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Kickstarter photo
Kickstarter

Indie Kickstarter trolled by fraudulent last-minute 7,000 euro pledge (Update)


Dev team is 'speechless'
May 14
// Mike Cosimano
[Update: Kickstarter has sent over an official comment, courtesy of  Director of Communications David Gallagher. "We work hard to keep Kickstarter a safe and trusted platform. Our Integrity Team actively monitors the sys...
TimeSplitters photo
TimeSplitters

'Everyone' at Crytek UK wants to do another TimeSplitters


You can't always get what you want
Jul 14
// Jordan Devore
"You would not believe the amount of times people ask for TimeSplitters," Crytek UK (formerly Free Radical) animator Mark Jackson told OXM at last week's Develop conference. "[Another installment is] just waiting for the righ...
Kinect Sports photo
Kinect Sports

Kinect Sports Rivals has a Battletoads reference in it


I'll hold your hand while we cry for Rare
Apr 07
// Chris Carter
As the sands of time continue to drop in this hourglass called life, it's easy to forget things -- even major elements of our childhood. For instance, I completely forgot Rare was responsible for the amazing Battletoads ...
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Princess in Another Castle movie trailer teases feels


'Escape' short film expanded
Feb 27
// Dale North
Do you remember the sad/amazing Zelda-themed short film we shared with you a few years back? It was called "Escape," and it told the story of a girl named Danni. Her rough home life takes her down, but popping in Zelda saves...

Onimusha photo
Onimusha

Onimusha Soul coming to the PS3 in Japan


I just want a real new Onimusha
Jan 07
// Chris Carter
Hey, remember when Capcom announced a brand new Onimusha game called "Soul" and it ended up being a browser-based RPG? Yeah, that sucked. Well apparently Famitsu has revealed that the game is coming to the PlayStati...
Bethesda photo
Bethesda

Bethesda will not show anything new at VGX


No, Fallout 4 will not be revealed anytime soon
Dec 05
// Alessandro Fillari
Looks like we got our first disappointment of the week. With the VGX awards only two days away, the anticipation for what new titles are going to be revealed is reaching fever pitch. Unfortunately, we just got a confirmation ...
Goodbye photo
Goodbye

Take care, Destructoid, for everlasting peace


Nothing is over... you just don't turn it off
Oct 07
// Tony Ponce
You know that sudden feeling, that you have to make an important decision that will affect your future in significant ways, but you don't quite know what the decision is going to be or when you are going to make it? You simpl...
Wii photo
Selling 100 million is a good stopping point, right?
The Wii may have secured a solid lead ahead of the Xbox 360 and PS3 with a tidy 100 million units under its belt, but let's face facts: its time in the sun is over. With the 3DS dominating in Japan and the US and the Wii U ne...

Pokemon photo
Pokemon

Pokemon grave stone fills me with all the feels


Catching shinies in the afterlife
Sep 30
// Tony Ponce
Among the readers here, I'm sure there are a few who are so engaged in videogames that they've effectively become your identity. Will your game-playing habits be what you are remembered for long after you've passed on? A man ...
Arkham Origins photo
Arkham Origins

Arkham Origins on Wii U lacks multiplayer, naturally


Just another day
Aug 01
// Tony Ponce
Wii U is looking pretty down in the dumps. Maybe some quality software in the near future will cheer it right back up. Perhaps a little Batman: Arkham Origins -- I hear it's got multiplayer now. Well, it does on every platfor...

Ex-Rare dev explains culture clash with Microsoft

Jun 30 // Tony Ponce
To say that Rare fans quickly caught on to Microsoft's growing influence is an understatement. It was as clear as day to anyone who's ever picked up a controller. I remember three years ago when the fan site MundoRare closed down following a failed attempt to film a Rare documentary. The explanation from Rare for putting a stop to the project was that it wouldn't be "on message." Rare caught a lot of heat for that move, but it seems pretty obvious now that it was likely Microsoft HQ's self interests that resulted in that door slamming shut. Can you even call the shell of the studio that handed off development of the long-anticipated revival of its own Killer Instinct franchise "Rare" anymore? All the biggest names have high-tailed it out of there -- the Stamper brothers, David Wise, Chris Seavor, Grant Kirkhope, Chris Marlow, and so on. Who's still around to keep the old familial spirit alive? "I think at the moment the company is going through something of a rebirth as there are lots of new people and most of the old staff have left, so I'm excited to see what they do next," continued Tossell. "Whatever Rare does it will always hold a special place for me." I wouldn't be surprised if a single tear rolled down his cheek as he spoke that. Microsoft must have thought that by buying out Rare, which was a Nintendo studio through and through, the Xbox brand would suddenly out-Nintendo Nintendo. Did anyone really think it could be that easy? Just flash some green and snap your fingers and ta-da? Actually, according this story from Chris Seavor, in which one of Microsoft's suit honestly thought owning Rare also gave them ownership of Donkey Kong, I wouldn't doubt that's precisely what they thought would happen. Unbelievable. Interview: Nyamyam - Wii U "Has Huge Potential", "Will Be Using Dev Kits Again in the Future" [Nintendo Enthusiast via NowGamer]
Rare photo
Phil Tossell of Nyamyam feels the British studio lost a lot of its spark
Nyamyam studio co-founder Phil Tossell has seen the peak of Rare's golden age as well as its devolution into just another cog in the Microsoft machine. He joined Rare to work on Diddy Kong Racing, became lead programmer on St...

Oculus Rift co-founder struck and killed by speeding car

Jun 02 // Jonathan Holmes
Andrew was a brilliant computer graphics engineer, an avid photographer and hiker who loved nature, a true loyal friend and a founding member of our close-knit Oculus family. Some of us have known Andrew since college, and have worked with him at multiple companies beginning with Scaleform in Maryland which he helped start at age 19, then at Gaikai in Aliso Viejo, which brought him out to California, and finally at Oculus where he was a co-founder and lead engineer. Andrew's contributions span far and wide in the video game industry. His code is embedded in thousands of games played by millions of people around the world. Words can not express how sorely he will be missed or how deeply our sympathy runs for his family. Andrew will always be in our thoughts and will never be forgotten. We love you, Reisse.
Oculus Rift co-founder photo
Suspects in custody, potential murder charges pending
Oculus Rift co-founder Andrew Scott Reisse, age 33, was killed by a speeding car in Santa Ana, California. The car was allegedly driven by Victor Sanchez, age 21, who along with two other unnamed suspects, were fleeing from p...

PlayStation 2 photo
That goes for games, accessories, and systems
GameStop will stop taking in PlayStation 2 systems, games, and accessories starting on June 1, 2013. A poster on Reddit snapped the above picture, and I've since confirmed with a number of stores and employees at different Ga...

Zelda Reorchestrated photo
Saddest of days
Zelda Reorchestrated first gained prominence just over three years ago with the release of an Ocarina of Time symphonic arrangement. Since then, the site has expanded with new music from various Zelda games. The entire moveme...

Kickstarter photo
Kickstarter

Project Awakened fails to meet Kickstarter goal


Unreal Engine 4-powered project failed to raise $500,000
Mar 06
// Alasdair Duncan
In another reminder that Kickstarter isn't the surefire way to fund your game, the impressive-looking Project Awakened has failed its Kickstarter drive. Developer Phosphor Games raised $338,498 of its required target of $500,...
PSN photo
PSN

PlayStation Network undergoing maintenance today


Will be down until around 9PM Pacfic
Mar 04
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
PlayStation Network will be down all day today as Sony does some upgrading to the PlayStation Store software. The downtime started at 5:00AM Pacific, and is expected to be down until around 9:00PM Pacific. If you signed into ...
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Creator of D and Enemy Zero passes away


Kenji Eno dies at the age of 42
Feb 21
// Audun Sorlie
In the midst of all the PS4 announcements and excitement, there was a bit of sad news to come out of Japan to put a damper on the hearts of longtime gamers. Kenji Eno, the eccentric and highly unusual game director and musici...

Vigil Games' lead combat designer says his goodbyes

Jan 23 // Tony Ponce
My name is Ben Cureton, and I was the Lead Combat Designer at Vigil Games. I'm sitting at my desk among... what appears to be a warzone. The walls look bare. It's quiet. The seats are empty. We've all been on edge for the past couple months... and more so, the last couple weeks. I mean, I'm sure you can imagine what it's like to wonder if you will have a job tomorrow. Most of us here joked about it just to keep the mood light, but we all knew what could happen. Now I look around and I realize... it did happen. Am I sad? Well yea. I've been in this industry for 20 years. Seriously. Two decades. I've been laid off more than once. It sucks every time. But am I sad I don't have a job? Not really... I'm sure I'll get another one eventually. I'm sad because it won't be THIS job. It won't be at Vigil. That's why I'm sad. The people I waged war with are no longer together. The people that I bled with, vented with, argued with (often times LOUDLY), and kicked back with... these people will never be together again in the same combination. Not that it was perfect. But what is perfect? Did I like coming to work? Yes. Was I proud of the work that I did? Yes. More importantly, was I proud of the work that WE did? Absolutely. I knew, without a shadow of the doubt, that the project we were working on (Codenamed: Crawler) was going to blow people away. In fact, it DID blow people away. We did, in TWO months, what many companies haven't done in a year. The pride of knowing that no one was doing anything like us was so satisfying, it kept us coming to work and giving 100% every single day, even through the dark times. ... so maybe you can imagine what it feels like when you read the list of who bought what only to discover your name is not on the list. Why? Did we do something wrong? Were we not good enough? Were we not worth 'anything?' Imagine that. Vigil was filled with people that I would put up against the best in the industry. People that made my work better, people that made me a better designer, and people that made me a better person. And now they are gone. Their seats are empty. It's OK, though. I guess this post makes it sound a bit melodramatic. Seriously... if you work in the video game industry you have to be resilient. Doing what you love often comes with a price - anyone who has been around for a while can tell you that. Today, that price has been paid. That being said, I'd still never dissuade anyone from following their dreams if their dream is to make video games. While it's not as romantic as it sounds, it's sure a hell of a lot of fun. So don't cry for the people at Vigil. We made games for game players. I have no Horror stories from working here... only Honor stories. Through both praise and critiques alike, our goal was always to make a product as if we, ourselves, were the end-user. We may have gotten pushed and pulled in certain directions by forces out of our control, we were always in it to make games for game players. And that's what we did. I can only hope that those spared from the other companies remain employed long into the future. There is not much worse than false hope, and these people deserve to continue making great games. You may not know their names, but they exist, and they bleed, sweat, and cry for your entertainment. I mean that honestly, with no negativity. They do it... no, WE do it... because we want you to have a good time. In closing, I can only say thank you to the fans of Vigil games. Your support means more than you can imagine. Your feedback (both positive and negative) gave us long-lasting insight that we will all take with us, wherever we may go. You are the reason we made Darksiders 1 &2... and you are the reason we will continue to make games. And with that... my seat is empty. Ben CuretonLead Combat DesignerVigil Games P.S. This is no place for a horse.
Farewell from Vigil photo
Posted farewell letter on NeoGAF
THQ has cleared its plate and sold off all its assets... well... not all of them. For some reason, not one company placed a bid for Darksiders developer Vigil Games, dooming the young studio. Vigil's lead combat designer Ben ...

THQ is done, all assets sold off

Jan 23 // Tony Ponce
To All THQ Employees: We now have the answers we've been seeking through our financial restructuring and Chapter 11 case. While much will be written, here are the facts of the bids and auction that occurred: Yesterday morning, we received a competing bid for the operating business, along with Clearlake's offer, and numerous offers for separate assets. During an auction process that lasted over 22 hours, the final conclusion was that the separate-asset bids would net more than a single buyer for the majority of the company. Shortly, we will, present the results to the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, which must concur with our assessment. The proposed sales of multiple assets is as follows: Sega agreed to purchase Relic Koch Media agreed to purchase Volition and Metro Crytek agreed to purchase Homefront Take 2 agreed purchase Evolve and Ubisoft agreed to purchase Montreal and South Park We expect these sales to close this week. Some assets, including our publishing businesses and Vigil, along with some other intellectual properties are not included in the sale agreements. They will remain part of the Chapter 11 case. We will make every effort to find appropriate buyers, if possible. What this means for employees We expect that most employees of the entities included in the sale will be offered employment by the new owners. However, we cannot say what these owners may intend, and there will likely be some positions that will not be needed under the new ownership. You should receive notice this week or early next week if the new owners intend to extend employment to you. Please note that the terms of your new employment, including pay and benefits, may be different from the current terms of your employment with THQ. If you are an employee of an entity that is not included in the sale, we regret that your position will end. A small number of our headquarters staff will continue to be employed by THQ beyond January 25 to assist with the transition. THQ has sufficient resources to pay these employees for work going forward, and we will be contacting these employees immediately to ensure their continued employment during this transition period. We are requesting the ability to offer certain severance pay to minimize disruption for employees of non-included entities as they determine the next steps in their careers. We know you will have many questions about this news. We'll be meeting tomorrow when we return to talk through this announcement and to answer any questions you have. You will receive a benefits fact sheet and FAQs with answers to some questions that may be on your mind. Please review these materials closely. A personal note The work that you all have done as part of the THQ family is imaginative, creative, artistic and highly valued by our loyal gamers. We are proud of what we have accomplished despite today's outcome. It has been our privilege to work alongside the entire THQ team. While the company will cease to exist, we are heartened that the majority of our studios and games will continue under new ownership. We were hoping that the entire company would remain intact, but we expect to hear good news from each of the separate entities that will be operating as part of new organizations. For those THQ employees who are part of entities that are not included in the sale, we are confident that the talent you have displayed as part of THQ will be recognized as you take the next steps in your career. Thank you all for your dedication and for sharing your talent with the THQ team. We wish you the best of luck and hope you will keep in touch. Sincerely, Brian Farrell Chief Executive Officer Jason Rubin President
THQ is done photo
THQ's CEO and president send off final letter to employees
[Update 2: Certain licenses that weren't sold off may find new digs elsewhere. The WWE series, for instance, could find its way into Take-Two's pockets.] [Update: Vigil Games' lead combat designer, Ben Cureton, decided to wri...

Monster Hunter photo
Monster Hunter

Pour one out: Monster Hunter Tri servers nixed in April


Goodnight, sweet prince
Jan 18
// Chris Carter
"Out with the old, in with the new," as they say. Capcom is getting ready to launch Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate, and in return, they're shutting down the servers for the Wii's Monster Hunter Tri on April 30th. You'll have six w...
PlayStation 2 photo
End of an era!
Last week we found out that PlayStation 2s had stopped shipping in Japan. Sony has now officially announced that PlayStation 2 production has stopped worldwide, according to The Guardian. Yes, it's truly an end of an era. Har...

PS2 discontinued photo
PS2 discontinued

End of an Era: PS2 stops shipping in Japan


You'll be missed
Dec 28
// Dale North
Sony has ceased shipping of the PlayStation 2 console in Japan this week, bringing an end a 13-year lifespan. Whatever is out there on shelves is what's left. That's it. According to Famitsu, more than 150 mill...

Remembering studios that closed in 2012

Dec 22 // Sterling Aiayla Lyons
Hudson Soft Founded on May 18, 1973, Hudson Soft has been a force in this industry for so long that it seemed as if it would always be around. By 2003, the company had over 500 employees, with studios in both Tokyo and California. Throughout its history, Hudson designed a vast amount games and characters, including the iconic Bomberman, as well as less-iconic-but-still-identifiable Bonk. This story was one that was drawn out, as last year saw the closure of the offices in California. The final nail would come this year, when even the Tokyo offices would also be shut down. It’s something that is definitely heartbreaking for many a fan of the company's works, as well as people who loved the classic bee logo -- doubly for people in both categories like me. With the closure came the announcement that Konami would be absorbing what was left of Hudson, and retiring the name. So while the cute bee might be put out on the rocker on the front porch, hopefully the properties that bee ran won’t be neglected in the future. THQ & THQ San Diego Yesterday we reported that THQ had filed for bankruptcy. The company may not intend to reduce its workforce size during this period, but it's not a very optimistic situation. In March, the company reported a net loss of $239.9 million for the end of the fiscal year, which was over $100 million greater than the previous year's loss. Shortly after, THQ publicly made a deal with Electronic Arts to sell off its license to the UFC franchise. This directly lead to the closure of the THQ studio located in San Diego, the team behind the UFC games. This is one of those times that just goes to show you how fragile some things are in the industry. One deal sealed the fate of a whole studio, and all the workers there. While this might not be the end for THQ yet, the company's long-term survival is by no means guaranteed. I don't usually root for a publisher, but my heart is out for this one, if only for Saints Row 4. Black Hole Entertainment Black Hole Entertainment might be known for a few different games. It developed a couple of Warhammer games: Mark of Chaos and Black March. The company's most notable recent achievement would be Heroes of Might and Magic 6, which can be claimed as the reason for its downfall. Shortly after filing for bankruptcy, an insider from the company came out with claims that Ubisoft, the publisher they worked with, was at fault. The claims laid down include a lack of accountability from Ubisoft for missed deadlines, consistently sudden changes and feature removal demands by Ubisoft, and Ubisoft restructuring the key development team numerous times. Supposedly, the penalties from the missed deadlines, as well as the losses from money spent on features taken out of the game after completed made it so that an unreasonable 200 million copies needed to be sold before Black Hole would see any profit. Whether these claims are true is unknown, but the fact that the company went bankrupt still remains. Radical Entertainment Radical Entertainment is mainly known for the recent series Prototype, but it has been around since 1991, getting passed between multiple publishing companies through its history. There were layoffs, and many claimed that these layoffs lead to the crash of the Vancouver game design market. It was the oldest studio located in Vancouver, after all. This story happens to have a silver lining, as it appears that the company is still partially intact, functioning as a support studio for Activision Blizzard. Rockstar Vancouver/Barking Dog Rockstar's Vancouver studio is known for Bully and the recently released Max Payne 3. Shortly after the release of Max Payne 3, it was announced that Rockstar would be dissolving the studio to refocus its efforts in Canada on its Toronto-based studio. This story does not bring the saddest news of closure though, unless you're someone complaining about the decline of the Vancouver market. All 35 of the Vancouver employees were offered positions within the Toronto studio. With the additional claim of more positions being created afterwards, hopefully this leads to big new projects coming from those folks. Sony Liverpool/Psygnosis Sony Liverpool, perhaps better known as Psygnosis, is the studio behind the WipEout series. At the start of the year, Sony Worldwide Studios came out with an announcement that they would be restructuring the Liverpool studio. Many of the projects they were working on were halted as a result. It wouldn't be until August when the announcement finally came about the studio's closing. The studio employed roughly 100 people across two development teams. The studio was reportedly working on two projects at the time, each for the next-generation Sony console. While the facility at Liverpool remains functional, it is only to house other Sony Computer Entertainment Europe departments. The status of the two projects, one being a new WipEout, is unknown. BigBig Studios BigBig Studios, I feel, is mainly known for Pursuit Force, one of the better launch games for the PlayStation Portable. The studio was formed from a core team of four former Codemasters employees. Sony acquired the studio in 2007, and assigned them to work exclusively on games for the portable system. That might have been the major component in the downfall of the studio, due to the generally dismal life of the portable device itself. The last game they made would be the recent Vita game, Little Deviants which released to less-than-stellar reviews. The studio would be shut down at the beginning of the year as part of restructuring of Sony's European studios. Zipper Interactive Zipper interactive started out making computer games before it became tied to the franchise that would rule the company for the most of its life span, SOCOM. In 2006, the studio was acquired by Sony Computer Entertainment and would go on to make games exclusively for the PlayStation brand.  Not to let SCE Europe have all the fun restructuring studios, SCE Worldwide Studios announced in March that Zipper Interactive would be shut down. The reason given was that it was part of a normal cycle of resource re-alignment within Sony. The studio had roughly 80 employees at the time of closure. Its recent games, SOCOM 4, MAG, and Unit 13 are still going to be supported, according to Sony. Paragon Studios NCSoft is one of the few companies that almost exclusively deals in MMOs. Of course, most of that is acquiring studios that make those kind of games and just putting the monetary system on top of that. There are two things that usually happen. Either the game becomes too bloated to sustain from a financial standpoint, or the people calling the shots shift their focus to something "new." Such is the case with City of Heroes, which was finally shut down this year, much to the outrage and disappointment of its players. The really sad part comes with the liquidation of Paragon Studios, the developers behind the game. As of now, I don’t exactly know what happened to the folks who worked there, whether they were reassigned, or just let go entirely. At the very least, I hope that they are all still out there making games. 38 Studios and Big Huge Games 38 Studios started in 2006, originally named "Green Monster Games." Founded by Baseball star Curt Schilling with a dream to make his own MMO, he seemed to start out the right way, hiring talent that had great experience in the game world. In addition to writer R.A. Salvatore and artist Todd McFarlane, former general manager of games at Comcast Jennifer Maclean, former lead engineer at EA Jon Laff, and a former lead designer of EverQuest Travis McGeathy were in the employ of the studio. To further bolster the prestigious talent base of the company, 38 games acquired studio Big Huge Games, of Rise of Nations fame. The single-player RPG that BHG was working on at the time would be turned into a tie-in to Schilling's MMO. It all looked like it was going the right way, and in 2010, the studio received a $75 million dollar guaranteed loan from the state of Rhode Island to relocate their business to the state, in the hopes of creating new jobs. In February of this year, that RPG would see release in the form of Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning, which received favorable reviews. A missed loan payment just a few months later, and very shortly after, the entire 379 person workforce was laid off, with 38 Studios entering bankruptcy. Schilling and his studio has come under investigation since then for criminal charges, though at the time of writing, no federal charges have been filed against him. A state-level investigation is still underway. As for the folks under Big Huge Games, they're still happily together as Epic Baltimore.
Studio Closures in 2012 photo
Taking a sec to pay respects
This year was great in general for videogames. Beyond the predictable success of games like Halo 4 and Call of Duty: Black Ops II, there were a ton of hits that came out of nowhere, including not just big publisher titles, bu...

GamesMaster photo
GamesMaster

The GamesMaster sadly passed away


Sir Patrick Moore dead at age 89
Dec 09
// Audun Sorlie
For those growing up in Europe and old enough to remember, GamesMaster was an absolutely awesome show with cheesy screen effects and crazy kids being dealt gaming challenges in order to get their hands on the coveted golden j...

Nintendo Power's last hurrah leaves me in tears

Dec 08 // Tony Ponce
You already know about the magazine's cover, which pays tribute to the cover of the very first issue. Perhaps even cooler than that is the included poster, which features a spread of every single issue plus variant covers stretching all the way back to 1988, bringing the total count to 300. I can even see the issue that started it all for me: October 1991, with Star Trek on the front. I was a devoted subscriber until early in the GameCube years, when I foolishly dropped it for the more "mature" Game Informer. I even tossed my entire back catalog in the trash because I was running out of room in my closet! I was soooo stupid. I wish I could go back in time 10 years and punch my high school self in the nuts. The mag is split up into four massive sections: NP's top Nintendo games ever, a recap of all 24 years of NP history, farewells from current and past NP editors, and a review blowout for most of the Wii U launch library. And this time around, the letters to the editors don't only include messages from readers but also from industry faces like WayForward's Matt Bozon and Sean Velasco, DreamRift's Peter Ong, and Game|Life's Chris Kohler, among others. The top 285 games -- one for every issue of the magazine's run -- definitely has some odd placements, especially on the lower rungs. I'm slightly disappointed that the Game Boy got as little representation as it did, but just about all the games you'd expect to make the cut have. These are just the editors' opinions, after all, and it's not like you'll be able to write in your objections. The biggest draw, of course, is the year-by-year retrospective of Nintendo Power. Seeing the scans from those decades-old issues and reading about all the promotions running at the time really sent me back to my childhood. They even highlight one of my favorite moments: a 1995 contest in which the winner would get to be an extra on the set of The Mask II! Whoever won that contest got royally fucked over! Ha! Simply seeing the magazine's progression in an abridged format gives you a true sense of how much effort was put in tailoring Nintendo Power to the fans. From free games for subscribers in the form of Dragon Warrior and The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition to full-on monthly comics for Mario, Zelda, Metroid, Star Fox, and more, it was just an avalanche of goodness. Editors from throughout NP's life chime in with their favorite moments and also a couple of their more shameful ones. For instance, I'm glad that Scott Pelland, managing editor from 1988 to 2008, was able to admit that no one on staff was happy to promote the Virtual Boy but were obligated to anyway. And Steve Thomason, editor-in-chief from 2003 to 2012, asks forgiveness for giving Shadow the Hedgehog an 8.0. It's cool, Steve. Nobody's perfect. If there was one thing about this issue I wasn't too pleased by, it was the third-party advertisements. One of the things I admired about Nintendo Power back in the early days was that, unlike competing mags, it was relatively ad-free, and the few ads that were there were for Nintendo's own hardware and software. It wasn't until this past decade that NP started welcoming outside ads. I had hoped that for this big sendoff, the mag would have eschewed any and all ads. I mean, seriously, what's the worst that could have happened? The companies pull support and refuse to print anything in Nintendo Power ever again? Pssssh! The magazine closes with one last surprise: a two-page comic starring Nester and his son Maxwell. Nester was just a spunky kid when he first graced NP alongside "Gamemaster" Howard Phillips. After Nester's Adventures completed its run, he would return sporadically for high-profile events, such as the mag's100th issue. We saw him grow up, go to college, and start a family, but throughout it all, he's still a kid at heart and able to pass that gaming spirit on to his progeny. It was a fun ride, Nintendo Power. You did alright.
Bye bye, Nintendo Power photo
The final issue hits all the right notes
Last night, I noticed that the final issue of Nintendo Power was in stock at Barnes & Noble. Naturally, I bought two copies: one to peruse and one to leave in the shrink wrap FOR. EV. ER. If you've ever been an NP reader ...

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Rockman Xover has at least 100,000 users


I'm not sure if I should be sad, or what
Dec 06
// Chris Carter
Remember when Capcom got us all excited for Mega Man's anniversary this year, and then basically took a dump on us with Rockman Xover? Well apparently after reaching the top three listing on iTunes the week of release, The Me...
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The final Nintendo Power cover is perfect


Simply... perfect...
Nov 30
// Tony Ponce
On the left is Nintendo Power #1. On the right is the final issue, #285. Wow. Bravo. We were hoping to wait until the mag hit newsstands on December 11, but since this photo of its cover has been making the rounds all day, we...
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Aww: Wii U Nintendo TVii service pushed back to December


Sneaky Nintendo
Nov 16
// Dale North
[Update: At least the Netflix app will be ready in time for launch, it just won't be a part of TVii.] A massive press release this morning from Nintendo detailed this weekend's Wii U launch and ran down all of the system's fe...
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Goodbye, Destructoid


<3
Nov 10
// Chad Concelmo
As some of you may or may not have heard, this is officially my last day with Destructoid. Man ... I can barely type that without getting upset. I am starting a new job next week at GolinHarris as a writer for Nintendo. It is...
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Future US puts another game mag out to pasture
Damn, son. Future US is on the warpath as of late. It wasn't enough for the publishing house to pull the plug on Nintendo Power; now its sights are set on PlayStation: The Official Magazine (not to be confused with PlayStatio...


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