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Very Quick Tips: Civilization: Beyond Earth

Oct 23 // Darren Nakamura
General tips: When exploring uncharted territory, take movement one hex at a time. Explorers get two movement points per turn, and it is smart to keep one banked in case your unit walks into an ambush (see above). Aliens are more aggressive to those near Alien Nests, or to those who attack other aliens. Stay away from them with non-combat units (especially Colonists). If possible, place your capital on a coastal hex. Creating connections between your capital and your others cities affords a nice energy bonus. Land connections must be built by Worker units as roads, but sea connections are automatically put in place between two coastal cities. Coastal cities will also have more options for trade routes later. Consider all aspects of geography when placing a new city. Mountains and canyons are nearly worthless with respect to production, but make a city more defensible from attack. Some advanced units can traverse canyons, so they are not as effective as mountains in that regard. Buildings: Build at least one of each building, even if you don't think you need it. The mission system will often augment the ability of buildings after one has been constructed, so they can gain semi-hidden abilities. For instance, the Repair Facility (required technology: Engineering) gives a minor production bonus to land units, but can also be modified to increase orbital coverage after one is built. Early on, the Trade Depot (required technology: Pioneering) is one of the most important buildings to increase energy, science, food, and/or production output. Later, the Autoplant (required technology: Robotics) can be upgraded to increase the number of trade routes a city can hold. Fill up those trade routes early and reap huge benefits over the course of the game. On that note, the Ultrasonic Fence (required technology: Ecology) is a crucial building, because it can be upgraded so that trade units are never attacked by aliens. Build one as soon as possible specifically for this ability, and others only where necessary for its standard ability. Resources: There are six strategic resources, but only half are visible on the map in the beginning. The Chemistry technology reveals Petroleum, the Engineering technology reveals Titanium, and the Geophysics technology reveals Geothermal. Gaining some or all of these technologies before building a second city can help in making a better placement decision. The other three strategic resources, Firaxite, Floatstone, and Xenomass, are immediately visible, but respectively require the Robotics technology, the Terraforming technology, and the Alien Sciences technology in order to use them. All of the more powerful units are only available after specializing in an Affinity, so it is smart to decide early on which Affinity to follow. In general, Firaxite corresponds to the Supremacy Affinity, Floatstone corresponds to the Purity Affinity, and Xenomass corresponds to the Harmony Affinity. Use nearby resources to help make the decision. Alien Nests always appear on tiles with Xenomass, and as a corollary, Xenomass can always be found under Alien Nests. If you need access to Xenomass, then you may have to do some bug hunting. Diplomacy: You can often get away with one non-aggressive act against each other civilization by just apologizing. These acts include: completing expeditions near enemy borders, placing orbital units near enemy territory, and having a spy caught in an enemy city. The AI will often suggest ludicrous trades and offer favors in return. These favors are typically only worth about 100 energy or a strategic resource when you call them in. If another civilization gets to a choice city spot before you can settle there, it is possible to gain it without going to war. Open up a deal, put the city on the table, and ask what it would cost. The price can be high in strategic resources, but early in the game those don't matter much, so it might even be effectively cheap.  Combat: Siege Worms are formidable, but it can be worthwhile to kill one. A mission early on tasks you with killing a Siege Worm, and its rewards are fairly lucrative. If one hangs out near your cities for too long, you can kill it with ten city bombardments without risking any units. The reward for killing the first Siege Worm is not adjusted for inflation, so if you wait until you have better equipped combat units, it is not as impactful. Air units work under a modified rock-paper-scissors mechanism. Strikes are ranged attacks against ground units and must be ordered each time. Intercepts will target air units ordered to Strike within range. Sweeps act like Strikes, but instead check for any Intercepts in the area. It is always safest to begin with a Sweep before trying a Strike, but that is often a wasted action. Cities can hold up to three air units at a time. Before being upgraded, a Carrier can only hold one air unit. 
Beyond Earth guide photo
Help for going above and beyond
Civilization: Beyond Earth is fantastic, but even though it does a lot through tutorial popups, missions, and the Civilopedia to help new players, it can still be daunting. With several new systems in place, even series veter...

Review: Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth

Oct 23 // Darren Nakamura
Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth (Linux, Mac, Windows [reviewed])Developer: Firaxis GamesPublisher: 2K GamesReleased: October 24, 2014MSRP: $49.99Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit Civilization veterans will be immediately familiar with most of the systems in place here, as they mimic those in Civilization V closely. Players found cities, within which they manage production, food, energy, culture, science, and health. In the international arena, there is diplomacy, trade, exploration, espionage, and war. Everything is interconnected in some way, and success comes to those who find the proper balance of it all. The interplay between all of the different systems and resources is complex. While the series has made positive strides with tutorial popups and the exhaustive Civilopedia it is still dense and a little inaccessible for new players. Some information is difficult to find but through trial and error. It is easy to know what Civilization is about, but it takes dedication to really know Civilization. Fortunately, getting to know Civilization is inherently rewarding. Finding interesting synergies between technologies and powers makes the player feel smart. Forming plans and seeing them through to fruition is intensely satisfying, and it is largely responsible for the series' notorious addictive quality. All of that is present in Beyond Earth. [embed]281963:55814:0[/embed] The most touted new feature in Beyond Earth is the Affinity system. Previously, unique units were tied to specific factions, but here they are dependent on a faction's level in one of three Affinities: Purity, Supremacy, and Harmony. Each Affinity represents a fundamentally different philosophy for how humanity should interact with the alien world. Purity followers believe that humans are special and should change the new world to be more Earth-like. Supremacy followers believe that humans should be cybernetically augmented in order to respond to environmental hazards. Harmony followers believe that humans must biologically adapt and become more like the indigenous life in order to survive. The Affinities are level-based and the choice is always open to increase any of the three through technological advances and mission rewards. It is generally smart to specialize in one Affinity, since the more powerful units require a minimum level, but it is possible to maintain a broad approach and take a little of each. The choice between Affinities sets the trajectory for the narrative of Beyond Earth. Though it is easily ignored for any who get into this strictly for the gameplay, the story is emphasized more strongly here than any any previous title in the series. It always starts the same: Humans wrecked Earth and have to find a new place to live. Which Affinity is focused on (if any) determines which victory condition is most easily attained, and each victory ends the story in a different place than the others. Another new tweak to the systems is in the Virtues. Breaking from Civilization V's system and instead following the same philosophy behind Affinities, none of the Virtues are mutually exclusive. Each time a new Virtue is earned, players may choose to develop down one of four trees: Might (military power), Prosperity (food), Knowledge (science and culture), and Industry (energy and production). There are benefits for generalizing as well as for specializing, and no one strategy is clearly better than another. One completely new aspect of Beyond Earth is the orbital layer. Set above the normal ground-level action, there is a hex grid layer representing the position of satellites in geosynchronous orbit. These orbital units can have various effects over areas, including increasing output of affected tiles, improving combat prowess for units underneath, or attacking from relative safety with a planet-carving laser. Placing an orbital unit near another civilization is not considered an outright act of war, though most will not take kindly to it. One memory I will keep for a long time involved General Kozlov placing a tactical support satellite near my borders, so I retaliated with an orbital laser in range of three of his cities, just waiting to be fired if he should misstep. It was the sort of cold war stuff that is often absent in games like this. The technology system received a substantial overhaul in more ways than one. Naturally, the science-fiction setting demands the imagination of new technologies. Those found in Beyond Earth range from currently existent (titanium mining) to really "out there" (constructing a giant flower that allows a neural connection between all humans and the living planet), though most are based firmly in plausible ideas for future technology. The most obvious change to the technology system is that it is set up as a radial web, expanding outward from a central point. The choice is available to set up a strong base of general knowledge, to make a beeline for any of the furthest techs, or to do anything in between. Most Affinity gains occur through researching specific technologies, so the tech web is also the arena that has the greatest effect on how a given civilization approaches the new world and how it plans to seek victory. There are five victory conditions: one for each of the three Affinities, one reliant on non-Affinity technologies, and the standard "destroy all the other civilizations" victory. Purity is attached to The Promised Land victory, which seeks to settle Earthlings who stayed behind on the new planet. Supremacy is attached to the Emancipation victory, whose goal is to return to Earth and demonstrate the power of cybernetics. Harmony is attached to the Transcendence victory, which aims to meld minds with the planet itself. Contact is the Affinity-agnostic victory; it involves building a beacon to communicate with an intelligent alien race. Narratively, each victory represents its corresponding philosophy well. The three Affinities approach the world with entirely different ideas, and their stories have appropriately different endings. However, the biggest failing of Civilization: Beyond Earth is that four of the five victory conditions feel too similar to one another from a gameplay perspective. Though the narrative reasoning varies, the basic framework for The Promised Land, Emancipation, and Transcendence is as follows: Research the required technologies, level up the corresponding Affinity to 13, build a planetary wonder, then defend it for approximately 30 turns. Contact largely follows the same path but without the minimum Affinity requirement. What happens after a planetary wonder is built varies between victory conditions, but not enough to make the individual experiences feel unique. From a balance perspective, it is easy to see why Beyond Earth adheres to this formula. It ensures a similar timeline regardless of path and it gives opponents clear warning that a player is nearing the end, allowing last-ditch efforts to race for another victory or topple the leader. For a series known for having multiple paths to victory, and especially for a narrative emphasizing just how divergent the ideologies within it are to one another, it is disappointing how similar each win condition is. There is no cultural, economic, or peace victory. There are only what amount to four science victories and a military victory. That said, the journey to get to the end does have a different feel depending on which Affinity is followed. The unique units bestowed to each Affinity interact with the environment differently and the benefits afforded allow for varied play styles. Where Purity and Supremacy fight against the planet's toxic miasma, Harmony learns to harness its power. Where Supremacy and Harmony benefit from leaving alien life alone, Purity gains combat bonuses against it. Where Purity and Harmony are geographically limited, Supremacy leverages its superior engineering in order to easily spread its influence across the map. Following the orbital escalation with General Kozlov described a ways above, he eventually did attack. After beating back his forces and teasing a peace treaty out of him, I dropped several tiles worth of miasma on his cities, just as a reminder for what happens when one messes with the African Union. He was cleaning it up for years, choking on it the whole time. Classic. In a separate encounter, Hutama of the Polystralians made note of my relative military weakness and, fueled by avarice and envy, broke our neighborly trade relationship in hopes of coming out a few cities richer. Although I was outgunned, he grossly underestimated the severe tactical disadvantage the local canyons and mountains put him at, and his forces were sunk to the bottom of the ocean before they could make landfall. That all highlights one of Civilization's greatest strengths: It provides the framework for totally awesome stuff to happen and lasting memories to be formed. Beyond Earth excels in that virtue with its new additions. Aesthetically, Beyond Earth really nails it. The three different planetary biomes add visual variety, and the rich colors pop. The palette features a lot of teal, pink, and purple, which conveys the idea of an alien world well. The soundtrack is appropriately grandiose during the climaxes and subdued during the lulls. Upon a dastardly betrayal or the completion of a planetary wonder, sweeping string pieces evoke a feeling that history is being made. In all, Beyond Earth is excellent. It maintains the secret sauce that the series is known for while adding setting-appropriate systems that change the gameplay up in interesting ways. Orbital units are inherently cool and add depth to international encounters. The narrative is thoughtful and important without being too preachy. Affinities show that the team put a lot of effort into considering how differing viewpoints may tackle the challenge of founding an alien world, as well as the consequences of those actions. If only there were more variety in the structure of the victory conditions between divergent philosophies, Civilization: Beyond Earth would be a perfect game. Even with that dissonance, it is damn close. The Civilization pedigree holds a lot of weight after all these years, and Beyond Earth more than lives up to its name.
Beyond Earth review photo
"Civilization, but set in the future on an alien planet." That is really all Firaxis and 2K needed to say to get people excited for the next entry in the long-running turn-based strategy series. There is a fair amount of new ...

Civilization deals photo
Civilization deals

Civilization: Beyond Earth pre-order deal breakdown

All the deals before this Friday's release
Oct 21
// Dealzon
Deals brought to you by the crew at Dealzon. FYI: sales from certain retailers go toward supporting Destructoid. If you spot more Beyond Earth pre-order deals and pre-load info, let us know in the comments! Mission Contr...
Civ photo

Civilization V is free to play on Steam right now

Also, Civilization: Beyond Earth can be pre-loaded
Oct 20
// Steven Hansen
Civilization: Beyond Earth comes out this Friday and in anticipation, Civilization V is now free to play on Steam until October 23.  It's all right here.
Civilization Beyond Earth photo
Civilization Beyond Earth

The intro cinematic for Civilization: Beyond Earth is actually pretty touching

Showing off the narrative backdrop for leaving Earth
Oct 15
// Darren Nakamura
I have been working on a review for the upcoming sci-fi strategy game Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth, and one of the things I could not wait to talk about is the introductory cinematic. It seems silly, but for a seri...
Civilization Beyond Earth photo
Civilization Beyond Earth

Civilization: Beyond Earth trailer outlines the new features

Sci-fi strategy coming later this month
Oct 01
// Darren Nakamura
Last week I detailed a lot of the new experiences that Civilization V veterans will find in Civilization: Beyond Earth. I loved what I played of it and you can read about that if you want, but those who are more visual ...

Civilization: Beyond Earth makes weekends disappear

Sep 26 // Darren Nakamura
Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth (Linux, Mac, PC [previewed])Developer: Firaxis GamesPublisher: 2K GamesReleased: October 24, 2014MSRP: $49.99Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit Those who have played Civilization V will see a lot of similarities right off the bat. Cities need food to increase population, production to build new buildings and units, money (energy in Beyond Earth) to maintain improvements, culture to expand borders and progress virtues, and science to enhance capabilities. A colony's health rating replaces happiness, but functions similarly: Healthy civilizations produce science and culture at their full potentials while unhealthy civilization receive a penalty. All of these pieces interconnect, and building a successful civilization means balancing each well. Single-tile stations replace minor civilizations but function in the same way. Non-sapient alien lifeforms take the place of barbarian tribes. This is where differences start to emerge. Where players in Civilization V can take on barbarian tribes with relative ease, and the tribes disappear from the map over time, aliens in Beyond Earth are much more formidable, and they can be found from the beginning all the way until the 250-turn mark that signals the end of the game. One such alien is the Siege Worm, which Dale was able to take down but generally should be avoided because they can one-hit kill most units, and they take very little damage from any military units before upgrades kick in. Pictured above is the lovely instance in which three Siege Worms decided to burrow up right in between two of my cities, wrecking my road between them and generally ruining my plans for about a hundred in-game years. [embed]273190:53373:0[/embed] Another hazard that life on alien planets presents is miasma, a ubiquitous terrain feature that saps the hit points of human units but restores those of aliens. Depending on the terrain generated, some alien nests may be even more fortified than others, with miasma surrounding and protecting them. What is interesting is that there are three philosophical schools of thought in how humanity may deal with the threat of alien lifeforms and miasma. Those who subscribe to the Purity ideal want to remain human while transforming the environment to suit their needs. Those who follow the Harmony and Supremacy ideals instead believe that humans must be adapted to survive in the world, though Harmony dictates that the adaptation should be done through biology while Supremacy dictates that it be done through technological augmentation. A civilization on the Purity path will be more likely to clear out miasma from friendly territory to allow for better control of resources, while a civilization following either Supremacy or Harmony may develop research that allows them to benefit from its existence. The trichotomy brings to mind the Sir David Attenborough quote "Instead of controlling the environment for the benefit of the population, perhaps it's time we control the population to allow the survival of the environment." Despite there being three fairly distinct philosophies, there are not hard limits on what any civilization can choose. In general, advancing steps in any one branch involves researching a related technology. Since scientific growth follows a radial web rather than a linear tree, it is easy to broaden one's scope and take on traits from any or all three of the ideas. That said, it is generally beneficial to specialize in one philosophy. Some buildings and units require certain levels in one of the three branches, and unit upgrades are governed by the highest level affinity, so maintaining balance affords a greater breadth of abilities, but focusing on one grants more powerful abilities. Another aspect of Beyond Earth that diverges significantly from previous entries in the series are the various victory conditions, which stem from the three affinities. While domination (control all capitals on the map) and time (have the most points after a set number of turns) are in play, there is no longer a strict technological victory, cultural victory, or economic victory. Instead, there are victories tied to each affinity. Purity followers want to try to contact Earth to bring the rest of humanity to the newly conquered planet; Supremacy followers want to contact Earth in order to wipe out the lesser beings left there; Harmony followers want to develop a neural connection with the living being that is the planet. Each of those conditions requires at least level 13 with its respective philosophy. What results is a game where just about every victory is a tech victory. As a game based in science fiction, it makes thematic sense that technology is important for winning, and as my preferred path, it works for me, but it could be off-putting to those who prefer other avenues or a more balanced approach to civilization-building. On that note, victory by any means other than having the most points when time runs out seems especially difficult (at least in the preview build). Even in a lush environment to maximize production and with my cities and trade routes set to crank science out at their maximum levels throughout the game, the closest I have come was completing the Wonder necessary for the Contact victory by turn 246, after which another 30 turns were necessary. Presumably the timer will be increased in the final product. Another new element emerges from Civilization: Beyond Earth due to its setting. Where previous titles in the series have been basic retellings of Earth's history, Beyond Earth is now telling a potential story of humanity's future, which allows for more freedom in that department. To help shape that, missions now pop up from time to time, which provide optional objectives to work toward and offer a glimpse into how humanity got to this point and what it learns from this new planet. There is a scientifically important narrative to be discovered here, but it requires some effort and is just as easily ignored. The terrain variety is impressive in some ways, but a little disappointing in others. While there are several options for generating the world layout (Protean is one large landmass, Terran has several Earth-like continents, Atlantean features many smaller islands, and other advanced options), the biomes from world to world do not seem very different from one another. The lush worlds have more plant life than the arid ones, the taiga has more unusable tundra, but the same terrain types can be found on most worlds; only their proportions change. The same aliens are present regardless of which world is chosen. From a gameplay perspective it makes sense, but from the perspective of wanting to explore vastly different alien worlds, it is a bit of a letdown. Graphically, Beyond Earth maintains the standard set by Civilization V, but it has the added benefit of extra color from being set on an alien planet. Seas are a vibrant green and mountains have an orange tinge. Individual civilization color schemes are futuristic, with a lot of teal, purple, and pink. A special note should be made about the soundtrack, which swells with intense string crescendos at the right moments, and otherwise sets the mood for interstellar exploration, which feels grand and important. All in all, Civilization is looking as good as ever with Beyond Earth. It scratches that itch for building a workable engine and outshining one's neighbors, while introducing a lot of new mechanics that change up the general strategy. The preview build seems pretty full-featured, but next month's full release should remove the hard turn limit. Perhaps then the other victory conditions may seem more attainable. In the mean time, starting up a new game cannot hurt, right? (Send help please; I cannot stop on my own.)
Civilization Beyond Earth photo
Yep, that is Civilization all right
The Civilization series is famous for playing out in unplanned marathon sessions, where "one more turn" quickly turns into five more turns, which turn into another hour, before the player finally looks away from the screen to...

Civilization Beyond Earth photo
Civilization Beyond Earth

AI construct 'Master Control' walks through a turn of Civilization: Beyond Earth in this PAX video

Grinding, chitinous beak
Aug 30
// Darren Nakamura
Steven got to play Civilization: Beyond Earth with the help of an "actual scienceman" not long ago, but the 2K and Firaxis still brought something new to show at PAX Prime this year. Earlier today at the Firaxis Megapan...

I took a field trip to play Civilization: Beyond Earth's first 100 turns

Aug 28 // Steven Hansen
[embed]280195:55442:0[/embed] Firaxis released the above first fifty minutes of Beyond Earth with commentary from Firaxis' Pete Murray and David McDonough. It delves into setting up your Civ game, ending before a few turns have passed. There are a bunch of decisions to make early on, including picking your sponsor (affects bonuses you'll get throughout your game), colonists (to reinforce your sponsor choice or to try and balance things out). You can also choose from pre-determined planets geared for veteran Civilization players -- this definitely is quite a bit of "Civ 5 in space" -- or roll random planets of three categories: Terran (Earth-like -- large swaths of sea and land), Protean (one ocean, one large landmass), and Atlantean (small, connected islands you can sail between on gondola to support the tourism economy).  Going Atlantean was an easy decision, but then I had to keep clicking away at the randomizer to get a planet name I liked. I saw "Nye," a science name, but my finger was faster than my brain and I clicked again and lost it. I did the same for "Funk." However, I needed to lay claim to planet Funk and so I cycled through all of the randomly generated planets until it came up again.  I landed on Funk and began my great conquest of getting ravaged by siege worms. There are three basic affinities to align yourself with. Harmony thinks you should adjust and adapt to alien ecosystems. Supremacy thinks you should conquer them. Purity just wants to have its own little slice of old earth. It's more brute force than Supremacy, which turns to cybernetics and technology as humankind's key to survival.  One hundred turns is not a lot of turns to play out in Civilization. I barely got any trade routes going and didn't get to engage in much diplomacy beyond one gent that suggested we have open borders, to which I, aware that I would never reach his borders before my time expired, agreed to. Still, Harmony might be my preferred route. It is not advisable to go after local alien wildlife. If you do, it will get angry and kill you. Even if you don't, a Siege Worm might still decimate every single structure you've built before enough volleys of missiles from your city center shoos it off. Early on, you don't have a lot of choice but to coexist, so leaning in on Harmony makes sense. Then again, all of the affinities can be pretty isolationist early on as you just focus on domestic infrastructure, save for sending explorers to excavate fallen satellites and other wreckage.  The biggest difference Beyond Earth has over Civ 5 is the sprawling tech web (42:08 in the above video), which groups generalized ideas in extending directions (and more specialized, resource intensive subsets below them). That and the bonus for upping Virtues across the board, rather than filling them out sequentially. Also that you're in space this time and don't have to deal with Gandhi. 
Civ Beyond Earth preview photo
Space is the place
Civilization: Beyond Earth isn't just a missed opportunity for transmedia synergy by way of the family Smith's After Earth. It's a game about space. About space colonization, specifically, because the Earth is a goner (w...

50 mins of Beyond Earth photo
50 mins of Beyond Earth

Boldly go 50 Minutes into Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth

Begining game choices that will set the stage for your sci-fi civilization
Aug 26
// Rob Morrow
Firaxis has just released over fifty minutes of beginning-game footage of its science fiction-themed entry into the Civilization series, Beyond Earth. And, as an added bonus for the Red Team, Firaxis would like you to k...
Firaxicon photo

Civilization, XCOM dev doing its own fan convention

Aug 26
// Steven Hansen
Firaxicon sounds like an expensive drug for lumberjacks. Or a bad sci-fi original film. But it's actually a new convention put on by Firaxis, developer of the Civilization games and the recent, real good XCOM reboot...
Deals photo

Play Borderlands 2 for free on Steam this weekend

Shoot and loot like it's 2012
Aug 21
// Jordan Devore
As part of a 2K sale on Steam this weekend, the publisher is giving folks a chance to play Borderlands 2 for free on Steam today through Sunday at 1:00pm Pacific. Borderlands 2 has also been marked down to $4.99 to own, or $9...
Civ: Beyond Earth photo
Civ: Beyond Earth

Sid Meierís Civilization: Beyond Earth will launch in October

There's a pre-order bonus too
Jul 03
// Chris Carter
Civilization: Beyond Earth looks like a pretty cool entry into the Civ franchise, and now we have a set release date -- October 24th, 2014, coming in at $49.99. Currently, PC is the only planned platform. There's also a pre-...
Civilization Revolution 2 photo
Civilization Revolution 2

Sid Meier's Civilization Revolution 2 announced as a mobile exclusive

Real emotional roller coaster of a headline, that one
Jun 23
// Darren Nakamura
Civilization Revolution was an interesting thing. As it was pared down to function well on consoles, handhelds, and eventually mobile devices, many diehards considered it dumbed down from the roots of the series. Still, it so...

Preview: Sid Meierís Civilization: Beyond Earth

May 20 // Dale North
[embed]275105:53951:0[/embed] I started out in an area called the Lush Biome where the idea was to take the explorer unit from my base and go explore, with the hopes of finding anything that could help us. But these guys are not a combat unit at all so they were quickly trampled by the green miasma-eating aliens that spawned up from a point just above my base. Angry at dying so soon, I sent my only combat unit up to take care of business, but they were quickly surrounded and whittled down to just a few members. It wasn’t but a couple of turns before my one little hex of nearly dead troops was surrounded.  Down but not out, I quickly generated new units and used my base’s defenses to hold the little guys off. That almost dead unit was able to level up and become stronger, too. I was eventually able to take out that troublesome alien spawn point, get a new explorer unit to start exploring nearby ruins, and even build up some defenses. Meanwhile, leaders of other factions were knocking on my door, and none of them were willing to play nice. If that wasn’t enough, I quickly got to a point to where massive Siege Worms were drilling underground and then coming up to attack my base. The plan I had to build a beacon to distract them and then take them out from behind was never going to be realized. Tactical satellite building? Psssh.  I was going to have to leave this demo session without achieving anything.  The three or four dozen turns I had to play Civ: Beyond Earth weren’t enough to dig down deep. I barely got to touch the massive web of a tech tree that the game brings. In this web you start out in the very middle with habitation and expand outward. Even with only a few moves I was able to branch out into some deep science fiction ideas. Computing could quickly move into things like transcendental math, terraforming, or synthetic thought. Going off on a completely unique path would be very easy in this game. Quests? Nope. Not enough time. Some popped up, but I had my hands full. Taking on these quests are how you’ll dig into the story and learn more about humanity’s new home.    I also didn’t get to interact much with any of the leaders or learn their affinities and preferences for humanity’s future. But from what I saw in my brief session, that stuff is pretty interesting. Some groups want humanity to preserve itself without the use of cybernetics, while others think that humanity needs to evolve into something like a native species. What’s clear is that none of them agree. Each’s factions beliefs are reflected in their talk, military units, and even their architecture. I would have needed much more time to begin exploring these approaches. Hopefully I can do that soon. But I was able to take out a single Siege Worm before my time was up. This is a city-sized beast that takes multiple units to take out — one we were directed to avoid. I took it down with desperate measures and felt a bit better about myself. In my game, humanity was probably still screwed. But at least I accomplished something on this harsh alien planet.   Civilization: Beyond Earth launches on PC, Mac, and Linux this fall. has relaunched with new information on Beyond Earth today.
Civ: Beyond Earth photo
I killed a worm and I liked it
I tried to help settlers colonize a new planet (Earth becomes uninhabitable after we screw it up in a big way) in our first hands-on with a pre-alpha build of the upcoming game Civilization: Beyond Earth early last week. I wa...

2K Games photo
2K Games

2K moving Borderlands, Civilization games to Steamworks

And discontinuing online support for some titles post-GameSpy shutdown
Apr 22
// Jordan Devore
2K has announced plans to migrate some of its online-enabled games away from GameSpy Technology since the service is shutting down on May 31, 2014. Loads of titles will be impacted -- not just 2K's library -- so consider this...

Firaxis designers speak on Civilization: Beyond Earth

Apr 20 // Darren Nakamura
Destructoid: Anything you want to say about Civilization: Beyond Earth right off the bat? Miller: We've been working on this game for a while, and to announce it today in front of some of our biggest fans is just the coolest thing. It's a really fun game. You know, it's Civilization in space! Our fans have been wanting this for a long time, and this is it. Destructoid: What sort of challenges are there converting Civilization to sci-fi? McDonough: There are lots. It's really exciting. Civ is a game with a great legacy, but it's almost all historically based. Among that legacy are Alpha Centauri and XCOM. This game is inspired by all of those.  The things that make Civ fun, when you play Civ you always want to go "one more turn," but the world around it is already set. Without history we have to make up technology trees, alien worlds, and that has been one of the bigger challenges. Destructoid: We were curious about how you would handle technology in Beyond Earth. How much is based off of what scientists are saying may be possible and how much is more like "hey this would be really cool if we did this"? McDonough: It's both! We did a lot of research on modern day scientific thinking and we thought it was important that our game start in reality, in a plausible setting. For the rest, we were inspired by a lot of current science fiction. But the best sci-fi is also scientifically real, so hopefully we have the best of both. [embed]273489:53496:0[/embed] Destructoid: Take me through the timeline. Where does this start? Is it present day onward? Miller: It's 200 to 250 years after present day. So we're imagining an earth in the future, and things good and bad have happened, and it culminates in an event where nations around the world are sending out expeditions into space to different planets to colonize, to spread the roots of humanity beyond our planet. So, like David said, we start in a very familiar place based on actual science, and we want to be able to draw a clear line from science that we know today and space travel we know today. We're very inspired by things like SpaceX and the new Cosmos with Neil deGrasse Tyson, we just love all that stuff. So we're taking all of the inspiration from that and keeping it very plausible, and starting from a new place 200 years from now and kind of just going wild. Destructoid: You said you've been working on this for a long time. Exactly how long have you been working on this? McDonough: Unfortunately we can't say specifically, but I think Will and I have been designing it in our heads for a really long time. Whispering in some ears around Firaxis. Miller: That's kind of how games get made around Firaxis. XCOM was Jake Solomon's baby for a long time, and he whispered in the right ears, and it eventually became a great game. We were given our shot at this, and it was the right time. We had a team that really wanted to do it, and it fit in our schedule, and we're so fortunate to be able to make this game. Destructoid: Did it start out as "Hey, wouldn't it be rad if we made Alpha Centauri?" and went from there to "Well, we can't really, but let's do basically that"? Miller: It's always been a reality to us that that IP is just sort of off limits, and I don't know if we would have used it if we had it, honestly. This game is such a different thing. It's definitely inspired by Alpha Centauri, but it's also inspired by a lot of other things too. It's a very different game and it has very different characteristics. It feels a lot different. I think it started as "Would it be cool if we could take Civilization into space? What would that game look like?" and then we went from there. Destructoid: Is there any chance for any sort of crossover with XCOM? Miller: The two games exist in their own fictional universes. That gives us the most flexibility, but I think you could expect some nods and winks and homages between the two. McDonough: One of the things about sci-fi is you can make easter eggs with no problem. Destructoid: So you're going off and exploring alien worlds. What's the variety going to be like for that? Strenger: We spent a lot of time making the map so that it isn't just like, earth and then purple earth. So everything in the map generator like landmass features to other crazy things to the alien life that is populating that map can change. We have a lot of different biomes, like an arid biome or a wetter jungle one. So the combinations really make it so every time you play, it's a unique world with its own challenges. Destructoid: You guys seem pretty excited for this. McDonough: The panel today was unbelievably cool, to see the reactions from the fans. We've been waiting a long time to be able to show it. We've been waiting a long time to come back to Civilization in the future. Miller: This game really is for our fans. For so long, our fans have been asking for a remake of Alpha Centauri or Civ in space or whatever, and this really is our game for them.
Firaxis interview photo
Possible crossover with XCOM, inspiration sources, and more
Last weekend during its panel at PAX East, Firaxis announced the next big project for the Civilization franchise: Civilization: Beyond Earth. After the announcement, Destructoid took some time to talk to some of the designers...

Civilization Beyond Earth photo
'We start in a very familiar place based on actual science... and kind of just [go] wild'
To take a brief aside from videogames: are you watching Cosmos: a Spacetime Odyssey? If not, you should be, especially if you are not particularly scientifically literate. It is filled with a lot of important information abou...

Civilization Beyond Earth photo
Civilization Beyond Earth

Civilization explores the final frontier with Beyond Earth

Firaxis announces new direction at PAX East
Apr 12
// Darren Nakamura
We knew Firaxis would be announcing a new game at their panel this morning at PAX East, and now we know what the team has been working on. Civilization: Beyond Earth is taking the series past future tech and into space explo...
Papers, Please photo
Papers, Please

Mod adds Arstotzka from Papers, Please to Civ V

Best check those borders
Feb 14
// Alasdair Duncan
Mashing two games together in a mod isn't always a recipe for success but this new mod for Civilization V looks like it might hit the mark. Steam user Snakeeater 337 has created a mod that adds Arstotzka, the country from Pap...
Deals photo

Civilization aplenty in the Humble Sid Meier Bundle

$15 for Civ III up through Civ V: Brave New World
Feb 04
// Jordan Devore
The latest Humble Bundle is one to avoid if you've got a bunch of responsibilities to take care of in the immediate future. Featuring the games of veteran designer Sid Meier, this package is broken into three tiers. First up,...
Ex-Civ devs start studio photo
Ex-Civ devs start studio

Mohawk Games founded by former Civilization developers

Backed by Stardock
Nov 06
// Joshua Derocher
The lead designer of Civilization IV, Soren Johnson, has started up his own studio called Mohawk Games. If one Civilization veteran isn't enough to make you happy, the co-founder of the studio is Dorian Newcomb, the art direc...
Deals photo

Get Borderlands 2: Game of the Year Edition on PC for $18

Also, Civilization V for $9 and BioShock Infinite for $12
Oct 11
// Darren Nakamura
[Update: Borderlands 2: Game of the Year Edition has sold out at this price. The other deals still appear to be available.] It was only a couple of days ago that the Borderlands 2: Game of the Year Edition launched in North A...
Heroes of StarCraft photo
Heroes of StarCraft

Heroes of StarCraft mod adds hero units to Civilization V

Why wouldn't you want Jim Raynor leading your troops?
Sep 29
// Joshua Derocher
I love mods, probably way more than I should, and it is always amazing the things that creative people can come up with. The Heroes of StarCraft mod for Civilization V, along with a partner mod by the same modder, adds hero u...
Beavis and Butt-Head photo
Beavis and Butt-Head

Beavis and Butt-Head are in Civilization V now

Mod of the millenium
Aug 21
// Chris Carter
Like most long-running TV shows, the Beavis and Butt-Head show had its ups and downs, but when it was up, it was up. So, a crafty modder set out to relive the best moments of the two semi-lovable idiots in the best way he kne...

A Civilization MMO is a thing that is happening

But it's just for South Korea
Aug 09
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Civilization Online is an upcoming MMO being developed by XLGAMES and 2K Games. Unlike other Civilization games where you control entire empires, this one has you playing as an individual unit in one of four different cultur...

Review: Civilization V: Brave New World

Jul 14 // Joshua Derocher
Civilization V: Brave New World (PC [reviewed], Mac)Developer: Firaxis GamesPublisher: 2K GamesRelease Date: July 9, 2013 (North America) / July 12, 2013 (Worldwide)MSRP: $29.99Rig: AMD 9850 Quad-Core 2.50 GHz, 5 GB of RAM, GeForce GTX 480, and Windows 7 64-bit The way a cultural victory used to work was that the player simply had to unlock every available policy for their civilization. This meant that all you had to do was earn as much culture as you possibly could to buy policies quickly, and it was important to keep your empire small since more cities would drive up the culture cost of new policies. This system seemed to be fine, but it always felt you were playing the game without any impact from other civilizations. You just had to sit back and build your little culture farms while other players duked it out for world domination. Now players have to fight against each other to become the dominant culture in the world, thus winning the new cultural victory. Cities can produce great works through great artists, writers, painters, and musicians. These great works, which represent cultural milestones that your civilization has created, are placed in museums or other cultural buildings and generate tourism for your empire. To win a cultural victory, you have to produce more tourism than other civilizations have made culture. [embed]258059:49555:0[/embed] Basically, tourism represents your attack points and culture is your defense points. When you have generated more total tourism then they have generated total culture, you win the game. If you have a dominant culture, other players' cities can defect to your side. This new victory is much more satisfying than the previous system, and it can be challenging when you have a lot of players trying to achieve it, since everyone will have a really high culture value. Civ IV players will also be happy to know that great people can "culture bomb" other players, meaning that you can go into their territory to spread your culture and tourism with a massive burst. Along with great people being able to make great works, artifacts can also be found at new antiquity sites using the Archaeologist unit. These sites will appear at places where earlier events happened in your game, places such as where you fought an enemy or you destroyed a barbarian camp. You can either dig out an artifact that can be placed in culture buildings to generate tourism, or you can turn the site into a landmark that will give you culture points. The older the site is, the more culture points you get from it. Later in the game, as players enter the modern era, they can adopt new Ideologies, which are basically a new set of skill trees tied into the existing policy system. Each player can only pick one ideology for their civilization: Freedom, Order, or Autocracy. These each have unique bonuses and new policies that players can adopt, and they also have a big impact on your relationship with other leaders. Everyone who adopts Freedom is much more likely to be friends with each other, and they probably won't get along with anyone choosing Order. Wars can erupt between ideologies, and it adds a really nice touch to the end game. It's not a huge departure from the policy system, but it does add enough to keep things interesting. Another end-game feature is the World Congress, which opens up when one civilization has met every other leader and they have the printing press. This player becomes the leader of the World Congress (which you can rename to anything you like, so my leaders met at the "Greater Council of Sloths"), and players can vote on issues that will affect everyone. The hosting player and the player with the most delegates can propose laws to be put to a vote. Delegates are gained by advancing in eras and by having allied city states. This really makes having lots of city states on your side beneficial. The laws enacted by the World Congress cover a variety of things, including banning a particular resource from play, increasing taxes on standing armies, enforcing a world religion, and events like the World Fair that lets players donate production to win prizes. It's really a system of trying to help yourself while inflicting serious pain on other players. If the winning player has a huge army, you can rally together with other players to bankrupt him by increasing the gold cost per turn of military units. If all of these new changes sound like fun, I have even more exciting news for you. My absolute favorite addition here is the reintroduction of Trade to the series. Players can build trade caravans and cargo ships, which are used to establish trade routes with other players, your own cities, and city states. You can get stupidly rich by investing in a lot of trade routes, and there are wonders and buildings that can improve the amount of gold you earn and how many trade routes you can have. You can earn so much money with trade routes that it adds a whole new way to play the game: being a rich country who just buys anything they want. Money is power, just like in the real world. You can bribe other leaders to vote your way in the World Congress, you can pay them to attack your enemies, you can buy research agreements to speed up your technological growth, and you can buy new units and buildings. If you spend the early game building up your gold income and trade routes, by the modern era you will be rich enough to get anything you want and make other people do your dirty work. It's a glorious way to play, and it is definitely my new favorite method of global domination. In one game, Egypt was being a dick to me, so I payed off three other leaders to declare war on him. His empire fell and I didn't even need to declare war or build an army. I felt insanely powerful, which isn't something that was present earlier in the game if you had a lot of gold. Along with all of these new mechanics there are also nine new leaders, new technologies, new units, two new scenarios, new wonders, new great person types, and a lot of tweaking to older mechanics like Religion and diplomacy. The patch notes and changes are lengthy and detailed, so I won't dive into each item, but it's a lot of little things that all add together to make Brave New World into the best experience I have had with the series, and I have been playing since the first game. My only major complaint is that this essentially makes Gods & Kings worthless since this has all of the mechanics from that expansion included, and you don't need it to play Brave New World. There are still unique leaders, units, and scenarios in Gods & Kings, but it's not enough to warrant the $30 price tag it still has. Brave New World is also currently $30, and that seems a bit steep for an expansion that could also be replaced in the future. If you didn't pick up Gods & Kings for some reason, I really suggest skipping it unless you can grab it for cheap on Steam. Brave New World is the expansion you need to get instead, and I highly recommend it to fans of the series. If you have been sitting out on Civilization V because you feel it's not as awesome as Civilization IV, you really need to get on this side of the fence now. Brave New World brings in all the best parts of Gods & Kings and it makes the game into something complex yet simple to learn. The ways you can play are greatly opened up with the new systems, and you can take very different approaches to each victory type. While it still seems less complicated than Civ IV with all of the expansions, Civ V with Brave New World does have a lot more going on and it's just easier than ever to get to all of it. That's always a good thing.
Review: Brave New World photo
It's the Civ game you've all been waiting for
When Civilization V launched a few years back, a lot of die-hard fans were disappointed with the lack of depth the game had to offer. The graphics were sharp, the interface was clean and intuitive, and the overall gameplay wa...

New releases photo
New releases

New releases: Civilization V gets a massive expansion

Plus, The Walking Dead: 400 Days, Guncraft, and some football
Jul 08
// Fraser Brown
Civilization V is pretty good, but Brave New World makes it wonderful. Launching in a couple of days, the latest expansion is filled with a bevy of new features, most of which improve the tiresome late game with new paths to...

Civ V trailer will be the best minute of your day

Fact: The announcers voice is a safe alternative to sleeping pills
May 31
// Abel Girmay
A new trailer has arrived for the Civilization V expansion, Civilization V: Brave New World. There's quite a bit of meat on Brave New World's bones, with plenty of later-game additions, and an emphasis on trade routes. For a...

Preview: Civilization V: Brave New World

May 17 // Fraser Brown
Civilization V (PC)Developer: Firaxis GamesPublisher: 2K GamesReleased: July 9, 2013  Although Brave New World's focus is ostensibly on the late game, there are a number of additions that players will have access to right from the get-go, while others appear a wee bit down the line. In some cases, their impact won't be fully appreciated at the start, but they slowly build up to have a meaningful impact.  International trade is one of the most notable new features, and can be dabbled in extremely early on. Trade routes can be set between player cities and those of other powers or even city states, moving goods via fragile caravans and cargo vessels, vulnerable to attack from barbarians or foreign aggressors.  Appropriately, I played as Morocco, one of the new civilizations with a penchant for trade. With the "Gateway to Africa" bonus, Morocco gets three gold and one culture for every international trade route. It may seem like small potatoes, but with multiple routes weaving throughout the world for thousands of years, it adds up to a tidy sum.  Trade isn't just about lining one's pockets, either. There's a give and take between trading powers, as gold, culture, religion, and science is exchanged. Trade is integral to those looking to spread their culture abroad, but it can be a double-edged sword, as foreign ways of thinking might find their way into your civilization. So what at first seems like an economic boon quickly reveals itself to benefit culture-focused civilizations. It's flexible, though, providing good reasons for any empire to take advantage of it.  The system amounts to bugger all if you don't have much culture to begin with, however. Luckily, Brave New World has a fair few new cultural wonders just waiting to be built as well as expanded great artists. These special units have now been split into three, with writers, artists and musicians all potentially appearing should you encourage them through social policies and other decisions.  Not only can these new great people be spent to give an instant boost to culture, they can be commissioned to create important works of art. Musical compositions, paintings, and pieces of literature can be put together, and then attached to slots provided by certain buildings and wonders. Ultimately, this generates tourism.  Foreign civilizations will be influenced by the tourist attractions of other civilizations, and the greater the rating, the more awestruck they will become. If you've wasted your time trying to get a peek at the Mona Lisa in the Louvre, or the Tutankhamun exhibit in the Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, then you'll know first-hand how big the crowds can get and the impact these pieces have on people.  In Brave New World these tourists get so impressed that they start wishing their own civilization was even half as awesome. They might even go so far as to start demanding their leader make some drastic changes.   Tourism and culture can be further augmented with the advent of archaeology. Cities can start producing archaeologists and sending them out to start digs. Once something is unearthed, the dig can either become a cultural landmark, or the artifact discovered can be brought back and put on show, generating more tourism.  A really wonderful touch is how these artifacts relate to each individual game. While digging up sites in my Moroccan empire, archaeologists discovered ancient Polish weapons, dropped by my enemies when I conquered their lands and removed them from the continent. There's still an element of randomization, but it's all connected to the unique history of your civilization and your experiences with it.  By the 20th century, there's a very good chance that players will have exhausted the social policy trees, with the only remaining options being ones that they've avoided due to them not providing appropriate or desired bonuses. Brave New World expands social policies by adding ideologies: Freedom, Order, and Autocracy. Once selected, instead of unlocking new social policies, players can start spending culture on their chosen ideology. There's a long list of bonuses split into three tiers, so even if there are, say, three civilizations following the freedom ideology, there's a good chance that they will have quite different boons.  This way, one can customize their civilization well into the 21st century, and these changes will have a tangible impact on the society, unlocking new wonders and drastically changing how a civilization functions. Through tourism and trade, the citizens of other civilizations might end up favoring your ideology, pestering their government to switch.  Fanning the flames of dissent in such a way can be extremely beneficial to a sneaky civilization. If the opposing leader refuses to capitulate, then they may have a full-blown rebellion on their hands, and if they choose to change their ideology, they must sacrifice a lot of previously held benefits. As civilizations become more advanced, the World Congress (and later the United Nations) is founded, bringing empires together to dictate the fate of the entire world. It's extremely reminiscent of the council in Alpha Centauri, but is far greater in scope.  Leaders can vote on global decisions from putting on a World Fair or a global athletic competition, to embargoing nations and states or banning certain luxuries. The list of possible actions is absolutely vast, and while the goal of this body is to create peace (and eventually leads to a diplomatic victory), there are plenty of ways to completely screw over the opposition. In my game, I managed to make my ideology and religion global, ban the luxuries used by my enemies, and further enhance my own culture. One's ability to dictate what's on the agenda and what passes or fails depends on how many delegates that can have voting, and I ended up having more delegates than all other civilizations combined. Not only did this mean I was the host of the World Congress, it meant that I had complete control over it.  It might need some tweaking, because at no point from the moment the body popped into existence did any of the other civilizations have a hope in hell of outvoting me. I had money, lots of culture, and all of the city states in my pocket, and so I dominated the Congress right up until the end of the game, where I was proclaimed leader of the world.  Although I ended up getting a diplomatic victory, it would have been perfectly possible for me to switch to another victory path. These new features are all intertwined, so while my initial goal was to take over the world thanks to my superior culture, that culture also gave me the political clout to go for a diplomatic victory. Likewise, thanks to my expansive international trade network, I had every city state at my beck and call -- paid off with funds from my caravans and cargo ships or in awe of me thanks to cultural and religious exchange -- so it would have been quite easy for me to declare war and wipe my opponents off the map. Brave New World will contain nine new civilizations, of which I saw the Zulu, Assyrian, Polish, and Moroccan civilizations; eight new wonders such as the Parthenon and Broadway; and two new scenarios: The Scramble for Africa and The American Civil War. Only the latter was playable, and I can't say I was particularly enamored with it. All war and no empire building makes Fraser a dull boy. For those looking to flex their military might, it will likely appeal more.  Civilization V: Brave New World launches on July 9 in North America and July 12 in the rest of the world. I'm rather looking forward to it. 
Civilization V preview photo
I have seen many things
With the arrival of the 20th century, I can sometimes get a bit bored in Civilization V. It continues to engage me enough so that I power through to achieve whatever victory path I had chosen, but therein lies the issue. I en...

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