hours of total gameplay, it does not overstay its welcome, and it definitely does justice to the franchise.
Powerpuff Girls review photo
Sugar, spice, and almost everything nice
Fifteen years ago, The Powerpuff Girls was my jam. I used to watch it (along with Dexter's Laboratory) just about every day after coming home from school, but before firing up a videogame. A couple weeks ago, when The Po...

Senran Kagura Bust photo
Senran Kagura Bust

Senran Kagura Burst box art was almost even sexier


This is a brawler, by the way
Mar 14
// Steven Hansen
Marvelous AQL didn't shy away from titillation with apparent porn game Senran Kagura Burst's European box art. The initial plan was even more blatant. The original box art design, prototyped above, was a slip cover. The outer...
 photo

Fight Club as a 16-bit beat-em-up game


Do you want to finish her off?
Mar 10
// Conrad Zimmerman
This was a treat to find this morning. It's the latest installment of "8-Bit Cinema", a series from YouTube Channel Cinefix which presents how films might have been represented in classic games, and they've cast Fight Club&n...
Guacamelee! photo
Guacamelee!

Guacamelee's Super Turbo Championship Edition enhancements detailed


Multiple save slots, independent dimension swapping, and more
Mar 06
// Jordan Devore
How many copies of Guacamelee! is too many? At first glance, I was sure I'd be able to pass on the recently-announced Super Turbo Championship Edition for Xbox 360, Wii U, PS4, and Xbox One having played it once before on PS3...
Senran Kagura Busted photo
Senran Kagura Busted

Senran Kagura Burst commercial likens it to pornography


It's a little bit [videogame] and a little bit [boobs]
Feb 28
// Steven Hansen
If you still live at home with an edgy "No stupid people beyond this point" sign on your door and your mom still cleans your bedroom for you because you are a child, she might find your porn game, this unfunny commercial suggests, with bundled up tissues and Vaseline.  Yes, you'll be Senran Kagura BUSTED. 
Double Dragon photo
Double Dragon

Double Dragon: Neon update addresses online lag


Tell your bro
Feb 27
// Jordan Devore
Patrick reviewed the recent PC version of Double Dragon: Neon and found the game itself to be rad but couldn't say the same for its online cooperative play due to input lag. A new update on Steam has been released to remedy t...
 photo

Battle Princess of Arcadias collides with PSN in 2014


It's up to you to defeat the monsters invading your once peaceful kingdom!
Feb 14
// Kyle MacGregor
Battle Princess of Arcadias and its splashy art are bound for North America and Europe later this year, thanks to the fine folks at NIS America. The Odin Sphere-esque action role-playing game will launch on PlayStation 3...
Double Dragon photo
Double Dragon

Double Dragon: Neon now available on Steam


Get ready to ROOOOOOOOCK!
Feb 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
The zaniest adventure of Billy and Jimmy Lee is available for PC players today, as Double Dragon: Neon arrives on Steam. You may now purchase it for the perfectly reasonable sum of $9.99. Setting aside all of the awesome...
To the Death photo
To the Death

Side-scrolling shooter/fighter To the Death looks great


From former Infinity Ward devs
Jan 21
// Dale North
Words can wait. Hop to To the Death's Kickstarter page and hit play on the video. Get past the few concept images and check out the 0:15 mark. Yeah. That. YES. This beauty comes from former Infinity Ward and Sony Santa Monic...
Guacamelee bundle photo
Guacamelee bundle

El Bundle Fantástico de Guacamelee! está en PSN ahora


If you don't already own it, now is a good time to get it
Jan 14
// Darren Nakamura
Guacamelee! came out early last year, and ended up being my second-favorite game of 2013, with its bright colors, unique setting, and satisfying brawler combat all wrapped up into a Metroidvania. I recommend it whenever ...
Double Dragon photo
Double Dragon

Double Dragon: Neon coming to Steam with online co-op


Sold
Jan 08
// Jordan Devore
Midnight City has announced the PC version of Double Dragon: Neon and the big new addition for Steam is the inclusion of online cooperative play. That's more than enough reason to play this again, in part, for its killer sou...
Senran Kagura 2 photo
Senran Kagura 2

Tamsoft announces Senran Kagura 2: Deep Crimson


Also for the 3DS
Jan 07
// Chris Carter
Even though it may be lacking in some areas, people seem to be enjoying Senran Kagura Burst -- at least, enough for developer Tamsoft to announce a sequel. Famitsu has confirmed that the game will be called Sen...
Sup Holmes photo
Get to know the people that make great videogames
Eight days ago on Sup Holmes (now on iTunes) we were joined by Interabang Entertainment's Justin Woodward. His story is among the most engaging we've had on the show yet. Justin went from hustling burnt CD to gaining two col...


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