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Temple Run: Oz the Great and Powerful releasing Feb. 27


Another licensed movie tie-in for the endless runner
Feb 04
// Keith Swiader
Temple Run: Oz the Great and Powerful, a Temple Run licensed tie-in game accompanying the film release of the same name, has been revealed on Twitter by Disney France PR representative Cecile Fouques. It will release on Febru...
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Temple Run 2 becomes 'fastest growing mobile game'


Some birds are pretty angry right now
Jan 31
// Keith Swiader
Temple Run 2 has garnered over 50 million downloads since its January 17 release on iOS, setting the record for "fastest growing mobile game," developer Imangi Studios today announced. The record was previously held by Angry ...
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Free Mutant Mudds iOS

Mutant Mudds will be free on iOS this week


Free on Thursday and Friday
Jan 30
// Chris Carter
Renegade Kid developer Jools Watsham dropped us a line today letting us know that Mutant Mudds will be free this Thursday and Friday (January 31 and February 1) for the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch platforms. You'd be crazy t...
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Run run run!

Temple Run 2 has been downloaded 20 million times already


Six million downloads on first day alone
Jan 21
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Temple Run 2, which was just released four days ago, has already been download over 20 million times on the Apple App Store. Six million downloads occurred on the first day alone. The game became the number one free app with...
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The Walking Dead

The Walking Dead has sold over 8.5 million episodes


For Clementine!
Jan 06
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Telltale CEO Dan Connors has told the Wall Street Journal that players have purchased more than 8.5 million episodes of The Walking Dead across consoles, PC, and iOS devices since release. As the WSJ states, at $5 per episode...
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Serj Tankian behind the musical score for Morning Star


"Psycho, groupie, cocaine, crazy!"
Dec 20
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Morning Star is an upcoming futuristic sci-fi shooter for iOS devices by Alex Seropian, the founder of Bungie. Much like The Drowning, Morning Star is also claiming to re-imagine the shooter genre for touch devices. It's eve...
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Theatrhythm: Final Fantasy iOS is a free app, paid songs


This could get expensive!
Dec 12
// Dale North
From the first minute I played Theatrhythm: Final Fantasy on the 3DS I wanted it for my iPhone. I have nothing against the 3DS, but I love this game so much that I always want it with me.  It's coming to iOS, but accordi...
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Pokedex for iOS launches today in US and Europe


Regional Pokedexes cost $5.99 apiece
Dec 10
// Dale North
North American and European Pokémon players with iPhones, iPads, or iPods can download Pokédex for iOS on the Apple App Store today. $1.99 gets you the full details on more than 640 Pokémon, including loc...
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Square Enix offers up a holiday iOS game sale


Final Fantasy IV coming soon
Dec 07
// Dale North
Square Enix is set to blow up your phone with popular existing games as well as some new ones. All three of the first Final Fantasy games are sale, as is Final Fantasy Dimensions, listed for as low as $3.99 (though ...
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The Drowning looks like a promising FPS for iOS


What was up with all those dead birds anyway?
Dec 06
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The Drowning is an upcoming first-person shooter for mobile devices by Scattered Entertainment (previously known as ngmoco Sweden.) The often outspoken Ben Cousins is leading the development, and this early look at the game ...
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Mutant Mudds rides a white steed onto iOS today


Quick impressions of the mobile port
Dec 06
// Tony Ponce
Today is the day that Renegade Kid's Mutant Mudds slip-slides onto Apple devices. If you'd like to double dip (or triple dip), it's a paltry $0.99 on the App Store. I've messed around with this latest build to see how it stac...
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Free Rayman Jungle Run update adds new world


Character pack also available for $0.99
Dec 06
// Tony Ponce
Rayman Jungle Run is what a mobile adaptation of a console platformer ought to be. Instead of a straight port shoehorned onto Apple and Android devices, it's a standalone title that merely complements the original, with touc...
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Oh you flirt! Mutant Mudds coming to iOS on December 6


Max and his water pistol like to get around
Nov 29
// Tony Ponce
Scandalous joking aside, Renegade Kid's Mutant Mudds has indeed been popping up everywhere. There's the 3DS original, the PC update, yesterday's confirmation of a Wii U "deluxe" edition, and now news of a port for iOS devices...
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Rockman Xover out in Japan, contains weird Legends video


We've definitely got a winner on our hands
Nov 29
// Tony Ponce
I know you've been on pins and needles regarding Rockman Xover. The free-to-play iOS title is available in Japan as of today, though the Western localization is still forthcoming. Heat Man of The Mega Man Network has been pu...
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GTA: Vice City coming to iOS and Android on December 6


10th Anniversary Edition of the best GTA
Nov 21
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Grand Theft Auto: Vice City 10th Anniversary Edition is set to come out on iOS and Android devices on December 6, 2012. It'll be going for $4.99, and will feature several enhancements such as updated character models, lightin...
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Music get: free Bar Oasis download on Dtoid's SoundCloud


Koreans know their game music
Nov 17
// Jayson Napolitano
We've got a special treat for you today. We wrote about the Bar Oasis 2 soundtrack in Note Worthy 005, and since that time, the team at Corners Studio has put together a special compilation album featuring remastered selectio...
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THE END TIMES ARE HERE: Pokedex comes to iOS


Save your soul before it's too late
Nov 16
// Dale North
What is the status of your soul? It's time to start considering how you've lived. Look at your affairs today and get them in order. Make right with your family, friends, the world. Do what you've always wanted to do...

Review: The Last Express (iOS)

Oct 20 // Casey Baker
The Last Express (iOS)Developer: DotEmuPublisher: DotEmuReleased: September 27, 2012MSRP: $4.99 In The Last Express, you take on the role of Robert Cath, an American adventurer who is dashingly handsome, fluent in various languages, and burdened with a questionable criminal past. In many ways, Cath fits into the Indiana Jones archetype -- even to the point that in one very Indiana Jones-ish combat scenario I could've sworn I heard the Wilhelm scream as an enemy died. Cath boards the Orient Express as an unknown, sneaking onto the train via motorcycle and quickly discovering that the friend he was expecting to rendezvous with has instead met his own mysterious demise. The game quickly sets you off onto a sort of choose-your-own-adventure, where you find yourself wandering the various corridors of the train and becoming either a passive or active participant of the events taking place around you. Even when playing casually on an iOS device, The Last Express will easily draw you into its immersive and self-contained universe. Characters pass by in narrow hallways, giving you a look and their pardon as they pass. People mill about in their rooms or in the restaurant car. And at various times you can eavesdrop on their conversations or actively become part of them. Of course, you don't actually have options as to what you will say -- Cath as a character is pretty self-assured and needs no help from our fourth-wall prodding -- though your choice to engage in conversations or ignore key characters will have a direct effect on your playthrough. [embed]236967:45496[/embed] The graphics are incredibly simplistic and the animations aren't even full-frame at times. Somehow, this simplicity is actually to the game's benefit. As you move about the train and watch characters interact, movements and gestures seem incredibly lifelike because of their familiarity -- it sort of feels like watching a simplified Renoir come to life. I know this sounds a bit pretentious, but I was honestly surprised by how such basic palettes and colors could tell such a deep and at times even emotional narrative. Normally, games that contain a murder mystery plot with overarching political intrigue really bore the shit out of me, but where The Last Express succeeds is in truly putting you in the moment. Every minute that passes is another minute towards your last destination, after all, and that final stopping place may change with your decisions from moment to moment. I can honestly say I have never felt the immediacy of my surroundings and actions in the same way as I did while playing through The Last Express. In one playthrough you may develop a love interest, help to defuse conflicts both petty and political, and develop alliances and enemies with various key players onboard. Granted, even though there are multiple ways to end the game, it seems that there is only one true sequence of events that leads to the "good" ending. Honestly, though, I'd be hard pressed to call any of the endings "happy." I've spent a lot of time gushing about the game itself -- I admittedly missed this gem the first time around, so it was exciting to play it in whatever format was available. However, the particular platform it's been released on has some incredibly frustrating issues, and I can't brand the game with a glowing review without considering the worthiness of it as a port. Touch sensitivity is a tricky beast for games ported to iOS, though successfully ported point-and-click adventure games have certainly come to mobile devices before. In complete honesty, I simply can't consider The Last Express among them. This may change with an update down the line, but as of now the game has an incredibly finicky touch control system. I played The Last Express on a 3rd generation iPad and found myself practically fighting with the controls at nearly every juncture. Icons on the screeen represent directions for your character to turn, though they could have been wingdings for all of the worth they had in actually getting my character to move properly. If I pressed on the button signifying "right," half the time the game would do the exact opposite. Pressing the button to move forward one frame would often send my character into a sprint, bypassing everything until the next traincar. These controls were especially frustratung during combat sequences, which play as proto-QTEs where you have to press the right direction with proper timing to survive dangerous fights. I nearly gave up in frustration during one of the late game battles because of this system. It took not only proper timing but bashing on the on-screen directional arrows and hoping they registered with the intended move. People often generally complain about touchscreen control and how awful it is for most mobile games. I argue stongly against this contention, as I have played so many awesome games with incredibly responsive controls that run the gamut from simple puzzle games (Ichi) to more complex adventure games like Swords & Sworcery that have the same familiar point-and-click interface. The Last Express falls on its face with the port's touch implementation, and this is really a shame. While I certainly accepted a certain amount of archaic control scheme frustration, I was surprised at how little work it seemed was actually put into making sure the game worked -- at least on an iPad. This was especially surprising given I was playing through on a device with ample screen space. Fortunately, The Last Express does have a good checkpoint system that even allows you to rewind time and play from an earlier train stop if you failed or missed something along the way. I suppose this and the newly implemented hint system are the major saving graces of this frustrating port. In every other way, it remains faithful to the original -- at least as far as I could surmise. I'm torn on this game, as I would normally give a game of this scope and brilliance a perfect 10, but my constant fight with the controls really did mar my enjoyment. Perhaps it's because the game is supposed to be playable on both iPad and iPhone, though from others' responses I've noticed it really only works on a smaller device. At the end of the day, I'd highly recommend picking up this relatively inexpensive version of The Last Express regardless, even if that means biting the bulllet with the control scheme and dealing with those frustrations. It's a piece of videogame history and a shining example of what can be done to create an experience so much more immersive than the Heavy Rains of today. I just can't rate the port as highly as I'd rate the core experience itself.
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Amazing game, touchy port
When The Last Express was first released in 1997, it was considered an incredibly engaging mystery set on the Orient Express as it traveled from Paris to Constantinople on the eve of World War I. In many ways the game was far...

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NYCC: The samurai bunny returns in new Usagi Yojimbo game


Happy Giant brings back the ronin warrior
Oct 13
// Audun Sorlie
Most people know him from his cameos in TMNT, but Miyamoto Usagi has been the star of his own comic book series for a long time. His first and only game, Samurai Warrior: The Battles of Usagi Yojimbo, came out in 1988 for the...
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He-Man punches Skeletor's friends in new iOS brawler


By the power of Apple!
Oct 10
// Jim Sterling
Sweet nostalgia is the hook by which Chillingo and Glitchsoft hope to snatch you with He-Man, a new brawler coming universally to iOS devices. It's based on the old cartoon, you see. This means I'm going to buy it. Because I'...
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Gamemaster Howard wants you to be a 'Know-It-All'


Sep 25
// Tony Ponce
Former Nintendo of America spokesman Howard Phillips has been sharing tons of goodies from his personal archives lately, and now he shares a game idea. As the original Nintendo "Gamemaster," he was tasked with knowing the in...

Review: Rayman Jungle Run

Sep 22 // Tony Ponce
Rayman Jungle Run (Android, iOS [reviewed])Developer: Pastagames, Ubisoft MontpellierPublisher: UbisoftRelease: September 19, 2012 (iOS) / September 27, 2012 (Android)MSRP: $2.99 What is often the biggest shortcoming of any touch-based platformer? The controls, of course. The more virtual buttons a game tries to squeeze on the screen, the more likely the game will fail to register your inputs. Without tactile feedback, it's hard to tell when you're just outside the button's input detection boundary until you tap the screen and nothing happens. Jungle Run streamlines controls by taking a page out of auto-runners like Canabalt -- Rayman is in constant motion, so all you have to worry about is dodging obstacles. Unlike Canabalt at its ilk, you aren't running along an endless horizontal corridor, gunning for that elusive "high score." This is a true blue platformer with chasms, spikes, enemies, floating platforms, wall jumps, and other hazards. The game is split into four worlds with 10 stages apiece. Each world introduces a new ability, giving you plenty of time to grow accustomed to a particular mechanic before the next one appears. In the first world, all you have to do is jump. Though there is a jump button in the bottom left corner, you can trigger the action by tapping anywhere on the screen, save for the top corners which are dedicated to the "restart level" and menu commands. [embed]235521:45182[/embed] In the second world, you gain the hover ability, executed by holding your finger on the screen once you are airborne, which you can also use to catch air currents to lift you higher. In the third world, you are introduced to wall running, which offers some clever gravity-defying challenges. In the final world, you learn how to punch through wooden barricades and enemies along your path. Punching is mapped to a separate button in the bottom right corner which, unlike the jump button, has to be pressed, but at least it's large enough that you'll never accidentally miss a punch. Reaching the end of a stage is not all that difficult, but your true goal is to collect Lums, the golden firefly-like critters found in every Rayman game. There are 100 Lums in each level, and finding them all will require you to take more precarious paths, intentionally miss jumps, or discover a hidden doors. By collecting all the Lums in at least five stages in a world, you'll unlock that world's tenth stage, a balls-hard run through the Land of the Livid Dead. Here, there are no Lums, only an increased risk of sudden death. Thankfully, as with all the other levels in the game, these are a minute in length tops, so there's never that sense of lost progress should you want to restart a stage. The icing on the cake is the art, which has been pulled directly from Rayman Origins. Normally, I would call out a developer for reusing copious amounts of assets, but the graphics from Origins are so colorful, bright, and beautiful that I have no objections about their reappearance here. This is a game you play with a smile plastered across your face, nodding your head along to the cheerful music and detailed animations. Unfortunately, the game ends full-stop upon completion of the final stage. There is no fanfare, no "congratulations" screen, just a boot back to the main menu. Feels rather abrupt, but I don't know why I was expecting anything else. Jungle Run is just a series of narrative-less challenge levels, but it's so fulfilling that at times you'll become confused into thinking it's something "greater," if that makes any sense. Not really a bad "problem" to have. That's not to say Jungle Run doesn't offer rewards for the dedicated player. The more Lums you collect, the more wallpaper you earn, which can be saved as the background image on whatever device you are using. It's not much, but how often does a game award prizes outside of the game itself? The challenges are reward enough on their own, so these are but pleasant extras. Rayman Jungle Run is proof that platformers can work on touch devices if you tailor the them to the strengths of the hardware rather than attempt to recreate a console experience. Had this merely been a watered-down port of Origins, it would have invited direct comparisons and highlighted the flaws of touch-based gameplay. Instead, it's a game with bite-sized levels and sensible controls yet all the action of its console brethren. This is what companion software ought to be.
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When did Ubisoft start becoming awesome again? Who would have thought the French studio would be the one to properly reinvigorate the 2D platforming genre, thus beating Nintendo at its own game? That's how I felt when I first...

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Tell us your high scores in Super Hexagon!


Sep 10
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
So we're really going crazy over Super Hexagon here at the Destructoid offices. It's all I could talk about this weekend, and I've gotten more than a handful of fellow editors addicted to the game. Currently, the highest scor...

Review: Super Hexagon

Sep 10 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
Super Hexagon (iOS)Developer: DistractionwarePublisher: DistractionwareRelease: September 5, 2012MSRP: $2.99 What makes Super Hexagon such an addictive experience is its simplicity. You control a little triangle that's stationed within the center of the screen. Touching the right side of your screen will move the triangle clockwise, and the left side of the screen moves you counter-clockwise. Tapping the screen will move the triangle ever so slightly, while holding down on the screen will see the shape moving at top speeds. Controls are very responsive, and they need to be as walls in the shape of geometric patterns are constantly advancing toward the center of the level. Levels are randomly generated, while specific pattern configurations are repeated at different points with each replay. The overall goal is to last as long as possible without getting crushed between two walls while you're zig-zagging your way through the endless maze. And I'm not joking when I say you might feel pain around your forehead. Shapes will be moving in one way, while the entire level could be spinning in another direction, all while you have to be aware of every potential threat coming at you from every direction. [embed]234664:45006[/embed] The premise sounds simple enough but I wouldn't doubt it if you hear "Game Over" at least a dozen times before you finally last longer than five seconds. You will die, a lot. The difficulty here isn't in that the game is abusing you, but more that your own abilities are being put to the test. Super Hexagon is about testing your reflexes, reaction speed, memorization, and your instincts, pushing them beyond your self imposed limitations. Colors are constantly changing in the levels, all while the geometric shapes pulse to the wonderful soundtrack by Chipzel. The music picks up at different parts of the track, so you'll get to hear something different instead of restarting from the beginning every time. A big deal in my book, as hearing the same track restart over and over with the retry of a level does get extremely annoying over time in other games.  Restarting a level will become norm, as Super Hexagon isn't kidding around. The lowest difficulty is Hard, going up to Harder, then Hardest. While levels are indefinite, you can technically pass each stage if you last for a full minute. Passing the minute mark rewards you by unlocking even higher difficulties, such as Hardester. This level of masochism will make sense to those that have experienced VVVVVV, the breakout hit by Terry Cavanagh. Super Hexagon is Terry's latest creation, which started life as a hastily put together project during a 48-hour game jam. Terry has since expanded on the original Hexagon, creating a far more enjoyable experience for the iOS, with PC, Mac and maybe even Android versions to come down the line. Super Hexagon is a simple, engaging game, perfect for the mobile experience. You'll go in thinking you'll play a short game, but soon find yourself repeating the same level at least a couple of dozen times, quickly jabbing at the screen to restart after cursing loudly from the ridiculous mistake you just made. Each play through is worth it though, as just breaking your own personal record by a second will give you a level of satisfaction you wouldn't expect to feel. Simply put, Super Hexagon is one of the best mobile gaming experiences I've had this year.
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Your brain will vomit rainbows
Super Hexagon is a game that makes your eyeballs feel like they're being forcibly twisted against your will while still in their sockets. It is a game that makes your brain feel like it's being torn up and stitched back toget...

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FIFA 13 iOS will have competitive online multiplayer


Aug 03
// Steven Hansen
When I played FIFA 12 for iOS last year, I found myself rather surprised by how nicely the experience transferred onto mobile devices. It obviously found success, as the team is being even more ambitious with FIFA 13 for iOS ...
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Let me preface this by saying that I'm not 100% sure if there are already Pokemon-like games available on iOS or Android devices. I'd love to be told differently, but for now I'll tell you about ngmoco's Monster Tracker, the ...

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ngmoco announces a new Transformers mobile game


Aug 03
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Transformers Mobile is an upcoming card battle game in the same style as ngmoco's current top hit, Rage of Bahamut. You'll be able to play as Autobots or Decepticons and take on missions where you'll be earning credits, recru...

Review: The Act

Jul 20 // Allistair Pinsof
[embed]231686:44456[/embed] The Act (iOS)Developer: React Entertainment Publisher: Chillingo LtdReleased: June 21, 2012MSRP: $0.99The Act was never meant to be an iOS game. Like a lot of games, The Act was released on the platform as a last resort. Unlike a lot of games, this choice was made after a decade of development for arcades. You can read the full story at Polygon, but I’ll give you the important details in a shotgun blast of information: Disney animators, arcade knob controller, emotions, and Dan Aykroyd. Chicken fingers. They’re delicious. Got that all? Try as the developer might, The Act can’t escape from comparisons to Dragon’s Lair, Space Ace, and other Laserdisc-based, animation-heavy QTE games (hyphens!). Like those games, The Act features cel animation from Disney animators and looks stunning. It also only lasts 30 minutes and you’ll spend most of that amount of time either watching a scene play out or cursing at your iPhone/iPad. Being a game developed two decades after Dragon’s Lair, The Act brings something new to the genre: a knob. Well, what used to be a knob. The game in its original, abandoned arcade form was controlled with a knob. You literally dialed into the right emotion that will help you connect with your surroundings and progress the story. It’s not as hippy-dippy as it sounds. Being a knobless-platform, the iOS version transforms the turning of a knob into a graceful finger swipe. Slowly swipe left, strongly swipe right, etc. It works surprisingly well most of the time. The Act is a love story that follows a dopey window washer who falls for a nurse at a nearby hospital. When he isn’t daydreaming about his own Casablanca romance, he’s saving his narcoleptic friend from falling off a skyscraper. The Act is full of great characters that are full of personality without speaking a single word. That’s right: The Act is free of dialogue. Instead, the story comes to life through the superb animation and moving score. It’s really a class act that leaves you feeling good -- good enough to forget and forgive most of the game’s frustrating scenarios. The different scenarios the male lead gets himself into are almost always bizarre, comical, and bittersweet. The game doesn’t start on a strong foot, unfortunately. The first scenario finds the lead daydreaming about the nurse. He’s dressed in a tux and ready to show some boldness to win her over. This boldness is applied through your touch, swiping left or right with nuance. You either hang tight and look like a chump or move in closer, slyly -- but not too quick or you’ll look desperate! This information is something you can only get by playing these scenarios, often time and time again. It’s very frustrating to play a game where you have to initially fail in order to win. There are occasions when The Act’s control scheme makes sense in the context of a scenario. When you see your boss choking, when you need to mimic your love interest, or when you only have one direction to swipe, the controls come naturally. The game is at its worst when it relies on the player to display specific emotions in reaction to others. First, you’ll need to find out exactly what the other parties are feeling. Then, you need to find out what emotions you have in your arsenal and how you apply them (left or right by how much?). Continually failing these challenges made my blood boil, especially when I knew what I had to do but I just didn’t know how to do it. The Act is kind enough to supply the player with infinite continues, but it doesn’t make the jerky stop-and-start of the story and animation any smoother. For a game about properly communicating your emotions in order to find success, the developer did a poor job of conveying its own desires to the player. The Act is a rough relationship that woos with visual charm, connects through some fantastic, emotional moments, but leaves the player a bit high and dry, in the end. There might not be another game like it, but there are better fish in the sea out there, even for a romantic gamer.
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I think I may be autistic. Or something. But, I’m not alone in having this thought. Paranoid self-diagnosing is a habit that our ADHD generation can’t kick any sooner than the meds we’re on. Very few of us...

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iOS MMO shamelessly rips off Torchlight


Jul 17
// Jim Sterling
Armed Heroes, a mobile MMORPG, is the latest game on iTunes to be caught shamelessly stealing stuff from other studios. The victim this time is Torchlight, with Runic Games' Travis Baldree calling out the thieving party -- EG...
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Infinity Blade is Epic's most profitable game


Jun 27
// Jim Sterling
Most readers will associate Epic Games almost exclusively with Gears of War these days, but Cliffy B's muscular man fantasy is not the company's prime breadwinner. Those who know about pulling power of mobile gaming (or just ...

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