hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

Action

Mirror's Edge Catalyst photo
Mirror's Edge Catalyst

Mirror's Edge Catalyst release date is February 23, 2016


Play Faith's origin story
Jun 15
// Darren Nakamura
At EA's press conference today, Sara Jansson showed off a trailer for the upcoming Mirror's Edge Catalyst. Before getting it started, she dropped the release date: February 23, 2016. That's less than a year before we can (fi...

Dark Souls III confirmed for early 2016

Jun 15 // Jordan Devore
(Cool box art, Namco.)
Dark Souls III photo
Rise from your grave!
The leaks killed the surprise, but I'm still into it -- Dark Souls III is coming early next year to PC, PS, and Xbox One. "Hidetaka Miyazaki and his team" are on the project, according to Bandai Namco. A pre-rendered video p...

Tomb Raider photo
Tomb Raider

Rise of the Tomb Raider gets a November release date


Mind that falling ice Lara
Jun 15
// Laura Kate Dale
Hey everyone, Rise of The Tomb Raider is coming to Xbox One on November 10.  There's also a chunk of gameplay footage which we will have up shortly. The game appears to be both faster and more action packed than the last Tomb Raider, which is pretty cool to see.
Fill up my Cuphead photo
Fill up my Cuphead

Cuphead still looks amazing in this new trailer!


Don't deal with the devil
Jun 15
// Jed Whitaker
The above trailer for the cartoon-esque Cuphead was just unveiled at Microsoft's E3 press conference. The trailer shows off plenty of new enemies, including an evil carrot and a giant mermaid that Cuphead fights in an airplane.  Cuphead releases in 2016 exclusively on Xbox One.
Shy samurai photo
Shy samurai

Afro Samurai 2 reveal trailer should reveal some gameplay


Shy samurai
Jun 12
// Steven Hansen
Finally a trailer for Afro Samurai 2: Revenge of Kuma. But it's just a story trailer. I never played Tom Cruise's The Last Afro Samurai game, which released in 2009, but former Bandai Namco (and original Afro Samurai) p...
The Witcher 3 photo
The Witcher 3

The Witcher 3's already been played for ten millennia or so


That's right -- 10,000 years
Jun 12
// Brett Makedonski
CD Projekt Red's The Witcher 3 is the type of game that you can sink a whole lot of hours into. Open-world role-playing games tend to run on the long side. It took testers 25 hours to speedrun it, after all. Couple that ...
Hollowpoint photo
Hollowpoint

AI and robots took our jobs! Crackdown 2 dev's new co-op shooter


Hollowpoint
Jun 12
// Steven Hansen
When the corporations inherit the earth, will you be part of the safe bourgeoisie, or a poor with no job to do other than corporate dirty work? Hollowpoint, a 4-player co-op PS4 and PC game slated for this year, assumes the ...
Bloodstained: Ritual photo
Bloodstained: Ritual

Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night cracks $4.5 million, gets Shovel Knight crossover


He's looking bulky
Jun 12
// Chris Carter
Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night is sticking it to the man, with $4.5 million raised, making it the most successful game on Kickstarter. But IGA and his team aren't resting on their laurels just yet, as even more conten...
#Darksiders2 photo
#Darksiders2

Darksiders 2 remake confirmed, has a punny name


A lot of Vigil team working on it
Jun 11
// Brett Makedonski
Closing in on four months later, we can finally confirm the February leak of a Darksiders 2 remake. Nordic Games announced a 1080p remaster for PS4 and Xbox One. It's cheekily named Darksiders 2 Deathinitive Edition, whi...

My first three hours with Street Fighter V were immensely satisfying

Jun 11 // Alessandro Fillari
Street Fighter V (PC, PlayStation 4 [previewed])Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomRelease date: TBA 2016 Once Street Fighter V is released, it'll be looked back on as a point in the series for many firsts. For starters, SFV is the first title in the series that will be available on only one console, but will also feature cross-play with the PC release. This is a big thing, as each platform for the previous installments tended to build its own microcosm of players. Not only will they play against each other, they'll share the same patches and updates, which will keep them together and competing regardless of the platform they choose. Moreover, Capcom is ensuring that online play will smooth and swift as ever with its new proprietary netcode called Kagemusha. Using some sophisticated rollback-based netcode, the developers are invested to ensure that the online play is consistent and hassle free. This is also the first in series to utilize the new and ever-versatile Unreal Engine 4. Though there were some concerns about whether or not Unreal could handle a title as twitch-based as SF, given the past iterations of the engine had difficulties with rendering and maintaining a solid frame rate, thankfully my time with the new fighter has made me a believer in the tech employed here. Not only are the visuals incredibly sharp and full of vibrant colors and details, the performance is rock solid. Simply put, this is the best Street Fighter has ever looked, and these images, nor the trailers, can match having the game played right in front of you. But enough about the fancy visuals; you want to hear how it plays. Of course, with every follow up to a massively popular and well-loved title, there comes the ever important question: what did they change? As you could likely tell from the trailers, Street Fighter V looks very similar to its predecessor, taking advantage of the same mechanics, like EX moves for instance, but also the similar focus on defensive gameplay (SFIV's Revenge Gauge). Street Fighter V definitely maintains those elements, but does them in a way that makes them feel unique to this installment. For instance, the Super Moves have now been upgraded to the new Critical Arts, which still require full EX Meter. While many of the signature moves are the same (Ryu's Shinku Hadoken and Chun-Li's Hoyokusen, for instance), the Critical Arts are more deadly and flashier than the supers of past. What I was surprised most by was that it goes further and features echoes to past SF titles -- even some influences from Street Fighter III and the Alpha series. While I initially thought they were just call-backs relevant to the characters (particularly the appearance of Nash), I found that the developers have essentially incorporated many elements that were successful from past titles, sometimes re-contextualizing them in interesting ways. After playing SFV, it was readily apparent that the previous trailers and footage we've seen haven't done the game justice one bit. Especially when you realize that they've been keeping one of their game-changing mechanics a secret. And it's one of the most interesting, engaging systems the series has seen in a long time. With the new Variable System, fighters can take advantage of multiple tactics and abilities that stem from the V-Gauge, an evolution of the Revenge Meter. As they build up bars of the gauge from taking damage or executing special V-Skills (character-specific support moves activated with MP+MK), they can use moves such as the V-Reversal, a powerful counterattack activated while blocking and pressing all punch or kick buttons (at the cost of one V-Gauge bar). But once you max out the meter, you can activate the special V-Trigger (HP+HK), which brings out the fighter's true potential. Despite some speculation, V-Triggers are not stance changes. The Trigger puts the fighters in a unique state for a short amount of time, where they can take advantage of unique buffs and some modified moves. Each character has their own unique take on the Variable System, which not only adapts to their own style, but does a lot to flesh them out. During my three hours of play, I got the impression that Street Fighter V is planning on enhancing the in-game narrative a bit by reflecting more of personality in the gameplay than ever before. For instance, Ryu's take on the system is influenced by his experience as a world-traveled warrior, and during his time, he's educated himself on different fighting styles, giving him the knowledge on how to best confront whoever he faces. In order to give you a better idea of what the Variable System is like, I'll be giving you an overview of things for the four playable characters we know of so far. Starting with Ryu, his V-Skill, called Mind's Eye, brings the return of the legendary Parry mechanic from Street Fighter III. For the novices out there, Ryu can time his skill at the exact moment of contact to block off enemy hits with no chip-damage -- and yes, it can be used for successive hits. Though in order to keep it balanced, it's unusable in the air. Once his V-Gauge is maxed out, he can activate his V-Trigger Denjin-Renki, imbuing him with a powerful aura for a limited time and grants him the ability to charge up his fireballs, giving them guard break potential. Also, his fireballs are given lightning properties, and when they connect you'll see brief flashes of the enemy's skeleton. It's a neat visual callback to SFII. Chun-Li's Variable mechanics focus on her maneuverability and dexterity during battles. As one of the more agile and aerial gifted fighters in the game, her Variable moves play on her strengths in a big way. For instance, her V-Trigger ability Ren-Kiko puts her in a powered-up state and gives her special moves extra hits. Her V-Skill, called Ren-Kyaku, is essentially a command jump that allows her to manually jump in any given direction. While this may seem like an odd skill, this command jump causes damage while leaving the ground and gives her ease of movement for some exceptional cross-up potential. The guys from Capcom I played against used Chun-Li quite effectively, and I left in awe of her acrobatics. It even made me want to shout out 'eh, eh, eh!' during her air juggles. Next up, we have the return of Guile's mentor and best friend Charlie. Since his last appearance in Alpha 3, things aren't the same for Charlie, who now goes by Nash. His new look shows that he's a changed man after his experimentation and torture by the hands of Shadaloo, and many of his former abilities have been modified, adopting a focus on swiftness and gap-closing maneuvers. His V-Skill, known as Bullet Clear, allows for him to absorb incoming projectiles and turn them into energy for his V-Gauge. For his V-Trigger, Nash does something a bit different. While many other characters enter a timed state that enhance moves, his trigger allows him to instantly teleport to a desired direction at the cost of his V-Gauge. Though this may seem a bit hefty of a cost for a teleport move, his V-Trigger can open up foes to a world of hurt if timed during a barrage of projectiles, leaving them vulnerable from behind or even in the air. By far, I had the most fun with Nash. He feels totally different from before, as his previous incarnations borrowed from Guile's moveset, and I'm pleased to say that he's truly come into his own for SFV. Lastly, we have M. Bison. As the main villain for much of the series, he's seen a bit of an upgrade since his last appearance. While older and a bit slower than his previous incarnations, he's still got plenty of tricks up his sleeve. With a far more menacing appearance, the leader of Shadaloo uses his Psycho powers to a far deadlier effect. With his V-Skill, called Psycho Reflect, he's able to conjure up a field of energy to bounce back projectiles and force them back at his enemies. As a charge-focused character, also sporting a modified movelist, this comes in handy when dealing with projectile-heavy opponents. With his Psycho Power V-Trigger, his abilities come into full effect, granting him increased speed and damage for special moves, and replacing his standard dash with a short-range teleport. I was impressed with what the Variable system brings to the table. In Street Fighter IV, the Revenge Gauge was only used to build your Ultra Combos, which for a lot of the skilled players often went unused. Thankfully, Street Fighter V makes better use of the mechanic here by making it a more active element during fights. The system added a whole layer of nuance to an already tried and true system, and I was super pleased with how easy it was to pick up. Though you've likely seen the phrase "easy to learn, difficult to master" thrown out a lot for games, I feel SFV lives up to that in a big way. I suspect many of the pros and hardcore fans will have fun analyzing the depths of the Variable System. It should be stated again at how gorgeous this game looks in motion. The frame rate was solid, and the new visuals have given the characters a greater level of detail. Though in some spots, it's clear that the game has still got things to work on. During the London stage, which looks incredible by the way, the background visuals didn't quite match up with what was going on in the foreground. For one, the frame rate was a bit off with the background action, which became a major distraction during battles running at 60 frames per second. But of course, this title is still a ways off, and it'll likely be cleared up before release. I have fond memories of growing up with Street Fighter II back in the day, and although I've kept with the series since, there were only a few titles that really blew me away and actively got me to up my game in order to compete with friends. Now am I saying that SFV matches those moments I had as a kid? Of course not. I only played a few hours of an unfinished build without the complete roster, after all. But what I did play showed a ton of promise, and honestly, I haven't felt this excited about Street Fighter in a long time. It's a great feeling having a new game in the wings, and I'm just itching to get back into the thick of it. Be sure to check back with Destructoid during the week of E3. We'll likely see more exciting titles from Capcom at the show. It's certainly going to be a good lineup this year.
Street Fighter V photo
Kick, Punch, it's all in the mind
After nearly thirty years, the Street Fighter series has still been going strong. With more incarnations than most people can remember, the series is seen by many as the quintessential example of what the fighting game genre ...

Hellblade photo
Hellblade

Ninja Theory is tackling mental illness with Hellblade


Fear is the mind killer
Jun 10
// Jordan Devore
With Hellblade, a small team within Ninja Theory will attempt to tell a psychosis-infused tale about a Celtic warrior named Senua who is struggling to cope after a traumatic Viking invasion. It's still presented as a third-p...
Rodea: The Sky Soldier photo
Rodea: The Sky Soldier

Rodea: The Sky Soldier launch delayed


Now coming in October
Jun 10
// Kyle MacGregor
The wait for Rodea: The Sky Soldier has been a long one and it just got a little bit longer. NIS America has revised its plans, pushing back the upcoming Wii U and Nintendo 3DS action game's September launch until O...
Witcher 3 photo
Witcher 3

The newest batch of Witcher 3 DLC includes a quest and a Gwent set


Gotta collect 'em all
Jun 10
// Chris Carter
CD Projekt Red has committed to delivering some free DLC updates post-launch for The Witcher 3 fans. While they aren't spectacular (mostly small quests and cosmetic items), this is the exact kind of content that would be...
Dark Souls III photo
Dark Souls III

Dark Souls III confirmed to be real, releasing in early 2016


According to this art leak
Jun 09
// Brett Makedonski
The past week has brought about speculation that From Software would follow up this year's Bloodborne with a third installment in the Dark Souls series. There were even some mighty convincing screenshots that h...
Veecaloid photo
Veecaloid

WayForward alumni made a mobile game about a shapeshifting Magical Girl pop idol


It misses the mark though, sadly
Jun 09
// Chris Carter
Veecaloid Pop is out this week on iOS devices, and the level of commitment you'll need for it is described as "Flappy Bird-esque." That's about on point, as the only commands on-screen are "tap" and "drag." The object of...
Armikrog photo
Armikrog

Claymation project Armikrog gets an August release date


$24.99
Jun 09
// Chris Carter
Developer Pencil Test Studios has sent over word that Armikrog will debut on August 18, not quite its original "second quarter 2015" target. To accompany the new announcement is a video showing off the game's eerie art ...

There's no way I'm playing Fortnite with randoms

Jun 08 // Jordan Devore
[embed]293554:58880:0[/embed] I didn't come away with any major new insights. This is a meaty game meant to be experienced over a long period of time, and it's hard to get a sense of how justified that will be from preview events alone. At what point do you grow tired of smacking abandoned junk for resources? There's also the matter of putting a lot of care into your fort's design but not quite enough care to stop the masses from ripping everything apart. Or maybe you didn't craft enough ammo, and now you're being overwhelmed by bees and laser beams. The threat of the grind demoralizes. I'm fond of Fortnite, conceptually, but I wonder if people will connect with it the way Epic hopes. It being free to play on PC and Mac will help. If you're planning on playing, be sure to do so with friends who can hold their own, communicate, and adapt when things inevitably go awry.
Fortnite photo
The PC and Mac beta is coming this year
I don't know that I've ever previewed the same game twice, but that's the situation I'm in after seeing Fortnite again at a recent pre-E3 event. It was much the same as last year. But since many people are unaware of what the...

Batman: Arkham Knight photo
Batman: Arkham Knight

Nvidia gives Batman: Arkham Knight the Gameworks treatment


Look at all the settings you won't use!
Jun 07
// Zack Furniss
Like the previous games in the Batman: Arkham series, Arkham Knight's PC release will feature extra bells and whistles courtesy of Nvidia. If you don't have an Nvidia card, you'll always have this trailer to imagine wha...
Chickensword photo
Chickensword

Chickensword is fast, funny, and furious


A bird that kills at will
Jun 07
// Jonathan Holmes
As a comedic tool, juxtaposition can cut both ways. Was Attack of the Killer Tomatoes a cheap "opposite day joke" one-note-tune of a film, or an adorable commitment to pushing a ridiculous concept past the point of reason? L...
Dark Souls III photo
Supposedly releasing next year
Following a report that Bandai Namco would announce Dark Souls III later this month at E3, The Know has come out with a slew of supposed screenshots and information for the game. This is the same group responsible for that s...

E3 2015 photo
E3 2015

XSEED reveals E3 lineup full of hot new projects


Trails, Onechanbra, EDF, Senran Kagura..
Jun 05
// Kyle MacGregor
XSEED just revealed the games it's planning to bring to E3 this month and they're pretty exciting. First things first: There will be a lot of new reveals at the event, including The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel...
Uncharted remasters photo
Uncharted remasters

Uncharted 4 beta access tied to The Nathan Drake Collection


Uncharted 1-3, 1080p, 60FPS
Jun 04
// Jordan Devore
Following this morning's accidental early reveal, Naughty Dog has come out with proper details on Uncharted: The Nathan Drake Collection. This bundle of PlayStation 4 remasters covers the first three games (in 1080p, running ...
Marvel Heroes anniversary photo
Marvel Heroes anniversary

Now is the best time to play Marvel Heroes


Two-year anniversary begins today
Jun 04
// Patrick Hancock
It's the two-year anniversary of the free-to-play ARPG Marvel Heroes today, and that calls for a celebration! The game is releasing its 48th playable hero today, Dr. Doom. Doom is essentially painted as the main villain ...
Witcher 3 photo
Witcher 3

A Witcher GIF that'll make you lose your mind


Or maybe just your head
Jun 03
// Brett Makedonski
Geralt doesn't always kill with this much flair. But, it's a special occasion! You only turn (level) 20 once, and it's worth celebrating. If a stylish decapitation and a body careening far into the sea is what you want, go for it. Treat yo'self, bud! Level up! [reddit]

Triad Wars just made me want to play Sleeping Dogs

Jun 03 // Brett Makedonski
For those who don't know, Triad Wars is a PC-only MMO set in the Sleeping Dogs world. It's about rising through the ranks of the underworld, and eventually being the kingpin. This is done by attacking other players' turf and defending yours. However, the multiplayer is asynchronous in that you don't have to be online in the event of an invasion. You set up lines of defense to fight for you in your absence. As Jordan and I divvied up Pre-E3 assignments at Square Enix's showcase, I knew I wanted Triad Wars. That desire was predicated entirely on this trailer; I wanted a developer to show me exactly how many ridiculous, over-the-top kills he could perform. Skewer someone on a pile of marlin heads so I can laugh about how dumb that is. Instead I was sat down and given instructions. The combat description (which came first) began with "So, have you played Sleeping Dogs?" and was asked with such an inflection as to proceed quickly when I answered in the affirmative. "Nope," I replied. That killed the mood right fast. From there, I was sort of left to fiddle with the controls to figure out how to fight on my own. Luckily, henchmen were lined up plot by plot to fall to my lightning-fast fists. I wrangled them mostly with no trouble, figuring out the two or three different combos that seemed to always do the trick. In reality, that might've been less on me, and more due to the fact that the developer approximated that the account I was playing on was 50 or so hours in. "Okay then," I responded, unsure of how this play experience could be transformed into any sort of coherent preview. I mean, I completely blew past any sense of progression that would act as a good indicator as to how the MMO components were. You know, the addictive quality that keeps players coming back to the same game time and time again. "Take me to do something," I half-demanded in a friendly tone. I was sure this was just a waste of time at this point. So, I hopped in a sporty car and drove off to attack another base. I worked my way through the exteriors of the compound, relying on careful headshots while strafing and my hastily-learned combat moves. Eventually, I karate-kicked the boss to submission. It was all pretty easy -- again, probably more a result of that 50+ hour account than my competency. And, that was the end of it. My takeaway from the whole thing was that Triad Wars seemed rather vanilla, but I'm not completely comfortable with that assessment. After all, I didn't play it the way it's supposed to be played. When I picked it up, it seemed like I was already on top, rather than climbing the ranks to dominate Hong Kong's seedy underbelly. I also simply didn't have adequate time to learn its systems, such as the intricate in-game economy it supposedly features. Really, none of it was presented in a way that MMOs need to be. That's unfortunate, but it's less a knock against this demo, and more a quality of all MMOs in preview situations. But, on a personal note, it made Sleeping Dogs seem like it's probably a pretty killer game. There's an environment that's definitely worth exploring more. I don't know if an MMO is how I want to see it, though. However, those who have been through Sleeping Dogs might find this the perfect opportunity to get back to that world. Any excuse to shove some poor bastard's head through a circular saw, really.
Triad Wars preview photo
More of a compliment than it sounds
Here's another one of those "Confession: I have a shame pile of unplayed games" statements: I never got around to playing Sleeping Dogs. Yeah, I heard it was surprisingly good, but something about it never piqued my interest....

Mighty No. 9 photo
Mighty No. 9

Mighty No. 9 has a one-hit-death mode


Uh, thanks but no thanks
Jun 03
// Jordan Devore
A few Mighty No. 9 updates to talk about today. First, all launch-window versions of the game will come with the Retro Hero DLC, which gives protagonist Beck a blocky, weirdly Minecraft-esque appearance and, good lord, a one...
Dragon Quest Heroes photo
Dragon Quest Heroes

You can buy Dragon Quest Heroes in a treasure chest


There's also a Day-One Edition
Jun 02
// Jordan Devore
If you're committed to getting Dragon Quest Heroes: The World Tree's Woe and the Blight Below -- I am, after playing two short levels -- then there are a couple of things to be aware of. The hack-and-slash game releases on Oc...

Review: Heroes of the Storm

Jun 02 // Chris Carter
Heroes of the Storm (Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: Blizzard EntertainmentPublisher: Blizzard EntertainmentMSRP: Free-to-playRelease Date: June 2, 2015 Fundamentally, Heroes is still very much a MOBA experience. It's a five-on-five, top-down, click-heavy affair with various roles such as support, tanks, and DPS, and there's a variety of different characters to choose from. To help break down the barrier to entry, Blizzard has made a number of concessions that set it apart from its competition. Perhaps the biggest difference with Heroes of the Storm is that there are no longer items of any kind, and that's something I'm really, really happy about. While I definitely appreciate the "me-too" nature of adding items to every new MOBA, as it did initially stem from the original DOTA (and by proxy, Warcraft III's shops), learning new item-meta in addition to every map and every nuance for each character can be taxing. I'll often spend hours upon hours theorycrafting builds when returning to specific MOBAs just to figure out the best course of action, which can get tiring if you have to do it for every game. Potions have been replaced by healing wells, found at every fort checkpoint -- making it even easier to get back into the action without any boring moments. Now, there's still plenty of theorycrafting to be had with Heroes of the Storm as characters do get the ability to choose between different abilities after hitting certain level milestones, but you don't need to worry about that one extra crucial layer that can make or break a match. But without items, newer players will be able to pick up any hero and play. Builds are initially limited as you start to level-up within the game's ranking system, offering only a few paths for heroes you've never played as before. It only takes a few games until everything is available though, and at player level 25 (a few days of heavy sessions), every skill will be unlocked automatically. In short, it'll be very easy to come back to Heroes months down the line and learn new playstyles. [embed]292749:58760:0[/embed] The open-ended build system is also great for another reason. Even if you don't build the perfect group composition for any given team, all hope isn't lost at hero selection. For instance, you can spec your support or tank characters into a more damage-centric role over the course of the game. Healers can spec entirely for damage if there's multiple support members on the team, and warriors can go a more tanky route if there's no one to soak up damage. It's far more forgiving than most MOBAs, where you can get yelled at for picking a hero that doesn't fit the current meta, much less your group. Shared experience is the other huge mechanic that Heroes of the Storm is pushing. Basically, it allows everyone on the team to be on the same exact level as one another at all times. For example, you won't have one master player who knows exactly how to lane amassing all of the XP on your team. Instead, the worst player is just as strong as the best one. I dig this system for multiple reasons. For one, it doesn't discourage players from attempting to mount a comeback. While another team can still theoretically outlevel their opponents as a collective, everyone can now feel like they're contributing without having fingers pointed at them. The cast itself is also a huge draw, mostly because it calls upon the rich lore already established in the Warcraft, Diablo, and StarCraft universes. There's not much backstory in terms of the world itself (unlike Riot Games, which does a fantastic job of keeping its lore interesting and fresh), but each hero has a ton of personality to make up for it. Old familiar characters like Thrall or Raynor have a lot of the same icons and skills from their respective games, as well as updated designs and sound effects. It's a joy to play as Nova and hear the classic StarCraft Ghost phrases, running up against the Lord of Terror himself, Diablo. It sounds hyperbolic, but I really do like playing as everyone (the only hero I straight-up don't like is Tychus), and there's more than enough variation to keep everyone entertained. Abathur, for instance, is a character that doesn't directly fight on the battlefield, but instead hitches a ride on other heroes (as well as towers and creeps) to do battle in the form of a sentient spirit of sorts. The Lost Vikings are a lot like Meepo from DOTA, in the sense that they're actually three different units that can be controlled independently, all in different lanes if you can handle it. There are plenty of more traditional platstyles available, as well as more unique choices like Zagara, who summons minions from StarCraft and can create creep (that barren-esque Zerg terrain) to buff herself. Other characters like Ghost and Zeratul can go stealth to pick off enemies. Sylvanas can disable towers or creeps by attacking them. Uther can heal for a short time after his death. You've seen some of these mechanics before in the genre, but the way each style plays out is unique to Heroes. If you're bored of playing the same exact five-on-five, three-lane map over and over in every game, Heroes can offer some respite. There's tons of maps to learn (seven in all at launch, with another Diablo-themed map in development), all of which have objectives built into them. These mini-quests range from collecting coins to pay a ghost pirate to blow away an enemy base, or defending a circle that shoots lasers at opposing forts. While a lot of folks likely won't enjoy the fact that a team can come back and win because of these events, they're actually just a more streamlined and flashy way of handling the Dragon and Baron Nashor objectives in, say, League of Legends. They're also designed to expedite matches -- an average Heroes game is usually 20 minutes, which is a stark contrast to 45-60 minute matches elsewhere. It's a great philosophy, as one of the common genre complaints is the fact that games take forever. The less Blizzard copies the status quo, the better. Heroes of the Storm also provides a more relaxed environment in general. There's far less pressure in unranked matches (as there should be), and there's even an option to turn off allied chat, thus avoiding taunts from angry players -- instead, you can rely on the fairly extensive pinging system on the mini-map to communicate. "All" chat is also entirely disabled, so you won't hear enemy trash-talking either. There's a few bad apples here and there, but in my experience, this is by and large the most welcoming MOBA community. This should help alleviate a lot of the concerns people have in regards to starting up the genre. For those of you who are more competitive, there is a ranked option called Hero League. There's no bans currently, but you can solo or group queue for it, and hero selection is done by a "draft" style format, where players switch off selecting characters. From what I've played of ranked, the community is just as understanding and helpful, and in every lobby I've been in, players have suggested picks for inexperienced folk and adjusted their picks to help the team. At the highest player rank there's also a team Hero League option for all five players to enter. Currently, the ranked system needs a bit more work in terms of the infrastructure behind it. Blizzard has noted that it is building a system in line with Hearthstone's ladder rankings, but top-tier players will require a lot more to keep playing. In terms of monetizaton, Heroes is roughly on par with League (which is fine by me), but with a slightly lower earn-rate for in-game currency. Yes, it's awesome that Dota 2 has all of its heroes unlocked from the start, and I wish we could have that strategy implemented in every MOBA. But the reality is, Blizzard has created enough avenues to earn gold, and the free-to-play rotation every week will still allow you to play every role and get the full Heroes experience. To earn gold, you can complete daily quests, which will net you around one character per month (depending on the price). By playing frequently, you'll earn gold inherently through completed matches, and by leveling up heroes, you'll earn a nice gold bonus at specific ranks. It's not really hard to do any of these tasks -- they merely require you to play heroes from specific franchises, roles, or play the hero itself a certain amount. There's also a few bundles, including a $20 physical boxed set at launch, that provide a large number of characters. A handful of heroes are also very cheap, to the point where you can buy a few after only a day or so of play. Ever since the beta, I've always had a reserved take on Heroes' economy. In short, it's a bit too conservative in terms of rewards, and Blizzard doesn't put out nearly enough sales (the weekly is usually just a middling one character). That could change over time, but for now, I would like to see a higher earn-rate overall. The good news is that all real-money purchases are just that -- real-money, with dollars and cents. You don't need to wade through and calculate "Riot Points" to figure out how much something costs. Skins are only available for purchase with real cash, which doesn't really bother me as they are a completely optional affair. Plus, when you see how much work goes into making a skin, the prices feel justified, especially when they're on sale. Heroes of the Storm has unfairly been branded as a "just a casual game" due to the removal of many tried and true MOBA mechanics. With over 100 hours of play under my belt, I can say with authority that those claims are untrue. Heroes has a ton of depth, it's very well balanced (though not perfect), and nearly every cast member is a blast to play. It achieves almost everything it sets out to accomplish, so I really hope it catches on with the non-believers and continues to grow. [This review is based on a retail build of the free-to-play game, but Blizzard provided us with 60,000 gold to spend in the shop. A $20 retail starter pack was purchased by the reviewer. I am currently player level 40, the maximum.]
Heroes of the Storm photo
My new go-to MOBA
When people hear the term "MOBA" they usually groan. I tend to respond with, "Tell me more." I grew up with RTS games since I could grasp a mouse and keyboard, and my first MOBA was the original DOTA back in 2005. Over t...

Dragon Quest Heroes isn't quite what I expected, but I'm in

Jun 02 // Jordan Devore
Here in the West, the game's full title is Dragon Quest Heroes: The World Tree's Woe and the Blight Below. I'm telling you that now because I can't hold it in any longer.  So silly. But also fun to say out loud (in the privacy of your home where strangers can't hear you being a weirdo). The first level I tried was not the first level of the game, but it was straightforward enough: slay all of the monsters. They're so darn cute! My history with Dragon Quest spans one title, Sentinels of the Starry Sky, so my connection to "iconic" series characters is tenuous at best. But I do love Akira Toriyama's creature designs, and that's a sufficient starting point for this game. [embed]292744:58779:0[/embed] Coming off of Hyrule Warriors, combat in Dragon Quest Heroes feels slower, more deliberate. Strategic. You can swap between four party members at any time, each with their own HP, MP, spells, and abilities. Land enough hits, and you'll fill a gauge that will put your hero into a souped-up state. In this lax early level, juggling characters effectively wasn't crucial for success, but that was definitely the case for the session's next stage, a battle against the towering Gigantes. The idea is to hop into cannons and shoot the cyclops straight in the you-know-where to put it into a downed state, then mash away while it's vulnerable. Don't let it destroy everything. Easy. But the beast had such an absurdly large pool of health that defeating it within the time limit seemed impossible. Matter of fact, after losing, I asked the Square Enix rep just to make sure. The fight was technically possible, he said. Guess I need to work on my strategy and timing. (Or grind?) Either way, the battle should be easier at home with the finished game. Much to my dismay, the demo ended right there. I didn't get to see the town hub. Or character upgrades. Or the story. Or monster medals, which are dropped by fallen foes and can be used to summon them onto the battlefield to fight for your side. For the purposes of writing this preview, that lack of first-hand experience is unfortunate, but the tease has ratcheted up my interest  considerably. Dragon Quest Heroes is already out in Japan, so inquiring minds can see as much or as little footage as they want ahead of the October 13, 2015 release for PS4 in North America. Between all the familiar music, sound effects, and faces, Dragon Quest fans are going to feel at home here. It was a warm, happy, inviting place, even for me. Combat flows more like a role-playing game and skirmishes feel smaller and simpler, but that's not inherently bad. It's just different. After a few hundred hours of Hyrule Warriors, yeah, I could go for something different.
Dragon Quest Heroes photo
Releasing Oct. 13, 2015 in North America
Having spent Too Many Hours with Hyrule Warriors, I was worried I'd be tapped out for Omega Force's next big spinoff, Dragon Quest Heroes. Well, maybe not worried. These games chip away at your life for months on end, and all...

Arkham Knight photo
Arkham Knight

Harley Quinn has a new Arkham Knight trailer, and she is quite pissed off


Swingin' that bat like Sammy Sosa
Jun 02
// Brett Makedonski
Harley Quinn continues her crusade against authority, and she does it in style in this new Arkham Knight trailer. Cops fall one by one via Louisville Sluggers to the dome, explosive children's toys, and swift (non-Taylo...

  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter?
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -