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Guild Wars sales photo
Guild Wars sales

China really likes Guild Wars 2

China DO care, to the tune of almost 4 million
Jul 08
// Steven Hansen
Guild Wars 2's Chinese publisher had the MMO at 760,000 players on launch day. Two months later, it's reporting 3.8 million Chinese players. Guild Wars 2's first year sales, before the Chinese launch, were at 3.5 million, so total sales are at least over 7 million.  Not bad, not bad.  [Via NeoGAF]
MMO photo

WildStar's 10-day open beta begins this week

Grab a beta key on Thursday
May 06
// Jordan Devore
Carbine Studios is opening up beta access for its MMO WildStar this week. The open beta event kicks off Thursday and will extend to May 18. During that period, just head to the game's website and request a key, or if you're a...
Guild Wars 2 photo
Guild Wars 2

NCSoft giving away 5,000 copies of Guild Wars 2

Just pledge your allegiance for a chance to win
Nov 30
// Wesley Ruscher
In one of the more spirited giveaways I've seen in recent years, NCSoft and ArenaNet are giving away 5,000 copies of Guild Wars 2 to folks willing to pledge their undying loyalty to the game on camera.  For a chance to ...

Lineage has made $1.8 billion since it launched in 1998

NCSoft's medieval fantasy MMORPG
Nov 28
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Wow. NCsoft announced that Lineage has made $1.8 billion since it launched 15 years ago in 1998. The medieval fantasy MMORPG is hugely popular in South Korea, with millions of subscribers also spread out in China, Japan, and other markets. Lineage II meanwhile has been played by more than 14 million users since that came out in 2003. All in all that's pretty damn impressive.
Guild Wars 2 photo
Guild Wars 2

Bazaar of the Fours Winds content live for Guild Wars 2

How Bazaar! How Bazaar!
Jul 14
// Jason Cabral
Time to dust off that Tyrian merchant hat and polish up all of your excess junk that you don't want -- I mean, quality product that you would hate to part with -- because the Bazaar of the Four Winds content for Guild Wars 2 ...
Guild Wars 2 patches photo
Guild Wars 2 patches

ArenaNet aiming for bi-weekly updates for Guild Wars 2

The studio is still wholly committed to the game
Jun 26
// Chris Carter
Do you still play Guild Wars 2? I do, and ArenaNet is listening to the folks who want more updates. Specifically, it looks like they're going to target updates every two weeks instead of a three week timeline. Speaking to Gam...
WildStar Paths system photo
WildStar Paths system

WildStar 'Paths' system detailed in new dev video

Oh jeez I'm excited about an MMO again...
May 22
// Patrick Hancock
The Path system in WildStar is the focus of the latest developer video, going into detail about how your character will cater to how you like to personally play. The available Paths are Soldier, Explorer, Scientist, and...
Guild Wars 2 photo
Guild Wars 2

ArenaNet is working on a Guild Wars 2 expansion (Update)

Doesn't have the timing locked down yet
May 13
// Jordan Devore
[Update: Clarifying the comments made during the NCSoft earnings call, a representative reached out to confirm that ArenaNet is still "taking a wait-and-see stance" with regards to a possible Guild Wars 2 expansion. It is, as...
WildStar Dev video photo
WildStar Dev video

New WildStar video somehow makes movement interesting

How not to get shot in the dick
May 10
// Patrick Hancock
Wait! Don't immediately dismiss a video about movement in an MMO -- this one is actually enjoyable. Not because the movement in WildStar is anything groundbreaking, but because the developers have injected a healthy dos...
WildStar beta sign-ups photo
WildStar beta sign-ups

WildStar opens up beta sign-ups to the public

Test the newest MMO from NCSoft
Apr 11
// Chris Carter
WildStar, the new MMO in town, is gearing up for beta testing, and you can be a part of it by signing up here. A representative for NCSoft has informed Destructoid that these beta events will not be mere "weekends," instead o...
WildStar MMO photo
WildStar MMO

WildStar developer video debuts player housing

Yes, it's instanced
Mar 26
// Chris Carter
Player housing is a hot-button issue in MMOs today. Although a handful of MMOs like Ultima Online have allowed players to place housing in the game world, most technical limitations have forced developers to instance housing...
WildStar photo
Endgame is codenamed 'Elder Games'
As people know, I'm a big proponent of a strong endgame content plan for MMOs, even at launch. As I wandered into the WildStar booth at PAX East, I was wondering if Carbine Studios (and publisher NCsoft), had a real plan...

WildStar photo

Build your own death fortress in sci-fi MMO WildStar

'Things are about to get f***ing real'
Mar 20
// Jordan Devore
Carbine Studios' upcoming MMO WildStar hasn't shown enough for me to full opinion yet, but we're starting to get there. This new trailer, while excited beyond belief, does offer a great little overview of what the game is al...
WildStar MMO photo
WildStar MMO

Sci-fi MMO WildStar launching this year

And no mention of free-to-play!
Feb 06
// Patrick Hancock
NCSoft's science-fiction MMO WildStar is officially coming at some point out this year. Taking place on the planet Nexus, WildStar pits players against the Dominion who has taken over Nexus and claimed it for its own. W...
City of Heroes photo
City of Heroes

A final farewell to City of Heroes

I'll miss you
Dec 02
// Patrick Hancock
Four years and seven months. That's how long I was a paying subscriber for City of Heroes. Looking back, I enjoyed most, if not all, of my time with the game. I've forged and strengthened relationships within the community that I never thought I would. City of Heroes is the best MMORPG I have ever played, and I am very sad to see it go. Farewell, City of Heroes.

'The Lost Shores' Guild Wars 2 event starts this week

Plus a free trial weekend
Nov 12
// Jordan Devore
It's another big month for Guild Wars 2 as ArenaNet prepares to kick off a one-time world event for the game dubbed "The Lost Shores." The official site offers a glimpse at this new storyline, which will begin at 12:00pm Paci...

Guild Wars 2: Shadow of the Mad King starts today

Update celebrates Halloween
Oct 22
// Jordan Devore
If you've been neglecting Guild Wars 2 as I regrettably have, the latest content update should offer plenty of incentive for you to clear some time for ArenaNet's Halloween festivities. Shadow of the Mad King begins today wit...

NCSoft confirms Western development of MMO Blade & Soul

Sep 14
// Dale North
Above you'll see the very first Western trailer for NCSoft's newest MMOROG, Blade & Soul. It's being developed for Western audiences by Team Bloodlust, the in-house studio based in NCsoft’s HQ in Seoul. The ti...

Your guide to Guild Wars 2

Aug 24 // Aerox
If you have any familiarity with other fantasy MMOs, here's the most important thing you need to know when selecting a character: the Trinity is dead. There are no "tanks," or people whose job it is to soak up damage and manage aggro and threat, no dedicated "healers," and no classes whose purpose is to dump out damage and do nothing else. This seems to be the number one biggest thing that people don't understand, even when I explain it to them, so I want to reiterate: the Trinity is dead. Everything you know about tanks, healers, and DPS is wrong. When I say that, I should be clear about what I mean. It's not that there is a "different kind of tanking." There is no tanking. Monsters can and will regularly attack everyone in the party, and everyone has a responsibility to mitigate or avoid the damage. There's not a "different kind of healing." Everyone has a self heal, and can spec to also have some weak group heals on long cooldowns, but healing is not and will not be a central focus of your gameplay, beyond your own responsibility to occasionally heal yourself. Every class is capable of dealing serious damage, and every class has the ability to act in a support capacity, throwing buffs (positive status effects) on their allies and debuffs (negative status effects) on their enemies (called "boons" and "conditions" in Guild Wars 2). And most classes have the ability to hand out some minor healing or regeneration to allies. Despite the notion of everyone being able to do "everything," each class feels quite different from one other because of the weapons they are able to use and their unique mechanics, so the best thing for you to do is read up on the classes and pick which one sounds most interesting. Don't fall into the trap of trying to pick based on archetypes. If you normally enjoy tanking in WoW, don't think you have to pick a Warrior or a Guardian -- there's no tanking because there's no reliable threat management. If you normally play a dedicated healer, you're not going to be standing back and healing anyone in Guild Wars 2, so find a profession that sounds cool and try it it out. Unlike virtually every other MMO on the market, every race can play as every class without any penalty or stat differences, so play around until you find a class that works best for you. Once you have your character created and you've moved through the very short introduction section, you're somewhat unceremoniously dumped right outside your city's starting zone with little direction. You'll see one green star on your map, indicating a portion of your story quest, and not much else. An NPC will direct you to what also appear to be quests -- different hearts on the map indicating people who need help. Your first inclination may be to run straight to your story quests or toward the heart quests -- after all, that's what we've been conditioned to do in almost every MMO since EverQuest. DON'T DO IT! One of the biggest fundamental shifts in thinking you'll have to do when playing Guild Wars 2 is to understand that the game is about exploration, not just running in a straight line. In most games, the best way to level is to do as many quests or dungeons as possible in a short amount of time. In Guild Wars 2, it's much different; the more time you spend wandering around off the beaten path, the more things you'll find to do. In this game, there are many ways to earn experience. You get experience for finding waypoints and points of interest on the map. You get experience for killing things. You get experience for reviving other players. You get experience for World vs. World PvP. You get experience for gathering crafting materials and making things out of them. You can even go back to old zones you never completed and get experience from them -- the game downlevels you to whatever zone you're in so you can do the content without blowing through it, while getting appropriate exp rewards for your actual level. These aren't just tiny amounts of experience, either -- they're significant. It won't be immediately apparent out the gate, but the best way to level in Guild Wars 2 is to do as many different things as possible as you play. In fact, to earn your first level out of the tutorial/intro mission, I recommend turning around, going back inside your race's major city, and exploring the entire thing. When it comes to actual "questing," the majority of "quests" in the game are randomly occurring events. As you walk around and explore the map, events will suddenly begin, or you'll move into range of an in-progress event. These events form what will likely be the core of your PvE experience, and you should always be looking to participate. Again, the best way to find these events is to just wander around exploring the map -- those who only run in a straight line to the heart and story quests will miss out. Events will occupy much of your time in the game, but if you ever get tired of them, or if feel like you are too under-leveled to move forward (and, if you only do story and heart quests and nothing else, you'll hit this point pretty quickly), remember all the other things you can do. Spend some time gathering materials and crafting items, go check out the World vs. World combat, or even check out the other races' starting areas. (Getting to them is simple, although not obvious. Lion's Gate has portals to all five major cities, and can be reached either through the portal in your own city, or by entering the sPvP lobby through your Hero Menu and taking the portal found there.) Remember -- don't focus just on quests, don't be afraid to aimlessly wander and explore, and don't be afraid to check out other zones. The more you explore, the better off you'll be. One of the other aspects of Guild Wars 2 that will probably take some adjusting to is the fact that it's a social game. Not "social game" in the sense that you're spamming farming invites to your friends, but social in that there's a very real incentive to work with other players, and luckily, doing so is simple and generally doesn't require any futzing with parties or raids. Hell, you don't even have to technically talk to anyone, but you will have to work with other people. Again, it's not immediately clear, but working with people in this game is ALWAYS beneficial. There's no kill stealing or even kill tagging. You can't take loot meant for someone else. Even gathering nodes will be unique to your character, meaning no one will swoop in in front of you and snag that ore chunk you had your eye on. If you come across other players, help them! Start attacking their monsters -- they won't mind, since you'll both get experience and treasure. Happen upon a downed or dying player? You'll want to try to revive them, since there's a bit of experience in it for you. If you see a group of people wandering around, follow them. You'll all help each other out, and there's a good chance you'll come across a random event together as a group. Similarly, if you see a whole bunch of players all running in one direction, definitely follow them. A major event is probably about to start or already in progress, and you won't want to miss out. Later in the game at around Level 30, when dungeons become available to you, you WILL have to start dealing with a party system. The dungeons are all five-mans, but, again, remember that the Trinity is dead. It shouldn't be super difficult to find a group, because virtually any group composition should be able to clear any dungeon in the game. You don't have to sit around waiting for a tank or a healer -- you can grab the four nearest Engineers and still have a reasonable chance of completing the dungeon. Simply put, if you're the kind of person who tries to play MMOs solo (which, I admit, often describes me), you're going to have to shift your thinking, or you're not going to have much fun in this game. All that said, my experience in the beta weekend has been that once all the barriers to co-operation are removed, people generally seem to act a whole lot nicer to each other. Now, we get to the combat itself. First off, your main skill set is tied to the weapon you're currently using -- the first five skills on your hotbar correspond directly to your equipped weapon. You start with only one skill in each useable weapon, but they quickly unlock as you kill things -- within two or three hours of play, you should have unlocked most if not all of your weapon skills. Your other five slots are a healing skill, three utility skills, and an elite skill, all of which you can choose from a set that you will unlock as you level up. When it comes to actually killing, throw everything you know about priority systems and rotations out the window. Guild Wars 2 isn't the kind of game where you stand in one place mashing buttons; you need to be moving CONSTANTLY. Almost every skill can be used while moving, even most channeled ones, and as such you should be constantly strafing and circling your target. Generally speaking, you have less skills overall than in most other MMOs, and the skills you do have come with significantly longer cooldowns. The time you're not spending mashing skill buttons instead goes to combat positioning and avoidance. In addition to just moving around your opponent, you also need to learn to dodge. The dodge skill is absolutely critical to survival in the game, and once you move past the first few areas, you'll find that even basic monsters can easily kill you if you're not careful. Many enemies have extremely powerful attacks that can one-shot you, so you need to learn the tells so that you can dodge out of the way. In the event you do go down, don't worry! The downed state, which you should be introduced to in the tutorial, is an expected and normal part of the game. Being downed doesn't necessarily mean you've done something wrong (although there's a good chance you're down because you blew a dodge), and you should quickly be revived by another player in the area. You can also come back from being downed by contributing to an enemy kill while downed, and it will be obvious how to do so when you first enter the state. If you do end up dying, you'll just respawn at a waypoint. As you move through areas, keep an eye out on your map for other downed players -- reviving them will grant you some experience, and they'll certainly appreciate the help. Finally, a few notes about loot, dungeons, and the "end-game." The "end-game" concept central to most MMOs is not present here. In Guild Wars 2, the time it takes to gain a level is designed to be roughly equal, whether you're leveling from 29 to 30 or from 79 to 80. Rather than gating content at the level cap, the content is more evenly spread throughout the entire game. When you do ultimately hit the level cap, you have an opportunity to go back to all the areas you've missed and try them out -- because of the downscaling system, you won't be just blowing through them without a challenge. Five-man dungeons are present in the game, and the first isn't available until level 30, but they don't exist to gear you up. Equivalent versions of all of the loot from dungeons can be found out in the world or crafted -- they instead serve as cosmetic rewards. Loot in general is significantly scaled back from many other games, and you'll find that you're pretty naturally upgrading your gear as you move through the game without any kind of dungeon or raid grinding. Instanced raids don't exist at all, but many will find that some of the major area events serve as de facto, non-instanced, mini-raids, and these are available as early as the starting areas of each race. As should be clear from the above, I spent a significant amount of time in most of the beta events, and had a really positive experience. I think a lot of you, even if you don't normally like MMOs, will enjoy the game as well. That said, I'm sure it won't appeal to everyone, and sadly I think a lot of people may be turned off from it simply because they try to play it like World of Warcraft or Old Republic. That's not to crap on those games (I still have an active World of Warcraft account and a great guild), but it's just to note that you really do have to change the way you think about and play MMOs to really "get" Guild Wars 2. If you read this guide the entire way through, you should have a pretty good idea of how to do so. See you in Tyria! [Jordan, Chris Carter, and I are planning on rolling on the server Ferguson's Crossing, and we expect a few other editors will be playing there as well. We don't have any kind of solid plans for a guild at this point, but if you're looking for a server, feel free to join us!]

With the Guild Wars 2 headstart beginning tomorrow, many of you will be playing the game for the first time. Some of you may still be on the fence about whether to purchase it or not (hint: you should). If you haven't played ...


Guild Wars 2 gets 4-disc soundtrack signed by composer

Jul 08
// Jayson Napolitano
Those itching to get their hands on the single-disc Guild Wars 2 Collector's Edition Soundtrack that is shipping with the game's collector's edition in late August will likely be surprised by the posting today on DirectSong, ...

Soon: Guild Wars 2 beta event is next weekend

Apr 18
// Jordan Devore
Despite knowing full well that I'll eventually buy Guild Wars 2 and would really like to get into the beta sooner rather than later, I've avoided pre-purchasing the game. Well, until now, that is. NCsoft and ArenaNet have fin...

You can pre-purchase Guild Wars 2 today so do that

Apr 10
// Fraser Brown
You can't see me right now, so you'll just have to take my word for it: I'm jumping for joy. Why, you ask? Well I just pre-purchased Guild Wars 2. If you haven't done so already then you can, too. NCsoft and ArenaNet hav...

NCsoft bows out of E3, probably playing Farmville instead

Mar 21
// Liam Fisher
I know you folks are starting to compile your own personal lists of who will or won't be in attendance at E3 this year, right? Well it seems you can definitely count on seeing Zynga there, so go ahead and breathe a sigh of re...

Guild Wars 2 Collector's Ed., pre-purchase offer detailed

Mar 13
// Jordan Devore
Fans eager to toss a wad of cash NCsoft's way for Guild Wars 2 will want to hear about the publisher's pre-purchase plan -- it grants access to all beta weekend events, a three-day head start at launch, and an exclusive in-ga...

NCsoft throws us a chicken bone with freemium mobile game

Feb 28
// Victoria Medina
NCsoft's Hoppin' Chicken, formerly known as iHop -- Getaway Chicken, is not only undergoing a name change, but is also making the move from a purchasable game to freemium. New features, including extra gameplay modes, pu...

Upcoming Guild Wars 2 closed beta set for next month

Feb 27
// Jordan Devore
During peak periods, 4,000 people per minute signed up to participate in the Guild Wars 2 closed beta. No wonder the website went down so quickly. To be fair, the game increasingly sounds like something many of us desperately...

Hot on the heels of last weekend's closed press beta, ArenaNet is now taking applications for all future Guild Wars 2 beta events. Sign-ups will only be open for the next 48 hours, so if you're interested, you should put your...

Guild Wars 2 isn't like any MMO you've played before

Feb 20 // Aerox
Guild Wars 2 (PC)Developer: ArenaNetPublisher: NCsoftRelease: 2012After creating my first character of seven, a Charr Warrior, I began in the Charr tutorial area. My first glance at the screen suggested there wasn't much new going on. I saw an NPC with a glowing green star above its head standing in front of me, some combat skills down in my hotbar, and quest details in the upper right corner. After completing the area and slaughtering a giant possessed statue with the help of about ten other players, I started to see what made the game unique. I tend to be a loner in MMOs; in World of Warcraft, I usually just quest by myself. I made it to level 85 with a Paladin, and I think I did maybe two instances. In Star Wars: The Old Republic, I did one Flashpoint and then spent the rest of the game completely by myself. In Guild Wars 2, I found myself working consistently with other players, and for the first time, I didn't mind. While, as I mentioned earlier, there are still quest givers and floating green stars, that mechanic is only used for your Story Quests -- a quest chain that is personal to your character, instanced, and based on your race and the decisions you made at character creation. Every other quest and event, which will likely make up the bulk of your Player vs. Environment experience, are world events that just naturally happen. You'll hear that a farmer needs help tending his field, or will be informed that a group of harpies is launching a raid on a nearby rock quarry. And as you start running towards these battles, you'll see that most of the other players in the area are, too. When you start fighting or assisting, all you have to do is jump in and start working on quest objectives. You don't need to group up or join a party, you don't need to worry about mob tagging or kill stealing, and you won't miss out on experience or loot as long as you participate in some way. Because it's so easy to work together, and because there aren't any negative consequences, Guild Wars 2 is the first MMO I've played where I actually feel connected to the rest of the player base. Rather than hide from other players, or compete with them for quest spawns, I found myself actively looking for opportunities to help others. Instead of running the other way when I saw large groups of people, I'd start following them, since I assumed they were heading somewhere interesting. Social aspects aside, it didn't really strike me how fundamentally different Guild Wars 2's philosophy was until I ran the Ascalon Catacombs dungeon. The trinity as you know it is absent -- there are no tanks, no dedicated healers, and no classes focused entirely on DPS. Every class feels unique both in terms of weapon skills and mechanics, and every class can contribute significantly in terms of dealing damage and helping the party with support and utility. You don't need any particular party composition to complete the PvE dungeons in Guild Wars 2 -- my group was made up of two Rangers, two Guardians, and an Engineer. According to the developers, the game has been explicitly designed so that you can grab anyone around you and run a dungeon, without worrying about which classes you have in attendance. Don't mistake this design choice for a decision to make dungeons easy, though. They're not. They're actually quite difficult -- even with three developers in our group, we wiped four or five times. Not because the dungeon was unfairly difficult or because the bosses had an unfair advantage, but because we often simply weren't paying attention and/or didn't quite have a handle on our classes yet. While Guild Wars 2's combat will generally feel familiar to MMO veterans, two mechanics set it apart from most other games: the ability to move while using most attacks (even many channeled ones), and the ability to dodge. Having to maneuver during combat, while a simple addition, adds a new tactical level that requires more attention. At early levels, you can get away with standing still and rhythmically pressing your hotkeys in rotation order, but you'll quickly learn that your position in relation to your enemies is important. Knowing when to dodge and how to position your party appears to be critical to success in Guild Wars 2. Since you don't have tanks, and you don't really have healers, anyone can be attacked at any time. Monster AI goes beyond standard threat/hate generated by damage, and we were told that it also takes into account a combination of things such as position (apparently the most important determinant) as well as who's already hurting. You can't just plop a tank on a boss and consider everyone safe -- because everyone is vulnerable, everyone has to know when to advance, retreat, or dodge a massive attack that could take them down in one or two hits. Because of the limited time frame of the beta, I had to make a choice between whether I wanted to dive into the World vs. World vs. World stuff, or the more standard Structured PvP. Since the World PvP was new to me (and since it seemed that's what everyone else was doing), that's where I chose to spend my time. It was, again, unlike anything I had ever played before. Throughout the weekend, the World PvP was consistently compared to the Realm PvP system of Dark Ages of Camelot, both by multiple members of the press and even some developers. I haven't played DAoC, so I can't confirm just how similar or different it is, but the general gist is as follows. Three entire servers are pitted against each other in a two-week, persistent battle across four connected maps. Three of the maps are virtually identical, and serve as each server's starting base of operations. The fourth map is a unique one in the middle that generally serves as the central hub for the fighting. You can freely travel to any of the four maps at any time through portals, though, so raids and incursions into "home base" territory are common. The goal is to capture various structures such as supply camps, keeps, and towers, and hold them for as long as possible. The more structures you hold, the more points you earn. The server with the most points at the end of the two weeks is the victor. The basic idea may sound simple on paper, but in practice it's anything but. Keeps and towers can acquire fortifications and weapons that can be manned and fired. Players can repair gates and walls as they're attacked, and also have opportunities to purchase upgrades for the entire structure -- but only if they have the money and supply to do so. Supply camps send out supply caravans to keeps and towers, but are lightly defended. A keep that's well supplied can last for hours during a siege, as long as there is at least one player inside to initiate repairs. Cut the supply lines and blockade the entrances, and the gates will fall fairly quickly. Add another team into the mix beyond the traditional two, and you have a fluid, complex PvP system that I found to be quite enjoyable, and I normally don't participate in PvP scenarios. I tried the World PvP on Saturday afternoon, the battle having raged on for a little over a day. We were in second place: the Green team had a moderate lead on us, while the Blue team was lagging far behind. As I joined the fight, I was told we were grouping en masse to try to take back a Green keep near one of our own castles. I met up with my team at the front gate, which we were trying to batter down to no effect. Looking at the map, we realized that the Green team owned almost every supply camp across all four areas, and that the damage we were doing was quickly being repaired by someone inside the keep. Technically, with enough time, we would have eventually been able to wear it down, but a Green scout had alerted his team that we were assaulting the keep, and we ended up being driven off by a defense squad. As we tried to regroup, we realized we needed to take back the supply camps. Our commander noted that the Green team seemed to consistently travel in one single pack; because they could theoretically be attacked by two teams at once, this wasn't necessarily a bad move. We figured, though, that we could use this to our advantage. We decided to attack another Green structure -- this time a tower -- but we peeled off two small teams of four (one of which I joined) to go try to take back the supply camps while Green was distracted by this new assault. It worked. For the next hour, my small group ran across all four maps, liberating supply camps and taking down any Green caravans we saw along the way. Currently, you are only notified that one of your structures is under attack if you are near it, although you can look at the map and see who controls each point. If you watch the map carefully, you can see that you're losing ground, but you won't know anything about the size of the force or which direction they're heading in next unless you have players scouting the area. Green apparently did not do this, as we were able to take all but one supply camp for Red. With their supply lines cut off, Green had a much harder time defending their points. We all grouped back up, and went on a rampage across Green's home territory, capturing four or five towers and keeps before we were eventually located and repelled. I logged out that night in pretty good spirits, convinced that we had put ourselves in a great position, until I logged back in Sunday morning and found that Blue had mounted a huge comeback overnight, taking virtually all of the territory we had previously won. Oops. Guild Wars 2 seems to have kept many of the basic structures and tropes of the MMO genre (levels, five-man dungeons, distinct classes), but much of the core MMO gameplay has been tweaked or expanded to create a new experience. MMO fans looking for something new will, I think, enjoy how social this game is, and appreciate that ArenaNet has tried to make group questing and dungeon running smooth, painless, and natural. PvP fans, especially those looking for persistent and complex battles, should enjoy the World vs. World. vs. World gameplay. If you've never played an MMO before but are interested in the genre, the lack of a subscription fee and the accessibility of the game may make Guild Wars 2 worth checking out. In a genre that's filled with clones and rehashes, the beta of Guild Wars 2 was refreshing. While there's not necessarily anything wrong with any previous MMOs, it's nice to see that ArenaNet is taking Guild Wars 2 in a unique direction.

This weekend, ArenaNet gave select members of the press a chance to see the current beta of Guild Wars 2. We had the opportunity to create Human, Charr, and Norn characters of any class, and play through each race's level 1-3...


NCsoft's first iOS game is tower defense, free today

Feb 03
// Dale North
Did you know that MMO maker NCsoft made an iOS game? Gem Keeper came out late last year, and it's a pretty nice little tower defense game for iOS devices. Today it's on the App Store as the Free App of the Day, so consider th...

Guild Wars 2 coming later this year with betas in spring

Jan 23
// Fraser Brown
I doubt that it will come as a surprise to anyone, but ArenaNet have revealed that Guild Wars 2 will indeed be stealing many of our lives this year. It seems inevitable that I'll be spending a significant portion of 2012 enta...

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