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Colbertoid photo

Colbert is giving his audience an earful of The Legend of Zelda

Symphony of the Goddesses on Oct. 13
Oct 05
// CJ Andriessen
I have been to two performances of The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses. The first was at the Pantages Theater in Los Angeles for one of the three premier performances. The second time was this past summer at the Wa...
Dead Star photo
Dead Star

The developers of ReCore sure are keeping busy

Armature announces Dead Star
Oct 05
// Jordan Devore
Dead Star is a top-down space combat game in development at Armature, the Austin studio formed by some key folks who worked on Metroid Prime 3: Corruption under Retro Studios. It has ten-on-ten multiplayer with dogfights, out...
Destiny photo

Microtransactions are coming to Destiny, but so are 18 new emotes

Shake what the Traveler gave ya
Oct 05
// Alissa McAloon
The Special Order vendor Tess Everis is returning to Destiny, and bringing 18 new emotes with her. The downside? You won't be able to buy the new dances with Glimmer, Destiny's in-game currency. Instead, players will need to ...
Bloggers Wanted photo
Bloggers Wanted

Bloggers Wanted: They call me spooky

Don't be afraid...
Oct 05
// Pixie The Fairy
October is a rarity among months in gaming. Often, you can't really think of a good game to pair with Thanksgiving, Christmas or Easter, but you can certainly think of games for Halloween. It's a time we turn our thoughts to ...
Indivisible photo

Skullgirls dev's metroidvania RPG Indivisible is looking pretty dang good

Up on Indiegogo, with a playable demo
Oct 05
// Darren Nakamura
Back in July we got a barebones announcement that Skullgirls developer Lab Zero Games has been working on a role-playing game called Indivisible and that it would begin a crowdfunding campaign for it late in September. It's ...
Driveclub photo

It's the last day to nab Driveclub PS Plus Edition

Might as well
Oct 05
// Jordan Devore
Hey, PlayStation Plus members! This is the last day to download the extended trial version of Driveclub before Sony pulls the offer. Add it to your account now before you forget. Driveclub PS Plus Edition comes with 13 tracks...
SMT IV Final photo
SMT IV Final

Shin Megami Tensei IV Final isn't a repeat

Don't be fooled by the name
Oct 05
// Jordan Devore
Atlus has been building to something Shin Megami Tensei related with a countdown. Thanks to Famitsu, we now know it's a new 3DS game, not rehash, called Shin Megami Tensei IV Final. It's expected to release February 10, 2016 ...
Elite controller photo
Elite controller

Goodness gracious, the Xbox One Elite Controller can do a lot

It really goes whole hog
Oct 05
// Brett Makedonski
The Xbox One Elite Controller was unveiled at E3, and it was kind of the sleeper-hit of Microsoft's showcase. The likes of game announcements and backward compatibility got the most attention, but damn -- that controlle...
Ubisoft photo

Ubisoft has a mystery stream going to tease its next project

'Survival is timeless'
Oct 05
// Brett Makedonski
[Update: Looks like we have our answer and it's Far Cry Primal.] What's Ubisoft working on next? Our only indication is this quick loop of a hieroglyph depicting a man holding a spear and bow. It's likely one of those fancy ...
Rocket League photo
Rocket League

Celebrate Halloween in Rocket League

Play this month to earn gear
Oct 05
// Jordan Devore
Halloween will be here before we know it -- especially if you're a Rocket League fan. If you play the game between October 18 and November 2, you'll be able to earn spooky customization items as post-match drops whether you w...
amiibo photo

The new retailer-exclusive amiibo shouldn't be hard to get

Good news for you and Mii
Oct 05
// Brett Makedonski
Continuing the recent trend of "Hey, amiibo aren't that hard to find anymore," the next North American release looks like it won't be that hard to find. And, the reason for that isn't just because this is the first group of a...
Sci-fi adventure photo
Sci-fi adventure

Pollen is a sci-fi thriller without jump scares

VR optional but recommended
Oct 05
// Jordan Devore
Another game for the "best played in virtual reality" list. Pollen, as you might recall from that time Brett ran a story about bees, is a sci-fi exploration game set on the largest moon of Saturn. You're on a research station, pulling and prodding things to solve puzzles, take in the environmental storytelling, and find out "what hides under Titan's surface."
Mario Maker photo
Mario Maker

Mario Maker player subverts guilt-trip level to save every Yoshi

Take that, Ross
Oct 05
// Jordan Devore
Some level creators are using Super Mario Maker as a platform to make us feel guilty. They're dreaming up courses that put Yoshi in harm's way and have it so Mario can't reach the end without sacrificing his faithful companio...
Zelda photo

Get a closer look at Legend of Zelda: Hyrule Warriors Legends

Oct 05
// Chris Carter
Hyrule Warriors Legends is set to debut on January 21 in Japan on 3DS, but for now, you can get a closer look at the new characters by way of the Zelda Musou Twitter account. New character model visuals are present for T...
Big Boss photo
Big Boss

Konami files trademark for 'Big Boss' pachinko machine

Kept you gamblin' huh?
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
Oh hey it's another pachinko story today! Following the recent claims that Konami is moving further away from traditional games development, and is instead focusing on pachinko and mobile markets, they have filed a new tradem...
StarCraft II photo
StarCraft II

Blizzard unveils all new UI for StarCraft II

Available for everyone
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
The final part of the StarCraft II trilogy, Legacy of the Void, is set to drop next month on PC. But before then, all fans, regardless of whether or not they've purchased the new expansion, will be seeing a UI overhaul. The ...
Guitar Hero Live photo
Guitar Hero Live

Guitar Hero Live is approaching DLC in a fairly controversial way

Streaming instead of ownership
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
FreeStyleGames, the developer of Guitar Hero Live, has posted its plans for the Guitar Hero TV (GHTV) portion of the game, and it's intriguing to say the least. Basically, instead of buying songs piecemeal for $2 or so, you'r...
Hearthstone photo

Hearthstone will finally be available in Japan soon

'Later this month'
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
The time has finally come for Hearthstone to hit Japan. Although the game wasn't previously that popular in the region (partially due to the fact that they had to play an international version), Blizzard will bring the g...
Nintendo photo

Nintendo excluded from list of world's top 100 brands for first time

The list began in 2001
Oct 05
// Brett Makedonski
I've gone on-record in the past to state that I would never, ever in a million years let my #Brandfall. Your brand is everything. Your brand is pure profit if you value retweets and likes more than money -- and what good mill...
Bayonetta photo

Sega Sammy is cutting its pachinko division by 200 jobs

Bayonetta machines blamed
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
Sega Sammy is cutting 200 jobs from its pachinko division, by way of a "voluntary retirement" program. Strangely enough Bayonetta and Fist of the North Star machines were blamed, which "were not sufficient to offset the ...
Blizzard photo

Blizzard games are now on sale digitally at Amazon

Including point cards
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
By way of an email I obtained this morning, Amazon has seemingly opened up shop for digital purchases of Blizzard games. Previously the marketplace was mostly littered with physical versions, and point cards were constantly o...

Underwater VR in Narcosis might wreck my shit

Oct 05 // Zack Furniss
Oculus Connect 2 was simultaneously exciting and nerve-wracking for me. Sure, I'd be able to step into worlds I could hardly fathom, but one of those worlds was the bottom of the gods-damned sea. Scrambling from a prior appointment to the event's seventh floor, I came across the room that contained Honor Code's Narcosis. Steven and Alessandro had both spent time with the demo at previous events, but it was my turn to explore the depths of his survival horror experience. I knocked on the door, expecting someone named Lawrence (making the rookie mistake of confusing the PR person for the game developer). When an excitable, charismatic Frenchman named Quentin opened the door, I started to apologize and walk away, thinking I had intruded on someone's private quarters. He assured me I was in the right place and led me to a computer, placing the Oculus Rift on my head and an Xbox One controller in my hands. The Los Angeles fire-air threatened to break my immersion from the start, but I wanted to be afraid, and I tried to block out my surroundings as best as I could. Another developer from Honor Code, the measured and engaging David Chen, came in as I was adjusting to the controls. They both made sure I understood how to maneuver my diver and then respectfully remained quiet as I made my way through an aquatic facility. Since you're wearing a helmeted diving suit, the Rift feels thematically appropriate. Having this gadget on your head is less distracting and more of a natural extension. Being able to lean forward and see oxygen gauges just beneath your eyes helps you accept you're really in this environment. I was peeking around corners as I approached them, sure that some ungodly being, whatever was responsible for the flooding of this base, was going to drag me even further into the depths. My demo was largely similar to the one Alessandro saw, though I spent more time slowly wading through a cave infested with long-limbed crabs the size of cars. I launched flares at them, watching them flinch into the darkness. How I hated having to slowly approach them to sidle past them to progress. Wandering around the sea floor is what messed with me most, though. Looking up and having no ceiling (be it cement or stalactites) to protect me was all it took for the stomach-eels return. I could no longer just stare ahead and keep progressing; I was turning around to make sure nothing was chasing me every few steps. Heat-induced sweat on my brow and the acute awareness that I was alone in a room with two men I didn't know was enough to keep me from full immersion, but if I had been at home, I'm not sure how I'd fare. An hour of wandering through sea caves as murderous cuttlefish tried to latch onto my face might be enough to break me. Coupled with the "Narcosis Moments" that the developers mentioned (hallucinations stemming from oxygen deprivation), I might not survive long enough to write about this again. But as much as digital submersion frightens me, finishing these games is my way of conquering this bizarre fear. I hope to play Narcosis when it releases next year for the entertainment, horror, and catharsis it could bring me.
Narcosis photo
Digital submersion is my one true fear
The ocean has never been particularly terrifying to me. Contemplating on a beach and staring at the blue sprawl fills me with a sense of calm, not horror. Snorkeling in a Hawaiian crater was one of the awe-inspiring mome...

Review: Rock Band 4

Oct 05 // Chris Carter
Rock Band 4 (PS4, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: HarmonixPublisher: Harmonix (with distribution by Mad Catz)Released: October 6, 2015MSRP: $59.99 (game), $129.99 (guitar bundle), $249.99 (Band-in-a-Box) So let's get right into it. The setlist (seen here) is going to be a point of contention for many. Point blank, I'm not really a fan of most of it, for multiple reasons. Firstly, U2 (the Guy Fieri of music) was added last-minute, and features not one but two songs featured in career mode. This completely obliterated the "random" feature for one of the groups I played with, as they hilariously refused to play U2. Then you have the issue of era disparity due to a disjointed design. Often times you'll find similar types of music grouped together, but generally speaking, Rock Band 4 is all over the place. For instance, there's one Elvis song ("Suspicious Minds," which I really dig), but then, there's nothing else even close to that age or style of music. You also have the issue of showcasing a heavy helping of B-hits from major artists, like "Kick it Out" from Heart or "Prayer" from Disturbed. Of course, music is subjective, but my major issue is the lack of any real epic rock tracks (and I don't mean "epic" in the bad meme sense) on offer here, which every rhythm game tends to provide. I mean, "That Smell" from Lynyrd Skynyrd? You can't help but feel like the rights to a lot of big-ticket songs weren't on the table, some of which instead went to Activision's Guitar Hero Live. But I think this weaker setlist is kind of what Harmonix is going for. They're banking on the fact that you already own a ton of DLC, or are willing to shell out for it. That's going to be a point of contention for many people, who may have started out in the Rock Band ecosystem on Xbox, but like most of this generation, have since switched to PS4 exclusively. I'm kind of torn on where I stand personally, because while I do see Rock Band as a "platform," I wish the included setlist were as strong as it has been in the past. Just to clarify with Harmonix as of this week, I double-checked on the DLC roadmap beyond the singles in the store now (of which there are hundreds of piecemeal tracks). Track packs (read: those discs of songs you bought) are being worked on currently, and aren't up for launch. Additionally, title exports (Rock Band 1 and 2 songs mostly) are not available yet, and have no time frame at the moment. Finally, Harmonix is "looking into" exporting Rock Band 3 but nothing is finalized. None of this affects this review as it's all theoretical, but it's good to know. As disappointed as I am with the base setlist, the game, as always, is sound. The common theme here with Rock Band 4 is "if it ain't broke, don't fix it," which is great for those of you who just want a current-gen Rock Band, and bad if you wanted something revolutionary. While the voting system (which allows players to select tracks, or vague categories such as eras and genres in a democratic fashion) is very cool, the career mode, despite promises of a major shakeup with the choice system, is largely the same. [embed]312826:60607:0[/embed] While there are choices such as picking between selling out and making more money in the short term or going on the road and garnering more long-term fans, they all feel very gamey in the end ("do you want fans or money?"). I really like the little story blurbs that pop up along the way that provide updates for the narrative such as "your van that you bought for next to nothing lost a door," but they really are more fluff than substance. Plus, the concept of playing tons of gigs with set songs (and some open-ended lists) for cash to buy new accessories never appealed to me -- when combined with the so-so story and the fact that every song is unlocked from the get-go, it doesn't feel like a gametype worth the effort. As a result, most of my time was spent with the quick tour and freeplay modes, which are still a lot of fun with a group. It's as simple as syncing the instruments (which is incredibly easy to do now) and pressing start, then you're ready to rock. The aforementioned voting system is a ton of fun, as it accepts every band member's choices, then triggers a slot machine-like animation that randomly picks one. It's fair, and it's a nice break from manually choosing songs. In terms of the adjustments to the instruments themselves, I also have mixed feelings. Everything has been marginally upgraded (both physically and in-game), but I'm still reeling from the complete lack of keyboard and Pro Guitar support. Harmonix certainly has a strong argument in that most players simply did not use these features last time around, but I can't help but feel like Rock Band 4 has been downgraded as a result. While I never really preferred the Rock Band style guitars (X-plorer for life), the build is noticeably more sturdy, which also applies for the new drum kit and microphone. The new gameplay feature with the guitar is the addition of freestyle sections, which no longer bound players to the rigors of tough solo portions. For casual players, this change is pretty great, and allows anyone to rock out in a fashion that more accurately portrays the spirit of the franchise. In essence, during your solo spots, you'll see new markers for blue and orange freestyle notations in the track. You'll simply strum to the beat, with the blue portion notating the top frets and the orange noting the bottom, and that's basically it. Sometimes you'll have to strum once and hold, for others, you'll have to shift rapidly to different frets. You won't lose any momentum here if you screw up, and every fret will cue a different sound, so you can come up with your own concoctions. The best part is this is wholly optional, so if you want to shred "Through the Fire and Flames" on expert, you can. Also, every song supports a full-time freestyle solo through a separate menu option. The drums have remained mostly the same, outside of Dynamic Drum Fills, and, as an exception to the lack of Pro instruments, Pro Drums (if you buy the Mad Catz Rock Band 4 Cymbal Expansion Kit of course). The former feature allows you to deploy Overdrive (Star Power) during pre-determined sections -- it's a minor change, and fortunately, like most of the new stuff, you can also turn this off. If you rock the mic, you'll have a few other marginal improvements as well. Now there's Freestyle Vocals, which allows people to improvise a bit. As long as you still sing on key, you'll be able to score points. It makes things a little more fun for singers as they don't have to follow as rigid of a pattern. Again, every instrument has been improved on paper, but not in a way that completely eclipses a lot of the advancements made with the last iteration. The physical element of bringing over instruments is also a bit strained, partially outside of Harmonix's purview. Firstly, you'll have to follow their compatibility chart here to see if your device will even work with the new game. Additionally, due to the shift in technology from the 360 to the Xbox One, you'll need a $20 adapter to even use your old instruments that do work. When you add in that nothing works cross-console family, things get even more tricky, as it'll cost you $250 to grab a new guitar, drum kit, and a mic -- and if you want to get a second guitar, it gets even pricier.  Rock Band 4 is a bit of a conundrum. On one hand, it's not only a hassle to switch generations due to the fact that so many elements don't work with the new one, but additionally -- Rock Band 3 is still a thing, supports all of your DLC, and has more features. On the other, there's nothing inherently wrong with this iteration, and for those of you who missed out in the past or have broken 360s or PS3s, you'll still be able to rock out into the night with friends and have a whole lot of fun. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher. The Band-in-a-Box bundle with a guitar, drum kit, and mic was assessed for this review. DLC or pre-order content of any kind was not provided, and was purchased by the reviewer.]
Rock Band 4 photo
Back in plastic
[Disclosure: Nick Chester, who is currently employed at Harmonix, previously worked at Destructoid. As always, no relationships, personal or professional, were factored into the preview. I personally didn't work with Chester ...

Home Free photo
Home Free

Dog RPG Home Free funded in five days

Kicks Arfer
Oct 05
// Darren Nakamura
Things have been looking kind of sad over on Kickstarter lately. Aside from the huge names making games like Mighty No. 9, Yooka-Laylee, Bloodstained, and Shenmue 3, it seems like the ratio of successes to failures has i...
Xbox One Elite photo
Xbox One Elite

One major feature from the Xbox One Elite controller is coming to all pads soon

Button mapping
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
The $150 Xbox One Elite controller has a ton of new features, but one of the most interesting mechanics is easily the ability to remap every button on the controller. Responding to a fan, Xbox's director of program manag...
Star Citizen photo
Star Citizen

Star Citizen developer CIG threatens to sue outlet over recent allegations

This whole situation is out of control
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
Strap yourselves in, it's time for another Star Citizen story. Depending on who you talk to, Star Citizen is somewhere in-between the most ambitious game of all time, or a complete train wreck (the answer is likely ...
Assassin's Creed photo
Assassin's Creed

Assassin's Creed: Syndicate Xbox One file size revealed

Roughly what we expected
Oct 05
// Laura Kate Dale
If you're an Xbox One owner and are planning to get a digital copy of Assassin's Creed: Syndicate, the time has come to ensure you've got enough space free on your hard drive. Thanks to the game's digital pre-order page going...
Undertale photo

Undertale is the highest rated PC game on Metacritic right now

Beating out Half-Life 2 and BioShock
Oct 05
// Laura Kate Dale
A couple of weeks back Destructoid's very own Ben Davis reviewed Undertale, a very EarthBound-inspired JRPG that melded a unique battle system, non-combat progression options, and a charming narrative to create an incredibly ...
Atlus photo

Atlus teases something Shin Megami Tensei IV related

'15,000 tweets'
Oct 05
// Chris Carter
Right now on the official Shin Megami Tensei IV site, Atlus is running a social media campaign to unlock some sort of special announcement. In short, if the game gets 15,000 retweets, we'll find out what it is. If you cl...
Shenmue 3 photo
Shenmue 3

$6M isn't enough to make Shenmue 3 'gorgeous visually'

'I could do with a bit more money'
Oct 05
// Vikki Blake
$6.3 million isn't enough for Shenmue creator Yu Suzuki. Talking to Eurogamer, Suzuki said that while the game will be crafted in line with the funds available to it, the game "doesn't have to be gorgeous visually."

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