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Nintendo Download 11/15/12: Mickey Edition


What's the time? Disney time
Nov 15
// Chris Carter
The 3DS has a decent amount of bulky titles this week, like Monster Shooter ($6.99), Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion ($39.99), Hotel Transylvania ($29.99), Myst ($29.99), and American Mensa Academy ($29.99). DSiWare is rocking...
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Nintendo Download 11/8/12: Paper Edition


Paper Mario!
Nov 08
// Chris Carter
The 3DS eShop is bringing some high price items to show off this week, with Pokedex 3D Pro ($14.99 -- wait, what?!) and Paper Mario: Sticker Star ($39.99). Remember that the Paper Mario digital download is included in the Don...
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Nintendo Download: Gnome Edition


David would be proud. Maybe.
Nov 01
// Chris Carter
You like gnomes, right? Of course you do! When they're not creeping you out or stealing your underpants, I guess they can be alright. Well today you're getting your weekly dose of gnome-age, whether you like it or not, with 2...

Review: Retro City Rampage

Oct 31 // Tony Ponce
Retro City Rampage (PC [reviewed], PlayStation Network, PlayStation Vita, WiiWare, Xbox Live Arcade)Developer: Vblank EntertainmentPublisher: Vblank EntertainmentRelease: October 9, 2012 (PC, PSN, Vita) / Q4 2012 (WiiWare, XBLA)MSRP: $14.99 (PC, PSN, Vita) / TBA (WiiWare, XBLA) Retro City Rampage has had quite the colorful history. Originally conceived as the NES homebrew project Grand Theftendo, Brian decided to shift development to PC in order to escape the NES' limitations. From then on, the game started to gain an identity of its own. RCR may be an open-world sandbox, but a GTA clone it is not. It is a melting pot of ideas and inspiration, a conglomerate of cameos and pop culture references that are woven into the fabric so seamlessly that it feels like they truly belong together. It's Brian's own Who Framed Roger Rabbit, and the in-game world of Theftropolis is his Toontown. So rich is the city with heartfelt nods to cherished icons of yesteryear that you can't even go 30 seconds without being slammed by a parade of nostalgia. As you cruise the streets, you may notice the Ninja Turtles' Party Wagon or the A-Team's van driving by. Environments and objects straight out of Super Mario Bros., The Legend of Zelda, Sonic the Hedgehog, and more dot the landscape. There's even a boxing gym operated by a man who is totally a dead ringer for Doc Louis from Punch-Out!! [embed]237235:45596[/embed] A lot of these references are window dressing, so it might be easy to pass RCR off as lacking substance. That couldn't be further from the truth. The biggest references of all are built into the missions themselves, straddling the line between parody and homage but always with love and attention to detail. In one mission, you break into the home of the very Batman-esque Biffman, don his costume, and patrol the streets in search of Biffman's nemesis the Jester. In another mission, you bust onto the set of a Saved by the Bell knockoff during a live taping, beat up the high school boys, then take the girl back to your place for some "iced tea." In yet another mission, you have to dive into the reservoir to deactivate bombs in a recreation of the infamous dam level from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles on the NES. These are the kinds of adventures you'll embark upon during the main missions, but you might want to kill some time driving around the street, jacking cars, and mowing down pedestrians instead. The more carnage you create, the more your notoriety grows, attracting the attention of ever more aggressive cops and eventually the military. As with GTA, there's something morbidly cathartic about spreading wanton chaos and destruction -- even more so when the world is populated by pixelated, toy-like caricatures of beach bums, gymnasts, and mariachis. Like I metioned, there is an overarching story. You are a hired thug known only as "Player," who is hurtled through time after stealing Bill and Ted's phone booth in front of a convenience store. Stranded in the future, you are fortunate enough to bump into Doc Choc, who's willing to let you use his DeLorean time machine if you can help repair it. Thus, you must track down the missing pieces of the machine, following leads and taking odd jobs along the way. During your quest, you frequently cross paths with your former employer, A.T. Corp., which holds a monopoly on nearly every industry in Theftropolis, from the media to software development. The biggest thorn in your side is the company's lead scientist, Dr. Von Buttnik, who rides around in a wrecking ball-swinging pod like a certain blue speedster's nemesis. In a stroke of hilarious cleverness, Player's conflict with A.T. Corp. sidesteps all player agency concerns. Player claims to be disgusted by A.T. Corp.'s nefarious business practices, which would seem at odds with his penchant for city-wide mayhem. When asked about this contradiction directly, Player flatly states that the two behaviors are not mutually exclusive. By embracing such a contradiction, Retro City Rampage allows you to have your cake and eat it too! Beyond the core levels, you unlock sub-missions that task you with using a specific weapon or tool to destroy a number of pedestrians or cars or to earn a certain amount of points within a time limit. You are then rated on your performance with a bronze, silver, or gold medal, and your score is posted onto the leaderboards. While scoring is typically very straightforward -- link kills together for a streak bonus -- I had serious issues in sub-missions involving handheld explosives like grenades or dynamite. Destroying people or vehicles with these items yields very few points, so the trick is to cause a chain reaction by using the explosion of one vehicle to destroy nearby ones. For some odd reason, this doesn't always result in a substantial amount of points. Maybe I've yet to discover exactly what triggers scoring chains when it comes to explosives, but I find them to be very random, making these some of the most difficult portions of the entire game. Then there are the guest mini-games, starring Commander Video from the BIT.TRIP series, Meat Boy, and even Harley Morenstein and Muscles Glasses from Epic Meal Time. Commander Video's game is an abridged version of BIT.TRIP RUNNER, Meat Boy's takes its cues from Rad Racer (use 3D glasses for stereoscopic mode!), and the EMT crew's closely resembles "Test Your Might" from Mortal Kombat. Clearing these games unlocks the characters' likenesses in either Free Roaming Mode or in the plastic surgery office alongside the Dtoid crew's mugs. The EMT game is not all that hard, but the BIT.TRIP and Meat Boy ones may make you want to smack your head against a wall. They start easily enough, but the challenge quickly ramps up. Particularly in BIT.TRIP, I was having extreme difficulty bouncing off alligator heads using the Xbox 360 controller. When I switched to the keyboard instead, jumping became far more responsive. That may have simply been a mechanical problem with my controller, but as I didn't have any similar issues elsewhere, I'm left to wonder. Customization is another major feature of RCR. You can change the border around the game screen to look like various monitors or arcade cabinets, add CRT scanlines, or apply color filters to simulate the look of old console, handheld, or computer software. If you want to pretend you are playing on an old VGA monitor, you can! If you want to recreate the feeling of squinting at the Game Boy's tiny spinach-colored square, that's possible too! Whatever tickles your nostalgia bone, there's an option available to satisfy your desires. Options extend to play style as well. By pressing and holding the fire button, you will lock onto the nearest target in your line of sight, but you can also use the right stick on a controller to enable twin-stick shooting, Smash TV style. You can dispatch enemies either by shooting them, bashing them, or running over them. n addition, you can pull a Mario and jump on their heads, a quick means to escape a tight squeeze when you are besieged on all sides. There's even a basic cover system for fans of Gears of War because... hell... why not? I haven't even touched upon the amazing chiptune soundtrack, composed by notable game composers Leonard "Freaky DNA" Paul (Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 2, NBA Jam 2010) and Jake "virt" Kaufman (Shantae, Double Dragon Neon) as well as game music arranger extraordinaire Matt "Norrin_Radd" Creamer. Their tunes can be heard on the various radio stations while cruising through Theftropolis, the pulse-pounding bass and melodies giving voice to RCR's marriage of anarchy and candy-coated nostalgia. Unfortunately, the on-screen action at any time can be so overwhelming that it drowns out the music. At its worst, the soundtrack sounds like chaotic noise, hardly the catchy rhythms we associate with 8-bit gaming. That isn't so much the soundtrack's fault as it is the sheer concentration of activity that fills every second of play time, but it's nonetheless disappointing. It's this chaos that serves as both RCR's greatest triumph and biggest failing. To go anywhere and do anything, to never go a minute without being bombarded by visual and aural stimulation -- that all sounds good on paper; in practice, it often comes off as distracting. It's a jumble of events that fly past so quickly that your sense of focus will fall apart if you aren't completely devoted. But that was always going to be a problem, considering the ambitious decade-long journey Brian embarked upon. He wanted this to be his magnum opus, a love letter to everything that ever influenced him or made him smile. At the very least, the game never feels bloated or drawn out -- if you only attempt the main story missions, you'll be done in a matter of hours. However, if you want to lose yourself in the city or embark upon an Easter egg quest, the size and scope make for the perfect playground. Will there be people who don't like Retro City Rampage? Of course. In many ways, it bites off more than it can chew, especially when it comes to some of the one-time gimmick missions. Regardless, it is an ambitious achievement that celebrates everything that gaming has been and ever will be. It's clever, funny, outrageous, and even a bit frustrating, but there is a genuine respect for both the players and the sources of all the referenced material. I've barely scratched the surface of what secrets and activities are in store, but I'll leave the rest to you to discover on your own.
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Grand Theftendo
[Full Disclosure: Not only do current and former Destructoid staff appear as unlockable character skins in the game, there's also a main story mission during which you go inside a giant Mr. Destructoid robot. For these reaso...

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Nintendo Download: Liberation Edition


Liberation Maiden headlines this week
Oct 25
// Chris Carter
Nintendo starts things off with a bang today with two high profile titles: Liberation Maiden (3DS eShop) and NightSky (3DS eShop) -- expect our reviews soon for both. For the 3DS Virtual Console, there's Ghost'n Goblins (eSho...
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Nintendo Download: Vic Viper Edition


It's Gradtastic
Oct 18
// Chris Carter
Today is a decent day to be a 3DS owner, as a heap of stuff is headed your way. First off we have Sparkle Snapshots 3D (3DS eShop, $5.99) and Gradius (3DS VC, $4.99) headed to the eShop, along with a Moshi Monsters Moshlings ...
Dtoid staff in a game?! photo
Dtoid staff in a game?!

How to unlock Destructoid staff in Retro City Rampage


Look, mom!
Oct 09
// Conrad Zimmerman
So, by now, you've obviously bought and downloaded Retro City Rampage (or are desperately waiting for it to arrive on your platform) because I made it pretty clear a couple of hours ago that this was a thing you were go...
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Nintendo Download: Cave Story Edition


Oct 04
// Chris Carter
Nintendo Downloads are usually nothing to go bonkers over, but today, a number of you might be bouncing off the walls at a chance to buy these offerings. Firstly, if you don't own Cave Story four times already, you can pick u...
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Nintendo Download: I hate snakes edition


Sep 20
// Chris Carter
Pictured: the best Indiana Jones movie. This week is dedicated to La-Mulana (1000 Wii Points), the remake I thought would never see the light of day on WiiWare. If you haven't experienced this game before and enjoy a cha...
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La-Mulana launch trailer shows development timeline


Sep 19
// Conrad Zimmerman
La-Mulana releases on WiiWare today and, to celebrate, Nigoro looks back on the long road which brought them to this day. Starting at the beginning of development on the free version all the way back in 2001 and moving ...
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Be a big cheater: Watch this La-Mulana beginner's guide


Sep 17
// Chris Carter
The La-Mulana remake will arrive on WiiWare soon (September 20th) for 1000 Wii Points ($10) in America, Europe, and Australia! In honor of this joyous occasion, Nigoro has concocted a "beginners guide" video and shared i...
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'All' VC and WiiWare games confirmed for Wii U transfer


Sep 13
// Chris Carter
Back at E3 2012, our own Samit Sarkar reported an interesting tidbit of news: Nintendo was "working" on the ability to transfer old Wii digital software over to the Wii U.Well, as of today, we finally have an answer. Accordin...
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A WiiWare trailer for La-Mulana surfaces


Indie platformer soon to make long-awaited arrival on service
Sep 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
As you may have heard me mention recently on Podtoid, I've become quite absorbed by La-Mulana of late, playing the enhanced PC version, making maps and taking notes. It's an incredibly refreshing experience, one which d...
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La-Mulana IS coming to WiiWare after all on September 20!


Aug 29
// Tony Ponce
Good things come to those who wait! When Nicalis decided that it would not be publishing the WiiWare version of La-Mulana, it felt like a bitter end to an extensive but ultimately fruitless dev cycle. It was eventually releas...
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Donkey Kong inspired ride monkeys into Retro City Rampage


Aug 26
// Jonathan Holmes
In the time since the first time I played Retro City Rampage I've co-hosted a show with newcomer Tara Long, created an animated talk show, talked to women about videogames, created Sup, Holmes?, and been the subject of m...

Review: La-Mulana (Remake)

Aug 01 // Tony Ponce
La-Mulana (PC, WiiWare)Developer: NigoroPublisher: Playism (PC) / EnjoyUp (WiiWare)Released: July 13, 2012 (PC) / September 20, 2012 (WiiWare)MSRP: $14.99 (PC) / 1000 Wii Points (WiiWare) In many ways, La-Mulana is like the first cousin of Cave Story. Both are sidescrolling, action-adventure platformers developed over the course of five years. They were originally available as freeware in Japan and earned worldwide recognition following the release of English translation patches. Eventually, they received updated WiiWare remakes, which were then ported back onto the PC with some extra tweaks. But while some people may consider Cave Story to be difficult in spots, it's a frolic through the seven levels of the Candy Cane Forest compared to the utter brutality that is La-Mulana. To be clear, I don't mind when a game's challenge derives from foiling formidable foes or mastering persnickety platforming perils. Give me Contra or Mega Man and I'll take my lumps like a man. La-Mulana is certainly no slouch when it comes to doling out death like it's going out of style, though its true challenge lies in attempting to solve the ruins' myriad puzzles. [embed]232174:44548:0[/embed] Your protagonist, Lemeza Kosugi, is an archaeologist off to explore the La-Mulana Ruins, the birthplace of all civilization. Naturally, the ruins are filled with traps and riddles meant to thwart any who dare set foot within. But unlike a game like Zelda in which puzzles don't get more complicated than sliding blocks around, the puzzles here require the meticulous deduction and intuition of a real-life Indiana Jones. La-Mulana has just as much in common with old PC adventure games as it does with your typical "Metroidvanias." You uncover treasure during your journey, from dolls and staves to books and amulets, that may not serve an immediate purpose but will certainly be required later on. You also trigger switches that can effect an environmental change in a separate field -- one of the main areas -- than the one you are currently in. There's a lot of shuffling, a lot of backtracking, and a lot of experimentation. Throughout the ruins are stone tablets, each with an inscribed riddle that offers a clue to solving a certain puzzle somewhere else. Maybe the puzzle in question is a few rooms away, maybe it's in a completely separate field. And since almost every room has a puzzle, and every puzzle an associated clue, chances are you won't remember them all unless you write them down on an honest-to-God notepad. At a certain point in the game, the laptop that serves as Lemeza's inventory gets upgraded with software that allows you to record 10 clues or NPC conversations plus an additional 10 following another software upgrade. Believe me, 20 slots is still not enough. If you go into La-Mulana like any ol' action game and don't pay attention to literally everything, you will find yourself wandering the halls lost and confused for hours. You can't take anything for granted -- the faintest etchings on the walls could offer some hint as to what item must be used. You must treat every word, every artifact, every structure like it's the most significant thing in the universe. Read those riddles with the same focus you would dedicate towards open-heart surgery. This is assuming that you can even solve the riddles. Some are so vague or obtuse that you may try to convince yourself that you can solve the mysteries of the ruins without any hints. Of course, that would be a mistake, as the odds of stumbling across a room's solution by chance grow slimmer and slimmer the deeper into the ruins you delve. What's so incredible about these puzzles is that, despite how infuriatingly impossible they seem, there is always going to be a clue. If you can't find one, it just means you haven't been looking in the right spots. The game wants you to get lost, wants you to throw your hands up in despair, yet it provides all the tools necessary for success if you just take the time to track them down. Learning the art of intense scrutiny might prove difficult for players who are accustomed to more expedited forms of gameplay. Remember, this nontraditional brand of challenge is in addition to ball-busting murder at the hands of the ruins' traps and guardians. Lemeza controls like a slightly more nimble Simon Belmont. His primary weapon is an upgradeable whip, though there are other weapons to discover plus sub-weapons to supplement your main attack. When you jump in an arc, forward momentum will prevent you from turning around in mid-air, but if you jump straight up, you'll have complete freedom of aerial mobility during your descent. The key to survival in La-Mulana is "conservation" -- item pickups are extremely limited. Sub-weapons require ammo, but enemies rarely drop any, so the only sensible way to keep a healthy supply is to purchase ammo from shops. On a related note, money is also limited. Aside from single-use coin chests, there are regenerating pots scattered about that similarly offer a one-time coin bonus, after which they'll either grant you chump change or nothing at all. Should you need to buy an important tool and lack significant funds and you've been frivolously spending dough on extra ammo that you probably didn't need, prepare to start farming for a looooong time. (However, there is a helper fairy later in the game that can improve the rate of item and coin drops.) Many doors and locks are opened by placing a weight on a small brown dais. Some doors will remain open permanently, while others close after you leave the room. Weights can only be used once, so consider them another item for your shopping list. In order to preserve your weights, you have to consider whether there are alternate paths to areas locked out by daises. It doesn't help that some daises actually trigger traps like rising spiked floors or inescapable boxes. In the latter case, your only option is to warp out of the enclosure or, should you have forgotten to acquire the Holy Grail item that allows for warping, to reset the game. Conservation applies towards your health as well, as opportunities to restore your HP are few and far between. Enemies sometimes drop green experience orbs, and once you collect an amount equivalent to your current max HP, your health will be replenished. As you extend your max HP by acquiring Sacred Orbs, more experience orbs will be required, making it much less likely that you'll be able to heal yourself at an opportune moment. The only other way to refill your health is to dip in one of two hot springs: the first located on the Surface near your base camp, the second located in an ice cavern a few hours into the game. You'll need to get into the habit of warping back to the Surface for your spa treatment before exploring a new field or fighting a boss. However, this strategy often presents a dilemma. With one exception, there is only a single warp tablet (which doubles as a save marker) in each field. If you haven't found the field's warp point and are in dire need of refueling, do you soldier on and hope that the warp is in the next room, risking death and loss of all your progress since your last save? Or do you retreat, heal, and save your file, only to have to endure the long trek back to where you previously were? Standard enemies are, at worst, minor annoyances that don't deal too much damage, but since health is such a crucial commodity, you don't want act recklessly. Not when boss guardians are more than happy to send you on a first-class flight to the Elysian Fields. You have to actually find the guardians first, however. Even if you know which room one is located in, you'll need to make its Ankh appear by solving some other puzzle in the field. Once the Ankh is revealed, you'll need to locate the hidden Ankh Jewel and raise it in front of the Ankh in order to trigger the battle. Each of the guardians is a towering wall of pain and that maliciously exploits Lemeza's short attack range. You have to jump and maneuver as close as you can to their weak points -- typically their heads -- without accidentally grazing their bodies. These battles demand a balance of playing it safe and taking risks you wouldn't normally consider. For instance, you might find that the best strategy is to suicide-dive the boss to score a few well-placed hits while taking damage yourself. Other times, you might want to endure a light attack from the enemy and use the subsequent invincibility frames to withstand an even more lethal onslaught, such as a screen-filling laser carnival. Inevitably, after a few hours or even within the first hour, you will find your breaking point. Maybe you'll be fighting the leviathan Bahamut, dying repeatedly because you can never evade his body slam, and the pressure of all the puzzles, all the traps, all the delirious running back and forth will finally take its toll. You'll wonder why you are suffering so much yet accomplishing so little. Why? Because despite everything I've just said, La-Mulana is a wonderful game. I wouldn't have endured so much torture if the journey itself wasn't compelling. It's such a rich and engrossing adventure, filled with more to see and do per square inch than many games offer in a meager six-hour runtime. La-Mulana may have been originally developed to recapture the spirit of retro gaming (particularly the Japanese age of MSX software), but the result is a true evolution to 2D sidescrolling action. The original La-Mulana mimicked the limited-color, low-res imagery of the MSX, but this remake is dolled up in a 32-bit style reminiscent of games like Symphony of the Night. The teeny character sprites are adorable, while the gargantuan bosses are vigorous and imposing. As the in-game history describes La-Mulana as the cradle of all mankind, each field is appropriately inspired by the architecture of a number of ancient cultures -- Greek, Maya, Egyptian, Japanese, Olmec, and so on -- all rich in color and detail, accented by subtle effects like dust clouds and heat haze. And the music! So fantastic! Each song is as complex and varied as a Michiru Yamane composition, never boring and never unsatisfying. You can spend hours pacing the same length of rooms, but the music will remain upbeat, driving you to persevere and rise above. I would even go as far as to say that this is my favorite soundtrack of the year thus far. The are nearly 20 distinct fields to explore and an exhaustive list of treasures and items to discover. With so much content, a single playthrough can last roughly 20 hours, and that's not including the equally exhaustive number of restarts due to Lemeza's frequent meetings with the Grim Reaper. This is an adventure to end all adventures, one that is only just beginning at a point where similar games are just about to wrap things up. That's why it's frustrating that the game is so damn difficult. If the only challenge to contend with was the familiar parade of precision platforming and unrelenting enemies, I wouldn't feel so torn. Bosses giving you grief? All you have to do is practice, practice, practice until you've mastered the patterns. But when the very act of progression is a puzzle, broken down into an array of smaller, interconnected puzzles that are in turn broken down further, tapering off into wispy branches with little assistance as to which branch to address first, mere "practice" won't do you a lot of good. I want to blame the game. I want to blame Nigoro. Or maybe it's my fault for becoming so complacent with the modern trends of excessive hand-holding and guidance. Maybe I've been trained to expect an explanatory prompt, to wait long enough until the solution falls into my lap. Perhaps I've been playing on autopilot for too long and needed a game like La-Mulana to slap me awake. It's something to consider, though a review is not a place for such discussion. A handful of players will pick up La-Mulana and fall in love instantly. It'll be exactly the kind of cutthroat trial that they've always craved but could never experience. For most, the difficulty wall will simply be too high. It's criminal to walk away from such a brilliant gem, which is why I endorse the use of wikis, maps, and guides. There's no shame in getting a little outside help. In fact, I think it adds a meta element to the campaign. In a game about archaeological expedition, why wouldn't you refer to the notes and directions of previous explorers? As long as you leverage these materials sparingly, you can transform your despair into enjoyment. The game will still be hard as balls, but it'll feel much more manageable. Beyond the seemingly insurmountable wall of challenge, La-Mulana is a brilliant title that exceeds in just about every category. Art, music, breadth of content, game length -- La-Mulana gets the highest marks. But there's simply no denying that the difficulty, as fair as Nigoro purports it to be, is a major deterrent. If you are willing to suffer, though, you will be blown away. I guarantee it. [La-Mulana is available exclusively for purchase on Playism.]
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Wow. This is beyond a doubt the hardest game I've ever played.

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Nintendo Download: Wario Edition


Jul 26
// Chris Carter
The Wario series is probably one of the most critically acclaimed franchises of all time. Pretty much all of his games are widely loved, from Wario's Woods all the way up to his offbeat WarioWare games. Today, Wario Land: Sup...
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Club Nintendo updates their stash, adds Bonsai Barber


Jul 25
// Chris Carter
It looks like Club Nintendo's lineup of digital games really is going to be staggered going forward, as Mario Tennis has been replaced by Bonsai Barber on WiiWare for 150 coins. The game is normally $10, and is a fairly well...
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Super Motherload isn't coming to WiiWare anymore


Jul 24
// Chris Carter
Remember nearly two years ago, when Super Motherload was announced? Of course you don't! All signs point to you never having heard of the game, but nonetheless, it's the latest project to have a cancelled WiiWare version. Evi...
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Nintendo Download: Son of Daedalus edition


Jul 19
// Chris Carter
It looks like that wise-cracking angel Pit is getting yet another re-release this year, in the form of Kid Icarus: Of Myths and Monsters (3DS VC, Game Boy, $3.99). As long as you're a fan of the NES original, I think you'll l...
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Nintendo Download: Pinball Wizard edition


Jul 12
// Chris Carter
There rarely comes a time when I can mention The Who, Pinball Quest, and Kirby in the same article, but today is that day my friends! Granted, my connections are tenuous at best, because the only real pinball related thing to...
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Nintendo DLC: Plenty of sports and a little pottery


Jul 05
// Dale North
I'm kidding on the LOL part. Kind of. I'm not into sports, but videogame sports are fine by me, especially when it comes to golf. Baseball and Tennis are great, too. And maybe pottery making? : NES Open Tournament Golf&n...
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Nintendo Download: Save the Furries Edition


Jun 21
// Chris Carter
Are you ready for today's Nintendo Download offerings? Of course you aren't -- no one ever is! For the 3DS eShop there's Order Up!! ($9.99), a food puzzle game that already exists on the iPhone for free, and Slitherlink ($4.9...
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LostWinds gets iOS update, soundtrack available on iTunes


Jun 17
// Kyle MacGregor
I was pretty blown away when the original LostWinds landed on WiiWare back in 2008. With a wonderful presentation, brilliant controls and an enchanting soundtrack it was the complete package. The real surprise was the fact th...
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Nintendo Download: Jr. Edition


Jun 14
// Chris Carter
The headliner of the week is the classic Donkey Kong Jr. for the 3DS Virtual Console ($4.99), which was probably one of the first games where you fought against the hero of the previous game (Jump Man/Mario), as an ally of th...
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VGdrumming to Solar Inferno, the most metal Mega Man song


Jun 10
// Tony Ponce
The music from Mega Man 10 is the strangest creature ever. On one hand, it assembles composers from each Classic Mega Man entry in an all-star jamboree. On the other hand, their contributions are perhaps some of the most bor...
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E3: Retro City Rampage in my hands! My dreams came true!


Jun 09
// Tony Ponce
The final game I checked out at E3 was the PS Vita port of Retro City Rampage, the title I was most looking forward to playing. With the copious amounts of hands-on previews and the frustration of its seemingly endless develo...
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Club Nintendo's Coin values are going to change July 1st


Jun 01
// Chris Carter
In an odd turn of events, Nintendo is changing the registered coin values for a ton of games. They're not going to be making the transition on a system by system case either: they're changing the individual values of each tit...
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Meat Boy goes stereoscopic in Retro City Rampage


May 31
// Tony Ponce
Today is May 31... HEY! Wasn't Retro City Rampage supposed to come out this month? Briiiiiiaaaaaan! You've got some 'splainin' to doooooooooooo! In all seriousness, the game is finished and running through a final bug check....
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Here's what Retro City Rampage looks like on the Vita


May 21
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Retro City Rampage's mastermind Brian Provinciano sat down with the PlayStation.Blog to show off his baby running on the PlayStation Vita. Brian details some of the Vita features, from the optimized visuals for the handheld ...

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