hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

indie

INFRAstructure photo
INFRAstructure

A spooky inside job is taking down buildings in INFRA


Jet fuel can't melt Stalburg beams!
Jul 10
// Jed Whitaker
INFRA is a first-person puzzle adventure game that has you playing as an inspector of a city's crumbling infrastructure. Sounds boring right? The spooky trailer above makes it sound like there is a mad millionaire plann...

Review: Duck Game

Jul 10 // Steven Hansen
Duck Game (PC)Developer: Landon PodbielskiPublisher: Adult Swim GamesMSRP: $12.99Released: June 4, 2015 Quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack. Quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack. Quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack. [embed]295748:59453:0[/embed] Quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack. Quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack. ...Ok, fine. Duck Game has a quack button. The feeling of impatiently tapping at an elevator to make it come faster has been turned to song and that song is the cacophony of up to four players mashing quack at the start of stages and, often, during combat. As much as the impish coquette in me would have delighted in leaving this review quacks in its entirety, I have a lot I want to say about Duck Game. Things that go beyond pure amusement -- the quack button, the ragdoll button, the tongue-hanging "Frog?" mask, the fucking name "Duck Game." There is an amusing set of solo challenge modes accessed through arcade cabinets. Success in these yields tickets which can be traded for gameplay modifiers, if you're stupid, or more funny hats, if you're smart. But the fatty meat of Duck Game is its multiplayer (online and local). While it could easily draw comparisons to a number of recently successful 2D multiplayer games like Samurai Gunn and TowerFall, I see a mix of randomness and pace from the likes of WarioWare and Super Crate Box. Matches can be over in seconds -- some stages seem designed that way. A victor is crowned, and it's off to the next fight. Breaking this whirlwind pace are intermissions where the ducks will toss their hats/masks across a field en route to 10 wins for ultimate victory.  They all look very mad and I love it. If the "Crazy Ass Goose!" video was not explicitly about a goose, I would say it was about these ducks. These ducks are the "Crazy Ass Goose!" of video games. Most interesting, though, is not that Duck Game has been energizing my living room of late, but how it does so. Part of it has to do with fast deaths and crazy weapons (riding chainsaws, magnet guns, Bionic Commando-claws, net guns, sledgehammers, trumpets). A lot of it boils down to an interesting take on what would otherwise be simple controls. In Samurai Gunn, you jump, slash, or shoot. In Duck Game, you jump, pick up/throw, and use. Along with the indispensable quack and its lesser relative, the ragdoll.  But Duck Game changes your interaction with the huge assortment of weapons that are scattered throughout maps. Everything needs to be picked up with a button press. With most guns, you can press pick up, then start pressing "use" (shoot, in this case), and it works as expected. But when you "pick up" a grenade, pressing "use" pulls the pin, and then you have to press "throw" (formerly "pick up") to toss it. It's not the assortment of weapons that is fun, it's the quick reflexes -- and their funny failures -- needed to remember how they all work, despite the simple two button layout. Shotguns are shot, then racked before they can be shot a again. Armor is picked up, then put on. Muskets are slowly, slowly reloaded. There are a litany of handguns, all with different properties. In the frantic panic, will you remember you were holding a derringer with one shot? I can't describe the amount of hollering coming from my living room after the tension-snapping slapstick of two ducks with shotguns meticulously coming up to the other before unleashing a barrage of empty-chamber clicks. They're both out of ammo and the calm, self-assured demeanor they came with dissolves into two panicked ducks jumping around looking for weapons. Quack. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Quack photo
Quack
Quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack quack qua...

Crypt of the NecroDancer photo
Crypt of the NecroDancer

Crypt of the NecroDancer headed to PS4 and Vita


Dance Dance PlayStation
Jul 10
// Darren Nakamura
Well this is nice. Previously available only for Linux, Mac, and Windows, Crypt of the NecroDancer is now on its way to PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita. Brace Yourself Games' community manager Heather Wilson made the annou...

Review: Spy Chameleon

Jul 10 // Steven Hansen
Spy Chameleon (Xbox One [reviewed], Wii U, PC)Developer: Unfinished PixelPublisher: Unfinished PixelMSRP: $4.99Released: May 22, 2015 (Xbox One) Spy Chameleon is a puzzle game with stealth flavorings that does one thing right. Its chameleon character changes colors in accordance with the four face buttons on an average Xbox 360 controller. To that end, I have no idea how it made it to Wii U before Xbox One. The palette swap ability is used for hiding in plain sight from both sweeping and stationary enemy vision cones. The cute mascot character works well with the colored rugs that adorn the first set of missions. Collectible flies lead you towards the best path for completing a level and you're rewarded for nabbing them all and coming in under time. A third chore is added once you've completed a level; you can go back and collect all the newly added ladybugs, too. In this retreading for things to do is Spy Chameleon's obvious flaw, which is that it is slight and tries to hide it. But it's not a good enough stealth game for that. [embed]294985:59452:0[/embed] The consistent aesthetic, albeit somewhat bare and not as lovingly detailed as the lead character, of the first mission gives way to repetitive, steel lab environments with mouse enemies and light-up floors that work against the jaunty Dreamworks lead. After those segments drag on, it tries to pick up, hurriedly introducing a few new mechanics (file cabinets to move and hide behind, paint cans to knock over, patrolling enemies you can eat from behind) and it just feels unfocused. The Metal Gear Solid cardboard box doesn't feel like an earned homage, just a disconnected reference. Spy Chameleon is a short game that feels too long. It's one good idea not fully realized and a reptilian mascot who deserves another shot. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Spy Chameleon review photo
Complacent Bond
Did the Gex 3 ad with a grinning Gex cupping a human woman's bare breasts kill green lizards in games? I'm pretty sure that horny-teen embodiment of '90s edge ended the Croc series, cost King K. Rool chief villain spots in Do...

Spelunky book photo
Spelunky book

A book about Spelunky is in the works from game creator Derek Yu


Published by Boss Fight Books
Jul 09
// Ben Davis
I have lost count of how many hours I've sunk into Spelunky, both the original free PC game and the multiplatform remake. And just when I think I'm starting to master the tough-as-nails procedurally generated platformer, I se...
The Magic Circle photo
The Magic Circle

The Magic Circle launch trailer pokes fun at games industry egoism


'Trailers are just lies set to music'
Jul 09
// Alessandro Fillari
Back in January, I had the pleasure of checking out The Magic Circle, a charming and funny adventure title that poked fun at the chaotic, often insane challenges of game development. There's a launch trailer to set the mood ...

Review: Spectra

Jul 09 // Brett Makedonski
Spectra (PC [reviewed], Xbox One, iOS, Android, Windows Phone)Developers: Gateway InteractivePublisher: MastertronicReleased: July 10, 2015 For all the things Spectra isn't, it does one thing very very well. The chiptune beats instantly remind of Chipzel's in Super Hexagon -- a game which is renowned for its recognizable and catchy music, and for its addictive qualities. There's a logical explanation for this connection: the music is made by Chipzel. Good as that component predictably is, one can't shake the feeling that the developers put the music too far at the forefront of Spectra. It's tied to the core of the game in such a way that Gateway Interactive actually developed around it. The ten levels are procedurally generated for what's happening with the music. Dynamic (racing) tracks for static (music) tracks. The problem isn't so much with the method, but with the absolute lack of variation in it. Spectra takes place on a winding two-lane road (like a Sheryl Crow song) with hexagonal prisms peppered along the way liberally to serve as obstacles. The entirety of Spectra consists of avoiding those barriers, picking up gold pellets, and ever-so-occasionally hitting a turbo marker that not only boosts speed but a score multiplier too. Technically, that score is probably the main reason to play Spectra. It's heavy on arcade-like qualities in that it asks the player to put up with great repetition in pursuit of leaderboard glory. Unfortunately, the procedural generation makes it so that no one can necessarily hunker down and teach themselves how to dominate the game. [embed]295486:59424:0[/embed] Instead, it emphasizes reaction over pattern recognition, which would be noble if the algorithm didn't often feel as if it spawns too many barriers at once. Sometimes it could very well be impossible to escape those situations unscathed. It's mostly unnoticeable on the earlier levels, but it's all too apparent in the later ones. Hampering those efforts is a control system that's not poor, but just slightly too loose for a game that only asks the player to steer. It's more a complication with the ship's animation than the actual controls. Regardless, it causes the tiniest of disconnects. A reaction-based game on a narrow pathway with thousands of hurdles has no excuse for not giving the player complete control. Spectra seemingly knows it as going off-track often grants a split second mercy window to get back on before plunging into the abyss. Besides score chasing, players may find themselves insistent on simply trying to finish each level. Clocking in around three and a half minutes each, it's no small feat as Spectra lends itself well to temporary concentration lapses causing immediate failure. The track length often seems about a minute too long to sustain any spurts of enjoyment. Even completion is unsatisfying as there's no finish line due to the game being unsure how far you will have made it over the duration of the song; rather than any sort of fanfare, a new screen pops up informing you of your accomplishment. I don't usually rely so literally upon Destructoid's scoring guide when assigning a number for a review, but it feels so apt in the case of Spectra. It's like a boring meal that did nothing more than chew up a little time. It does lack any real flavor. It didn't leave me any different than it found me. It's tolerable, but not anything special. Well, the music is special, but it turns out that Spectra can't stand on the merits of its music alone. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Spectra review photo
Beat it
Spectra isn't a lot of things. It isn't complicated; its mechanics and entire premise can be learned in literally five seconds. It isn't structured; level design is eschewed for procedural generation. It isn't long; an hour of playing will have unlocked all the tracks with plenty of time to retry the many failed ones. Probably most important: it isn't really fun.

Review: Sunset

Jul 08 // Steven Hansen
Sunset (Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: Tale of TalesPublisher: Tale of TalesMSRP: $19.99Released: May 21, 2015 Ortega's home starts out empty and austere as Angela's early duties, directed by scribbled notes Ortega leaves, revolve around unpacking boxes and slowly making a home out of the place. This is done by wandering around to find what needs to be done (a pile of dirty dishes, papers in disarray) and clicking on it, at which point Sunset cuts to a shot of the city's skyline and time ticks away on the clock until you're returned to first-person control with the task at hand completed. That chores are done in a cutaway feels like I'm being robbed of the physical connection to Ortega's apartment. The apartment itself becomes an evolving character going from home, to art sanctuary, to rebellion plot house, but boiling housework down to a single click makes Angela feel more like Ortega's executor than hired hand. This conflicts with the pitting of Angela against Ortega as far as class and social standing. With the same minimal effort he writes her a reminder to paint an accent wall, she does it. Just a click and time ticking off the clock, as if someone else is doing the work. Angela and Ortega communicate almost solely through notes scattered throughout the house. Angela can respond with one of two canned responses: warm responses trend towards romance, cool leave the relationship professional. I found Ortega's early flirtation off-putting and insulting, preferring to dutifully work, but things are complicated as the city becomes more volatile and Ortega seems to be leaving out intel Angela could pass along to the resistance. Gunfire in the streets turns to explosions, a stray bullet shatters a window. [embed]295633:59422:0[/embed] Craving more interaction, I found myself at one point glibly playing in Mass Effect style, that is going the warm route for chore execution and note correspondence for the sake of (or expectation of) sex. This was in part out of curiosity and to spice things up, but also, in a truer role-playing sense, I began to feel the familiar weight of Angela's poverty and the allure of easy escape into the arms of the wealthy, connected artist. This does clash, though, with Angela's fiery, sometimes too on-the-nose monologues upon entering the apartment week after week, criticizing Ortega's wealth, naivety, and concern over art. Most of Sunset's choices, like whether or not to push a romance or where to put away fresh-folded clothes, are small relative to what's going on externally, but the most interesting on a personal level. That I didn't even explore one possible choice, to not do my work, is interesting. But I only engaged Ortega for a lack of things to do -- I didn't respond to his notes at all at first -- as the chores themselves are handled for you. This leaves the notes and choosing responses as the main interaction; otherwise, it's less roleplay, more listening to Angela's elevator monologues and diary entries while sitting in a particular chair in the apartment. Sunset struggles with pacing, technical performance (movement is a tad wonky and it can run sluggish), and a disconnect between how its lead is written and, occasionally, what she does, player depending. The reduction of work to single click means the year's worth of date title cards, going up the elevator, and going down at sunset feels more monotonous than housekeeping. The music and colors are effective at setting mood, though, and there are instances of emotional resonance, strong writing and voice acting. Shorter, more tightly strung, Sunset's character study set against the revolutionary backdrop would've shone brighter, but as is it still leaves you enough to consider and a calendar to change. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Sunset review photo
Half moon
I like doing dishes. There is catharsis in cleaning, in being able to exert tangible control over your surroundings. Many things are out of my control, but I can keep my kitchen tidy. Sunset takes what most video games would ...

Planet Alpha 31 photo
Planet Alpha 31

Planet Alpha 31 has a fat buzzsaw robot


I missed the first 30 Planet Alpha games
Jul 08
// Darren Nakamura
These days it's pretty common to hear about a developer moving from working on AAA games into the indie space. Planet Alpha 31's Adrian Lazar is another example of that. After working at studios like Gameloft and IO Interact...
Soda Drinker Pro photo
Soda Drinker Pro

Soda Drinker Pro helping disabled people through a mechanical arm brace


No real, refreshing soda included
Jul 08
// Joe Parlock
[Update: Destructoid has received an email from Sean Halloran at Myomo, explaining more about how people have received Soda Drinker Pro: "Right now, Soda Drinker Pro for the MyoPro is still right out of development, and we ha...

Review: 0rbitalis

Jul 07 // Darren Nakamura
0rbitalis (Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: Alan ZucconiPublisher: MastertronicMSRP: $9.99Release Date: May 28, 2015 0rbitalis starts off with a simple goal: keep the probe from hitting a star or a planet for a set period of time. Generally, this can be achieved by finding just the right launch conditions to get the missile into a stable orbit. Soon after teaching that basic rule of thumb, it puts out levels in which stability is impossible and the surest course can be one with dangerous fly-bys and slingshot maneuvers, smashing into the surface of a star just moments after the timer runs down. That's just the first set of levels. Each set has only about five levels in it, with a progression that goes from introduction to experimentation to display of mastery quickly. Some levels can take a lot of time to complete as a result of their difficulty, but pacing is fast in terms of the number of conceptual tweaks. Long before a single idea feels played out, the next one is ushered in. [embed]293514:58888:0[/embed] These ideas can sound mundane, like having planets move along fixed paths, or they can sound fantastical, like anti-stars made of antimatter that produce antigravity fields. Either way, they bring something new to puzzle over. Other notable tweaks featured in certain level sets are pulsars whose gravitational pulls are variable over time, multiple star systems, and multiple rockets launching simultaneously from different locations. One major gameplay tweak comes with a total shift in goals. In certain levels there is a demarcated zone and the object is to spend a certain amount of time in the zone. Rather than surviving for as long as possible, the goal is to finish as quickly as possible. Instead of searching for a smooth orbit, the ideal solution often involves a high-power shot meant to break free and end once it has achieved its purpose. Personally, I prefer the more relaxed feel of the "survive as long as possible" levels. Since player interaction ends at the moment of the launch, there is a fair amount of downtime when the player isn't strictly doing anything other than watching the probe and predicting its path. That aspect in itself is almost a zen experience. With a mellow atmospheric music backing and a film grain filter over the simple geometric shapes, it's easy to be lulled into an almost catatonic state. I sat around just watching one orbit for about five minutes and it felt like it was only about thirty seconds. The visual effects work toward this as well. The subtle glow of space debris is calming, but the most striking effect is the trail following the probe. It fades slowly, so a long run over an interesting path creates an image reminiscent of those produced by a Spirograph. 0rbitalis has built-in screenshot functionality (in addition to Steam's), presumably because a good shot can result in some beautiful minimalist art. On the surface, 0rbitalis is a competent puzzle game with a simple central mechanic. It explores many facets with modifications and additions to that mechanic, and each new idea changes up gameplay enough that it never feels like its retreading ground. That's how one could describe 0rbitalis, but that doesn't really convey it. Finding the right groove and reaching a hypnotic state, that's 0rbitalis at its best. Fire a shot, have it smash into an asteroid. Fire another, have it slingshot off into deep space. Fire another, then contemplate the nature of the universe as it bends and loops around for minutes at a time, leaving behind a trail of where it has been. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
0rbitalis review photo
Hypn0tizing
A lot of ideas come out of the 48-hour game jam Ludum Dare, but only a small handful of them gain any appreciable notoriety past that. Every now and then a submission will get enough attention that its creators decide to deve...

Journey photo
Journey

Journey gets all emotional on PS4 in two weeks


Free for those who own it on PS3
Jul 07
// Brett Makedonski
Journey has been a staple of everyone's PlayStation 3 indie catalog for the past three years. In a scant two weeks, it'll be that exact same fixture except on PS4. They grow up so fast. Sony and thatgamecompany have ann...
A Mini Falafel Adventure photo
A Mini Falafel Adventure

Freeware metroidvania A Mini Falafel Adventure playable now


Get that Game Boy aesthetic
Jul 07
// Darren Nakamura
Look, we're all still a little peeved that Nintendo has neglected to make a 2D Metroid game in more than 10 years. However, while Nintendo has consistently jilted its Samus fans, we have been spoiled for choice in terms of o...
Super Impossible Road photo
Super Impossible Road

Super Impossible Road is the Mario Kart 64 Rainbow Road shortcut over and over


Coming to PlayStation 4
Jul 07
// Darren Nakamura
Mario Kart 64. Rainbow Road. Lakitu flashes the green light. The kart gets a boost of speed due to a well-timed acceleration. The track starts to curve down. The driver careens to the left and floats off into space. If done ...
Vanishing of Ethan Carter photo
Vanishing of Ethan Carter

The Vanishing of Ethan Carter has just turned up on PS4


In Europe anyways. He's still missing in the US
Jul 07
// Vikki Blake
The Vanishing of Ethan Carter is headed to PlayStation 4 on July 15. A teaser tweet from developer The Astronauts last week hinted that the game was due in "weeks, not months", and they weren't wrong - the game turned up...

Review: Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm

Jul 07 // Kyle MacGregor
Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm (Windows PC)Developer: PDW: HotapenPublisher: Nyu MediaMSRP: $14.99Released: July 7, 2015 Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm often draws comparisons to Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike, and for good reason. It was a major influence for designer Ume-Zono, who was an active competitor in tournaments, and has its fingerprints all over the place -- from the visuals to the parry system. In terms of the basic controls, there are four main attack buttons (split between light and heavy punches and kicks), plus two others that allow players to parry high and low attacks. Of course, there are combos and supers, though most of them are fairly simple and easy to pull off. That goes a long way in making the game feel accessible to newcomers. While there certainly are deeper systems to be explored, I felt comfortable with Yatagarasu in minutes, quickly picking up a Shoto-style character (there are two) and was throwing fireballs and dragon punches in no time. True to its inspiration, Yatagarasu is all about controlling space on the ground, and there are some interesting wrinkles in terms of movement to help you do so. There's a quick forward jump similar to King of Fighters' hyper hop, which is useful for closing distance or avoiding projectiles while mitigating your susceptibility to anti-air attacks -- which can't be blocked. Meanwhile, dashing is nice for backing up quickly, but still leaves you vulnerable to strikes.  The roster includes a diverse group of eleven fighters, all of whom are unlocked from the get-go. In addition to Shoto guys, the cast features a grappler, a pair of sword-swinging ladies that look nearly identical but play very differently, a Dudley clone boxer, and teleporting ninja. This version of the game adds three new characters, Kotaro (a technical fighter mid-air specialist), Azure (who makes use of a Reppuken à la King of Fighters' Geese), and Aja (a slow and heavy sword user). While there aren't a ton of characters, it still has a nice variety and the limited number of options means it probably won't take you too long to decide which ones fit your preferred styles of play. After selecting a fighter, you will have to make a couple decisions that add a bit of color to the experience. The game will prompt you to power up one of your two supers, which will make that one more powerful for that battle. Yatagarasu also has a commentary system, which features prominent faces from the fighting game community, including Jchensor, UltraDavid, and Maximilian. The commentary is a cute idea, but it can be distracting. And while there are a number of voices to choose from, after spending a while with the game I'd heard just about everything they'd had to offer and opted to switch them off entirely. There aren't a lot of other extras to be found, though. The package is about spartan as it gets, coming with a pair of arcade modes, versus, network play, and surprisingly robust training mode. Of course, the quality of the online experience is of the utmost importance. Or at least you'd think so. Despite GGPO support being promised in the project's crowdfunding campaign, the lag-reducing middleware has not yet been implemented, which is a huge disappointment. The development team still plans to include GGPO eventually, but it will not be there at launch. Since I've been playing Yatagarasu pre-release, I wasn't spoiled for choice in terms of competition, leading me to reluctantly take on a number of opponents with less than stellar ping.  I've experienced a lot of that in my time with Yatagarasu thus far, pushing past a string of minor headaches to enjoy the combat. Everything outside of battle -- from the way the game launches to the austere menus and 4:3 resolution that doesn't take into account widescreen -- it all could have been handled so much better. Even just getting my controllers and fight pad to work properly was a constant source of frustration. Without rhyme or apparent reason, something always seemed to be going wrong, putting a damper on an otherwise great experience. That's really a pity too, because when you're in a match and everything's working properly this game is an absolute dream. I enjoy the minimalist visuals and emphasis on mind games and feeling out your opponent, rather than pulling off technical combos. In a lot of ways, it's refreshing how stripped down Yatagarasu is, but it would have been nice to see more attention around the periphery.  Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm is wonderful, except when it isn't. From first blood to knockout this is an exceptional fighting game. I just wish the rest of it was held to that same standard.  [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Yatagarasu review photo
A strong contender
[Disclosure: The reviewer supported Yatagarasu Attack on Cataclysm's Indiegogo campaign.] Yatagarasu has taken a long and winding road to get where it is today. The doujin fighting game has existed in one form or an...

Myriad on PlayStation photo
Myriad on PlayStation

Stark, trippy shooter Myriad also heading to PS4 and Vita


Another baffling press release, too
Jul 07
// Darren Nakamura
Earlier this year I was impressed by several parts of Myriad. The first was its use of bold colors and hard edges. The second was its unique mechanical take on the twin-stick shooter genre. The third was its head-scratchingl...
Waifu bartending photo
Waifu bartending

VA-11 HALL-A's got cat girls, booze, and an oppressive state


Cyberpunk Bartender Action
Jul 06
// Steven Hansen
I've written before about VA-11 HALL-A, which should be the best anime-inspired bartending sim of the year. And I don't say that lightly.  This new trailer shows off some more of the patrons you'll be liquoring up and s...
Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Sup Holmes facilitates phallic feelings with Robert Yang


Sup Holmes every Sunday at 4pm EST!
Jul 05
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] [Update: Show's over folks...

This Japanese FPS just misses its mark

Jul 04 // Kyle MacGregor
The Legend of Alfur isn't particularly good, but I was more than willing to overlook its rough edges, at least at first. The experience pulled me in from the get-go. It begins when our protagonists, a lass named Shalnawaz and her brother Leon, are taken captive by soldiers from a neighboring kingdom. And to make matters worse, the men openly plan to sell the siblings into slavery.  Things quickly take an unexpected turn, though. One of the soldiers kills his commanding officer, then frames the siblings for the murder, forcing them to escape and fend off their pursuers. It's just a pity that the actual game doesn't back up the intrigue of the premise. Despite being a few years old now (and being created by a small team on a limited budget), this thing was dated when it launched. It isn't pretty. At all. But its graphical shortcomings pale in comparison with the gameplay. [embed]295318:59341:0[/embed] While engaging in shootouts, I often found my character clipping through objects and getting caught on scenery. Hiding behind cover isn't always effective, as enemy fire can travel through boulders, hillsides, and trees. And firing back is just as troublesome, thanks to some truly awful iron sights.  Still with me? Despite those many issues, I still somehow managed to glean a bit of enjoyment out of The Legend of Alfur. It is by no means great (or the best use of $10), but the sheer novelty of an anime-style first-person shooter cannot be denied. It's something I'd honestly like to see more of. If you'd like to see more Doujin Dojo, check back with Destructoid every weekend for more (hopefully positive) coverage of Japanese indie games and the people that make and localize them. Want us to report on something in particular? Hit me up ([email protected]) and stay tuned!
Doujin Dojo photo
Alfur isn't so legendary
Welcome to Doujin Dojo, a new weekly column dedicated to the Japanese indie scene. Maybe I should have started this out by gushing about Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale or Astebreed (which is now available on PS4, by the way)....

Dtoid/GameFan digital magazine is now free for everybody!

Jul 03 // Jonathan Holmes
Perhaps most importantly, this issue features exclusive artwork by the guy who made this space duck. As much as I love words, the art here is really the star of the show. There's so much beautiful stuff, paying tribute to franchises like MOTHER/EarthBound, Street Fighter, Smash Bros., Splatoon, and a lot more. Our exclusive Bloodstained cover art isn't too shabby, either. I've had to look at it just about every day for the past month and a half, and I'm still not sick of it.  To download the magazine for you computer, tablet or phone, go here, start an account, and enter code DTOID0215. You can pre-order the print version of the magazine over here, though orders are filling up fast.  
Dtoid/GameFan mag photo
Tell your friends!
Full disclosure: I was initially against the idea of allowing people to download the debut issue of Destructoid/GameFan magazine for free. That's not because I want money. My paycheck won't change regardless of how many issue...

Capsule Force photo
Capsule Force

Iron Galaxy's Capsule Force looks adorable


Launching this month
Jul 03
// Chris Carter
Iron Galaxy has announced that Capsule Force will launch on the PC and PS4 platforms this month on July 23. It's a retro-styled four player title that's set in the "far future of 1999." Although it's multiplayer oriented, it will have 30 missions to play solo. I really dig the aesthetic here, so I'll probably give it a shot.
Indivisible photo
Indivisible

Skullgirls dev making RPG with Mana composer


Indivisible announced at Anime Expo
Jul 02
// Kyle MacGregor
Tonight at Anime Expo in Los Angeles, Skullgirls developer Lab Zero Games announced Indivisible, a new action role-playing game inspired by the likes of Valkyrie Profile and Super Metroid. Secret of Mana composer H...
Broforce Update photo
Broforce Update

Broforce Freedom Update adds pointy objects, flexing


That's a sharp helmet
Jul 02
// Nic Rowen
Just in time for Independence Day, the testosterone soaked, uber-patriotic Broforce is getting a synthoil injection of content by way of its “Freedom Update.” Featuring two new bros to mangle commies and protect ...
Renoir Kickstarter photo
Renoir Kickstarter

Noir puzzle platformer Renoir on Kickstarter


Now with gameplay footage
Jul 02
// Darren Nakamura
A few months back we got our first look at Renoir and I expressed some cautious optimism since the film noir genre is underused in games but the reveal trailer had no information on gameplay past the puzzle-platformer genre ...
Card Hunter on Steam photo
Card Hunter on Steam

Browser-based tactical card RPG Card Hunter headed to Steam


New expansion coming soon too
Jul 02
// Darren Nakamura
Somehow I have missed out on Card Hunter for the past couple years. It released in 2013 and Destructoid's reviews patriarch Chris Carter loved it. I don't know how it wasn't on my radar; it has a lot going for it I'm into. I...
Sir, You Are Being Hunted photo
Sir, You Are Being Hunted

Sir, You Are Being Hunted has released an early multiplayer build


Robots aren't the only threat now
Jul 02
// Joe Parlock
Sir, You Are Being Hunted was my personal Game of the Year™ for 2014. With its fantastic British tweedpunk art style, some really neat AI and tense-as-hell stealth, it very quickly became a very special game to me. Now,...
Bombernauts photo
Bombernauts

Bombernauts makes me miss Bomberman


Baseball bats and bombs
Jul 01
// Jordan Devore
I probably can't take the day off to play Super Bomberman 2, so I'll pass along word of Bombernauts instead. It's almost ready for us. Ahead of the game's July 31 release on Steam, here's a refresher. Bombernauts is about bo...
Thomas Was Alone toys photo
Thomas Was Alone toys

Thomas Was Alone action figures are a real thing


Autographed by Mike Bithell
Jun 30
// Kyle MacGregor
I haven't had the urge to buy blocks in... a long time, but these Thomas Was Alone "action figures" are testing my resolve. The Claire figure even floats, apparently, which sounds perfect for the tub. Yes, I'm a supposed adul...
Terraria 1.3 photo
Terraria 1.3

Time to boot up Terraria again


Version 1.3 is here
Jun 30
// Jordan Devore
Everything I knew of Terraria's 1.3 update was shown in that mine cart video. Looking over the vast changelog, there are hundreds of additions, tweaks, and fixes. It's here and it's huge! Multiplayer is easier to set up, for ...

  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter!
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -