hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

PlayStation 2

Obscure Video Games: The Sniper 2

Jul 25 // Obscure Video Games
Gameplay is the least interesting thing here. The real star is the bizarre, ridiculous storyline. You and your friend C.A. pick up a hitchhiker as you're driving through the desert one day. You stop for lunch, and the Mafia accidentally hits the three of you with a bomb full of a nerve gas called "Tacklmacain." C.A. gets kidnapped by a mysterious stranger. You find out that the gas is slowly killing you, and you have to find the antidote. The restaurant owner turns out to be working undercover for the CIA and offers to help get you the antidote in exchange for your sniping skills. It gets weirder, but I won't ruin the rest. If you want some more info (and spoilers), watch this video: [embed]295876:59482:0[/embed] The game isn't very long -- only about 12 stages -- but there is a branching storyline as well as challenge missions that give you some replay. But again, the sniping part is just not that fun, so even if you hit an ending, you'll probably be fine missing the rest.
Obscure Video Games photo
Hit or miss?
The Sniper 2 is not a good game. In fact, it's pretty much the epitome of "kusoge." But that's what makes it so entertaining. Terrible voice acting, mediocre graphics, and an incomprehensible story are what kept me playing al...

What was the very first PlayStation 2 game you ever played?

Mar 04 // Ben Davis
Ben Davis My first experience with the PlayStation 2 was at a friend's house during his birthday party. I walked down to the basement to see a group of guys playing a racing game -- ATV Offroad Fury 2. I'm normally not a huge fan of racing games, but it looked gorgeous (compared to the PS1 graphics I was used to), and instead of racing, they were playing some weird tag mini-game where one player has a ball and the others try to ram into them with their ATVs to steal it. It looked like a lot of fun. I asked to play next turn, and once I started driving around, I immediately decided that I needed a PS2 as soon as possible. I got my own console a few months later, and of course, one of the first games I bought for it was ATV Offroad Fury 2. I actually really enjoyed it. Not just the mini-games, but the racing too. Plus, the soundtrack introduced me to Jurassic 5 and Garbage (still one of my favorite bands, actually), so that was nice. The tag mini-game is still my favorite thing about the game, though. I played that mode to death with my cousins back in the day. Chris Carter The first game I ever played on the PlayStation 2 was a launch title from the relatively niche developer From Software -- Eternal Ring. Before it was world renowned for the Souls series, From had crafted multiple sprawling worlds by way of the King's Field series, a personal favorite of mine. Eternal Ring was more of a successor of sorts in that it wasn't nearly as good, but I still got plenty of enjoyment out of it. Although many of you know what it's like to roam sandboxes in recent games like Fallout 3 and Skyrim, I remember the childlike wonder of exploring From Software's creations. Everything was unknown, and the stark difficulty level ensured that you had to adjust quickly if you wanted to actually get anywhere. I wouldn't recommend Eternal Ring to anyone today as it hasn't aged well, but it will always have a special place in my library. Josh Tolentino My very first PlayStation 2 game was a Japanese copy of Dead or Alive 2. I bought it alongside my Japanese PS2 just after the launch of the American version late in 2000. Why would I buy a Japanese edition when the American version was available? For one, it was cheaper, and second, I had heard via rumors that it had been cracked to allow the playing of pirated games. Living in the Philippines back then, you had to go bootleg to get games in a timely and affordable fashion, unless you were some senator's kid using public money to "buy original" and import from the US or Hong Kong. I also sprung for a Japanese copy of Devil May Cry, which came in handy, as it -- not Dead or Alive 2 -- proved to be the Great Enabler, in time. By March of 2001 it could be used alongside an Action Replay cheating device, and a weird little box that plugged into the PS2's front USB port to "hot swap" the legit game for the many bootleg copies that had begun to proliferate. Such were the things you did as a high schooler with a limited amount of discretionary income, and though I don't do it now, I have no excuses...or regrets. Without the bootlegging scene, a great many games of that golden age of PS2 gaming would have been unavailable to me, and not just for reasons of cost. Playing them, however I could, helped turn me from a kid with too much time and not enough money into a full-blown hobbyist. Stephen Turner First PlayStation 2 game I ever saw was Grand Theft Auto III, but the first one I ever played was Silent Hill 2. I'd just moved to the city for a new job and a new girlfriend, and spent my first paycheck on a PS2 bundle. I remember going to GAME, which I think was Electronics Boutique at the time, and specifically asking for Silent Hill 2. So I had that (the last Limited Edition copy), GTA3, and a choice between two DVDs -- one was Reservoir Dogs and the other was a family-friendly movie. Everybody picked Reservoir Dogs. I loved the original Silent Hill for the scares, and right off the bat, I went looking for them in Silent Hill 2. Then I reached the first apartment and made the decision to reset the game. You see, I went looking for something that intentionally wasn't there. Silent Hill 2 isn't really about jump scares or screaming terrors beyond the flashlight. It's a dark, melancholic metaphor for relationships, about moving on to the next woman. I came to realize how it mirrored my own situation at the time. I felt displaced as much as James Sunderland. It spooked me like no other game could (not until Forbidden Siren) because it found surrealism in the mundane. It was the first time I realized that games could be so much more than "shoot the thing." And it hasn't been topped since. Jonathan Holmes I was sour on the PlayStation 2 from the start. I had recently graduated from Art School with a focus on "handmade" animation (hand-drawn, sprites, stop motion, collage) with the dream of someday doing art for videogames. I studied the frames of animation in My Neighbor Totoro, A Nightmare Before Christmas and Street Fighter III like a theologian studies the Bible. The culture wide move during the PS1/N64/Saturn era to make games more like movies using crappy (at the time) polygon-based graphics filled me with fear and resentment. The PS2 seemed like it was moving things even further in that direction. It truly felt like they were "taking away my games," turning a medium I loved into something that felt ugly, bumbling, and worst of all "for somebody else who clearly isn't me." Thankfully, I've grown up a lot since then. So when I saw that the first Street Fighter game for the PS2 was not the beautiful Street Fighter III, and instead was the polygon-based Street Fighter EX3, I immediately resented the console. I also thought the "cheap gimmick" of including DVD playback was a lame way to appeal to "casuals and non-gamers," and was therefore stupid. Shortly after that I ended up dating a girl whose older brother had a PS2, and they showed me Dark Cloud and Okage: Shadow King. They weren't as awful as I thought they'd be, but I still wasn't all that impressed. "Both of these games would look a lot better if they had 2D graphics," I said, and then went back to playing whatever used Dreamcast game I'd picked up that month. I'd eventually warm up to the PS2, learning that every kind of game, polygon-based or not, can be a lot of fun if you let it. It's a lesson I wish I had learned a lot earlier. The only one who could ever stand to lose in my "battle to not like videogames that look a certain way" was me. Darren Nakamura I didn't have a PlayStation 2 at launch, but once Final Fantasy X released, I wanted to make sure I had one. The problem was that I was a jobless high school student, so I didn't have any way to get one. By some strange fortune, my sister bought a PS2 even though she hadn't really played games since Yoshi's Island on the SNES. (I think maybe she bought the PS2 because she was dating a guy who liked videogames.) I remember her telling me, "Just so we're clear, this is my PS2, not yours." Despite that, I bought games for it and played it more than she ever did, until she eventually sold it to me when I went off to college. The first game I played was Final Fantasy X, and it blew my mind how good the cutscenes looked compared to the previous three titles in the series. It didn't end up being my favorite Final Fantasy, but it was still great, and those first few moments with it were incredible at the time. Occams Electric Toothbrush As I walk the cobblestone streets of my mind, I try to recall the very first PlayStation 2 game I played. However, the lights of the city are dim. So let me tell you about the first PS2 game I remember playing. It was called Summoner, an RPG that in hindsight wasn’t particularly impressive or noteworthy except for the fact that you could summon creatures to fight for you. I was immediately drawn to this element as I’ve always been fond of Summoner classes. Something about calling out to some terrible and awesome thing to fight on your behalf just hit all the right power fantasy buttons for me. So all those years ago I am at my friend's house and he had purchased Summoner. We took turns playing it. We became lost in the story and the world and finding every new creature to tame. I think we were just enamored with capabilities of the PS2, capabilities that felt so far beyond what our childhood experiences had shown us. For the first time playing a videogame, the world felt real. We spent hours upon hours with that game. When we finally beat it, there was this electricity in the air. We both saw, maybe for the first time, the potential that videogames held. Andy Dixon I never actually owned a PlayStation 2 until about four years ago, when Dtoider Xzyliac mailed me one of his extras. (Sacrilege, I know.) But just because my name wasn't etched in Sharpie on any PS2 games back in the early 2000s doesn't mean I didn't get plenty of playtime with the console at friends' houses. And my first foray into that world was Grand Theft Auto III. I was a big fan of the original GTA when I played it on PC, but boy did I have no idea what I was in for this time around. The pure scope and vibrancy of the game world was so much bigger and more alive than anything I had ever played before, and I had so much fun blocking intersections and blowing up cars they probably should have had me checked out. It took me forever to actually beat the game I spent so much time just tooling around and listening to the radio, but by the time I was done with it, I had memorized every nook, cranny, and rampage of Liberty City, and there was no going back. Jason Faulkner Ever since the Metal Gear Solid series debuted, it's been a system-seller for me. I bought my second PlayStation (the first was destroyed in a move) just to play the debut title, and when a sequel was announced, I saved for months to buy a PlayStation 2. I wasn't able to get the full $299 together to purchase it, so my mom covered the rest and gave it to me for Christmas. I remember being blown away by the smooth curves of the character models in Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty, and feeling for the first time that the line was blurring between traditional cinematic experience and videogaming. My mom also forgot to get a memory card, so I got to sit in fear of a power outage destroying my progress. The PlayStation 2 was, in my opinion, the divide between gaming as a niche hobby and a form of mainstream entertainment, and the industry owes its current success to the great games and marketing produced for it. Brittany Vincent I wasn't able to get my PlayStation 2 until a while after its release, when I finally convinced my parents to go ahead and get it for me from a local used game shop. It came with two games upon purchase, and I chose Kingdom Hearts and Final Fantasy X, the two biggest reasons I wanted to get the system in the first place. I eagerly tore into Final Fantasy X after having asked my father to watch the opening scenes, and it certainly didn't disappoint. I was a longtime Final Fantasy fan becoming acclimated with a whole new world of improved graphical presentation and so many interesting things to come, and everything felt so vibrant, new, and exciting. When I tore through Final Fantasy X I returned it to the store for Final Fantasy X-2 and blew threw it as well, replaying the first few moments to watch the "Y-R-P" scene so many times I could practically choreograph it in real life now. I was in awe of how smooth and realistic the CG was then. It may sound bizarre, but I can't remember a time I felt more "in-tune" with what games were and where they would be going. I amassed what would eventually be the largest collection of games from one singular console, and I've never looked back. The PlayStation 2 remains firmly planted within my memory as a massive turning point in my career as a gamer, and I proudly remain loyal to it after all these years. Steven Hansen I keep asking the rest of our staff if they've played Orphen: Scion of Sorcery and they don't even answer me, let alone say no. It's like I'm a ghost shouting at my children to love me. I'm here, I'm here, can't you see me?! Thanks to the magic of "search engines" on the "world wide web," I have been able to confirm that Orphen is a videogame that exists. I didn't dream it up. I can't remember much else about it, though. I remember thinking it was cool 15 years ago, probably because its lead had a red headbanded Domon Kasshu look going on and I also thought G Gundam was cool 15 years ago. But in my Googling I went back and watched some footage from this odd, quasi-realtime JRPG and it's pretty dang bad. But I won't ever forget it! Or I won't ever forget not being able to remember it. -- What was the very first PS2 game you played? Let us know in the comments!
PS2 anniversary photo
The PS2 turns 15 today!
Today marks the 15th anniversary of the PlayStation 2. In those 15 years, we've already had two more Sony console releases, but the PS2 is still near and dear to many of our hearts. The console gave us many of our favorite ga...

All you need is Rez photo
All you need is Rez

Note to self: Replay Rez at least once a year


'The journey will begin anew'
Feb 23
// Jordan Devore
On the rare occasion I use my Xbox 360, I'm amazed the thing still works. It's laughably slow to boot up, full of games as it is, and having gone through several broken systems last generation, there's a lingering fear that t...
PlayStation poll photo
PlayStation poll

Poll: Final Fantasy VII most wanted remake, Dragon Quest V favorite PlayStation game


10,000 Japanese players polled on PlayStation
Dec 03
// Steven Hansen
Sony surveyed 10,000 Japanese PlayStation fans (via Gematsu) of all ages to decide the best PlayStation game over the past 20 years and Dragon Quest V took the top spot (Final Fantasy VII the second spot). Among res...

Happy 20th, PlayStation photo
Happy 20th, PlayStation

Sony celebrates 20 years of PlayStation with a video


Things cut at random to fast music!
Nov 13
// Steven Hansen
Devil Dice! I wonder if I can find my original disc. And, hey, Sony actually acknowledging the Vita (also advertising the pink one on their Japanese YouTube page)! Less good than making more games for it, but, you know. Plus...

Songs for the dearth: Classic music games to fill the hollow

May 29 // Brittany Vincent
Quest for Fame [embed]275563:54070:0[/embed] Quest for Fame was an Aerosmith-themed PC rocker that came packaged with a light blue guitar pick peripheral. You know, back when the term “peripheral” didn’t simply mean “enormous piece of plastic I’ll later toss in my closet.” Though the game suggested you tap the pick against a hard surface, I usually found that smacking my thigh produced the best results via “rhythm EKG,” the meter for measuring your progress on-screen. This meant you looked like a total moron while playing. It was quick, raw, and fairly dirty, like any BioWare sex scene. But it effectively simulated the feeling of “playing” a real guitar. And to me, that meant something. Unfortunately, through repeated use and abuse, the guitar pick eventually only responded when slammed against the computer desk in front of me. It was, however, a fresh look at a genre I’d never experienced before, and it hardly receives any of the credit it rightfully deserves as one of the first truly interactive guitar games to make you feel like a rock star. Space Channel 5 [embed]275563:54072:0[/embed] Atomic pink-haired Ulala, a particularly scintillating tentacle scene, and some embarrassingly catchy electronic pop joined together like undulating Planeteers to create Space Channel 5. By your powers combined, indeed. With every “chu!” and subsequent “HEY!”, the quirky crew liberated groovin’ presidents and helpless civilians from the clutches of the terrifying Morolians and those who dared side with them. In classic call-and-response fashion, enemies spewed out a string of nonsensical chants alongside “lyrics” that could only be described as lazy, leaving you as Ulala to repeat them back with the beat. Unless you had the memory of a goldfish, you could save the world. And I’m proud to say I -- wait, what? It wasn’t perfect, but I would have given my silver Space Michael onesie to work on Ulala’s Swingin’ Report Show. Admit it, you would have too, unless you don’t know the difference between Pudding and Padding. In that case, get off my stage. Gitaroo Man [embed]275563:54073:0[/embed] U-1 played a magical Gitaroo, or as us normal folk would call it, a guitar. And it was good. Still is. Don’t hate. Gitaroo Man, the classic drag-the-note-via-analog-stick-to-pitch-bend musical adventure had it all, even some particularly horrid English voice acting. From cutesy J-Pop to orchestral songs littered with hardcore guitar riffs, to some Day of the Dead-like tunes, it’s a cavalcade of songs meant to beat you into submission. Though genuinely nightmarish in difficulty, it’s still flyin’ to my heart after all these years. A rare find on the PlayStation 2, it saw subsequent release on the PSP for an affordable less-than-$20 steal. PaRappa the Rapper/Um Jammer Lammy [embed]275563:54074:0[/embed] I need to potty, or I’ll be real naughty. I’ll settle for talking about PaRappa the Rapper -- rappin’ dog, and Um Jammer Lammy -- wailin’ lamb (now immortalized on my right arm.) PaRappa, with all the street cred a talking dog could muster after falling in love with a sunflower and rapping about seafood cake, was pretty darn dope, y’all. Lammy adopted the same premise as PaRappa, but you wailed on a guitar rather than relying on your rapping chops to solve every single one of your problems. Rodney Alan Greenblat lent his magical touch to the games, giving them a “paper-thin” look, as well as some truly bizarre characters that to this day I can’t forget. Tupac may have gone down in history, but lines like “In the rain or in the snow / I got the funky flow / But now, I really gotta go” deserve archival for future generations. PaRappa received a lackluster sequel (minus the bit about the burgers) and Major Minor’s Majestic March ranks as one of the worst games I’ve ever had the misfortune of playing. So stick to PaRappa or Lammy’s first endeavors. And that’s the bottom line, ‘cause Chop Chop Master Onion said so. Vib Ribbon [embed]275563:54077:0[/embed] To some, this is one of the strangest music games ever made. To those same people, The Human Centipede is “scary” and the Fright Night remake induces nightmares. You know the type. With its overabundance of vector graphics and trippy music, it’s definitely an acquired taste. But one that goes down oh so good. Like eating at White Castle, without the crippling heartburn in the morning. As the vector rabbit Vibri, you traverse each level (a thin white line) riddled with obstacles. If you’re a chicken-wuss, you can use any CD to create stages for Vibri. Go ahead, use Limp Bizkit. Vibri trucks on to "Rollin’." You’ll quickly learn that Vib Ribbon also means to scare the bejeezus out of you, especially if you play along to the song “Polaroid.” Lordy, lordy. I know I spent hours with Monster Rancher back in the day trying to get different monsters from my dad’s CD collection...so if you wasted all your time spinning anything from The Pixies to ‘70s Superstar Club Hits, you’ll feel right at home here. Unfortunately, Vib Ribbon never saw a North American release, so you’ll need to get crafty to procure a copy in this day and age. Bust A Groove (Bust A Move) [embed]275563:54076:0[/embed] Following in the vein of PaRappa the Rapper, Bust A Groove boasted a varied mix of tracks ranging from trance to disco and everything in between. You input a string of arrows on the PlayStation’s d-pad followed by one of the four face buttons, all in time with the music, of course. It stars a crazy cast of characters, including a grown woman with an infantilism fetish, your token zombie character, and even capoeira-dancing aliens named (you guessed it) Capoeira. Hey, I never said it won points for originality. Each of the characters represent the mix of dance styles, so no matter who you pick you’re destined for busting some “stone-cold grooves." If you could manage to pull off Perfects for three or more turns, you’d get a Freeze. Dance perfectly, or reach a score higher than recommended for that stage? You’d get Fever Time, which showcased your character’s amazing dance moves in a solo show that almost always turned out dismally, unless you chose to play as gangsta rapper Strike. And he’s so much more street than Fiddy’ll ever be. Unfortunately, I stepped on my copy and cracked the disc. This is why I can’t have nice things.
Music games photo
Rockin' just to keep on rockin'
With a new Amplitude on the horizon and a post-Guitar Hero world having left much to be desired by way of rhythm games, we must look to the past to drink our fill from the fount of the world of music. And even before Guitar H...

 photo

Rental options temporarily appear on PlayStation Store


A glimpse of what's to come
Mar 14
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
We have a better idea at how PlayStation Now will exactly work thanks to an error that appeared on the PlayStation Store. PSNStores noticed they were able to rent Catherine, with a 1 day, 7 day, and 30 day options available. ...
 photo

Game Debate to the Death! Favorite Uncharted game?


My vote: the singer Drake riding a drake while playing as Drake. Drakeception.
Feb 25
// Tom Fronczak
In my previous poll I asked everyone to pick their favorite Legend of Zelda game from the lengthy and notable series. Out of over 1,400 total votes, here are the top four results: (21.37%) Ocarina of Time: 312 votes -- winne...
 photo

The evolution of PlayStation's graphics over the years


From PS1 to PS4
Aug 16
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The PlayStation Access channel has been doing a great job of building up hype for the upcoming launch of the PlayStation 4. Their latest video is no different, as it takes a bunch of games from across PlayStation's history a...
PS2 Classics photo
PS2 Classics

Capcom vs. SNK 2 hits PlayStation Network next week


Break out the arcade sticks!
Jul 12
// Kyle MacGregor
Capcom vs. SNK 2: Mark of the Millennium is set to arrive next week on PlayStation Network, the silver-tongued foxes of the PlayStation Blogcast have revealed. The classic PlayStation 2 crossover fighting game sports an expan...
Contra: Shattered Soldier photo
Contra: Shattered Soldier

Contra: Shattered Soldier runs and guns to PSN next week


It's time to kill some aliens!
Jun 07
// Kyle MacGregor
Contra: Shattered Soldier is blasting its way onto PlayStation Network next week. Announced on the latest edition of the PlayStation Blogcast, the shooter will arrive as a part of next week's store update.  Original...
Yakuza 1 & 2 photo
Yakuza 1 & 2

This Yakuza 1 & 2 Wii U trailer has me nostalgic


Do we have a chance for an international release?
May 20
// Chris Carter
A few days ago we got a look at the upcoming Yakuza 1 & 2 HD re-release for the Wii U, and now, the full trailer is ready for eyeball consumption. As is the case with any Yakuza game, it shows off some insane gameplay va...
Tales of Symphonia PS3 photo
Tales of Symphonia PS3

Rumor: Tales of Symphonia to re-release on PS3


Hideo Baba discusses high-definition RPG bundle
May 13
// Kyle MacGregor
Tales of Symphonia is reportedly receiving a high-definition re-release on PlayStation 3. Speaking with Koi-Nya, series producer Hideo Baba teased what he is calling "a representation of the dreams and hopes of the fans,...
Fatal Frame photo
Fatal Frame

Fatal Frame 2: Crimson Butterfly floats to PSN this week


Tecmo Koei's survival horror series returns to PS2 Classics
May 05
// Kyle MacGregor
Fatal Frame 2: Crimson Butterfly is creeping its way onto PlayStation Network this week. Its arrival is hot on the heels of the original Fatal Frame, which only landed on Sony's online service a few short weeks ago....
PlayStation 2 photo
That goes for games, accessories, and systems
GameStop will stop taking in PlayStation 2 systems, games, and accessories starting on June 1, 2013. A poster on Reddit snapped the above picture, and I've since confirmed with a number of stores and employees at different Ga...

Katamari Damacy photo
Katamari Damacy

Katamari Damacy trundles to PlayStation Network next week


Roll up all the things!
Apr 26
// Kyle MacGregor
Katamari Damacy is coming to PlayStation Network! Announced during this week's PlayStation Blogcast, the first entry in Namco Bandai's acid trip of a series is set to arrive as a part of next Tuesday's PlayStation Store ...
Console chimera photo
Console chimera

18 different gaming consoles combined into one system


The ultimate mod
Apr 16
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Modder Bacteria spent over three years and over $1,000 to merge 18 different consoles into one giant box. It contains circuitry from 15 different systems, works with one master controller, a single power supply, and a single...
 photo

Devil Summoner PSA: PS2 games on Amazon, anime streaming


For my SMT people
Apr 08
// Dale North
Good morning to my fellow Shin Megami Tensei fans. It's a wonderful time to be alive, isn't it? We're playing through Devil Summoner: Soul Hackers right now for review, and Shin Megami Tensei IV was announced for North Americ...
Fatal Frame photo
Fatal Frame

Fatal Frame creeping onto PlayStation Network this week


Spooky PS2 Classic returns this Tuesday
Apr 07
// Kyle MacGregor
Prepare to wet your pants! Fatal Frame is coming to PlayStation Network. Announced during this week's PlayStation Blogcast, the first entry in Tecmo's unique survival horror series is set to arrive on Sony's online store this...
Grand Theft Auto photo
Grand Theft Auto

Liberty City/Vice City Stories now on PlayStation Store


May help ease the wait for Grand Theft Auto V
Apr 03
// Keith Swiader
The catalog of downloadable PlayStation 2 titles on the PlayStation Store increases by two today, as Grand Theft Auto: Liberty City Stories and Vice City Stories are now available in North America and Europe for $9.99/€9...

Rock Band had a ridiculously profound effect on my life

Apr 02 // Brett Makedonski
I was hooked immediately. From the opening notes of Guitar Hero's "I Love Rock 'n Roll," I just connected with the game in a way that I had never experienced before. We spent the night taking turns attempting to best some of the music industry's most revered and recognizable songs. Sure, it was only medium difficulty and there were still plenty of plunks and wails, but each passed song brought with it an undeserved sense of faux-rock stardom. That night bred an obsession of sorts for me. From that point forward, Harmonix had my heart. I spent countless hours practicing and perfecting Guitar Hero, and later Guitar Hero 2. I went so far as to track my scores through an online database. It wasn't long before five-starring songs wasn't good enough; I was chasing gold stars and full combos. If I missed a note, I started the song over. Meticulous? Hell yes it was. But it never, ever stopped being fun. In 2007, Harmonix took its revolutionary concept of plastic instruments and put a spin on it to include a full band dynamic. Consider my interest sufficiently piqued. I wasn't alone, either. By the time the game released, my friends were constantly chiding me to buy it. They all offered to chip in, and to this day, I only own about one-fifteenth of my original Rock Band kit. The investment turned out to be well worth it. The night I brought it home, we played it until the wee hours of the morning. We rotated everyone through all of the instruments, and put particular care into ensuring that everyone sang. We played songs like "Say It Ain't So" and "Wanted Dead or Alive" way too many times because we didn't realize that we weren't unlocking new songs. Simply put, the night was perfect. As Rock Band put a whole new spin on the music genre of videogames, it also changed the light in which I experienced them. The Guitar Hero franchise had grown into a place of competitiveness for me. I associated those games with precision, perfection, and besting other players. Rock Band taught me to step back from that and enjoy the games for what they were. I still cared about the scores, but I also couldn't fault other people for not caring as much as I wanted to. I never really had the dynamic of a four-person band that all excelled on Expert. Truthfully, I'm kind of glad I didn't. It let me enjoy the Rock Band games as a pure social experience -- something that doesn't seem to come along often in videogames. That first night of owning Rock Band set the pace for what was to come. Rock Band would eventually become the centerpiece for many of my social moments across the next five years. In college, entire parties revolved around Rock Band. Many nights out on the town were pre-gamed while playing Rock Band. It was always a uniting activity, as it seemed that everyone, across all walks of life, genuinely enjoyed playing the game. I'd wager that plenty of others have come to the exact same conclusion. Now that Harmonix is pulling the plug on weekly DLC, it feels like the franchise as a whole is going with it. You can't blame Harmonix though -- the genre had simply reached its saturation point, and that probably came a few years ago. At least it's going out with a semblance of dignity. Throughout the years, I spent hundreds of hours playing Rock Band and spent at least a thousand dollars on downloadable songs. These games had an impact on my life unlike any other videogame that I've ever played. I can only hope that Harmonix's next big undertaking can play even a fraction of a role in my life that Rock Band did.  As Don McLean's "American Pie," the final piece of regularly scheduled DLC for Rock Band, so eloquently puts it, "I can still remember how that music used to make me smile."
Rock Band photo
The day the music died
It's a sad week. Granted, it's an inevitability that's more than five years in the making, but nonetheless, it's sad. This is the week that Harmonix releases its final regularly scheduled Rock Band DLC -- a str...

 photo

Game Debate to the Death! Favorite Tomb Raider game?


Conan O'Brien is banned from voting!
Apr 02
// Tom Fronczak
In the previous debate we gave the SimCity hate a rest and instead focused on which game developer was the most loyal to their fans. More than a hundred people joined in on the debate and dozens of teams received much deserve...
Crash Bandicoot photo
Crash Bandicoot

Crash Bandicoot was originally Willie the Wombat?!?!


Did You Know Gaming tackles Crash Bandicoot
Mar 27
// Chris Carter
Crash Bandicoot is one of my favorite platforming franchises. The first three main entries were stellar, and even Crash Team Racing and Crash Bash, as shameful as they were, were extremely fun experiences. If you want to lea...
Capcom vs. SNK 2 photo
Capcom vs. SNK 2

Capcom vs. SNK 2 could be coming as soon as this April


THIS BATTLE IS ABOUT TO EXPLODE
Mar 21
// Raz Rauf
Late last year, Chris reported on the development of a re-release of the fighting game crossover classic Capcom vs. SNK 2, briefly reminiscing on his tourney days and looking forward to revisit a game so close to his, and ind...

100% Series Retrospective: God of War

Mar 13 // Chris Carter
Why God of War? I've always been a fan of Greek mythology. I almost took up an additional major of Ancient History in college, as a matter of fact. While I played many Roman-themed action games like Rygar (both of them) growing up, God of War was the first game to truly re-create the insanely violent mythos. Game after game, I would be excited to see who Sony would incorporate next. Icarus? Hephaestus? As loose as these adaptations were, it was still interesting to see how characters would be incorporated, and if possible, how they would meet their end. The fantastic set-pieces were also a major factor in the God of War series' appeal. Riding on top of titan's back that comprised an entire level was one of the greatest moments in gaming, among many other jaw-dropping moments in the franchise. I don't think any of the games are that deep from a pure combat perspective. Outside of the occasional parry (which you don't really need) and pinpoint dodge, you can basically use a few select combos and still best the vast majority of confrontations. But that doesn't mean that they aren't extremely fun, and don't offer some of the most entertaining fights and bosses in the entire genre. If you haven't joined me on my Quests before, the way they work is pretty simple. It's kind of like a retrospective, but rather than just give you an overview of a franchise, I'll generally let you know what I thought of the game when it was released, and what I think of it now. If I didn't provide a complete vision of what the game is like before I replay it, I'll provide an "extended thoughts" section below each applicable entry. I'll update my progress in real time through my blog, and after I finish the entire Quest, I'll share it with you guys on the front page.For this particular Quest, I actually finished everything in rapid succession over the course of a few days, so I skipped the c-blog portion and got right into it. God of War - PlayStation 2 [Owned], PlayStation 3 (HD Collection) [Owned]COMPLETED God of War kind of came out of nowhere. I had just wrapped up my Master Ninja playthrough of Ninja Gaiden (Xbox), and the Dante Must Die difficulty in Devil May Cry 3, when Kratos came along. Can you believe Devil May Cry 3 and God of War came out in the same month? The game mesmerized me with its amazing set-pieces, breathtaking graphics (at the time), and interesting characters. While it wasn't the deepest story in the world, Kratos' tale of revenge was a good enough motivator to keep me going and tear through fight after fight until I came to the conclusion -- then I played it again, and again. The Hydra fight was one of the biggest "holy shit" moments in all of gaming, and developer Santa Monica managed to stuff a whole lot more into the package that kept you entertained and wanting more. I distinctly remember spending an entire evening in college beating the game on the God Mode difficulty just so I could get the final secret -- an actual phone number to a hotline where you could call Kratos. That's pretty much a clear-cut finalist for the "best extra ever" award. Today, the game doesn't hold up nearly as well as some of the others in the series. But at the same time, it's still worth playing, especially with the HD version on the PlayStation 3. God of War II - PlayStation 2 [Owned], PlayStation 3 (HD Collection) [Owned]COMPLETED To date, God of War II is my absolute favorite in the franchise, and one of my favorite action games of all time. Somehow, it contains one of the most well-paced campaigns in the history of the genre, in the sense that it constantly keeps you interested at every waking moment. In fact, if God of War II had half of the boss fights it does, it would still be in the running for some of the best single combat experiences of all time. One of the crazy things about the release of God of War II is that it actually came out a few months after the release of the PlayStation 3. It was one of the better swan songs in recent memory for a console, and really helped send off the PlayStation 2 in an amazing way. I generally dislike the claim that a sequel "is better than the original in every way," but that really is the case here. It has a more compelling story, better bosses, better combat, and more unique abilities. I've played this game so many times that many of the locales and fights are burnt into my memory. Tiny nuances like being able to slide down walls quicker, and a much better learning curve helped cement the game as one of the best starter action games for new fans who wanted to learn the ropes without getting too frustrated. The only major flaw of God of War II is that it doesn't truly innovate -- it just does everything better. In that sense, people who absolutely hated the first game probably won't find solace here. But at the same time, if you truly dislike God of War II, I'd have a hard time finding you a more accessible action game. God of War III - PlayStation 3 [Owned]COMPLETED Plain and simple, God of War III is the only weak spot of the entire series for me. Something about it just didn't sit right, even if, mechanically, it's very similar to the quality of the first two games. Part of the reason is because Kratos has progressed from a sympathetic, somewhat justified tragic figure, to a complete asshole. After the strides that Chains of Olympus to humanize Kratos, God of War III pretty much throws all of that out of the window, and then absolutely crumbles at the end with one of the weakest endings in all of gaming. From a pure action standpoint though, III is pretty much one of the most insane games ever made. In an almost senseless effort to top itself and its predecessors at every waking moment, you basically end up fighting everything left on Mount Olympus, and then some. The graphical upgrades are nice, but the set-pieces just don't really measure up to the first two games. But because of how high it aims, the final confrontation is a complete letdown, and the cliffhanging ending that still hasn't been addressed was a terrible way to treat the franchise. If you must see how Kratos predictably gets his final (?) vengeance with cutting-edge graphics, you should still probably play God of War III. God of War: Chains of Olympus - PSP, PlayStation 3 (HD Collection) [Owned]COMPLETED Chains of Olympus is a quaint little side story that blew people away (at the time), considering the sheer fact that it was one of the first portable games to recreate a faithful home console experience. Taking place before the original God of War, Chains of Olympus deals with Persephone, the reluctant Queen of the Underworld, and Atlas, a titan who appears in other God of War games. The plot is a little by the numbers, but make no mistake: this is still very much a solid God of War game that entertains from start to finish, with no real glaring faults. Playing it on the Vita with a remapped second analog stick or on the PS3 with the DualShock is the best way to experience it, but the original PSP controls are by no means poor. God of War: Ghost of Sparta - PSP, PlayStation 3 (HD Collection) [Owned]COMPLETED Ghost of Sparta is one of the better games in the series. From the get-go, things get fairly personal for Kratos, and this adventure actually has a justification, rather than Chains of Olympus, which was mainly a fluff piece. The gist of Ghost is that Kratos finds out what happened to his brother, who is part of the reason why he is who he is during the course of the games, and the person who inspired his trademark red markings on his face. It gives a bit more meaning to the character before he's ruined in III, and the set-pieces are worthy of the franchise, starting things off with a bang in Atlantis. You finally get to deal with Kratos' family, and see him at his most vulnerable since the brief cutscene where he murders his wife and daughter in a fit of rage. It's also a bit more fleshed out than Chains of Olympus gameplay-wise, featuring new weapons and powers, which puts it on par with the console games in terms of a fully featured experience. If you're looking for a good starting point for the series, playing this in between God of War 1 and 2 is a great idea. God of War: Ascension - PlayStation 3 [Owned] COMPLETED Ascension is an interesting game, to say the least. It fluctuates from insanely easy to fairly difficult on a whim, and offers up a hefty balance of backtracking and brand new beautiful set pieces. It doesn't really offer anything new story-wise, and honestly, outside of the experience, it's fairly inconsequential to the franchise as a whole. Ok, so we sort of understand how far Kratos is willing to go to beat the odds -- but we get that in spades in God of War III, so it's not really unexpected, after all. If you aren't a God of War fan, this won't do anything to sway you. Still, Ascension is a fairly solid action game through and through, with decent pacing, and some neat weapon mechanics that let you switch elements on a whim (but not mid-combo, sadly). On the higher difficulty levels, the game is occasionally one of the more challenging entries, which made me extremely happy. Whenever the press at large is addressing its concerns over having trouble beating the game, you know it's going to be good!  Oh, and that part that people had a lot of trouble with? Also known as the Trial of Archimedes? I completed it on my third try. I'll have a guide out soon to help out people who aren't able to do it. It wasn't that bad, so don't think the game is impossible or broken or anything -- just power up your blades first and foremost to maximum and you should be good to go, as always. As a general rule, I'm ok with an added multiplayer component if it doesn't interfere with the single-player experience. Thankfully, it doesn't, and online play offers a fairly enjoyable Power Stone-esque experience. While it doesn't blow me away enough to get me addicted like some recent games, I can see myself jumping back in occasionally to beat up some fellow gladiators. I joined the cult of Hades, which allows me to use some of Ascension's trickier abilities and spells, and had a great time. Ascension needed to do something drastically different, as the formula is starting to wear a bit thin. At its core, the game is a prequel to a prequel (Chains of Olympus), which sounds pretty absurd on paper. Sony Santa Monica has tapped this well fairly dry, but apparently, it was still full of just enough spring water by the time they got to Ascension. Collection Photo: Final thoughts:God of War is one of the most consistent franchises I've ever played. Although it doesn't innovate nearly as much as other action series tend to do, you really can't say there's an outright "bad" game in the series, despite my general disappointment in III. Pretty much all of the games hold up, especially considering that Sony has made the entire franchise available on the PlayStation 3 through HD remakes. If Sony treated most of their franchises half as well as God of War, you'd see a lot less failed Sony IPs and closed studios today. They take great care of the franchise, and for good reason -- they're still system sellers, even to this day.
100% God of War photo
Carter's Quest
[Read on for a description of every God of War game ever released in the US, and my completion of them all in 2013.] 2013 is an exciting year. Now that I know you guys enjoy reading my Quests, I'm going to make an effort to d...

Cyborg Michael Jordan photo
Cyborg Michael Jordan

Cyborg Michael Jordan could have been in NBA Street


Perhaps in a perfect universe...
Mar 01
// Patrick Hancock
Remember the Street games? NFL Street was probably my favorite, but NBA Street was right up there with it in terms of arcade-style quality. Well, it looks like NBA Street in particular was only living up t...
Twisted Metal sale photo
Twisted Metal sale

David Jaffe debuts the Twisted Metal Birthday Bundle


Twisted Metal 1, 2, Black, and TM 2012
Feb 12
// Chris Carter
It looks like Twisted Metal 1 and Black weren't the only ones joining the fun, as the PSN is getting an all-out four game birthday pack for $39.99. Should you decide to go with the piecemeal approach, the new 2012 Twiste...
 photo

Capcom snubs Onimusha/Dino Crisis, wants new IP


Old franchises unlikely, new franchises desired
Feb 01
// Jim Sterling
Resident Evil Revelations producer Masachika Kawata has admitted Capcom isn't too hot on the idea of returning to Onimusha or Dino Crisis anytime soon. According to the developer, Capcom's more interested in brand new IP righ...
Disgaea 2 photo
Disgaea 2

Disgaea 2: Cursed Memories comes to PSN today


Cool, dood!
Jan 22
// Kyle MacGregor
Because you spent every waking moment gorging on Disgaea: Hour of Darkness since its digital re-release on last week, NIS America is dishing out seconds. Tactical role-playing game Disgaea 2: Cursed Memories&nb...

100% Series Retrospective: Devil May Cry

Jan 16 // Chris Carter
Why Devil May Cry?All things considered, Devil May Cry is probably my favorite action franchise ever. The series is particularly close to my heart, as I remember when each game came out, and it's one of the only franchises where I rushed to buy every single game day one. I vividly remember the first time I played the original game, the first time I played the standard version of Devil May Cry 3 and struggled on the first boss (because normal mode was secretly hard mode in the original), and the many times I watched the same clip of Devil May Cry 4's first gameplay video.The DMC series does action right, simply put. It's the perfect technical action series, that essentially functions as a fighting game in an action-adventure's body. There's cancelling, split-second timing considerations, a heavy emphasis on combos, and a strong sense of urgency with the game's challenging difficulty levels. It has memorable boss fights, amazingly cool weapons, sick cheesy '90s action cutscenes, tons of unlockables, and solid anime-style voice acting.People are quick to note that the new DmC is more welcoming to newer players. I heavily agree with that, but the secret is, Devil May Cry was always welcoming. In fact, it was one of the only action games ever to put in an "Easy Automatic" mode that allowed you to turn it down a notch if you died too many times. It was a perfect compromise, as it allowed you to execute advanced moves with the press of a button. It's a shame so many people have been turned away by a promise of an "impossible" barrier of entry.I figured with the recent release of DmC: Devil May Cry, it would be a great time to dive into the series again, and see how the new game stacks up directly. For those of you who aren't aware, the series is widely popular, spawning a few novels, manga, an anime series, a US comic series, and a potential feature film.Dante himself as appeared in many other games, including the Viewtiful Joe series, Shin Megami Tensei: Nocturne, Marvel Vs. Capcom 3 (with Vergil), and PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale. If you haven't joined me on my Quests before, the way they work is pretty simple. It's kind of like a retrospective, but rather than just give you an overview of a franchise, I'll generally let you know what I thought of the game when it was released, and what I think of it now. If I didn't provide a complete vision of what the game is like before I replay it, I'll provide an "extended thoughts" section below each applicable entry. I'll update my progress in real time through my blog, and after I finish the entire Quest, I'll share it with you guys on the front page.For this particular Quest, I actually finished everything in rapid succession over the course of a few days, so I skipped the c-blog portion and got right into it.Let's go!Devil May Cry - PlayStation 2 [Owned], PlayStation 3 (HD Collection), Xbox 360 (HD Collection) [Owned]COMPLETEDAt the time, the first Devil May Cry game was extremely fresh and unique. The simple premise of a cocky Devil Hunter engaging in demon hunting was a match made in anime heaven, and it worked. Although the game has started out as Resident Evil 4, it was eventually turned into something else entirely after the fixed camera from previous Resident Evil games was dropped for a more dynamic view. After the development team traveled across Europe in an attempt to inject some gothic influence into the game, the project was changed entirely: the outcome was Devil May Cry.I vividly remember seeing the first screenshots for the game, and getting extremely excited at nearly every picture. I loved the deep reds and purple color schemes of Dante and the Marionette enemies, and the ability to juggle enemies with your twin pistols was pretty unreal. Funnily enough, the concept of air juggling was inspired by a glitch in another Capcom game, Onimusha.Devil May Cry was unique in that it was one of the only games ever to feature a "style" (scoring) system that made you self aware of your gameplay, and always challenged you to play better. But that wasn't the only challenge of mixing attacks up and not getting hit -- it was difficult in general to boot!Starting the series tradition of unlockable difficulties and costumes, Devil May Cry was also one of the first games to offer an "extreme" difficulty mode, in this case, titled "Dante Must Die."  It was very challenging, and naturally, very rewarding to complete -- and unlike many retro games that featured a "fake difficulty" (through bad design or software limitations), this challenge was legitimate, which made it all the more reason to power through it.So how was my replay of the game? Well, the PS2 original is pretty choppy by today's standards, but the HD version feels just fine. While a lot of the elements found in the first game have been eclipsed (either copied, or bested by later games in its own series), it's still an enjoyable action game even to this day.Devil May Cry 2 - PlayStation 2 [Owned], PlayStation 3 (HD Collection), Xbox 360 (HD Collection) [Owned]COMPLETEDA common joke I like to make in Devil May Cry posts is "Yes, of course, Devil May Cry 4, the oddly named third Devil May Cry game" -- in reference to the fact that the black sheep of the franchise, 2, is generally shunned by fans into a non-existent state.While I've beaten the other games at least ten times each (DMC 3 a lot more than that), I've only beaten DMC 2 a scant few times. So imagine my excitement going into it, seeing if it was truly as bad as I remembered.And...it basically is. So many changes were made that weren't really necessary. For one, a side character named Lucia is introduced, and...she's not very compelling. Unlike Kat from the new DmC though, she isn't just an ancillary addition -- oh no -- she's basically forced into every facet of the game as a playable character.On top of that, Dante changes into a less interesting, darker version of his previous happy-go-lucky self, and it isn't really fun to watch. The difficulty (a staple of the series) was also lowered, and weapons weren't as nuanced. Everything seemed to sort of blend together -- whether it was the very samey weapon collection or the similar-looking levels (there's far too much open space and not enough memorable environments).The point is, it didn't stand out, which is generally what the Devil May Cry series makes its money on. Boss battles are extremely dull and forgettable.If you're going to brave this, try it on the HD collection. Don't bother hunting it down and paying money for it individually. Besides, the first and third games are worth the price of entry alone for the package.Devil May Cry 3: Dante's Awakening - PlayStation 2 [Owned], PlayStation 2 (Special Edition) [Owned], PC, PlayStation 3 (HD Collection), Xbox 360 (HD Collection) [Owned]COMPLETEDDevil May Cry 3 is an interesting and storied release. The very first iteration (the standard edition) featured the Hard difficulty as a standard. Meaning, Hard was actually Very Hard. As a result, I remember dying a number of times on the first sub-boss of the game (which is like five minutes in). That's a challenge, my friends, and one of the many reasons why I was immediately enamored by this game.Some time later, a "Special Edition" was released, with new encounters, tweaked difficulty levels (it shifted every mode down one peg to understandably make it more accessible), and added the ability to play as Vergil. Yep, one of the biggest badasses in all of gaming was finally playable, and it was glorious. In fact, a playable Vergil is so appealing that Capcom opted to include a playable Vergil campaign as DLC in the new DmC.But enough about Vergil; the game itself, even the non-special edition, is my favorite action game ever. The crux is due to two things: swappable weapons, and styles. While the new DmC has the ability to switch weapons mid-combat, it isn't instantaneous -- Devil May Cry 3's system was. Two weapons each were assigned to slots on the left and right, which would be switched using L2 and R2, respectively. As a result, you could utilize combos with *four* weapons in them at once. The kicker? All of the weapons were fine tuned, and fun to use.Styles were another thing entirely that allowed you to play the game the way you wanted to play it. If you preferred a more defensive play-style, Royal Guard was your huckleberry. It allowed you to use split second timing and guard attacks in a traditional manner, in addition to the standard dodge mechanic. There are suitable styles for melee weapons and ranged as well, but my absolute favorite is the Trickster style, which improves your speed, maneuverability, and jumping abilities. All of these styles level up, RPG style, and can be brought across difficulty levels, allowing you to replay the game as many times as you want to max everything out. It was a ton of fun, and there were a few nights where I'd beat the game twice in a row -- it was that enjoyable.Of course, it also contained some of the best boss fights in all of gaming. Which brings us to the final battle -- Dante's epic showdown with Vergil. I mean, what can I say about this fight that hasn't been said a million times over? It truly is worthy of the term "epic." On higher difficulty levels, it's one of the most intense, and mesmerizing fights in all of action games (it might even be my number-one choice).If you haven't experienced Devil May Cry 3 yet, you need to. If I had to summarize the third game into one word, it would be "gunchucks."Devil May Cry 4 - PlayStation 3, PC, iOS [Owned], Xbox 360 [Owned]COMPLETEDThe fourth Devil May Cry game had one of the best core action engines of all time -- but you wouldn't know it, because the actual campaign had a heap of problems. Backtracking, pacing issues, and an all around lack of a compelling narrative hurt this game. The chief complaint for me was backtracking, so much in that it basically expected you to beat the same game twice (and even fight many of the same exact bosses) with two different characters.Like Devil May Cry 2, DMC 4 featured two characters. This time around I actually liked the newcomer (Nero), and enjoyed his different play-style, but the fact remains that the campaign itself is very uninteresting at points. It's a shame, because it's one of the best-looking games on the PS3/360.Despite those issues though, Devil May Cry 4 shines brightest when you're playing as Dante, and switching between all four styles at will in the game's Bloody Palace mode. It's combat bliss, despite its fleeting nature. Don't let anyone tell you Devil May Cry 4 is a bad game. It's not. It also sold very well, which makes the decision to go with a completely new studio all the more puzzling for fans.DmC: Devil May Cry - PlayStation 3, PC, Xbox 360 [Owned]COMPLETEDSo we've come full circle now. We're past the fully Capcom developed titles and we're onto Ninja Theory.As everyone knows, I'm not the biggest NT fan. Back when they were known as Just Add Monsters, they made a game called Kung Fu Chaos, which was basically an uninspired (and very racially charged) Smash Bros. clone for the Xbox.Surprisingly, I found out four years later that they developed Heavenly Sword for the PS3, and went to check it out. While it had the machinations of a cool-looking game, I thought it was a pretty basic and uninspired God of War tech demo. But still, Ninja Theory trucked on, and released Enslaved: Odyssey to the West, which was probably their most successful game to date from a critical standpoint. Even then, I still wasn't impressed. Although Enslaved contains some of the best imagery I've ever seen in a videogame, the combat system was probably one of the worst I've ever experienced, and platforming basically consisted of "hold forward, press a button occasionally."So naturally, I was a little skeptical of DmC: Devil May Cry. But even as Ninja Theory had hundreds of insults thrown their way, I remained steadfast, and always said I would give it a shot, because at the end of the day, I'll give anything a chance. I'm glad I did. As Jim stated in his review, the game has many redeeming qualities.Although it isn't as innovative as the first game was for the time, and isn't up to snuff combat-wise like 3 and 4 were, I enjoyed DmC for what it was. The platforming was actually pretty good (and probably the best in the entire series), and the premise transcended a '90s action movie to the point where it would be (somewhat) universally appealing.Despite the fact that I really didn't like the new characters for the most part, including Dante (no, not because of his hair -- I just felt like he was almost painfully generic), the world was something I could get into. Plus the combat wasn't bad at all, and is Ninja Theory's best effort to date in terms of straight gameplay mechanics. In terms of difficulty, DmC was a bit of a letdown (like 2), and you really need to play it on the game's Son of Sparda mode (Very Hard) to get a true Devil May Cry experience -- you just have to beat the game once to unlock it.While I wouldn't recommend the game to absolutely everyone, I would recommend it to most action fans. You might not be as wowed by it as some people, but you'll most likely enjoy it more than the average action-adventure.Collection Photo: Final thoughts:Devil May Cry is a pretty weird series. It starts off with a bang, regresses, peaks, regresses a bit again, and reinvents itself over five short games. Honestly, not a lot of series have that storied a history with this kind of reputation.Although the collection of games is far from what I'd call a "troubled" past (every game but the second has universal acclaim from fans of the genre), it is an interesting one, and one I enjoyed reliving on this Quest.Devil May Cry 3's brilliance was no surprise discovery here, but rediscovering why Devil May Cry 4 was such a shame was a bit jarring, and disappointing. I was expecting the first game to not hold up well, but if you play the HD collection, it's just fine. DmC impressed me more than I thought it would, but there's a lot of issues that hold it back from greatness -- kind of like Devil May Cry 4.As for recommendations, I'd probably tell newcomers to give the HD Collection a try and test out easy automatic if Normal is too troubling, and the new game, with a price cut.So now we're in an odd spot. Capcom has a franchise that upped its presentation, but regressed a bit gameplay-wise. It's a give and take for fans, and something not all fans were willing to give.The good news is, Capcom hasn't closed the door on an internally developed Devil May Cry 5. I mean, these two sub-franchises can coexist, right?Right?
100% Devil May Cry photo
Carter's Quest
[Read on for a description of every Devil May Cry game ever released in the US, and my completion of them all in 2013.]2013 is going to be an exciting year. Now that I know you guys enjoy reading my Quests, I'm going to make ...


Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...