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rhythm games

Theatrhythm Final Fantasy photo
Theatrhythm Final Fantasy

Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: All-Star Carnival gets a teaser site


Love that extended party size
Feb 12
// Chris Carter
The arcade version of Theatrhythm has a name -- Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: All-Star Carnival -- and also a new teaser site. It's set to debut in Japan this year, but will also be available at the Japan Amusement Exp...
Rock Band 4 photo
Rock Band 4

Rock Band 4 adds 'Get Lucky,' tons of fixes with February update


And a few more songs
Feb 03
// Chris Carter
Harmonix has just dropped a rather large update on Rock Band 4, which fixes a number of issues that were plaguing the game. It's that one -- the one that wipes the leaderboards clean due to exploits -- so be prepared to start...
Theatrhythm Final Fantasy photo
Theatrhythm Final Fantasy

Theatrhythm Final Fantasy confirmed for arcades!


Glad to see this series alive and well
Feb 03
// Chris Carter
Just this morning, Square Enix confirmed that they are working on an arcade build for Theatrhythm Final Fantasy. The same producer from the 3DS version will return to supervise the project, and more info is coming next w...

Guitar Hero Live is resurrecting the infamous 'Through the Fire and the Flames'

Feb 03 // Chris Carter
As explained by Coppard, "veterans have risen to the challenge so far which everything we've thrown at them, so bringing this song back is the next natural step. We found that with this challenge, the tracks we've identified as 'difficult' are on the level. We'll be surprised to see full combos for these songs back-to-back, but we know people are going to do it." With the "Rivals" leaderboard feature enabled throughout the challenge, you're also constantly going head to head with other people through this gauntlet. The rest of the event includes Hangar 18, Strife, Ghost Walking, and Cry of Achilles. When asked how the team builds these tracks (particularly the madness of Fire and Flames), Coppard noted that they "start from the top, then work their way down." He says once they have all the notes they need for Expert level, they can then start simplifying it further. But for Guitar Hero Live they had to add in a few new elements, which Coppard says will weed out a lot of players right off the bat. "First off, if you couldn't play the intro to Fire and Flames, you were kicked out, full stop. It's like a right of passage. Now we're using open strums and the six-button layout that wasn't in the original, so it adds a whole new dimension to the song." He calls it the "final boss of all of Guitar Hero." I believe him, as the song caused a bunch of people in my play group in college to quit. The event kicks today, and will run through February 8 at 7AM PT. After the event, Fire and Flames will be added into the normal rotation of GHTV.
Guitar Hero Live photo
For a five-song expert marathon event
Activision has been steadily supporting Guitar Hero Live's TV element for months now, adding constant new content to the game. Although it has microtransactions the system is more than fair, and allows for a ton of songs to b...


Idolm@ster Platinum Stars photo
Idolm@ster Platinum Stars

Get your body Lady for Idolmaster: Platinum Stars' trailer


Prepare for EXTREME LIVE
Jan 28
// Josh Tolentino
It wasn't enough for Bandai Namco to merely announce that Idolm@ster: Platinum Stars was on its way to PS4 this year, oh no. No, they had to show the thing off in motion today, and I have to say it's looking quite good....
Xbox One photo
Xbox One

Xbox One owners can now download Rock Band 1 tracks in Rock Band 4


Transfer is ready
Jan 25
// Chris Carter
Earlier this month Harmonix flipped the switch that allowed PS4 players to import the original Rock Band into the newly released Rock Band 4 -- but it left Xbox One owners hanging until an undisclosed date. But the publi...
Lost in Harmony photo
Lost in Harmony

Here's a snippet of that Wyclef Jean song from Lost in Harmony


Out on iOS today
Jan 22
// Darren Nakamura
Yoan Fanise (Valiant Hearts: The Great War) broke from Ubisoft last year to form Digixart Entertainment, and the studio's first game is out on iOS devices today. Lost in Harmony looks like a decent rhythm game/Battletoads bik...
Rock Band 4 photo
Rock Band 4

You can now import the original Rock Band into Rock Band 4


Xbox One's import is delayed
Jan 18
// Chris Carter
Harmonix is making good on its promise to get you more legacy tracks in Rock Band 4, and that includes the original game. Although the Xbox One import has been delayed a bit, PS4 owners can log on now and go to the Export tab...
NecroDancer on consoles photo
NecroDancer on consoles

Crypt of the NecroDancer is hoppin' to PS4, Vita in February


With new tunes from Virt
Jan 12
// Jordan Devore
We're quite fond of the rhythmic dungeon-crawler Crypt of the NecroDancer around here. I like it. Darren likes it. Patrick gave the PC version a 9.5 out of 10. The more platforms it's on, the better. The PlayStation 4 and Vit...
Theatrhythm photo
Theatrhythm

Theatrhythm producer says he wants more Theatrhythm games


Hey me too
Jan 10
// Chris Carter
While it would have been easy for Theatrhythm to die after the first game, Square Enix has fostered it into a nice little mini-franchise, capping off two Final Fantasy titles with a Dragon Quest entry. Speaking...
Guitar Hero photo
Guitar Hero

Guitar Hero Live players love them some Tenacious D


'Tribute' #1 in the UK, #3 globally
Jan 08
// Jordan Devore
FreeStyle Games has come out with a list of the most-played songs in Guitar Hero Live over the holidays and I can't be the only one who finds lists like this somewhat entertaining. Between December 24 and January 3, the most ...

Review: Chiptune Champion

Jan 08 // Jed Whitaker
Chiptune Champion (PC [reviewed])Developer: Blake GarnerPublisher: Blake GarnerMSRP: $9.99Released: January 8, 2016 If you're like me then you grew up playing the NES where chiptunes were the norm, then you became a teenage pirate and you'd get distracted by keygen music, and now you're an adult and you just have a general love of chiptune and enjoy purchasing games and music to support artists. If so, you may want to give Chiptune Champion a play then, as it is filled with some of the best chiptunes out there from artists such as Rymdkraft, Carf Darko, and Savestates, with 40 songs in total. The whole presentation is bare-bones, but it gets the job done. Notes come from the top of the screen and the appropriate number key needs to be held while pressing the enter key on time, very similar to how Guitar Hero and Rock Band are played. The graphics are about what you'd expect from a 16-bit style game, and there isn't an option to have the game fill the whole screen, instead full screen puts a black box on the outside of the screen. Music continues to play regardless of if you hit the notes or not, but an obnoxious sound effect plays loudly if you miss a note or play one at the wrong time. I checked the options to see if the sound effect could be turned down or off, but no such options exist.  [embed]332764:61786:0[/embed] The developer suggests holding your keyboard vertically and facing away from yourself while playing, but I found it was easier to remap the keys to home row and play with my keyboard in its natural position. That said, my keyboard has a bit of extra plastic at the top that makes it a bit more extended, so your experience may vary based on your hardware. Once my keys were remapped I had a far better experience but was still only able to play on the easiest difficulty only requiring four keys. The medium and expert difficulties have you playing five keys, and ramp up the difficulty significantly, so if you're looking for a challenge you'll certainly find it there. There are also weekly and overall leaderboards per song, if you're into that kind of thing. On top of the included 40 songs is the ability to create your own and share them via Steam Workshop. Custom songs can be created, imported and exported right from the game, so even if your favorite chiptune artist isn't included you could technically create their tracks in the game or beg them to (looking at you Alphadeus.)  While the presentation leaves a bit to be desired, the music is on point and often had me humming along before the songs were even over, which is probably the most important factor to any music and rhythm game. If you're a fan of chiptunes and want a Guitar Hero-like experience on PC then Chiptune Champion is easily recommendable, it sure beats jumping through the hoops required to get Frets on Fire to work on modern technology.  [embed]332764:61786:0[/embed]
Review: Chiptune Champion photo
Keygen Music Hero
I love chiptune music and I love music and rhythm games, so of course I had to play Chiptune Champion, which combines them both.  It might not be perfect, and it might not be much to look at it, but it has its charm. 

Review: Amplitude

Jan 05 // Chris Carter
Amplitude (PS3, PS4 [reviewed])Developer: HarmonixPublisher: HarmonixMSRP: $19.99Released: January 5, 2016 (PS4) / TBA (PS3) Amplitude might be hard to master, but it's extremely easy to pick up. If you've played the series before you'll be able to jump right back in at the highest difficulty level, but for the rest of you, a quick five minute tutorial is all you'll need. Simply put, notes are laid down on tracks that symbolize instruments (or vocals), with L1, R1, and R2 (or Square, Triangle, and Circle) triggering the left, middle, or right notes respectively. Players are required to hit specific notes on beat on each track, then move to the next one. That's essentially it. There are a few more nuances like "Streaking" (combos, initiated by quickly moving and playing notes on a new track), and power-ups (simple concepts like clearing a track instantly), but you'll pick up the basics in no time. And in many ways, that's what's so great about Amplitude. The concept of a ship driving down a literal road that signifies your progress in a song is brilliant, and although it's been done a few times since the franchise's retirement, Harmonix does it best. All four difficulties (plus one bonus unlock) feel balanced, and the highest (Expert) is sufficiently challenging. Amplitude doesn't have a whole lot on offer though, content-wise. The campaign is a mere 15 songs long, consisting of a "concept album" created by Harmonix. It's a neat idea in theory, but it's over before you know it, and will definitely leave players wanting more. The fact that it cannot be played with friends and is required to unlock a handful of songs for multiplayer also isn't ideal. After finishing up the campaign, I had no desire to ever play it again. [embed]328939:61634:0[/embed] In that sense, the vast majority of your time will be spent in the free play mode, which supports up to four players in both versus or team play (1v3 or 2v2) situations. It's just as fun as it was in the past, as there's even more strategy involved with more ships on the track, since you can block out opponents from entering a track by claiming it first. With all of the power-ups being used in tandem, things can get hectic. It's Amplitude at its best, and truly successful players will need to watch their own track as well as peruse the entire board for the next move on top of counter-maneuvers, taking other ships into account. Where Amplitude really falls short is its lackluster 30-song soundtrack. You can take a look at the full setlist here to get an idea of what to expect -- spoiler: it's a lot of in-house work. Most of it is competent electronica crafted by the talented folks at Harmonix, but I just don't dig most of the vocal work -- either the performances or the lyrics -- and the majority of songs are not nearly as memorable as classics from the old games like Garbage's "Cherry Lips" or David Bowie's "Everyone Says Hi." I would play those songs for hours on end years back, but like the campaign, I'm willing to skip out on most of the new tracks. The original games weren't afraid to get out of their comfort zone with songs like "Dope Nose" from Weezer and "King of Rock" by Run-DMC, and the lack of risk-taking really shows with this new iteration. Another general issue I have is the way songs are doled out while playing. Tracks are locked behind the campaign as previously mentioned, but others require players to complete a ton of songs to access them. One even takes 60 plays to unlock! Why did Harmonix feel the need to do this? To gate the experience and ensure it lasts longer? It goes against the party-like nature of the game, and feels like a relic of the past. I wouldn't mind doing this if the reward were greater (like the original), but it isn't. Amplitude is a competent rhythm game that should provide lots of fun at parties, but the hamstrung tracklist is a severe detriment to its longevity. Harmonix was able to preserve the classic experience, but may have gone overboard in its effort to do so. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher. I did not contribute to the Kickstarter campaign.]
Amplitude review photo
This Amp doesn't go to 11
Before there was an abundance of rhythm games out there with plastic peripherals, there were developers like Harmonix leading the way with controller-based experiences. Along with some long sessions of Gitaroo Man and Pa...

Kinect lives photo
Kinect lives

They're still making Kinect games!


Well I'll be
Dec 30
// Jordan Devore
2015 was the year I packed up my Kinect for good. The device wasn't getting enough use -- certainly not for controller-free Xbox One menu navigation, which I never grew accustomed to, and rarely if ever for gaming. I got one ...
Rock Band 4 photo
Rock Band 4

Rock Band 4 to wipe leaderboards due to 'gnarly bug'


That's a cute way to put it
Dec 24
// Chris Carter
I enjoyed Rock Band 4 for the most part, but that game shipped with a few issues that weren't discovered or sorted out until after launch. Mostly relating to physical instrument troubles, but there was another bug that f...
Avenged Sevenfold photo
Avenged Sevenfold

Avenged Sevenfold is hosting a show on Guitar Hero Live this week


Which will be aired this week
Dec 23
// Chris Carter
I'm still rocking out with Guitar Hero Live, mostly because of the constant free content that comes my way by way of Guitar Hero TV. Sure there are microtransactions under the surface, but for weeks now, I've played the ...
Amplitude photo
Amplitude

FreQuency mode comes to Amplitude reboot


To tunnel or not to tunnel
Dec 23
// Vikki Blake
The rebooted Amplitude will feature a FreQuency mode which turns the otherwise flat tracks into 3D tunnels. "In the original Amplitude, we got away from the tunnel design of FreQuency and flattened out the tracks," Harmo...
Rock Band 3 photo
Rock Band 3

Here's how to bring Rock Band 3's tracks into 4


It's pretty easy
Dec 17
// Chris Carter
Harmonix has finally added in the ability to bring over every track from Rock Band 3 into the newest iteration. Yep, that's every track, and despite the import licensing issues in the past, all 83 songs are good to go. P...
PaRappa on PS4 photo
PaRappa on PS4

I'm glad I got PaRappa the Rapper 2 on PS4


What a delightful experience
Dec 16
// Jordan Devore
PaRappa the Rapper 2 holds up so well! As you might have seen, the PlayStation 2 rhythm game became available this week on PS4. It's a classic tale about a rapping dog with a lifetime supply of noodles who really just wants a...

Review: The Bit.Trip

Dec 15 // Ben Davis
The Bit.Trip (PS4 [reviewed], PS Vita, PS3)Developer: Choice ProvisionsPublisher: Choice ProvisionsMSRP: $9.99 (Cross-Buy)Released: December 5, 2015 (PS4, PS Vita), TBA (PS3) The Bit.Trip is a collection of all six games in the Bit.Trip series which were originally released on WiiWare, similar to Bit.Trip Complete for Wii and Bit.Trip Saga for 3DS from a few years ago. It may have a different name than the other compilations, but it's largely the same aside from the controls, menus, and a few extras. The Bit.Trip differs in that it offers Trophies and leaderboards, which already existed for the PC versions of the games, but not for the Wii and 3DS versions. However, it's lacking all of the bonus content and extra challenge levels introduced in Bit.Trip Complete. Those extras would have been a nice addition here as a way to entice people who have already played some of the games before, but as it stands, it's basically just a straightforward compilation. [embed]326911:61531:0[/embed] Even so, the Bit.Trip games still hold up incredibly well, and the price is perfect for anyone looking to experience them again (or for the first time). All six games can be accessed from the slick main menu, featuring some neat concept art whenever a title is selected. Each game also allows the player to choose between Easy, Normal, or Hard difficulty settings, which is nice because the Bit.Trip games can be quite difficult, even on Easy! For those who haven't played Bit.Trip before, the series spans several different genres with an emphasis on rhythm-based gameplay, all held together with similar themes to tell the story of the life and death of Commander Video. Bit.Trip Beat and Bit.Trip Flux are very Pong-like in nature, requiring the player to move a paddle up and down to bounce incoming beats back to the rhythm. Bit.Trip Runner switches things up as a rhythmic auto-running platformer, while Bit.Trip Fate takes the series in another drastically different direction as a musical on-rails shooter. Bit.Trip Core and Bit.Trip Void are a bit harder to describe, but they both offer gameplay that is completely unique to the series. Core gives players control of an X and Y axis which can zap any beats that pass over them, while Void has players controlling an ever-expanding black hole which must consume other black shapes while avoiding white ones. Void is actually my personal favorite of the series, simply because I've never played anything else quite like it. The biggest difference for the PlayStation versions of these games is of course going to be the controls. I found playing with the Dualshock 4 to be quite comfortable and intuitive, easily on par with the Wii controls. Both Core and Void let the player choose between the left analog stick or the d-pad for movement. I found the analog stick to be preferable in most situations, although the d-pad was useful for a certain boss in Void which requires precision movements, and some players will probably prefer to use the d-pad to play Core (I found it to be a little uncomfortable after a while). Fate uses both analog sticks -- one for movement and one for aiming and shooting -- and it felt perfect. The controls for Runner are about what you'd expect, since it only requires simple button inputs. It would be kind of hard to mess those up. As for Beat and Flux, the controls work similarly to the Wii Remote in that you simply have to tilt the Dualshock 4 forward and back to move the paddle. It seemed to really pick up on my hands shaking though, which caused the paddle to sort of vibrate slightly up and down all the time. This made it feel as though I didn't have as much control over the paddle as I would have like, but it wasn't too much of a deal-breaker for me since I wasn't going for high scores or anything. However, it did make the final boss of Beat especially difficult since it's easier to win by hitting the beats back with the very tip of the paddle. I kept missing even the slow-moving beats by the slightest degree, most likely because of the vibrations. Finally, for players interested in leaderboards, they'll be happy to know that each game has separate leaderboards for every individual level, divided between the three difficulty settings. These can be accessed directly from the main menu or individually from the menus of the specific games. While The Bit.Trip could have been made marginally better with the addition of any kind of bonus content (such as the extra challenges found in Bit.Trip Complete), it's still a solid compilation of an excellent series of games. Thankfully, they hold up just as well on PlayStation consoles as they did on the Wii. If you still haven't taken the dive into the rhythmic, arcade-y goodness of Bit.Trip, or if you've been looking for a reason to play through it all again, now would be the perfect time to do so. [This review is based on a retail build of the game purchased by the reviewer.]
The Bit.Trip review photo
SERIES.COMPLETE
The Bit.Trip series holds a special place in my heart. With a wonderful blend of rhythm-based mechanics and arcade-style gameplay spanning various genres, the games are easy to pick up, quick to fall in love with, and yet inc...

Brutal Mode is the best thing to happen to Rock Band in years

Dec 11 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]325866:61490:0[/embed] Take a look at this video of me playing. It'll give you a greater sense of what actually makes this difficult. Sometimes I play well, other times I play poorly. At no times, however, am I playing comfortably. For those who have spent countless hours honing their Rock Band proficiency, this is the perfect addition to the game. It forces the hardcore community to play differently than they've played before, but while still using the same skills. This is built for the people who chase full combos and won't accept anything less. It taps into their meticulous drive to play well, and beautifully flips it on its head. Brutal Mode is maddening and it's not because of the vanishing notes. It's because of the psychological mind games the mode plays. Any well-versed player will tell you that they don't watch the notes reach the bottom of the track. Instead, they reach a sort of inner-harmony where they immediately internalize the note and play it in time while doing the same for every other note that flows downward. It's not a sensation that can be easily explained to anyone who hasn't felt it. This mode's brilliance lies within the fact that it changes the Rock Band experience from a visual one to an audial one. Sure, there's a preview of the upcoming notes, but it's on you to know the correct time to play them. Feeling the music is necessary; disconnecting from the music and trying to brute force the notes on what seems to be the right beat will just result in awkward plunks and wails. Overthinking it is a formula for failure. Ironically, when you're failing is when Brutal Mode is maybe at its toughest. It'd seem natural that the inverse is true; the worse you're doing, the longer you can see the notes. That should be easiest. It's not, though. Not even close. Any fluctuation in the process can temporarily damn you. Seeing those notes and thinking about them switches your mindset back from audial to visual. As it turns out, your brain can adjust to sticking to one of those; flip-flopping is where you get confused and freeze up. The invention of Brutal Mode is a staunch informer that being able to see the notes is a huge crutch, even if it doesn't seem that way.  In 2010, Harmonix tried to advance the Rock Band experience by introducing Pro Mode -- a way for players to actually learn the instruments they were simulating. It didn't fare all that well. The barrier to entry was high and the learning curve was steep. As it turns out, a lot of people who spent a bunch of time mastering Rock Band and Guitar Hero didn't want to start from scratch on a new skill; they wanted to build on the ones they already have. Brutal Mode feels as if it were built for that audience. It's an extension of the toughest Rock Band has to offer while managing to change the way the game is approached. Anyone who's good enough at Rock Band to take a serious try at Brutal Mode has long ago lost the magic that comes with improving at the genre. This helps recapture some of that. That's a win by any measure, brutal as it may be.
Rock Band 4 photo
And the toughest
Harmonix rolled out an update for Rock Band 4 earlier this week that included a whole bunch of unexpected additions. It's impressive in its scope. A lot of the changes were meant to make Rock Band 4 feel more like a...

PS2 games on PS4 photo
PS2 games on PS4

PaRappa the Rapper 2 hits PS4 next week


Burgers all day every day
Dec 10
// Jordan Devore
Sony has begun selling PlayStation 2 games on PlayStation 4 with Trophies and 1080p support. After that initial batch of titles, PaRappa the Rapper 2 is up next. It'll be available on Tuesday. It's unknown exactly how much th...
Rez Infinite photo
Rez Infinite

Rez Infinite coming to PlayStation VR


Daft Punk light show from Mizuguchi
Dec 05
// Steven Hansen
See that nuts, Daft Punk style light up suit in the grainy stream footage screenshots? That's Rez's Tetsuya Mizuguchi playing Rez Infinite, which just announced for PS4 and PlayStation VR. I will be sick everywhere and it will be great. (I've only gotten nauseous once in VR, but I can't remember trying anything as fast and trippy as Rez.)
Rock Band 4 photo
Rock Band 4

Rock Band 4's newest mode gets harder as you get better


Become a brutal legend
Dec 04
// Brett Makedonski
As a part of the December 8 update to Rock Band 4, the game's most adept and hardcore players will get a new challenge that requires their finely honed skill set. Harmonix is introducing Brutal Mode to the game, a variation ...
Rock Band VR photo
Rock Band VR

Harmonix is doing Rock Band VR for Oculus Rift


Huh, okay
Dec 03
// Jordan Devore
As announced this evening during Geoff Keighley's The Game Awards, Harmonix and Oculus are partnering for Rock Band VR. A rough clip with first-person footage of a player holding a guitar was shown, as well as a bit between Oculus founder Palmer Luckey and the band DragonForce. He wore flag pants, you guys. The Oculus Rift launches in Q1 2016, and Rock Band VR will be out sometime next year.
Amplitude photo
Amplitude

Amplitude set to release on January 5 for PS4


Ring in the new year
Dec 02
// Darren Nakamura
It has been a bit of a wait for Amplitude, Harmonix's 2014 Kickstarter success. It was originally slated for release in March of 2015, but was pushed back a few times to January of 2016. Still, a year is nothing if you consid...
Activision photo
Activision

Activision reveals crowd-sourced music video results for Guitar Hero Live


100,000 videos generated
Dec 01
// Chris Carter
I'm generally not a fan of lip-sync videos, but it looks like Activision managed to round up quite a few people into their newest scheme for Guitar Hero Live. The gist is that people are tasked with creating a video for Ed Sh...

Review: Superbeat: Xonic

Nov 30 // Jed Whitaker
Superbeat: Xonic (PS Vita [reviewed], PS TV)Developer: NurijoyPublisher: PM Studios, Atlus & ActtilMSRP: $39.99Released: November 10, 2015 This spiritual successor to the DJMax series has you tapping on the edges of the screen as visualized music from various genres fly at you, or optionally using the D-pad and buttons if that is you'd prefer. Personally I found that Superbeat was far more suited to touchscreen gameplay than traditional controls. By using touch you never have to think about what buttons to press, instead just matching the notes as they connect with the screen, which in turn makes things a tiny bit easier. The only downside to touch is getting used to the scratch notes, which are yellow notes that require tapping then quickly swiping either up or down based on the arrow inside of them. Scratch notes really gave me trouble till I'd spent days with the game and finally found the perfect technique to trigger them. Aside from that, the gameplay is spot on. Hitting notes just feel great on the smooth OLED of my launch edition Vita, even if I didn't recognize any of the music upon first playing it. By the time I was finished with the game I found myself humming along to songs and going back to play my favorites to level up.  [embed]323291:61307:0[/embed] Superbeat has an XP leveling system that is used to unlock songs and World Tour stages. XP is gained by completing songs, and bonus XP are awarded for difficulty and perks related to unlockable DJ Icons. DJ Icons can grant perks or protections such as double health, more recovery, more XP and even break shields. Shields are used to prevent damage being taken and combos being broken and are necessary for many of the World Tour stages unless you're a natural born finger dancer.  World Tour is really where you'll spend most of your time with the game, completing various challenges that require various goals such as massive combos that last across songs, perfectly played songs, and achieving high scores. My biggest gripe with the game is that the difficulty of World Tour stages doesn't really match up with their listed difficulty; I often found myself failing the easy stages while breezing through medium and hard difficulties.  The Tour stages that are brutally difficult require you to get 90%+ JUD, with JUD being related to score. While DJ Icons can help you pass many stages, they do little to help pass JUD stages, as the shields only grant you "good" rated presses instead of "superbeats" that give you a higher score. Some of the challenges are so hard that I found it damned near impossible to complete them in my time with the game, meaning I missed out on one last set of challenges and another "fart" sound effect that can be used in place of the default rimshot sound effect played when hitting notes.  After close to 40 hours with the game, I'm nowhere near acquiring all the unlockables, though I've managed to unlock every track -- all of which I really enjoy aside from one metal song that gives Crazytown's "Butterfly" a run for its title of 'shittiest song ever.' I rarely play my Vita, but now I'm going to have to pack it and Xonic along with me for any flights as my new go to "don't panic because you could die at any moment" game.  Superbeat: Xonic is an original enough take on the rhythm genre to make it feel fresh again and is easily the best touch screen based music game I've played with Cytus coming a close second. Filled to the brim with catchy tunes, I'll be revisiting Superbeat in the coming months anytime I travel. Apart from some brutally difficult challenges, the only other thing holding me back from giving this game a perfect score is that it is on the Vita, a system that I'd still regret buying even if this was the second best rhythm game I've ever played -- long live the king, PaRappa the Rapper. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.] Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon (3DS)Developer: Spike ChunsoftPublisher: NintendoMSRP: $39.99Released: November 20, 2015 [embed]323291:61307:0[/embed]
Superbeat review photo
Fingering has never been so fun
I've been playing rhythm games since they exploded onto the scene with PaRappa the Rapper in 1997, and having nearly played at least one title of every rhythm game series released I can easily say Superbeat: Xonic is top tier. But be forewarned, this is the Dark Souls...nay...the 127 Hours of music games, only you get to keep your arms attached. SUPERBEAT: XONiC

Hatsune Miku photo
Hatsune Miku

Hatsune Miku: Project Diva X will arrive in March in Japan


On Vita
Nov 30
// Chris Carter
The Hatsune Miku machine isn't stopping anytime soon. Sega has just announced that Hatsune Miku: Project Diva X will arrive on March 24, 2016 in Japan, exclusively for the Vita. An Aime card (arcade transfer accesso...
Fallout Band 4 photo
Fallout Band 4

Look like a wasteland warrior when Fallout 4 invades Rock Band 4


A duet of cuatros
Nov 24
// Brett Makedonski
If you fancy yourself a living room faux-musician, this is probably the closest you'll ever get to looking like a Fall Out Boy. Harmonix has collaborated with Bethesda to add free Fallout 4 Vault-111 jumpsuits to the Ro...

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