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Nintendo photo

Nintendo Powerline Counselor conditions come to light in new interview

'Color printers weren't common'
Nov 23
// Chris Carter
AV Club has a great interview with a former Nintendo Powerline counselor, and I suggest you read all of it. For those of you who aren't familiar with the concept, Nintendo basically hired people to work in a toll-based call c...
League of Legends photo
League of Legends

League of Legends promotes new Champion with a browser game

Trial of the Kraken Priestess
Nov 23
// Chris Carter
Illaoi, the Kraken Priestess, is the newest Champion on the block for League of Legends. Riot Games is allowing players to get acquainted with her tough love personality by way of a minigame, which is playable in your browser...
Slain photo
I've been keeping an eye on Slain!, a PC project (and PS4 + Xbox One, eventually, with a possible Vita edition) that's going to be released soon on Steam. Well, it was going to be released soon, as developer Wolf Brew Games h...

Bloodborne photo

Here's how to access the Bloodborne: The Old Hunters DLC

Step by step
Nov 23
// Chris Carter
Bloodborne, much like its predecessors, is a relatively esoteric game. Even simple things like locating a $20 DLC package can be hidden beneath the surface, so here's a quick rundown of how to enter the Old Hunters add-...

Review: Bloodborne: The Old Hunters

Nov 23 // Chris Carter
Bloodborne: The Old Hunters (PS4)Developer: From SoftwarePublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: November 24, 2015MSRP: $19.99 (requires core game) Throughout my complete five hour playthrough of The Old Hunters, I couldn't help but think that most of it could have just been in the full game. In fact, a lot of layouts are straight-up reused, not only from an aesthetic standpoint, but in a literal sense. The grand cathedral steps are recreated and only slightly altered, and roughly half of the DLC feels like it could have just been an extension of Yharnam. In some ways that's perfectly fine as it matches up with the rest of the experience, but in others, it's underwhelming. The enemies in particular are new, but a chunk of them aren't as memorable as the foes from other Souls DLCs, in the sense that I didn't really have to alter my tactics to confront them -- a large reason why I love add-ons for previous iterations. The biggest draw of course is the abundance of the titular Hunters, humanoid enemies that operate similarly to the player character. Sure there were a handful of them in the base game, but here, they're front and center, ready to flip some of your own tactics on you. Other enemies aren't as iconic, as there's a decent amount of repeats, from werewolves, to the Cthulu-esque giants, to standard infected townsfolk. The zones are a mixed bag as well. It wasn't until the last stretch of the DLC that I really saw something unique, even if everything up to that point was well designed. Most areas are open, and in the latter half, there's a decent amount of exploration and puzzle solving required. There's also a few mysterious NPCs to deal with, which is a Souls tradition, and I'm happy it was carried over here. [embed]320746:61140:0[/embed] So how are the boss fights? Par for the course, really. While I won't spoil anything, the first major encounter is heavily entwined in the game's lore, and this hulking monstrosity is a sufficient challenge if you're going at it solo. The rest of the boss fights are down down to earth, featuring smaller enemies that mirror the encounters with the aforementioned Hunters. I wasn't blown away by any of them, but I enjoyed the fights all the same, mostly because of the fact that I'm a sucker for smaller scale battles. In all, you're getting roughly five hours worth of content for the core story (about 10 if you do everything), 10 weapons (including a new, good shield), and five bosses. The new "League" update is available to everyone, and augments the overall package quite well. I might sound down on a lot of aspects of The Old Hunters, but ultimately, it will satiate most fans out there. The fact that it was supposed to be two DLCs that were merged into one makes sense, as part of it feels like cut content, and the other half seems like wholly original work. While I'm glad I had an excuse to drop into the world of Yharnam once again, there's a part of me that feels disappointed that this will be the last, and only add-on for Bloodborne. If you're curious as to how to access the DLC, check out the video above. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Bloodborne DLC review photo
All Nightmare Long
While many gamers out there are fighting the good fight against DLC, From Software is certainly making the case for it. Dark Souls had one of the most fantastic add-ons of all time in the form of Artorias of the Abyss, w...

FFXII photo

Final Fantasy's Vaan isn't a street rat: I don't buy that

'I'm gonna be a sky pirate'
Nov 23
// Chris Carter
I've always had a lukewarm relationship with Final Fantasy XII, and its protagonist, Vaan. The only thing it really did for me was ape Final Fantasy XI's combat and add in gambits. Post-game content was pretty cool comp...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Fallout 4 Script Extender has arrived, and with it the ability to make bigger mods for the game

Early initial release, but give it time
Nov 23
// Joe Parlock
Bethesda games are known for being modding playgrounds, and Fallout 4 is no exception. It’s only been out for about two weeks, but there’s already plenty of worthwhile mods floating around. Sevral mods for Skyrim,...
Minecraft photo

Minecraft Pocket Edition and Windows 10 Edition finally have redstone

Make a computer in your phone
Nov 23
// Joe Parlock
Redstone is one of the most important things in Minecraft. It lets people build incredibly impressive things such as self-performing songs and fully-functioning computers. Seriously, the kind of stuff some people can do with ...
Payday 2 photo
Payday 2

Overkill: 'For all the distress we've caused the past few weeks... we're sorry'

Still not ditching microtransactions
Nov 23
// Joe Parlock
Last week Payday 2 developer Overkill had a sit down to discuss various things with their Steam community moderators, who had gone on strike following even further tweaks to the game’s controversial new microtransaction...
World of Darkness photo
World of Darkness

White Wolf can still license World of Darkness to other publishers

Despite being bought by Paradox
Nov 23
// Joe Parlock
People got cautiously excited when Paradox bought the popular tabletop World of Darkness IP and its creator White Wolf last month. The publisher is known mainly for grand strategy games (developed in-house) as well as th...
amiibo photo

One year after the debut of amiibo, here are the ones that are rare worldwide

After restocks
Nov 22
// Chris Carter
With multiple waves of restocks, many shortages in the great amiibo war of 2015 have been resolved. But I decided to do some research today to try to track down the toughest amiibo to find, and I've come up with a brief list ...
PlayStation TV photo
PlayStation TV

Hot Deal: PlayStation TV on sale for $19.99

Vita (TV) means life
Nov 22
// Kyle MacGregor
In case you haven't picked up a PlayStation Vita yet, now is a good time to (sort of) pick one up on the cheap. Best Buy is currently offering PlayStation TV, the Vita's microconsole variant, for $19.99. Of course, that attra...

Podtoid 313: Horse Cock

Nov 22 // Kyle MacGregor
[embed]321993:61218:0[/embed] Recent Episodes: Podtoid 312: Call of Duty: Black Oddish III Podtoid 311: The Fallout 4 S.P.E.C.I.A.L. Podtoid 310: Intergalactic Child Abduction Podtoid 309: Code Name Li Po Podtoid 308: Back to the Force You can reach us by email at [email protected]
Destructoid's video game podcast
Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or download it here. The Podtoid gang returns from Korea and Canada to recount tales of their adventures, discuss Downwell, Star Wars: Battlefront, and other fine games releasing this holiday season, our favorite spreads to put on breads, and difficulties with daiquiris. Also, horse cocks.

Indivisible photo

Take a look at the full cast of Indivisible's guest characters

Don't stop believing
Nov 22
// Jonathan Holmes
Indivisible is currently in crowdfunding overtime, with over a million dollars raised and 13 days left in its extended Indigogo campaign. The game still has about $400,000 left to raise in that time, so it's anyone's guess if...

Just Cause 3 and Dragon Quest Heroes 28% off for PC/Steam

Fly? Yes. Land? No.
Nov 22
// Dealzon
With all the Battlefront and Fallout 4 news from the last few weeks it feels like the hype-train really never left the station. But in the deal train makes go on as December titles are now on the horizon. Square Enix's Just C...
Bravely Second photo
Bravely Second

Rumor: Bravely Second swaps Native American headdress for cowboy hat

An offensive attempt to be unoffensive?
Nov 22
// Jonathan Holmes
Destructoid just received a heated news tip in our tips inbox stating "...I learned that Square Enix has replaced a Native American class called Tomahawk with Cowboy class in Bravely Second's western version. I find this very...
My new hero photo
My new hero

Mark Cuban: League of Legends is 'a real sport'

If anyone knows sports, it's him
Nov 22
// Jed Whitaker
If you're like me, you know the name and face of Mark Cuban, but you probably don't know a whole lot about him. I put on my detective coat and hat and did some digging (read: Wikipedia) and found that he is a businessman...
amiibo photo
No need to wait in line
The amiibo season this year is nearly over. Pending the release of the Shovel Knight figure in "Holiday 2015" (which could very easily be pushed), Lottie is the last known toy to be released in 2015, as a Target exclusive. As...

Call of Duty sales photo
Call of Duty sales

Call of Duty: Black Ops III tops Japanese charts

Two weeks and counting
Nov 21
// Kyle MacGregor
You typically don't see first-person shooters topping the Japanese software charts, but that's exactly what Treyach's Call of Duty: Black Ops III has done since its launch two weeks ago. The first-person shooter moved 18...
Holiday toys photo
Holiday toys

Christmas Pikachu and other holiday Pokemon merch

From the Pokemon Center
Nov 21
// Steven Hansen
From the people that brought you Intern Pikachu, the Pokémon Center is doing a holiday line of Pokémon products. Deck the halls with Pokéballs of holly. Rudolph the red-nosed Deerling. Uh. Man, I really h...

The Silent Hill Retrospective: Origins

Nov 21 // Stephen Turner
Origins is, without being too harsh, a Xerox of the original. The big picture is always in frame, but many of the details, what made the original Silent Hill so special, are faded. Familiar faces fulfill their established roles, locations are revisited and remixed, and the journey from the outskirts of town to the middle of nowhere seems oddly comforting. It's Silent Hill re-told by fans; a closeness that robs Origins of an outsider perspective and player alienation. Narratively speaking, Silent Hill's success was down to its "one-and-done" attitude. For all the weirdness on display, its character motives were clear and the important historical aspects were found on every street corner; allowing us to fill in the blanks with little conjecture. Origins, as the name suggests, fills it in for us at the expense of brevity and credibility, as all those detours into exposition and connections actually harm the original's acts of desperation and improvisation. Be honest: Do you need to know exactly how a baby girl ends up at the side of the road in Silent Hill? Isn’t it more tragic and disturbing when the Masons stumble upon her, and letting our imaginations run wild? That's the major narrative flaw of all prequels, though. They can only embellish, not establish. Silent Hill never needed Travis Grady. While he’s actually a likable protagonist, and his profession as a trucker is quite metaphorical (motel suicides and freeway escapism go hand-in-hand), his story is, sadly, just an excuse for new gameplay ideas and player agency. Origins is Alessa Gillespie’s story, from the house fire to the rear view mirror. One passes into lore, the other is just a footnote, but both vie for your attention in an act of narrative dominance. Unsurprisingly, it seeps into every scene between Travis and Alessa, as he struggles with her manipulations, before succumbing to the role of catalyst. To its credit, Origins made good on its use of mise-en-scene when it comes to giving Travis definition. The various locations were grandiose, gothic, and theatrical - each one a conspiratory labyrinth beyond the understanding of a small blue collar man - with only the Riverside Motel being intimate and claustrophobic for the sake of acceptance and heroism. For a character dragged along by established events, Travis' only form of control is through the use of mirrors, now portals to The Otherworld and back again. Though it reinforced his strength to rebel against the ruling class of Silent Hill, the act also dampened its most foreign aspect. The Otherworld (here, a fire-damaged mess until the familiar rust-and-blood takes hold) was no longer this conceptual tour-de-force that made the audience endure for its narrative riches. Now it was a tourist attraction, one that could be appraised at the flip of a switch. Though their appearances are little more than novelty, seeing Silent Hill's cast all young and fresh faced left us with a wistful yearning, not unlike finding old snapshots of family and friends. Dahlia Gillespie was a white-trash brunette, while Dr. Kaufmann looked a little more dashing without the spare tires. Sure, their stories were already told, but if Origins couldn't escape the past, at least it would have fun reveling in nostalgia. Most affecting, though entirely arbitrary, is Lisa Garland. Instead of being seen through the eyes of a child, we see the drug addict once alluded to in her diary. At the motel, that sound of her having sex in a nearby room perfectly deconstructs the naïve adoration of her fanbase, bonding them to an equally heartbroken Travis in the process. Personally, it's one of the better parts of Origins, a subtle, real-time moment that Climax would refine in every one of Shattered Memories' car journeys. From then on, a grittier, gut-punch characterisation would permeate all of the Westernised Silent Hill games. Origins isn't an awful game, nor is it a stellar one. It simply exists. There's always a shallow memory waiting to strike, deep in the mist, lost to the shadows. Psycho-sexual images roam the halls, lumbering beats loosely touch upon its protagonist's travels, nurses make their return and substitutes like The Butcher step in for missing icons. Origins works best at conjuring up warm feelings when revisiting Central Silent Hill, left to your own devices and Akira Yamaoka's bite-sized score (which is more of throwback, than throwaway). But for every right, it's bound by a necessary wrong. Personally, that's what make the game so middle-of-road, rather than outright terrible. But it's impossible to ignore the fact Origins was meant to reboot the series with a fresh set of eyes, and sell a few PSPs in the meantime. Instead, it only served to strengthen the trepidation in its fanbase. Silent Hill would go through a difficult time, of which much is still up for debate, before Konami gave up on this outsourcing malarkey. From Origins to Downpour, as much as they tried new ideas, they were always reliant on what the fans liked to sell as many copies as they could in the face of dwindling interest. And who knows if P.T. will get that resurrection it deserves. But no matter what happens, just like Travis Grady, Origins will always remain the little guy in the big burning house, almost consumed by the flames of the past.
Silent Hill photo
'You all left that girl to burn!'
Silent Hill: Origins opened with an outsider saving a little girl from a house fire. But when you look back on its place in the series, it meant so much more than a simple rescue. Travis Grady had problems of his own, but the...

JRPGs photo

PS Vita RPG Ray Gigant heads west next spring

Playable at PlayStation Experience
Nov 21
// Kyle MacGregor
PlayStation Vita dungeon crawler Ray Gigant is coming to North America and Europe next spring. The role-playing game comes from Operation Abyss and Demon Gaze studio Experience, and while it was published by Bandai Namco in ...

Review: Mayan Death Robots

Nov 21 // Patrick Hancock
Mayan Death Robots (PC)Developer: Sileni StudiosPublisher: SOEDESCO PublishingReleased: November 20, 2015MSRP: $14.99  Mayan Death Robots pits two giant robots against each other as a television sport for other robots, I suppose, to watch. Each season of this television show chooses a new planet, and it just so happens that this season is on Earth around the 1500s. The premise is loose and really only serves to usher the player from one mission to the next, but it's definitely cute. Mayan Death Robots is a 1v1 match that plays out similar to the classic Worms games. Players pick one of the eight unique robots and are then plopped into a battlefield. The objective of each game is to destroy the opponent's Core, which is a small box somewhere behind them. In the way, however, is plenty of terrain as well as the enemy robot. Each robot has two types of attacks, the ability to jump, and the ability to create new terrain. That last bit is interesting; each player can create terrain in the form of Tetris blocks anywhere within a certain radius of their robot, as long as it's not floating mid-air. This allows some interesting defensive play in a game that would otherwise be entirely offensive. There's a limit to the amount of blocks, and using it consecutively yields less and less blocks. [embed]321771:61215:0[/embed] Turns happen simultaneously and publicly. There's a short time period to choose an action, then another time period to aim said action, then both players' actions happen at once. However, knowing what an opponent is going to do doesn't mean it can be stopped. If a player sees their opponent shooting straight at the core, that shot will go off. Shooting the ground beneath them or the robot itself won't affect anything since both shots are fired at once. Tiny pixelated Mayans roam about on each player's side, worshiping the giant robot from the sky. Killing the enemy's Mayans will grant a bonus to the explosion size of the player, but it's rarely worth it to fire specifically at Mayans; it is usually just an added benefit of firing at something else. Mayans will also attack the enemy robot if they stand nearby. This is legitimately useful, since they are constantly doing damage while the turn timer is ticking down, and it prevents the opponent from jumping right next to the Core and blowing it to bits. Every so often, an item wheel will spin and award both players randomly selected items. These items are one-time use, but provide some variety to the gameplay that can start to feel tedious after long play sessions. The game incentivizes the player to use the item quickly, since they are lost upon death. If a player is dead when the wheel spins, they do not receive the item. The core gameplay is great. Playing against another human can lead to intense back-and-forth matches. Multiplayer supports two players locally (no online) with either gamepads or the keyboard. It's a nice feature that both players can use the keyboard, since not everyone has controllers for their PC. An odd omission is the total lack of mouse support, even in menus. In a game that focuses on aiming precise shots, it would have been a boon to be able to use the mouse. Perhaps the most unfortunate aspect is that players are forced to unlock the playable robots and the more interesting items. Of the ten robots available, six are unlocked from the start and the rest are acquired through the campaign. While I understand the necessity to give the player a feeling of progression, those who buy the game and just want to play with a friend will be disappointed. Luckily, the campaign can be played through with a buddy. All of the robots feel different from each other, despite the only difference being their two attacks. Some of them have special properties, like having their attacks become more powerful the longer they are in the air, or being able to shoot through certain terrain. While they feel unique, all robots play very similarly: get into a position that your attacks benefit from, and shoot away. Each match has the potential to be an intense back-and-forth or a complete slog; it all depends on the players (or AI) involved. The campaign is set up as a series of over 30 "episodes." There is no tutorial, but players will likely pick up the mechanics quickly. Occasionally, these episodes will modify the standard gameplay by adding stage hazards. These hazards tend to be either incredibly annoying or completely useless. Only rarely do they affect gameplay in a unique, interesting way. There is also an occasional stage boss, which removes the cores from the map and asks both players to destroy the monster. This is great, if you're playing with another human. Cooperating with the AI is downright awful. You see, the boss has to be "summoned" by performing certain actions on the map, but the AI doesn't give a shit. The AI is more concerned with destroying the player's core, making it a huge pain to even get the boss to appear most of the time. If the match ends before the boss is summoned, the player must restart the level. The bosses each have their own mechanics, which are very hit or miss. Some bosses, like the map modifiers, are more annoying than they are worth. Plus, after defeating a boss, the cores come back and the match continues like normal. It's a strange cooperative-to-competitive swing that just feels random. Other than the boss levels, there is no way to lose a level while playing the campaign. Sure, the AI can win, but it doesn't matter, the player progresses to the next stage anyway. This makes sense if two humans are playing each other, since one will always win, but not when playing solo. There's no incentive for a single player to all. There are no rankings, stars, or scores to do better in, there's no leaderboards, nothing. A solo player could go through each level and lose, as long as they summon the boss in the boss levels, and progress through the entire campaign and unlock everything.  There's also a Versus mode which is as straightforward as they come. Players can only compete on the modified maps by going through the campaign and selecting that specific episode to play on, but it would have been great to be able to choose these modifiers from a list in Versus mode, potentially mixing and matching some to create some zany situations. Unfortunately, nothing of the sort exists. Versus is as vanilla as it gets. Despite my enjoyment of the game mechanically, I cannot recommend Mayan Death Robots to anyone looking for a worthwhile single-player experience. For those wanting another entertaining local multiplayer game, however, it provides some unique strategic gameplay. It likely won't keep players enthralled for hours on end, but serves as a great addition to any local-multiplayer library.
Mayan Death Robots review photo
Maybe they're friendly death robots...
I really enjoyed my time with Mayan Death Robots at PAX East this year. My buddy and I played a few matches and left anticipating its eventual release. Now that it is released, I was excited to jump in and see the final ...

Koei Tecmo photo
Koei Tecmo

Atelier Escha & Logy Plus coming to PlayStation Vita in January

With lots of new content
Nov 21
// Kyle MacGregor
Atelier Escha & Logy Plus: Alchemists of the Dusk Sky is coming to PlayStation Vita in North America on January 19 and Europe the very next day, Koei Tecmo has announced. The role-playing game originally came out on PlayS...
EDF photo

Two Earth Defense Force games deploy Dec. 8

Nov 21
// Kyle MacGregor
XSEED Games is serving up a double-shot of bug-killing action on December 8, simultaneously putting out both Earth Defense Force 4.1 and Earth Defense Force 2 in North America. EDF 4.1, an expansion on last year's Earth ...
Final Fantasy photo
Final Fantasy

Hahahaha: Tidus shows his stuff in Dissidia Final Fantasy arcade

Sorry, 'Tee-dus'
Nov 21
// Chris Carter
Tidus (Teedus) is kind of an awkward protagonist. X was the first fully-voiced Final Fantasy game, and Square really tried to force in some strange subplots and scenes meant to evoke emotion -- instead, they ended ...
Doujin bundle photo
Doujin bundle

Humble Weekly brings back the Japanese indies

Good variety
Nov 21
// Jordan Devore
The doujin scene isn't my usual beat, but Astebreed is cool as hell and I like sharing deals whenever possible. As such, hey, you may want to take a look at this Japan-centric Humble Weekly Bundle. No rush! You've got several...
amiibo photo
The Trinity shortage was a year ago
It's crazy to think that exactly one year ago today, I was hopping from store to store to pick up the first ever wave of amiibo. While characters like Mario were extremely easy to find, I distinctly noticed that even though I...

Virtual Reality photo
Virtual Reality

Samsung's $99 Gear VR headset out now in US

International release to follow
Nov 21
// Kyle MacGregor
Oculus and Samsung's $99 Gear VR headset is now available in the United States. The attractive price point comes with one caveat: the device is only compatible with this year's line of Samsung smartphones (the Galaxy Not...
MIDA Multi-Tool photo
MIDA Multi-Tool

Hold up: The MIDA Multi-Tool is coming back to Destiny

Nov 21
// Chris Carter
When Destiny made the jump to "Year 2" with The Taken King, a number of Exotics didn't make it along for the ride. A huge one is the Gjallarhorn, a notoriously unbalanced rocket launcher that nearly every raid group...

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