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Rare photo
Rare

Rare designer talks canceled Donkey Kong Racing


And its strange journey to Xbox
Feb 28
// Jordan Devore
Announced at E3 2001, Donkey Kong Racing was going to be Rare's sequel to Diddy Kong Racing for the GameCube. I distinctly remember seeing images of it in magazines at the time, thinking it was a true score for the console, a...
Mario Kart photo
Mario Kart

Why don't more games do this? Mario Kart's linked world


Mario Kart: Double Dash's world is connected
Jan 25
// Wesley Ruscher
It's no secret that Nintendo puts a lot of love into their games, but I had no idea they had gone this far with my favorite mascot racer, Mario Kart: Double Dash. Thanks to another informative video from the folks over at Ga...
Wii U sales photo
Wii U sales

Wii U expected to sell 25 million units over lifetime


That's more than the GameCube
Nov 22
// Joshua Derocher
DFC Intelligence, a video game research and consulting firm, told GamesIndustry International that they expect the Wii U to sell 25 million units over its lifetime. That's a quarter of the total sales of the Wii, and it's onl...
New Tales of Symphonia photo
New Tales of Symphonia

Tales of Symphonia getting a new Collector's Edition


In North America, even!
Oct 16
// Patrick Hancock
I've only played one Tales game, and it was Tales of Symphonia for the GameCube. It seemed to have just what I wanted, engaging combat and likeable characters in an appropriately insane JRPG plot. Though really, I d...
Wind Waker HD photo
Wind Waker HD

The Wind Waker HD was developed in only six months


That doesn't mean it was easy
Oct 09
// Brett Makedonski
Nintendo's recent remake of The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD was one that had fans giddy with anticipation. Luckily, that anticipation didn't have to last all that long, because according to the series' produc...
Cosplay photo
Cosplay

This Wind Waker cosplay will blow you away


It's dangerous to go alone
Oct 06
// Wesley Ruscher
Ahoy ye scurvy dogs! Have I got a special treat for you this week. To commemorate this weekend's retail launch of the phenomenal The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD, I bring to you an exclusive Tetra and Medli cosplay...
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The Resident Evil GameCube remake didn't do that well


Which is why Resident Evil 4 became more of an action title
Sep 27
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Speaking with IGN, The Evil Within director Shinji Mikami spoke about the survival horror genre and took a look back at the Resident Evil series. As it turns out, the poor sales of the amazing Resident Evil GameCube remake is...

Review: The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD

Sep 18 // Jim Sterling
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD (Wii U)Developer: Nintendo EAD Group No. 3Publisher: NintendoReleased: September 20, 2013 (NA), October 4, 2013 (EU)MSRP: $49.99 The Wind Waker debuted on the GameCube in 2002. Its visual style is crafted with such perfect simplicity, however, that the HD coat of paint effortlessly obscures any suggestion of it being over a decade old. From the moment the title screen appears, The Wind Waker HD delights with its bright, crisp, colorful visuals. It's the perfect kind of game to re-release in HD -- something that already looked fantastic, and was held back purely by the constraints of standard definition.  Unlike games that perpetually push the notion of "photorealism" and subsequently look pitifully dated when resurrected in future generations (the original Killzone springs immediately to mind), the elegant cartoon stylings of The Wind Waker lend it a timeless visual quality that raises a huge grin when gawped at for the first time in 1080p. To conclude this shameless fellating of The Wind Waker's art style, and its suitability for high definition, Nintendo made a fantastic call on this one.  Though visually timeless, the GameCube classic has aged in other areas, particularly when it comes to its basic interactivity. This is an issue exacerbated by the Wii U GamePad, the analog sticks of which are a bit too twitchy for Link's movements and have a tendency to overreact to the slightest of nudges. It doesn't help that the combat itself is a little bit clunky these days, while the need to travel across vast quantities of ocean -- helped nonetheless by some excellent background music -- can feel like something of a chore these days -- at least until you get the Swift Sail. There are some gyroscope controls thrown into the mix, because obviously there are, and they're maybe 50% effective at what they do. While I appreciate the theoretical ease of selecting the grappling hook, physically moving the GamePad to aim it, and instantly letting loose, the inescapable twitchiness and sensitive motion input makes it difficult to stay on target, and as such, the intended fluidity only works in about half of its uses. Fortunately, you can turn these features off, or you can use the Pro Controller if you want a far more traditional experience without the modern hindrances and benefits.  Griping aside, Nintendo's done a solid job of streamlining some of the more clanking elements of gameplay. The GamePad's touchscreen does an excellent job of presenting extraneous information, as well as making inventory management a breeze. The ability to swipe items into the action buttons at will eliminates that common Zelda problem, the constant need to pause the game and switch equipment around. Similarly, the lower screen also houses the world map, which provides similar convenience for sailing from island to island. These improvements are merely minor touches and do little to significantly overhaul the experience, but they're all welcome changes that subtly contribute to crafting a superior experience.  On the subject of streamlining, some minor gameplay fixes have been made to reverse some of the game's most notorious drags. The hunt for the Triforce shards has been made far less infuriating, with most of them now available on land with only three requiring tedious ocean fishing. You can also wander around Wind Waker's pretty world in first-person view should you desire, but you won't be able to use all your items.  Other additions include a beefed up Hero mode -- available as soon as you begin a new game -- the ability to upload Picto Box selfies using Miiverse, and message bottles. At the time of writing, this latter feature is not currently online, but when it is you'll be able to write messages that, via Miiverse, shall appear as bottled messages in other peoples' games, floating in the ocean for random retrieval. While currently offline, it's a neat little idea that ought to give Miiverse fans something extra to play with.  At the press of a button, you may switch the entire game from your television to your GamePad, though obviously you'll lose the added benefits of having a permanent inventory/map screen in your hand. The controller's screen is also a subpar method of displaying how gorgeous Wind Waker is, and it's highly recommended you stick to your TV as much as possible.  Most importantly, however, everything irrevocably enchanting about The Wind Waker has been preserved for this HD re-release. Its sense of color and optimism, the overwhelming eccentricity of its oceanic world, the vibrant sense of life and excitement that permeates this particular game more than any other Zelda title to date. There's something innately special lying at the heart of this one, something extra joyful that its series brethren lacks. This is not to say other Zelda's aren't as good, or even better in some ways, it's just that none of them have the same magnetism in the personality department. This is why it's my favorite entry in the series, even if I couldn't quite say it's the best one.  Indeed, The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker suffers from some archaic mechanics, its fundamentals not having aged quite so gracefully as its aesthetics. Its unwieldiness and occasional sluggish pace can, in fact, grow temporarily infuriating. However, the streamlined menu system and map access go some way toward making up for any setbacks, while the unmistakable Wind Waker charisma ensures you won't ever stay mad at it for long.  After all, in a world of greedy cartography fish and cynical French Minesweeper purveyors, how could you not keep smiling? 
Wind Waker HD photo
'Hoy there, small fry!
[Note: Join us Thursday @ 2pm PST for a live video + chat discussion about this review.] The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker is easily my favorite Zelda game in the series -- a not altogether uncommon opinion, now that many y...

Wii U Zelda bundle photo
Special Zelda art featured on the GamePad
This past week Destructoid was the first to bring you news on an upcoming Wii U bundle that would be bundled with The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD. Today Nintendo released a new trailer for the upcoming game showing of...

Wind Waker HD photo
Wind Waker HD

Wind Waker HD's Hero Mode, fixed Triforce hunt, and more


What enhancements are in store for Link's return to the Great Sea?
Aug 22
// Tony Ponce
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD won't arrive in the States and Europe until October -- along with a new Wii U bundle to boot -- but we have yet to learn all of what has been updated since its former life on the GameCub...
Pikmin photo
Pikmin

Nintendo bred a new flower to market Pikmin on GameCube!?


Latest Did You Know Gaming? blows my mind
Aug 04
// Tony Ponce
The common refrain these days is that Nintendo doesn't know how to market the Wii U. But I know the creativity is still there, waiting to be tapped. Case in point... The latest episode of Did You Know Gaming? arrives just in...
Eternal Darkness photo
Eternal Darkness

Is Eternal Darkness coming to the Wii U eShop?


Nintendo filed a new trademark mentioning "downloadable electronic game software"
Jul 29
// Tony Ponce
Precursor Games, a.k.a. the ghost of Silicon Knights, is still trying to get Shadow of the Eternals off the ground, hoping to attract Kickstarter backers with the promise of David Hayter's gravelly pipes. However you feel tow...
Spacious Anxious photo
Spacious Anxious

Spacious Anxious sounds like Metroid boss music


Concept album by sleepytimejesse samples SNES, N64, and GC games
Jul 29
// Tony Ponce
Musician sleepytimejesse has graced the Dtoid front page before. Last year, he directed I Miss You - EarthBound 2012, in which various artists used the sound library from EarthBound to produce an entirely new score. He later ...
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This is the ultimate collection of Zelda strategy guides


And it all comes in a treasure chest!
Jul 17
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Well look at what just popped up over on Amazon! The Legend of Zelda Box Set is a collection of Prima strategy guides that includes six hardcover books for Ocarina of Time 3D, Spirit Tracks, Phantom Hourglass, The Wind Waker,...
GameCube on Wii U photo
GameCube on Wii U

Neat adapter allows GameCube controller use on the Wii U


Bust out your WaveBirds!
Jun 05
// Chris Carter
If you're a fan of the GameCube controller and lament the lack of love on the Wii U, it appears as if this adapter is your answer. It appears as if this unofficial piece of hardware will allow you to utilize compatibility opt...
Console chimera photo
Console chimera

18 different gaming consoles combined into one system


The ultimate mod
Apr 16
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Modder Bacteria spent over three years and over $1,000 to merge 18 different consoles into one giant box. It contains circuitry from 15 different systems, works with one master controller, a single power supply, and a single...

Tales producer comments on Symphonia's success, Wii U

Apr 12 // Keith Swiader
"I believe the success of Tales of Symphonia has multiple factors to it," Baba said, "the first being that it was the first Tales title that was rendered in 3D polygons, so we believe that was a huge component to its success. Another huge component was that we had a lot of support from Nintendo, so that allowed us to reach out to a broader audience that we weren't able to reach before." Baba added that external forces were not the entire reason for Symphonia's success; he said Symphonia was also a "solid title with a solid story." Learning that Nintendo provided immense support to the release of Tales of Symphonia -- with a follow-up released on the Wii -- I inquired what Baba's thoughts were on the Wii U, and if past Nintendo experiences would translate to a potential Wii U Tales game. "Our main target audience for the Tales franchise is still ultimately Japan, so when we make a game we want to target our main fanbase," he said, adding that, after doing extensive research in Japan, the team found that their audience is centered around the PlayStation 3. As a result, the team's focus remains there. "So we like the idea of the Wii U -- we think it's a great system -- and if it becomes more and more successful in the future that's a console we would like to tap eventually, but for the time being we don't have any plans and we are focused on maintaining our fanbase on PlayStation 3," Baba said. "It's not really about our opinions on whether or not it's a good system; ultimately it becomes a question of, 'What consoles do our fans have?'" Tales of Xillia will release on PlayStation 3 August 6, and has a snazzy Collector's Edition to boot.
Tales series success photo
Why Tales of Symphonia resonated with the West, and potential Wii U support
During Namco Bandai Games' Manhattan press conference last week, where they showed off the likes of Armored Core: Verdict Day and Dark Souls II, I had the chance to sit at a round-table with Tales series producer Hideo Baba. ...

Gamecube  photo
Gamecube

F-Zero GX for GameCube has the arcade version in it too


Hackers just found out about it
Mar 07
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Remember F-Zero GX for the GameCube? Fun game, and as it turns out, it's been hiding the arcade version in it this whole time. F-Zero AX was developed at the same time as GX, and both versions are essentially the same. Arcad...

Destructoid's dream list of Wii U remakes

Jan 24 // Tony Ponce
Viewtiful Joe 1 & 2 Watching the latest trailer for The Wonderful 101, I get a sudden urge to replay director Hideki Kamiya's original tokusatsu game, Viewtiful Joe. Ever since Clover Studio was shuttered, Capcom has let this marvelous property go to waste, trotting Joe out only for crossover fighters. It's time to bring the "henshin" hero back with an HD compilation of the two mainline titles! Viewtiful Joe was every bit as stylish as its titular star, rocking that cel-shading like the world was ending. As two of the most visually striking games on the GameCube, an HD overhaul would only make them look more amazing, with thick bold lines and nary a sharp polygonal corner. I also see a great opportunity for Capcom to tweak the games for the GamePad in order to incorporate touch abilities from the DS installment, Viewtiful Joe: Double Trouble! In that game, Joe could split the screen in half by drawing a line, swap the top and bottom screens, and manipulate objects in the environment. It might sound a bit gimmicky, but I strongly believe that there is potential for some clever puzzles and gameplay across two screens. But perhaps that's leaning too far into sequel territory. I really just want a Viewtiful Joe 1 & 2 combo pack so that maybe Capcom will wake up and complete the trilogy. Killer7 Killer7 is one of the most celebrated games to come out of Japan, but it can be a bit polarizing for some, particularly with the control scheme. That wouldn't be an issue with the Wii U, however, with the ability to customize multiple control options and tweak them into perfection. Think about it -- changing personas on the GamePad? Viewing all the pertinent information you need without having to pause the game? Those who wish to use IR controls would also have the Wii Remote at the ready thanks to the Wii U's diverse control options. Visually, although the original is still relevant, a nice HD sheen will do wonders in bringing Killer7 to a new generation. Now is a great time to strike while the iron is hot, as Suda has enjoyed immense success since No More Heroes. Suda, I hope you're listening! Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem You'd be hard-pressed to find a videogame mindfuck as crazy as Eternal Darkness. I mean, it can be done, especially if you dig deep into the PC's recesses of adventure titles, but there was something special about playing Eternal Darkness on a Nintendo console that made it delightfully macabre. Think of the possibilities with the Wii U GamePad! The insanity effects when your character's sanity bar drops too low, a staple of Eternal Darkness, could be even more absurd as the game plays tricks on your GamePad and TV in tandem. Given the large number of items and weapons, on-screen equipment capabilities also have the potential to improve combat. The only real Achilles' heel of the original was the graphical limitations of the GameCube and Silicon Knight's development tools, both of which are rectified on the HD Wii U. Chibi-Robo! Plug into Adventure! When this game was first released, videogames about "relationships" and "achievements" were a rarity. These days, they're all anyone can talk about. Chibi-Robo! did all that first, and in this writer's humble opinion, it did it all best. What appears on the surface to be a simple game about a tiny robot making his way through a suburban home quickly evolves into an adventure into family dysfunction. The husband is out of work and obsessed with escapism through watching TV and collecting toys. The wife feels lost and alone, with only little Chibi-Robo to confide in. The daughter thinks they're all awful and spends most of her life pretending to be a frog. Only Chibi-Robo can save them from divorce and despair. You also get to play a game of Tamagotchi. Think of how amazing that would be in HD! This under-appreciated masterpiece deserves a second chance, in high definition or otherwise. Cubivore: Survival of the Fittest Hey, you know that Tokyo Jungle game that's so trendy right now? Back in the day, there was a game just like that, but with added heaven, poops, rainbows, and cubes. That game was called Cubivore. Can you imagine seeing them cube-faced dicks in HD for the first time with no jaggies? Mega Man Network Transmission This game is awesome in theory, but pretty messy in practice. What better time to clean up by changing the character run speed and tweaking the enemy damage threshold / power than during Mega Man's 25th birthday? For those who haven't played it, Mega Man Network Transmission is a 2D platformer that features a Battle Network-style remix of multiple characters and bosses from the classic Mega Man series. It feels like two or three old-school Mega Man games in one, with the addition of polygon-based graphics and Zero from the Mega Man X series thrown in for good measure. It's a shame that more fans of the series haven't played this one. It would be hard to imagine an HD remix of this obscure title selling well at retail, but throw that thing down on the Wii U eShop for $10, and the game could finally find the audience that it always deserved. Odama This quirky combination of pinball and battlefield tactics was one of the last titles published for the GameCube, and it remains one of my favorite titles from that platform. As Yamanouchi Kagetora, a young general in feudal Japan, the player leads a small force of men against a massive army using their secret weapon, a huge stone ball called the Odama. A great combination of action and strategy, the player has to issue commands to their troops (by voice -- Odama made use of the GameCube microphone peripheral) while simultaneously directing the Odama by way of flippers and tilting the landscape. A remake of Odama on Wii U could be extraordinary. For starters, there's no longer need of any peripheral devices to play, as the GamePad's built-in microphone addresses the need to issue voice commands. Likewise, tilt controls could be managed with the GamePad's accelerometers rather than buttons, and I expect that such action would feel quite satisfying with that broad controller in hand. Of course it will never, ever happen. Smashing together two niche gameplay genres seems like a good way to make a game with an even more limited audience, and Odama did not fare well either critically or commercially upon release. Still, if we're dreaming, I'd love to see another stab taken at this unique game. The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures When the Wii U was first revealed, one of the first games that came to mind was The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures. For the fortunate few who could muster all of the necessary hardware to play a four-player game, this was one of the most hectic cooperative-competitive hybrid experiences of its time. The GamePad seemed like it was built for Four Swords Adventures, with action moving between the main screen for outdoor environments and individual screens for indoor areas. That's not even mentioning that the hand-drawn Wind Waker-esque sprites would look incredible in HD. Sadly, when Nintendo announced that support for four GamePads wouldn't be included in the Wii U's capabilities, the dream of having more people with access to such a unique style of gameplay was dashed. With online capability, it's still technically plausible, although a lot of the charm would be lost without the ability to have four players smashing pots and throwing each other into pits all on the same screen. Star Fox Adventures Despite all of the flak that it gets for its departure from on-rails shooting, Star Fox Adventures was actually a pretty great action-adventure game. As Rare's last game for a non-handheld Nintendo system, both its mechanics and its world were expertly crafted. Remade on the Wii U, the aptly, if not unimaginatively, named Dinosaur Planet and all of its scaly inhabitants could look fantastic. The GamePad wouldn't have to do much more than display a map or function as Fox's inventory screen, and it would be a streamlined experience. However, in the spirit of a true remake, Star Fox Adventures could be revamped to include more uses for Fox's sidekick Tricky, promoting him from a useful tool to a fully controllable cooperative partner. With the GamePad screen, Tricky could explore areas independently, aiding Fox in more meaningful ways. P.N.03 Combat is often described as a dance, and few games epitomize that rhythmic struggle more so than P.N.03. Vanessa Z. Schneider is a graceful heroine, one who responds to the ebb and flow of combat with acrobatic leaps and stylish moves, dodging and hurtling over gunfire with the elegance of a figure skater. It's just too bad that she handles more like Jill Valentine than Michelle Kwan. Tank-like controls, a holdover from Shinji Mikami's work on the Resident Evil games, make for a steep learning curve. However, it's mastering P.N.03's systems and working within its constraints that makes the game such an enjoyable experience (and the pulsing techno and synth-rock soundtrack doesn't hurt either). I wouldn't mess this stylish arcade shooter's addictive formula for the world. Save, perhaps, for a fresh lick of paint and change of venue. Vanessa would look mighty pretty in high-definition on the Wii U. Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles is my second favorite game on the GameCube, falling right behind the near-perfect Resident Evil 4. It was infinitely more charming than I had expected it to be. The art direction is among the best the series has seen, and I think, even in its original form, the game still holds up today. The stylized, impressive visuals are ripe for an HD remake and wouldn't expose any unsightly seams. A lot of the game's personality also comes from Kumi Tanioka's brilliant score, which is earthy, ancient, and incredibly unique. Still, while I got an uncommon kick out of playing the game solo, cooperative play is where it's at. Crystal Chronicles featured up to four player co-op and used the Game Boy Advance link cables so each player could access their own menus and deal with typical RPG fare without a convoluted system that burdens everyone else. The Wii U essentially offers a more advanced, standardized version of the Game Boy Advance-to-GameCube connection, making the parallel a no-brainer. Allowing for both local and online play also mitigates the hurdle of getting four people together in a room, though I feel the journey might lose a little luster without that inimitable, personal couch co-op feel. I've been disappointingly unimpressed by what I've played of follow-up entries in the Crystal Chronicles series, so going back to where they got everything right would be a nice way of introducing a more accessible version of the series to a new set of fans ready to caravan across the lands.
Wii U remakes photo
These GameCube titles deserve an upgrade!
Oh Nintendo. Now you've done it. In announcing The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker Reborn, a hi-res upgrade of the classic GameCube adventure, Nintendo has set a precedent for Wii U remakes. The gloves are off and everything ...

Watch five classic Nintendo system launch clips

Nov 17 // Allistair Pinsof
1. Super Mario Bros. 3 Launch, February 1990 [embed]238853:45822:0[/embed] Look at those mustaches! Yup, it's the early '90s. TV news media still awkwardly reports on game launches, treating those that stand in line as deviants, but not to the degree media did in the '90s. It's as if the newreporter wants to say, "What the hell is wrong with you!?" The part when the little kid nerd rages on the newsreporter makes it all worth it: "You don't know! You're a grown-up! You hardly do this!" the kid yells. Hell yeah, kid! You tell him! 2. Parents Upset Over New Nintendo Console, August 1991 [embed]238853:45823:0[/embed] Instead of standing in line for the Super Nintendo, these kids are stuck in a room with a hack therapist because they are too "Nintenpendent". This is one of the most laughably sensationalized displays of news media exaggerating the effect games have on kids. The news station uses the launch of the Super Nintendo as a way of scaring its audience of the perils of videogames. Keep an eye out for the stunning green screen effects that put the newsreporter into F-Zero. 3. ITV News reporting on Nintendo 64 release, September 1996 [embed]238853:45824:0[/embed] The Nintendo 64's early years was my favorite time with a Nintendo system. I remember bringing it home and being blown away by all them friggin' bits. This news clip on the system's launch is pretty dry but worth watching for seeing some old talking heads. It's always amusing to hear a game journalist from 1996 saying, "These are the graphics we always hoped we'd be able to see." But, seriously, some one tell those kids to not sit so close to the TV. I mean, c'mon. That's like basic parenting, right there. 4. Japanese launch of the GameCube, September 2001 [video link] Billy "Louie the Cat" Berghammer has been in the industry for longer than most journalists. I love the guy! Here's Billy at the Japan Gamecube launch, showing the event from a Westerner's perspective. The launch took place just two days after the Sept. 11 attack in the US, which explains the somber opening of the video. Either Billy visited the wrong store or the GameCube had a really sad launch in Japan, going by the video. Watch the following videos in the series for more. 5. Toys R Us Wii line, November 2006 [embed]238853:45825:0[/embed] Back in 2006, before Destructoid was sent multiple early pre-launch console for review, we did stupid stuff like stand in line with people during a system launch. Here's a buried Dtoid video of us hanging out at Toys R' Us for the Wii launch. You know, just because. I have a feeling the Wii U launch won't be quite as intense as the Wii's but who knows until it happens. Be safe out there, people! Keep your Wii U close and your riot shield closer. [image]
Nintendo Nostalgia photo
From NES to Wii U
Today, Nintendo launches the first next-gen system or last current-gen system, depending how you look at it. Things always appear different in retrospect, which is perfectly illustrated in these bizarre, ancient clips of Nint...

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Mario goes electro with a Mario RPG mini remix album


Goombette by Doni released through GameChops
Nov 14
// Tony Ponce
Whoa, now! We've got a live one! Let me introduce you to Doni, a Canadian electronica producer who has given his own spin to several game soundtracks, from Streets of Rage 2 to Katamari Damacy. Do visit his site to check out ...
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Dad alters text in Wind Waker to turn Link into a girl


He wants his daughter to understand that girls can be heroes too
Nov 10
// Tony Ponce
Mike Hoye loves playing videogames and sharing his pastime with his three-year-old daughter Maya. Their game of choice is The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, and Mike likes to read the text aloud so Maya can follow along. Bu...
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Jump on Zelda: Twilight Symphony while you can


1,500 more units are already half-way gone!
Nov 04
// Jayson Napolitano
[Update: Above is a 45-minute album preview that the ZREO team has just made available.]We posted a few days ago that 500 gorgeous units of The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Symphony were being made available for pre-order, but ...

100% Series Retrospective: Resident Evil

Oct 02 // Chris Carter
Resident Evil - PlayStation [Owned], PC, Saturn, PSN [Owned] COMPLETED Resident Evil is where it all started. Gaming legend Shinji Mikami created a game that was not only an homage to Sweet Home, but also a great survival horror companion to Alone in the Dark. Unlike most games at the time, you simply didn't know what to expect next -- literally anything could jump out and try and bite your head off. Moments like the first time you experienced zombie dogs jumping through a window, or the famous first-person Hunter scene are burned into my memory. Despite the low-budget voice acting (which only added a campy, enjoyable Evil Dead feel to it), Resident Evil is a pure classic, even today.  Resident Evil 2 - PlayStation, PC, Nintendo 64, Dreamcast, GameCube, PSN [Owned] COMPLETED Resident Evil 2 took the first iteration's mansion setting, and turned it to 11. It wasn't just "The Mansion" anymore -- your playground was an entire city. Somehow, someway, Resident Evil 2 filled this city with secrets, story, and tons of character. Costume changes and hidden modes became more of a big deal, and started shaping up Resident Evil's trademark of packing in tons of content. The unique "two-disc" approach, in which the game was basically two games, was also rarely done at the time, and was a testament to the sheer undertaking that this year-and-nine-month project really was. The dynamic "Zapping System" mechanic that changed your story was pretty much unheard of at the time, and still is today. While I don't think Resident Evil 2 was as fun as the original, one thing's for sure: it's one of the most technically impressive games of all time.  Resident Evil 3 - PlayStation, PC, Dreamcast, GameCube, PSN [Owned] COMPLETED "3" was unique in that it had a big bad boss enemy stalk you the entire game -- basically right from the very beginning. It also introduced a mechanic that I was extremely grateful for, and rarely re-used: dodging. After the main game was completed, you could access the first true Mercenaries mode, entitled "Operation: Mad Jackal." RE3's variation was much more fleshed out than the prior installments' "Survivor" or "Battle Game" gametypes. Quite honestly, Mad Jackal set me up for my rabid love of the Mercenaries gametype. In fact, for a few titles, I would play Mercenaries for considerably longer than the actual core game -- Resident Evil 3 was one such example.  Resident Evil Survivor - PlayStation [Owned], PC COMPLETED My recollection of Survivor is vague at best: I remember renting it with my little brother, and beating it in an afternoon. The only specific thing I really remember about it is that it's basically Doom in Resident Evil form, and you literally cannot save the game, ever. While you're able to keep any weapons and items after death, you have to restart from the beginning if you die: considering is is around 1-3 hours, that might suck. EXTENDED THOUGHTS: Survivor is what it is. It's not a terrible "lightgun game," but it isn't great, either. One of the biggest punches in the face is the fact that it feels like a straight arcade port (even though it's not) given the fact that there are no continue points. It's hard to recommend for that reason alone, but if you're a Resident Evil fanatic, you may as well track this one down.  Resident Evil Code: Veronica - Dreamcast, PlayStation 2 [Owned], GameCube, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [Owned] COMPLETED Code Veronica was formerly my favorite game in the series, before REmake and RE5 came along. It was the first game to offer semi-fixed angles for the camera, instead of pre-rendered backgrounds, which was partly due to the upgrade in hardware to the PlayStation 2. It also offered a first-person view for a few weapons, and an amalgamation of various Resident Evil games, such as the 180-degree turn, upgradeable weapons, and explosive scenery. Simply put, it was just a clean, fun Resident Evil game. In the PS2 version, there were a few ham-fisted action scenes involving Wesker, but they were good fun too and helped add to the game's enjoyment. In addition to the normal game (Code: Veronica X), I completed battle mode with every character.  Resident Evil Gaiden - Game Boy Color [Owned] COMPLETED Gaiden ("side-story" in Japanese), is probably the only "bad" Resident Evil game in the entire franchise. While a few others were extremely average, Gaiden is borderline unplayable. Strangely enough, it's a top down/rhythm game hybrid -- the results are disastrous, and not even Leon and Barry can save this one. Combat is done in a turn-based game style, where contact with an enemy initiates a mini-game similar to the "field goal kick" bar from the popular Madden NFL series. To be blunt, combat just wasn't scary, and it wasn't much fun either. Resident Evil REmake - GameCube, Wii [Owned] COMPLETED RE1's GameCube REmake is possibly the best remake of all time, for any series. Capcom pulled out all the stops for this one, when they could have easily just re-released the game à la the RE GameCube collection. The graphics are updated, the voice acting is improved, and the game is overhauled so much that fans will barely recognize some parts of it (among a few new areas). The REmake offers up classic RE1 gameplay with a brand new veneer -- personally, while it's not my favorite, I think it's technically the best game in the series.  Resident Evil Zero - GameCube [Owned], Wii [Owned] COMPLETED Resident Evil Zero is one of the only games I haven't completed in the series before this Quest. While I had a GameCube, I was too busy playing other stuff at the time (including the GameCube's REmake), and just missed this one. I've heard mixed reactions -- both that it doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things, and that it's a solid entry to the franchise. Either way, I'm excited to jump into one this year with the Wii re-release. EXTENDED THOUGHTS: I'm not a huge fan of Zero, but that's mostly due to the two title characters involved. As the main series precursor to RE, I think Zero falls short in many respects. I didn't really feel connected to Rebecca or Billy nearly as much as I did with any previous character in the series, and considering they hardly ever make a re-appearance, I can only assume many people felt the same. I applaud Capcom for bringing us back to the Spencer Mansion and giving us a bit of insight into the mystery there, but honestly, REmake did all of this and more (I can't say enough good things about that game).  Resident Evil: Dead Aim - PlayStation 2 [Owned] COMPLETED Dead Aim is easily the best light-gun game in the series, especially for its time. Movement was shown in a third-person view like standard Resident Evil games, but it switched to first-person for shooting purposes. This basically created a hybrid shooting/adventure game that at least allowed you to pick your fights during most instances, instead of being forced to battle every single enemy on-rails. Why Capcom didn't follow this formula further, I'll never know, as it made for a really interesting game. It also offered up a few new characters that, while forgettable, show Capcom was at least trying something different instead of putting Leon and Chris into a game for the hundredth time.  Resident Evil Outbreak - PlayStation 2 [Owned] COMPLETED Outbreak was a fan's dream: for the first time, Resident Evil was truly multiplayer! You could cooperate or betray your teammates, just like a real zombie apocalypse. There were plenty of "How could you leave me behind!" and "It was both of us or one of us!" moments, and this made for a unique experience that hasn't really been matched yet, even with Left 4 Dead. Outbreak served up classic hopeless Resident Evil tension with heated multiplayer gameplay, and it's a shame so many people missed out on it (mostly due to the haphazard marketing of the PS2's HDD and Internet accessory).  Resident Evil Outbreak File #2 - PlayStation 2 [Owned] COMPLETED Strangely enough, Outbreak 2 was the first Resident Evil game to allow people to move and shoot. Since it wasn't as popular in America, however, no one really talks about it. Part of the reason for the lack of popularity was the fact that it was basically a carbon-copy of Outbreak 1, with a few different scenarios. The game added an extra communication system that allowed people to talk to one another despite the region, and a few other small additions, but it wasn't really enough to show up on most people's radars. Personally, I wasn't upset with more of the same, as I enjoyed the original Outbreak.  Resident Evil 4 - GameCube, PlayStation 2 [Owned], PC, Wii [Owned]*, iPhone [Owned], iPad, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [Owned] COMPLETED Many fans are upset at Resident Evil 4 for spearheading the series into an action-oriented direction. Personally, I see it as a natural evolution of the series. The behind-the-back camera and aiming mechanics are a much better alternative than anything previously offered, and the enemy variety lends itself well to the new direction. For whatever reason, people never seem to fault Resident Evil 4 for a more action-centric focus, instead choosing Resident Evil 5 as the sacrificial lamb. Personally, I never saw it: I was already ready for action ever since Code Veronica X. The Mercenaries mode also takes a further step forward, and offers up even more additional content than ever before -- most notably the ability to select multiple stages, and the inability to actually complete it. Resident Evil 4 was also insanely popular, and helped revitalize the series.  Resident Evil: Deadly Silence - DS [Owned] COMPLETED Deadly Silence. DS. Get it?! One of the cool things about this version of Resident Evil is that the top screen of the DS is used as a map, and a health indicator at all times. Additionally, the game is pretty much a spot-on port of the PS1 game, voice acting and all, which is pretty impressive given the DS' general lack of horsepower. It also has a multiplayer mode; it's kind of weak, given that you and your friends never actually see each other in different parts of the mansion, but it's a free addition nonetheless. To differentiate this playthrough from my original RE run, I'm playing the "REbirth mode," which adds a ton of unique first-person action scenes, and DS-centric additions/re-arrangements. Even though the game is basically a port, touch screen-specific puzzles and changes are enough to justify another playthrough here. All in all, Deadly Silence is about what you'd expect out of an above average portable port, and a solid addition to any RE fan's collection.  Resident Evil: The Umbrella Chronicles - Wii [Owned], PlayStation 3 COMPLETED Umbrella Chronicles is an on-rails shooter for the Wii. That's about all I can say about it, honestly, before I head into this one. It doesn't take a whole lot of effort or time to complete it, and cooperative gameplay is kind of shoe-horned in. Thankfully, it has a decent amount of unlockable content. While I have played Umbrella Chronicles, I haven't tackled it as much as Darkside Chronicles, so I'll be sure and post extended thoughts below. EXTENDED THOUGHTS: If you like light-gun games, be sure and check this one out. It offers pretty standard, enjoyable light-gun arcade-y fun over the backdrop of a few past Resident Evil titles. Umbrella Chronicles is a good way to get a refresher for Resident Evil Zero, Resident Evil 1, and Resident Evil 3. Although, despite how fun it can be, I'd highly recommend playing it with a partner, as it enhances the enjoyment tenfold. Resident Evil 5 - Xbox 360 [Owned], PlayStation 3 [Owned], PC COMPLETED I make it no secret that Resident Evil 5 is my favorite game of all time (emphasis on personal favorite). The day I got it at midnight, I took off work the next day, and beat it sometime in the morning. The next day, my wife and I started a co-op campaign that would last about a week -- after that, I grinded through another playthrough to get some cash for extra weapons; I just couldn't get enough. To put it simply, I think RE5 is the most fun game in the entire series. There's a hefty campaign, tons of extra content, co-op, and for the first time, there's co-op Mercenaries -- what more could you want? I literally played RE5 for months on end, and ate up all the DLC possible. I can't say enough good things about this game. For my 2012 playthrough, I'm either going to tackle the PlayStation Move version of the game, or replay it with my wife. Resident Evil: The Darkside Chronicles - Wii [Owned], PlayStation 3 COMPLETED Darkside Chronicles is a considerable improvement upon Umbrella Chronicles. There's a new evade move and it offers a dynamic difficulty setting, along with an improved co-op mode. Like the other light-gun titles in the series, Darkside Chronicles is basically a love-it-or-hate-it kind of game. It doesn't really offer a whole lot more than most other on-rail shooters. If you're a Resident Evil fan, however, you may want to put up with it just for the extra story bits. EXTENDED THOUGHTS: Out of the two light-gun Wii titles, Darkside Chronicles is the better game; especially for two players. The developers make a much better effort to accommodate co-op play, and the new mechanics make gameplay smoother. You also get crucial backstory on Leon and Krauser, which helps make Resident Evil 4's Krauser encounters that much more enjoyable. If you have to choose one of the two Wii light-gun games, make it Darkside -- but getting both isn't a bad idea.  Resident Evil: Deck Building Game - [Owned] COMPLETED If you haven't played a deck-building game before, the concept is pretty simple. There are a bunch of stacks of static cards in the center of the play area. You have one giant deck, of which you draw five cards at a time from. With those five cards, you can perform a number of actions depending on what you randomly drew -- you can buy cards from the middle or perform actions to either draw more cards or modify your deck. Resident Evil's deck-building variant adds another new concept: fighting infected. On any given turn, you're allowed one buy, one action, and one "exploration" that allows you to take a door card and explore the Spencer Mansion. In the mansion you can find items or battle infected for trophies -- depending on the gametype, the player with the most trophies (kills) wins. I've played a number of deck-building games before such as Dominion, but Resident Evil is one of my favorites. Each player gets assigned a unique character that changes your abilities, which helps add to the characterization and uniqueness of the game. Also, it's a delight to take down the Nemesis with a bunch of knife cards as Krauser. Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D - 3DS [Owned] COMPLETED Mercenaries 3D is a very niche title. If you love the Mercenaries mini-games from other titles, you may like Mercs 3D. If you loathe them -- well, that's kind of the entire game here. Mercs 3D made waves in the gaming community at release due to the inability to delete saves, and its incredibly short length (it can be beaten in a few hours). It also had a few other problems like the short draw distance, among other graphical glitches. Personally, I thought the game was acceptable, and played it for quite a while before putting it down. While it may seem like a cash grab at first, there are a decent amount of scenarios included, and Mercs fanatics will be sure to come back to it occasionally.  Resident Evil: Revelations - 3DS [Owned] COMPLETED Did the mysteriously abandoned Resident Evil PSP game end up as Revelations? Does it really matter at this point? Early previews are calling this "one of the best Resident Evils in a long time, and possibly the best Resident Evil ever." The demo is great, the visuals are great, and there's really no reason to doubt this entry, despite the fact that it's on a portable. I plan on getting this game day one and ripping through it in a few days. I'll be sure and post my thoughts after completion. EXTENDED THOUGHTS: After playing the final release, I felt like the demo was a bait and switch of sorts. The fact of the matter is, without going into spoiler territory, at least half of the game is not the tight-knit claustrophobic experience the demo made it out to be. A lot of Revelations is spent with an AI partner clunking around, or in open areas fighting non-stop enemies in a full-out actionfest -- the switch between the Cruise Ship sections and everywhere else is jarring, and the story isn't the greatest to boot. Thankfully, the game looked great, controlled great, and Raid Mode is pretty fun solo or with a friend. I hope that Capcom puts this new engine to good use, and expands upon a lot of concepts with Revelations. It's not one of my favorite Resident Evil games for sure, but it's not bad, either.  Resident Evil Game Boy Color - Game Boy Color ROM [Owned] COMPLETED This previously unreleased title has finally been given to the public by an anonymous source. While it evidently isn't possible to beat the game in its current state, I'll still attempt to complete as much as possible. Up until 2012, no one has had a chance to play this missing piece of history, so I'm pretty excited to see what we've been missing all these years. EXTENDED THOUGHTS: Considering Resident Evil GBC is only available as a free ROM, you aren't really risking anything financially to try it. There isn't a whole lot to say about this one that can't really be said by looking at the screenshot above. It's a very simplistic version of Resident Evil, distilled into a tiny cartridge-size package. The ROM isn't complete, but at least you can get a taste of this lost game. While it isn't ideal, I would have salivated at the prospect of a portable Resident Evil game for car trips as a child.  Resident Evil: Operation Raccoon City - Xbox 360 [Owned], PlayStation 3, PC COMPLETED I honestly have no idea what to expect from Raccoon City. I'm not the biggest fan of Slant Six, and I'm not too keen on the possible idea of shooting down Resident Evil's heroes and heroines. Additionally, based on rumors, the game may not have a split-screen mode, which would hinder my ability to play with my wife. Regardless, I'll be picking up Raccoon City this year on my 360, and I'm eager to see what it can offer to the series. EXTENDED THOUGHTS: Raccoon City is a disappointment. While fun, the game has a heap of issues, from online stability, to numerous gamebreaking glitches. Players have been known to fall through the floor, turn into ghosts, and all sorts of other mishaps. It's a shame, because for Resident Evil fans, the game is a fun little romp through the events of Resident Evil 2 and 3. You get to see pretty much every major monster from the series (Nemesis included!), and some familiar faces like Birkin, Leon, and Hunk. If done correctly -- and possibly as canon -- this could have been a really worthwhile entry into the franchise. As it stands, it's a hard recommendation  Resident Evil 6 - Xbox 360 [Owned], PlayStation 3, PC COMPLETED I could not be more excited for Resident Evil 6. From the rumors offered so far, it looks to have a full Mercenaries mode with multiplayer, story mode co-op, and a single-player campaign without an AI partner. In short, it apparently offers more content than RE5. I'm excited for the new setting, and hopefully the story will be interesting this time around without Wesker (presumably, provided he isn't cloned). Although the series is decidedly more action-oriented, there are also rumors of more claustrophobic areas and slower-moving zombies having a part in RE6 -- if they can do it right, I say bring it on. EXTENDED THOUGHTS: Despite my initial excitement, over time, I came into Resident Evil 6 expecting to be disappointed. I had heard so many bad things from my friends and colleagues who have played it at various events like E3 and TGS. I had personally bought Dragon's Dogma primarily for early access to the Resident Evil 6 demo, and came away fairly unimpressed. I played the Resident Evil 5 demo for hours on end (over twenty hours in fact) -- with the Resident Evil 6 demo, I literally played it once and deleted it. So with all this in mind, I came into Resident Evil 6 very skeptical, and left mostly impressed. Mostly. Spreading apart all three (four, if you count Ada) stories was a ballsy move. With Resident Evil 5, it was enjoyable to play as Chris and Sheva the entire game, as the story wasn't all over the place, and you were grounded in both characters, which made it easy to learn their nuances and melee abilities. With Resident Evil 6, you're jumping all over the place at times, and it can be jarring. Not only does every character handle differently, but everyone has a different UI to boot. Given the mostly fast-paced action the game spews at you constantly, design choices like the inability to pause the game in co-op just feel weird, as do QTEs that only involve one player, wrapped up in such unexciting things as starting a car. Still, I found myself enjoying the game the more I played it. (I'm talking ten hours of learning the nuances of combat). I'll fully admit, Mercenaries -- which you all know I'm a giant fan of -- really helped me grasp said nuances much quicker than the campaign, and bolstered my enjoyment tenfold. As you can see in this video, combat is more than meets the eye in Resident Evil 6. There's sliding, counters, quick-shotting, and contextual melee moves. It's like a complex fighting game in a sense, but integrated into one of my favorite franchises of all time. Naturally, since it's done well, I'm enjoying myself. RE6 also has a ton of content provided that you're ready to embrace the action-oriented gameplay (which has been a staple since RE4). There's an Ada campaign, a handful of online modes, a meta-game involving skill XP in both the campaign and Mercenaries, tons of unlocks and some costumes for Mercs, and more. Like RE5, there's enough here to keep you playing well into 2013. While it isn't one of my favorite games in the franchise by far, I think it's a fairly solid action game (what immediately comes to mind is my opinion of Skyward Sword: great action-RPG, alright Zelda game). Just like RE5, your mileage will vary depending on how fun your co-op partner is -- just know, however, that the co-op AI is not nearly as frustrating as Sheva was. Collection Photo:  Final thoughts: The Resident Evil series has certainly had its ups and downs. From its horror roots to a metamorphosis of action to the chagrin of many fans, everyone has to admit that the franchise is interesting, if nothing else. As a whole, I found myself not enjoying this Quest nearly as much as the other ones, and I can't really put my finger on why, as I still like the series overall. While I was truly eager to rip into Tony Hawk, Kingdom Hearts, and Zelda almost immediately, I took a long break in between some of the games here, as I found it fairly tough to continue on. Perhaps it's because of the slow-moving nature of many of the earlier games, and when played in rapid succession, it can get a bit grating? I don't know for sure. Thankfully, the multiplayer iterations kept me going, as it was a blast to, well, blast away the undead with my wife or with a friend.    
100% Resident Evil photo
Carter's Quest
[Read on for a description of every Resident Evil game ever released in the US, and my completion of them all in 2012.] Why Resident Evil? This year, Capcom is pushing out three entirely new Resident Evil games -- it's also t...

Getting It Right: Resident Evil

Sep 24 // Allistair Pinsof
Resident Evil [2002] (GameCube, Wii)Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomReleased: April 30, 2002 In a nutshell: In 2002, Capcom did what no developer would dare do in 2012: made a faithful recreation of a six-year-old game with a cult following. This remake added new areas, enemies, endings, and improved controls, but the biggest upgrade was in the visuals, which added the horror back into the game's large, foreboding mansion. Though we still use the label "survival horror," the emphasis has been taken off "survival" since the release of this gem. A large, interconnected world Like any great horror movie, there is an ebb and flow to the horrors of Resident Evil, and it's all dictated by the game's brilliantly crafted setting. Some would love to have a mansion, but the thought of all that empty space and dark corners scares me away from the idea. Resident Evil is a game about this feeling -- the unnerving fear of the unknown and the comfort of familiarity. At the start, the Spencer Mansion is a foreboding place where every door is an invitation to evil and dismemberment. Soon, you start to map out the first floor. Next, you find brief sanctuary in the save rooms. By the time you clear out the halls, the house begins to feel like a home, and your heartbeat relaxes. The game teases you with locked doors -- even worse, mysteriously jammed doors! Unlocking them to discover a shortcut to a previous area is as satisfying as taking down one of the game's bosses. Never knowing what's around the corner As a culture, we live in fear of spoilers. A great surprise is as close to a holy moment as us geeks get, and there will be hell to pay if someone takes that away from us! Lucky for you, Resident Evil is a game full of surprises, though they aren't very nice ones. It never highlights what's around the corner or gives the false security of a checkpoint, so you'll be constantly praying that the next room is a puzzle and not a boss encounter. As you travel further into the game, old areas start revealing hidden items, cleared rooms start offering new enemies, and old bosses rear their head again. You'll be wishing you didn't leave that ammo box on the ground in that one room that you can't remember where the hell it is and OH GOD A GIANT SNAKE FUUUuuu ... It goes without saying that surprise is essential to a good horror game. Just look at Silent Hill: Shattered Memories to see how limp a horror game can become when it advertises its next move. Resident Evil asks the player to blindly trust the game; that if the player tries their best, they will survive. But some players will soon realize that their best isn't good enough. Just like in Dark Souls and Spelunky, making it to areas that you know others could never reach makes the journey all the sweeter. Finding comfort in a familiar place Resident Evil is a grueling game that isn’t shy about playing with expectations. Dogs provide literal jump scares, new enemies invade old areas, and there is a price to pay for every zombie you don't fully dispose of. Along with the horror of feeling locked outside areas and trapped within others, there is a simple joy to playing virtual cartographer. For those God of War and Super Metroid players who feel giddy after fully exploring an area, Resident Evil will make them pee their pants -- assuming they don't shit themselves first. Finding solace in the save rooms and main hallway is a unique feeling that I don't get from any other series. By the end of the game, you feel like you know the mansion inside and out, making you feel empowered. Or maybe that's just the grenade launcher with 18 acid rounds talking? Regardless, you feel like you've been on a wild ride as you return to familiar places and reflect on all the horrifying events that have transpired. The game allows you a moment to catch your breath before giving you another reason to let it all out in a scream, again. Alternate paths and strategies Maybe it's the fault of marketing and media exposure, but the branching paths of Heavy Rain and Mass Effect never shocked me in the way those of Resident Evil do. While it's clear that those two games were designed around the branching path concept and wanted to make the element of design clear to the player, Resident Evil is a game about psychological fear and withholding information. There are several times in the game where the player can choose drastically different options, but you'd never think you had an alternate choice unless you read about it in a FAQ. Even when you do read a guide, you'll often find yourself lost. "Wait, where is the automatic shotgun and why am I carrying this broken shotgun?" you’ll ask. Or, "Why did I never have that boss fight at the end?" In addition to these narrative splits, there are some clever alternate approaches one can take in the combat. There is the binary choice between evading and fighting with the common zombie, but things become more interesting with the boss fights that often offer a non-combat approach if you go the extra mile in your puzzle solving. On top of all this, the game has two main characters to play as that offer different dialog, weapons, and changes in the narrative. Unlike Heavy Rain and Mass Effect, by the end, I felt like I played the game the only way it could have been played rather than carving out my own version of it. Instead of wondering if I played the "best version," I was left wondering if there was even another version at all. Death means something As anyone who has played Spelunky can attest, taking away the ability to save can render even an approachable, cute platformer into a game of tense, horrific moments. And as anyone who has played the recent batch of horror games can attest, being given numerous checkpoints takes the fear out of the genre. The greatest fear for a Resident Evil player isn't zombies, but running out of ink ribbons. These ribbons are hidden throughout the game and are the only way to save progress. Since there are only 30 or so throughout the 11-hour game, and since you'll often be lucky to have more than one in your inventory, it's a constant source of tension that makes every unopened door and uncleared hallway into an unbearable threat. There is a compromise the player and developer make with such a restricted save system. Yes, it inconveniences the player, but it also heightens the fear and pleasure of the game. There is no moment more tense than going an hour without saving and being stuck with low health. But, there is no moment more satisfying than finding a save room, right when you thought you'd have to restart the entire game. For the brave and willing, the ink ribbon system will give you some of the most memorable gaming moments ever. Resident Evil was a landmark title in 1996 that ushered in mature console horror gaming. By 2002, its impact had been weakened, but Capcom addressed this with this nearly flawless remake. The lightning, detailed CG backgrounds, and high-polygon models still look fantastic and keep the game from feeling goofy in the way the original PlayStation games are now. For those who think they can handle the challenge and scares of this classic, you'll need to readjust how you approach games. Resident Evil was never the norm. Its pacing and unforgiving design limit its audience, but all of its misperceived flaws are essential to the experience. The controls aren't sluggish but intentionally slow, making intense moments more intense. The ink ribbon system and limited inventory ask players to make constant sacrifices that add weight to their actions. It's clear that Resident Evil is an abnormal, obtuse game, but everything about it adds up to one of the most unique, memorable horror games of all time. Resident Evil (1996) may have spawned the genre, RE2 may have broadened its scope, but this remake is the crown jewel of the genre. [And yes, I love RE4, but it's not survival horror.]
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Something happened between 2002 and 2003. Gamers and critics suddenly stopped praising Resident Evil as one of gaming's best series and started calling it dated, clunky, and boring. Take Resident Evil Code: Veronica. Upon ...

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