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Review: Nekoburo: Cats Block

Jul 12 // Jed Whitaker
Nekoburo - Cats Block (PS Vita, PlayStation TV [Reviewed])Developer: F K Digital Publisher: Neko EntertainmentMSRP: $7.99Released: July 7, 2015 Square alien cats made of electrical waves are passing the Earth when a solar storm strikes, knocking them to the planet. One of the cats gets found by a human female who takes him home and treats him nicely, so he decides to summon his pals through her television to join him living with his new servant. If this somehow related to the gameplay other than featuring said cats, it was never apparent.  Levels consist of a standard falling from the top of the screen match three mechanic, three cats fall from the top of the screen that can be moved left to right and be reordered on a tilted playing field. Each level has a specific quest such as clearing a certain number of cats of a certain color within a timelimit, or surviving for a set amount of time while cats drop quickly. Matching three or more cats of the same color in a horizontal, vertical or diagonal line will clear them. Clearing cats also fills up a meter that grants items that help clear the board such as horizontal and vertical bombs, a grid warp that clears a set of nine surrounding blocks, clearing all cats of a single color and a rainbow block that clears the entire board.  [embed]295827:59475:0[/embed] Acquiring these items and knowing when to use them are an important part of the game, as each level seemingly has a specific way to complete it. For example, one level has what look to be tofu blocks slowly advancing from the bottom of the screen that can only be cleared with items or clearing cats in horizontal lines. In this level the only real way to complete the level is to constantly build up and use items to keep the middle of the screen cleared, as the middle is the only area that can cause a failure, the other rows don't matter and stack up past the edges of the level with no repurrrrrrcussions. The levels are laid out in such a way that it forces you to learn the mechanics of the game with no hand holding. One level may require so many vertical bombs to be used to clear it, thus teaching you how to effectively use them, another may require rainbow blocks be detonated which is extremely important in later levels.  After every 10 levels a new cat will materialize through the TV in the human's house, in tow with its own personality, background information and colorful comic. Unfortunately the dialogue and background information is so poorly localized it is basically incomprehensible. I've played a lot of poorly localized games in my day -- looking at you Zero Wing -- but this one was easily the worst. Here are two examples of the awfully translated text: "He hope to become an charming men as chocolate," and "Even though fiery rude, he have sense of justice. He did something that against the grain with him, because think to much."  Nekoburo isn't exactly a hard game as it is random -- or more specifically, the difficulty is mostly due to the random generation of the falling cat blocks. Sometimes, exactly what is required to complete a level will spawn, other times you'll have to work for it. This isn't specific to any level though, so it isn't like the levels are specifically designed to spawn cats in a certain way, at least it seems that way on the surface level. Multiple attempts at the same level will eventually yield positive results, allowing level completion, other times the game just seems to be against you. Though this is the case with most puzzle games, so it isn't exactly a new problem with the genre -- it's just worse here. Between levels you can customize the apartment with furniture, and play with the cats with toys, both of which are unlocked by completing certain goals attached to them. While the cats are uber cute, this portion of the game left much to be desired; the furniture can't be moved, and the toys aren't exactly fun to play with more than once. One of the toys is turning on the TV for the cats to watch, the screen just lights up white as the cats sit there, not what I'd call a toy or entertaining.  The story mode can be completed in around six or seven hours, mostly due to trial and error. A survival mode is unlocked around half way through the story mode that is just an endless mode that increases in difficulty, much like marathon mode in Tetris. As there are no online leaderboards and the furniture is little more than pallet swaps there is little reason to continue playing once the story mode is finished unless you're a completionist.  The best thing about Nekoburo: Cats Block is the art style; everything is bright, colorful and super adorable, but take that away and you're left with a generic, poorly translated puzzle game with a tilted playing field that doesn't compliment gameplay. Nekoburo is certainly not the cat's meow.  [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Nekoburo Review photo
Pussies
I love pussies, my dad loves pussies and my Grand Peppers loved pussies before he met his untimely demise on that trampoline -- RIP Grand Peppers may you continue to love pussies in the afterlife. But, we are all fluent in th...

Executive shade photo
Executive shade

Xbox's Phil Spencer: Executives should play games


Tips his fedora to Sony
Jul 07
// Jed Whitaker
Xbox boss Phil Spencer said "I think our industry is better when more people who made decisions on games play." Basically meaning executives of gaming companies would make better decisions if they themselves were ga...
Final Fantasy VII remake photo
Final Fantasy VII remake

So people are really into this Final Fantasy VII remake


A casual look at some numbers
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
I was rooting around YouTubes as one does when a number of (hah) zeros caught my eye: 10,018,000. That was the view count on the PlayStation upload of the Final Fantasy VII remake announcement trailer (there's an additional m...

Dreams photo
Dreams

Dreams is Media Molecule's latest wonderfully creative game


More at Paris Games Week
Jun 15
// Brett Makedonski
"I hope this fills your head with questions. That's natural." That's what Media Molecule's Alex Evans had to say about Dreams, the studio's latest project. He nailed it; Dreams has me wondering what the hell it is, whil...

The Silent Hill Retrospective: Silent Hill

May 30 // Stephen Turner
Silent Hill was as much about crumbling economics as it was about night cries and picket fences. Much like Resident Evil’s Raccoon City, the dilapidated lakeside town was undone by greed. America losing its values to modernisation was a recurring theme in survival horror. It was a warning from those whom had lost their own traditions to capitalist growth, not that far removed from the J-Horror zeitgeist at the time. But more often than not, Silent Hill takes its inspiration from days gone by. Old Silent Hill's influences are worn on street names and ledgers, from Stephen King to Sonic Youth to Psycho. Even the intro pops to the sounds of vinyl, its theme song in equal parts Eastern tremolo and Western twang. These influences come together to create small-town America on the slide, full of “mom & pop” stores and tight-knit suburban mazes. But rather than a tourist, you’re a trespasser. Horror in all its forms has this element of invasion. Here, Harry Mason breaks into homes, schools, and hospitals, as he searches for his missing daughter. Though the overall plot ends up becoming more about the Otherworld, his parental fears are always at the forefront. Essentially, it's not Harry's story, but Alessa Gilesspie's. As the player, and as Mason, we're the outsiders looking in. Perception is the key to the story and scares. Memories are skewered to point where friendly faces are misjudged and emotional attachments lead to narrow-minded decisions. Harry falls through the layers of reality, like the waking waves of a bad dream, and sees the town for what it really is. The Otherworld is an abstract place, clearly a concept that reflects its tortured conduit. What could’ve possibly been a new paradise takes a horrific form because of Alessa's abuse and lack of care by her mother, Dahlia Gilesspie, and Dr. Michael Kaufmann. Later games would force the perspective onto the main protagonist, and at times would suffer for it, but few would capture that “traveller in a foreign land” feel of their predecessor. It's because of the Otherworld that Silent Hill is relentless and oppressive. It constantly toys with the audience, waiting to take shape, and gradually stripping away the safety nets. Harry is shown to be extremely vulnerable, early on. He stumbles off steps, puts out his hands as he crashes into walls, has to catch his breath, and is a terrible shot. Our first contact with the Otherworld ends in seemingly death. It’s a far cry from the shrug-it-off antics of S.T.A.R.S. or Edward Carnby P.I. Every attempt is made to obfuscate the audience, either by claustrophobic gaze, location, sounds, or virtual threat. Radio static is both friend and foe; warning us of monsters beyond the flashlight's reach and ramping up the tension just by letting us know that something's there. Ominous, hollow synths give way to industrial noise, punishing and overbearing. Akira Yamaoka’s soundtrack is comparatively brutal to his later work, the kind of unsettling cacophony that would give a pre-Grammy winner John Congleton nightmares. Even at its most calm in the Fog World, the music still sets your teeth on edge. And yet, by the final act, where reality is in actuality nothingness, Silent Hill does an amazing job of drawing sympathy out of horrific circumstances. To many, Lisa Garland is the human face of Silent Hill (both town and title), and our perception of her stems from Alessa’s own memories. She’s seen as this kind and selfless nurse that only wants to help, but as we delve deeper, endure and learn, we discover what lies beneath. The bright smile, the homely uniform, and her position of warmth and care, are all her “picket fences.” By the end, we find out Lisa was a drug addict, terrified of her only patient. Through Harry, she finds the strength to push onwards, only to realise her own fate was already set in stone. Truth shatters the façade, breaks down her body, and we’re confronted with yet another disturbing subject of horror. For Harry, it's too much and he runs away. But for once, instead of the oppressive percussion of Yamaoka’s themes, we’re treated to the melancholic Not Tomorrow. These were people, not monsters. [embed]292927:58733:0[/embed] In a time of hi-five heroics, Silent Hill offered no such compliments. The best ending closes on a bittersweet note. The town is still lost to the Otherworld, though probably not as powerful as it once was, and Harry doesn't quite get his daughter back. In a shot mirroring the intro, and with his cop friend, Cybil Bennett, standing in for his deceased wife, there's the nagging suspicion that for all we've done, it might just happen again. Sure, we saved a young girl's soul, but we didn't really win anything. Only lessons and traditions were learned. Maybe that was the point, considering the start of this article. As a game, the first and only PSX release has undoubtedly aged in the last 16 years. But much like the low-budget horror movies and low-fi recordings it emulated, Silent Hill overcame handicap through inventiveness. The Otherworld, the town, the storytelling, they were all informed by thinking outside the box. Everything we know about Silent Hill – every fan theory, every femme fatale characteristic, run-down aesthetic, social commentary, urban quest, childhood memory, occultist lore, and personal demon – stems from this very title. So it might be a little frayed around the edges, and certain conveyances are needlessly obscure, but for a mainstream horror game that was intended, quite cynically by Konami remember, to chase after that sweet Resident Evil success, it really was a very unique and artistic beast. It's still wonderful to think how something like that could be produced by such a small group of rag-tag developers, left alone to their own devices in a fairly corporate environment. Of course, though we had survived our first trip through the dark side of Americana, the world had been left open for more lost souls and more horrific layers to come…
Feature photo
What's going on with that radio?
Western horror, Eastern eyes. That was what made Silent Hill memorable for a generation. It was visceral and relentless, oppressive and paranoid, and underlined with a tragic tale that hadn’t been seen on the normally e...

Sony photo
Sony

Sony opens first-party VR-focused studio, names it after Kanye's baby


Probably, I think
May 18
// Brett Makedonski
Sony's sure taking virtual reality seriously. It wasn't long ago that we weren't completely positive if Project Morpheus was meant for a retail release, or if it were just a research and development project to show off emergi...
Demos photo
Demos

Do you still use demos to make a purchasing decision?


Sadly, demos are rare these days
May 18
// Chris Carter
We now live in an era where an "exclusive Early Access beta test that can only be obtained by pre-order customers at participating retailers and download the app" is a thing. Whereas demos used to be straight-forward marketin...
Sony photo
Sony

Like clockwork: Sony's E3 presser is evening of June 15


As it should be
May 15
// Brett Makedonski
This year's E3 will be a bit busier than usual, due to some press conferences we're not used to seeing. Bethesda, Square Enix, and a PC-centric show will all play a part in making the news schedule more hectic than it wo...

Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster on PS4 looks better than ever, but has major problems

May 14 // Brett Zeidler
Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster (PS Vita, PS3, PS4 [tested])Developer: Square EnixPublisher: Square EnixReleased: May 12, 2015MSRP: $49.99 In terms of the entire package, the PS4 version is the exact same compilation as the original remaster release. The international versions of both base games, Eternal Calm, Last Mission, and the super weird audio drama are all here. Nothing in terms of gameplay content was added or removed. However, there appears to be an alteration or a major bug affecting FFX's random number generation. People even more keen than myself on FFX have noticed the RNG system is completely broken in the PS4 version. Random encounters and events are supposed to be, well, random. However, this is no longer the case in this version. Encounters always occur when they are supposed to, they will always have the same enemies, and the battles will always play out exactly the same way. No matter how many times the game is reset, the occurrence and outcome of encounters or events that involve the RNG system are set in stone. This has a drastic affect in key aspects of the game. Say you're having trouble on a specific boss, and if you could just land that twenty-second hit it would change the tide of battle for you. Well, the bad news is on the PS4 version you're always going to miss that twenty-second hit as it stands. Additionally, this changes ribbon farming, blitzball, and likely everything else that involves RNG. I couldn't test every aspect of this, but I could easily predict down to the second when my first battle against two Chimera would occur during one of my saves in the Calm Lands. I could have tracked this up to as many subsequent "random" encounters as I wished. I checked the exact same save file on PS3, and encounters were always random. FFX-2 does not appear to have this problem. [embed]292113:58550:0[/embed] A major complaint of the PS3 and Vita release was the new rearranged soundtrack. It seemed a lot of people simply outright hated its existence, whereas others would have at least preferred the choice to switch to the original soundtrack. Thankfully, players now have that option at any point during their playthrough. I actually really enjoyed the remaster soundtrack, but on my current playthrough it's been nice to use the original. It sounds amazing. The Besaid Village theme in particular sounded the best even back in 2001. Unfortunately, the background music system also has a major bug in the PS4 release. Background music on the PS2, PS3, and Vita versions continued playing where the track left off once a battle occurred, but now this is no longer the case. For a game like FFX that has a ton of random encounters, you will likely only ever hear the first ten or twenty seconds of a track unless you stop and listen to the music. It appears to have to do with how the soundtrack switching system was implemented, affecting both FFX and FFX-2. The soundtracks sound amazing, which makes this bug so unfortunate. Hopefully it can easily be fixed in a future patch. Cross-Save was a great feature of the PS3 and Vita version, and it's been extended here for the PS4 version. Once a particular game is fired up, all old saves that were stored in the cloud previously can be accessed just as quickly and easily as before. It took me less than a few minutes to install the game, start up Final Fantasy X, load a save from awhile back, and instantly pick up right where I had left off at that point. That's pretty cool. The PS4 version of the remaster has even more enhanced visuals, which is pretty amazing considering how incredible and smooth the game looked on PS3. To check this, I started a fresh playthrough on both consoles on the same television and played them alongside each other. The PS4 does have a slight graphical enhancement overall, but I really only noticed it because I was looking for it. There's a sort of extra crispness to the PS4 version, and the occasional aliasing issues that were still on the PS3 version are gone here. It's not a major overhaul, but the improvements are there. Additionally, Square claims more NPCs and monsters received enhanced models. I didn't notice any of these in my current playthrough (it's really hard to just stumble upon these without knowing specifically which were enhanced), but seeing poor-looking character models in the same scenes with enhanced ones was a big complaint, so it's nice to know this was addressed in some fashion. However, some other major complaints were not addressed at all. Cutscenes, for whatever reason, are still not skippable and there's no option to toggle between the old character models and the remastered ones. These types of things don't detract from my experience, but they were definitely huge complaints upon release last year, and it's unfortunate they weren't taken care of here. Some of those cutscenes are really long, man. As is stands, the PlayStation 4 version of Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster is not the definitive version of the compilation. Even for super fans of Final Fantasy X, it's hard to recommend a version of their favorite game that has broken RNG, a background music bug, and still no skippable cutscenes no matter how beautiful the game looks or how incredibly fast it loads now. With an MSRP of $50 it's also a really hard sell to a brand-new player when the other two versions are currently so much cheaper, even more so if they already own one of those two versions (especially since they launched at $40). The PS3 version does lack the original soundtrack, but other than that it offers the truest experience of Final Fantasy X and X-2. If you must have it on PS4 or that's your only option, I'd honestly recommend waiting for the RNG and background music issues to hopefully be patched soon and the inevitable price drop. If those two major issues are ever fixed, the PlayStation 4 version of Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster would easily be the definitive package.
Final Fantasy X/X-2 PS4 photo
Spira never felt so good
Barely over a year after its original release on PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Vita, Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster makes its way to the PlayStation 4. A remaster of a remaster, if you will. However, the original releas...

Deals photo
Deals

PlayStation TV price cut in half at GameStop


$39.99 "Vita" time?
May 13
// Dealzon
Remember when the PlayStation TV was selling for $99.99 back around its October 2014 release date? Well now it's all the way down to $39.99 today in a seemingly random half price deal at GameStop. PlayStation TV is $39....

This post explains the entire Mega Man Legends copyright situation

May 11 // Chris Carter
Oronamin C is a real beverage over in Japan, and is sold in the vending machines in the first Legends game. In addition, there are a few other copyrighted references. Now, here is the problem -- Sony apparently does not allow the modification of source code for a PSN classic. In other words, it needs to be the exact same release. So unless these issues can be solved by Capcom's legal team (or Sony drops the policy), a full-on PSOne Classic release for Legends 1 is not going to happen. Nintendo however, does allow the modification of code. If it was deemed a worth endeavor by both Capcom and Nintendo Mega Man 64 could feasibly be ported. In fact, the original code for 64 already has a few of these changes already. Other options suggested by Protodude include the release of the PSP version (untranslated), a PC port by Capcom, or a full remake -- all of which have a low chance of happening in my book. Whatever the case, I'd love to see it happen. There's plenty of hope for Legends 2, but maybe Capcom wants to deal with everything and release them both at the same time. For now, we wait. Regarding Mega Man Legends and Property Infringement [Rockman Corner] [Art from Walls4Joy] [embed]291931:58501:0[/embed]
Mega Man Legends photo
Wow, it's complicated
For years now people have been clamoring for the release of Mega Man Legends 1 and 2 on the PSN (or the Nintendo 64 version on the eShop, for that matter), but Capcom hasn't budged. We're one step closer with The Mi...

Devs Play photo
Devs Play

Watch IGA play Symphony of the Night with Double Fine


#whip
May 08
// Jordan Devore
I hadn't really thought about it until now, but man, I would like to spend two hours today watching designer Koji Igarashi play Castlevania: Symphony of the Night alongside Double Fine senior gameplay programmer Anna Kipnis ...
Mega Man photo
Mega Man

The Misadventures of Tron Bonne out now on PSN


Rare PS1 gem now widely available
May 06
// Kyle MacGregor
Good news, everyone! Just as we anticipated, The Misadventures of Tron Bonne is indeed coming to PlayStation Network. In fact, it's already arrived! Instead of spending a small fortune on a PS1 copy, you can now get the Mega Man Legends spinoff on PS3, Vita, or PSP just $6. The Misadventures of Tron Bonne [PlayStation Store -- Thanks, Patrick]
Sony photo
Sony

Sony opts to not hold a press conference at world's largest videogame show


Siding with the Parisians instead
May 06
// Brett Makedonski
In early August, hundreds of thousands of people will descend upon Cologne, Germany for gamescom, the largest videogame trade show on the planet. Publishers and platform owners will have plenty to announce with all game enthu...
PlayStation Now photo
PlayStation Now

Sony expands PlayStation Now subscriptions to the PS3


Coming next month
May 05
// Chris Carter
PlayStation Now has had a subscription service since the start of this year on the PlayStation 4. For $19.99 a month or $44.99 for three months, you can access part (haha, why) of the titles on-hand. Starting next month ...
Tron Bonne photo
Tron Bonne

Ultra-rare Misadventures of Tron Bonne might be coming to PSOne Classics


A mint copy will run you $200+
May 05
// Chris Carter
Rejoice, Mega Man Legends fans! Another lost piece of history might be making its way to the PSN. The elusive Misadventures of Tron Bonne has been rated by the ESRB, listing PS3, PSP, and Vita in its database. ...
Project Morpheus photo
Project Morpheus

The Heist demo for Project Morpheus used to allow you to shoot yourself


It got removed, for better or worse
May 04
// Joe Parlock
It’s interesting to see where people will draw the line when it comes to VR technology and what we put players through. I really mean it's interesting to see where ‘big companies’ draw the line, because we a...
Sony finances photo
Sony finances

PlayStation was Sony's biggest earner in 2014


Up 33 percent year-over-year
Apr 30
// Brett Makedonski
Sony's fiscal year ended at the close of March, and the Japanese conglomerate just released its annual report. 2014 was a good year for PlayStation -- so much so that it holds the mantle as Sony's biggest earner, as it drove ...
LittleBigPlanet photo
LittleBigPlanet

Adventure Time content coming to LittleBigPlanet 3


The fun will never end with Sackboy and Friends
Apr 29
// Laura Kate Dale
Hey adventure lovers, are you looking for more content to shove into your copy of LittleBigPlanet 3? Fancy dressing Sackboy up as Finn, Jake, Fionna or the Ice King? Well, Sony is probably able to help you out there. There's...
Arkham Knight photo
Arkham Knight

Spoiler-filled Arkham Knight trailer leaps from the shadows


So many cool looking things, my eyes can't take it
Apr 27
// Laura Kate Dale
So, the new Arkham Knight trailer has managed to climb out of the shadows and has left us unconscious face down in a pool of water. Man, there's a lot of cool spoiler type stuff to see here. Nightwing, Red Hood, Catwoman, Co...
Portable console gaming? photo
Portable console gaming?

PlayStation is touring the US with a bus full of unreleased games


Eight stops announced for now
Apr 23
// Alissa McAloon
PlayStation is taking cues from America's political circuit and will be driving a bus across the United States. Starting this weekend, the Road to Greatness tour will be making stops in select cities across the country to giv...
PSN Flash sale photo
PSN Flash sale

Feel like spending money? This PSN Flash Sale can help with that


112 games to drop cash on
Apr 17
// Brett Makedonski
Sony's kicked the weekend off a bit prematurely with one of its patented Flash sales. The "Flash" part doesn't means it'll be over quick though, because this one runs through Monday morning. Maybe it alludes to how suddenly i...
Game Arts photo
Game Arts

Should GungHo bring back Grandia and Lunar?


The company is gauging interest in porting the Game Arts catalog to PC
Apr 16
// Jordan Devore
GungHo Online Entertainment America wants to know which Game Arts titles it should port to PC. Grandia. Lunar. Uhh, Thexder. The list goes on. Problem is, there's only enough room in this survey for one choice, so you've got ...
PlayStation photo
PlayStation

Here's the best picks from the PlayStation Europe Store Sale


Cheap games. Woo!
Apr 16
// Vikki Blake
PlayStation has discounted a metric crapton of games on the PSN Europe Store from now until the end of April. First up, Dying Light stars as the Deal of the Week, available until April 22 for €49.99/ £39.99/AU$69.99 (previously €69.99/£54.99/AU$99.95). Unless you're in Germany. For some reason. Sorry (not my fault. Honest).
Obscure Video Games photo
Obscure Video Games

Obscure Video Games: Oh No!


Paw-handed bulging bald boys are nothing to be negative about
Mar 28
// Obscure Video Games
"Oh no!" is what I say whenever I hear somebody's put out another runner game. I completely lost interest in the genre years ago. However, back in 2000, it was still a fairly novel concept. That's when Asmik Ace Entertainment...
PS sale photo
PS sale

Get 10% off PS Store purchases this weekend


Bloodborne here I come
Mar 26
// Robert Summa
If you've already gotten Bloodborne or any other new releases over the past couple days at full price, then you'll be happy to know that Sony is holding a 10% off all purchases special this weekend. It's pretty much their way...
Syphon Filter tasers photo
Syphon Filter tasers

Syphon Filter! That's not how tasers work!


Advanced flame throwers
Mar 26
// Steven Hansen
We were messing with some unearthed PlayStation 1 demo discs over as casa mia last night. It was a bit of nostalgia hit, flipping between video panes. Also, why didn't anyone tell me about Tobal 2? It looks like a fisticuffs...
PS4 update photo
PS4 update

Your PS4's getting better tomorrow with the Yukimura update


Version 2.50
Mar 25
// Brett Makedonski
The great thing about these expensive, newfangled videogame consoles is that what you take out of the box isn't what you'll have forever. The platforms are constantly evolving to make for a better user experience. PlayStation...
Final Fantasy VII fangame photo
Final Fantasy VII fangame

We'll never get to play this Final Fantasy VII fan sequel


Who knew a PlayStation could do this?
Mar 07
// Jason Faulkner
Rodensoft, a Japanese indie developer, has revealed new information regarding a Final Fantasy VII fan game in development as a personal project. Final Fantasy VII: Time Guardian was planned to be an alternate version of the ...
Last Guardian is alive photo
Last Guardian is alive

Last Guardian 'still in development' despite trademark abandonment


An administrative error
Feb 17
// Steven Hansen
Folks were worried last night when Sony failed to extend the trademark for The Last Guardian. Sony confirmed to GameSpot that it, "can confirm that the Last Guardian is still in development." Failing to renew the tr...

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