Flood in Titanic: A Space Between.
Image via Globiss Interactive.

Titanic: A Space Between is a beautiful tragedy in VR

A successful depiction of disaster.

My experiments with VR have led to some strange experiences, as well as a few action-packed titles. Titanic: A Space Between falls more in the strange category, though it manages to capture my attention thanks to its gorgeous visuals, compelling tale, and a runtime that is just long enough to leave you wanting more.

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The Titanic ship and its terrible fate have always been a magnet for macabre myths and mysteries, and Globiss Interactive’s game plays on this concept while grappling with the morality of turning a real deadly disaster into a thing of amusement. The terror and tragedy are all present, and it’s up to you to decide whether you want to engage with it or get sucked into a sightseeing adventure instead.

Hallway in Titanic: A Space Between.
Image via Globiss Interactive.

VR done right

Though it’s listed as a horror title, A Space Between is a puzzle adventure game at its core. To make progress, you’ll have to solve problems and make use of tools around you and items you find. You can expect an average difficulty level, though it’s not always obvious what you should do next, especially if you miss the instructions the first time around. Nevertheless, nothing ever feels unfair or nonsensical.

Like I said, there’s also an adventure aspect to things. The Titanic was a thing of beauty, and the game captures it beautifully. Although it has its heart-racing moments, A Space Between isn’t a particularly fast-paced game. Consequently, I had time to take things slow and drink in the ship’s decadent design. On the Quest 3, it’s a beautiful marvel that I’d recommend to anyone looking for something visually impressive.

You get to explore various parts of the ship, including the upper deck which gives you a spectacular view of the night sky and the sights the passengers must have been treated to. For anyone who has pondered on why the ship has captured imaginations for decades, this game may be the one to answer that question. As soon as that headset is on, you’re transported to a ship that looks and feels like it was made for royalty.

When it comes to VR gaming, it’s never just about the sights. Interactivity is also important. Do items in the environment react to my actions? Can I grab things or intuitively use the various items I find? A Space Between excels in this regard, giving you random objects around the ship you can interact with. Whether it’s champagne glasses you can break, door knobs you can twist, or barrels you can break with a shovel, it’s all possible. It might sound like a minor aspect, but such things play an important role when it comes to immersion in VR.

A room in Titanic: A Space Between.
Screenshot by Globiss Interactive.

Guilt and gorgeousness

As previously highlighted, part of what attracts us to the Titanic is the splendor of the ship. Scintillating glass chandeliers, brass doorknobs that shimmer, and hallways draped with luxurious carpets are inextricable parts of how the ill-fated ship is remembered. All of this is rendered in A Space Between.

As I take in the sights, I can’t help but feel a sense of guilt. It’s beautiful, but I’m also in the middle of an event that resulted in numerous deaths. This is some morbid sightseeing, and if you’re immersed enough, you can’t help but feel some discomfort.

How you interpret things is up to you. For some, the main focus will be the rich excesses that some enjoy while others live in poverty. Others will, like myself, ponder on whether tragedy should become entertainment.

You’ll get to see things from the perspective of different characters, and the game dips into both sci-fi and horror, but to say more would be to spoil its secrets. This is one title where the story is best enjoyed going into it as blindly as possible because it goes places you won’t expect.

Boiler room in Titanic: A Space Between.
Image via Globiss Interactive.

A great game flying under the radar

VR is still incredibly niche which limits the reach of games on the medium. The problem is made worse by the fact that VR manufacturers don’t always support their headsets as much as they should. This has led to VR studios like First Contact Entertainment shutting down.

Nevertheless, now and again, a title will appear that serves as a reminder of what VR is capable of when it is at its best. A Space Between is one of those titles. I enjoyed my time with the game. Its tale has both entertaining and unexpected twists, and the visuals are splendid, to say the least. If you’re looking for a slightly terrifying title you can complete in about three hours, Titanic: A Space Between won’t disappoint.


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Author
Smangaliso Simelane
Staff Writer - Smangaliso Simelane is a writer with a passion for all things related to video games. He has been writing about video games since 2020.