hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

Vigil Games

 photo

Darksiders II delayed to August


Apr 18
// Jim Sterling
THQ has announced that Darksiders II will be pushed back from June to August, allowing Vigil more time to polish the final product. A more solid release date will be revealed in the next few days.  The publisher has pree...
 photo

Warhammer 40,000: Dark Millennium won't release as an MMO


Mar 29
// Jordan Devore
THQ has announced that Warhammer 40,000: Dark Millennium Online isn't going to release as a massively multiplayer online game as originally expected. The title has been "refocused" as an "immersive single player and online mu...

Preview: Darksiders II is inspired by the best there is

Mar 26 // Ryan Perez
Darksiders II (PC, PlayStation 3, Wii U, Xbox 360 [previewed]) Developer: Vigil Games Publisher: THQ Release: June 26, 2012 Players take on the role of the Horseman Death, whose hobbies include ripping monsters to pieces, donning haggard armor, wielding unreasonably large scythes, and long walks on the souls of your ancestors. After his brother, the Horseman War, is accused of conspiring to start the Apocalypse before its due time, Death embarks on a disobedient quest to prove his brother's innocence any way he can. I suppose if you're a fan of the scary part of the Holy Bible, then DSII's narrative will probably appeal to you ... or it'll offend you, depending on how you look at it. I can't say I personally found the first game's story to be all that intriguing, but it does make the lore of the sequel a bit easier to absorb. I'll admit, it is nice to see developers utilizing tapping something other than Greek mythology for once. As for the levels, Darksiders II has a very dungeon-based style of progression. Players will make their way from room to elaborately designed room, defeating waves of monsters, solving slightly challenging puzzles, and attaining keys to unlock other areas. Like I said before, the game feels a lot like Zelda, as backtracking is a common occurrence and treasure chests are numerous. No flamboyant men cavorting around in green unitards, fortunately. I'll admit that some puzzles do throw you for a bit of a loop. Their solutions aren't always obvious (as they shouldn't be), and solving certain head-scratchers provides a real sense of accomplishment. At times, frustration might rear its fat, ugly head, but it's totally worth those moments when you slap your forehead and think, "Ah, of course!" I won't lie, though -- other moments may include your dropping the controller and saying to yourself, "Are you fuckin' serious? That's what I had to do?" Combat is of the fast hack-'n-slash variety, with numerous combos and special moves to clear out several enemies at once. One move I utilized frequently was Death's ability to send a scythe spinning into an area in front of him, stunning and dealing steady damage to enemies in its proximity (bigger monsters didn't budge, though). Death's scythes prove to be very versatile weapons and could easily rival Kratos' Blades of Chaos as some of the most kickass game weapons around. Also, much like during the fights in God of War, a button prompt, which triggers a finishing move, appears above the heads of nearly defeated enemies. Wait until you see him change into his traditional Grim Reaper form as a result -- one of the game's finer "holy shit" moments. For players who enjoy customization, Darksiders II features some pretty decent RPG elements. Monsters and treasure chests provide loot in the form of weapons, armor, and items, all which can be applied to Death for stat boosts. Every set of boots, greaves, or shoulder guards I slapped onto Death provided a different, more menacing look than the last. Even his scythes got a nice visual upgrade each time I found a better pair. By the end of the demo, my Death looked like something off of a heavy metal album cover -- how very appropriate that THQ decided to play Metallica during the event. In regard to how cool Death looks, my favorite aspect of the game is definitely the art. The locales have a very otherworldly feel to them, but not so much that they are completely void of any practicality. Giant wood and steel mechanisms decorate larger areas, providing a sense of age and primitiveness to the setting, as though some ancient, ethereal civilization built everything you see, only to leave it to the ages and let it all rot. At the end of the demo, I encountered one of the game's several bosses. I know I'm not the first to suggest this, but the giant, rock-like creature I battled (known as the "Guardian") reminded me a lot of Shadow of the Colossus. As I rode atop my mighty white steed, I was forced to time my hurdles and sprints in order to dodge its slow, powerful attacks. In order to defeat it, I had to target specific weak spots on its body after certain attacks. While the fight was certainly difficult -- I have horrible timing during these types of battles -- it was also very exhilarating, and a testament to the kind of variety that Darksiders II had. Overall, Darksiders II carries all the elements of a strong sequel to a decent action title. Even with its very blatant inspiration, the game does offer some intriguing and unique creativity, which gives the narrative and its world just enough believability to pull you in. The story and characters are somewhat interesting, the combat is fast and fun, the RPG elements provide some nice depth and variety, and the visuals are pleasurable to gawk at.
 photo

Though I never brought myself to complete the first Darksiders, I did enjoy it for the length that I played. It was nothing phenomenal in its own right, but it was still a fun experience, due to retaining enough good ins...

 photo

Death gets dramatic in this Darksiders II trailer


Mar 23
// Jim Sterling
Man, THQ sure loves those Darksiders II trailers. Here's another one, apparently the first of several cinematic videos in which Death jumps about and hits stuff with ludicrous oversized weaponry. Like you'd expect.  No ...
 photo

Earlier this week, Hamza and I went to see Darksiders II. Because I have nicer hair than Hamza, I got to do a video interview with Dave Adams, the general manager of Vigil Games. He was nice enough to answer some of my dumb questions, and the folks at THQ emailed over some new gameplay footage. Go watch! #darksiders2

 photo

Check out Death's world in this Darksiders II video


Mar 14
// Jim Sterling
Here's a video of Vigil Games chatting about the world it's created for Darksiders II. You'll get to learn a little bit about the concept for certain locations, as well hear a lot of boasting about how huge the environment is. Apparently if the first game was the Moon, this is Earth. Oooh! Still really looking forward to this sucker, so I've nothing to add. What about you lot?
 photo

Darksiders II preorders upgraded to 'Limited Editions'


Mar 05
// Jim Sterling
If you've preordered Darksiders II, you'll be getting a bit more than you've expected, with THQ revealing that any copy reserved prior to release shall become a Limited Edition version at no extra charge.  The Limited Ed...
 photo

Darksiders 2 launches June 26, pre-order stuff revealed


Feb 14
// Jim Sterling
THQ has revealed that Darksiders II is coming to Xbox 360, PS3 and PC on June 26. Huzzah! It's also revealed the various pre-order bonuses available at different retails. Huh ... zuuuhr.  Without further ado, here's the ...
 photo

Darksiders prequel novel and lore bible incoming


Feb 01
// Jim Sterling
Videogames love prequel novels, and Darksiders is no exception. Random House is publishing Darksiders: The Abomination Vault in May, set to coincide with the release of Darksiders II. According to the PR machine, the book wil...
 photo

Death is EVERYWHERE in this terrifying Darksiders II vid


Jan 25
// Jim Sterling
Yesterday, THQ released a new trailer for Darksiders II, showcasing Death's presence and influence throughout human history. A few people thought that the trailer was funny, since Death's mask had been stuck onto a bunch of ...
 photo

Death is eternal in new Darksiders II trailer


Jan 24
// Jim Sterling
Here's a grim, brooding trailer for Darksiders II, bigging up its grim, brooding protagonist. I am so stoked for this game it's not even funny.  If you haven't already, check out Wesley's great preview of the game. He got to check it out in detail, and seemed suitably impressed. Can't argue with that!

Preview: Darksiders II

Jan 24 // Wesley Ruscher
Darksiders II (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U)Developer: Vigil GamesPublisher: THQRelease: Summer 2012It’s fairly uncommon for a franchise to drop their main protagonist, especially one that embodied the spirit of the game. Sure, Metal Gear Solid 2 had its infamous bait-and-switch and Bioshock’s sequel dropped players in the role of a Big Daddy (though I’d argue that game’s true main character was actually the underwater city of Rapture), but each of these game’s predecessors were blockbuster hits. Something Darksiders was not. “Typically when you get a sequel, you get the same guy with the same moves,” explains David Adams, Vigil Games general manager. “...We thought it would be cool to have a sequel with a whole new character that does different stuff. [As] a gamer, I can get a whole new experience. I’m not just getting the same one that has been retread with a different story.”As Death made his debut before my eyes, a feeling of familiarity overwhelmed me as I gazed up the more slender and sinister killer. Similar to his brother, this fearsome entity gives off the vibe that he’s not one to mess with. A fact made all but true, the moment Death ripped his first enemy apart with his vicious Reaper form. “In Darksiders, War had what we called Havoc form, where he turned into that big red demon,” says Adams. “Death has Reaper form, his version... but just because of his character, Death uses his power more casually than War would.” Like his more noble brother, Death isn’t alone on his quest. While War was plagued by the pestilent Watcher throughout his trials, Death finds guidance in his travels from a his own fellow companion -- a silent crow that perches on the shoulder of the dark hero whenever he enters one of Darksiders II's myriad mazes. “[He’s] called Dust,” explains Adams about Death’s Navi-like companion. “He’s kind of like a familiar who gives you little hints and clues as to what’s going on. He’ll fly over to an important area and be like, ‘Hey, look at this!’...but he’s more subtle. He doesn’t talk to you or overtly tell you anything. He’ll just conveniently fly around.” It’s with this explanation that I’m reminded about both the criticism and praise the original Darksiders received. At its core, the original followed the tried and true path of one of gaming’s most beloved classics, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. A fair comparison, something own Jim Sterling made in his review, but one I took with a grain of salt since I hadn’t played Miyamoto’s masterpiece at the time. As I watched Death run the gauntlet of hacking and slashing enemies to bits -- in the same combo-esque glory of its predecessor -- climb, run on walls, and jump with the finesse War lacked, and use the environment around him to proceed in his quest, there was definitely something both old and new with the parallel sequel. At first glance, it looks much like its predecessor, but underneath its darker facade lies a more fleshed out experience. “[Darksiders II’s] not so rigid,” Adams explains. “It has a lot of the same elements, like you get cool gear items that lets you do new stuff and there’s boss fights, but its not...go to a dungeon, get a gear item, fight a boss, leave, go to a dungeon, get a gear item. It’s not that formulaic. It’s a lot more free flowing.”While I can only imagine how much more of an open experience Darksiders II will be, the early demonstration was more about showing off the amount of depth the sequel has in store for players in the customization department. The surface was only scratched when it came to the upgrade and weapon system, but what was presented hinted at systems immensely deeper than the first game. “Without a specific number... There are a lot of different weapons in the game, different moves, combinations, [and] how they link together,” explains Adams.Dual scythes are Death’s primary tools of destruction, but he also has access to a multitude of secondary weapons such as pistols, claws, and powerful clubs that can be combined together easily. Magic also plays a bigger role in Death’s arsenal. Spells like Exume summon zombies to aid in battle, and Murder, which brings forth a relentless flock of deadly ravens that slowly pick apart enemies allow Death to be more strategic in his fights. And though these are but two spells, it’s really up to the player to chose how Death develops, whether it be in the skills he learns or the weapons he finds throughout his endeavors. “[Darksiders II] is still about adventure and exploring,” says Adams. “But there’s a lot more stuff to do. Your character grows, you get cool items, you can level up your skills, you go on side quests, you go to towns, you talk to NPC’s. The first one is much more straight forward. You’re a guy on a quest for revenge; kill, kill, kill, solve some puzzles, kill... [Darksiders II] is more of a world, where the first one was more of an action flick with cool puzzles in it.”Darksiders may have laid the foundation, but Vigil Games is set on making everything bigger and better in this pseudo sequel. With the best elements of action, adventure, and RPG thrown into the cold, murderous hands of Death, I for one can’t wait to shape my own dark destiny later this summer when Darksiders II arrives.
 photo

At the end of Darksiders, War looked to the skies and saw his brothers, the remaining Horsemen, plummeting to Earth to reunite with the resurrected hero. It was a befitting ending, and one that built hope for where the ser...

 photo

Diddling with a Darksiders II Death Mask


Jan 23
// Jim Sterling
An ominous package recently arrived, containing occult and forbidden artifacts from realms beyond our darkest imagination. Either that, or THQ popped a pretend mask in the mail and I filmed myself doing something dumb with it.  Either way, this is a video of some stuff that happened pertaining to Darksiders II. What fun!
 photo

Death rises in this new Darksiders II video


Jan 20
// Jim Sterling
Here's a new trailer for Darksiders II, in which the lads at Vigil talk about creating a brand new horseman for the sequel. They discuss the differences between Death and War, detail his playstyle, and give us a look at his ...
 photo

Death lives in Darksiders II teaser trailer


Dec 12
// Jim Sterling
Here's a dramatic teaser trailer for Darksiders II, which debuted at some weird televised frat party this past weekend. Strangely, it eluded our coverage, but as the resident Darksiders geek, I have made sure to get it poste...
 photo

Warhammer 40K: Dark Millennium MMO dated and detailed


Oct 13
// Jim Sterling
After ten thousand years of silence, THQ has come out of the woodwork with a bunch of details and a release date for Warhammer 40,000: Dark Millennium Online, the fabled MMO set in Games Workshop's sci-fi universe. ...
 photo

Get moody with these Darksiders II screens


Aug 18
// Jim Sterling
THQ has spunked out some lovely Darksiders II screens for your arousal. It features zombie kings, giant bugs, and Death's rotting horse, Despair. What a cheerful little name.  As a big fan of the original Darksiders, thi...
 photo

Even more skulls in this Darksiders II extended trailer


Jul 19
// Maurice Tan
Hamza's preview of Darksiders II left me pretty excited with all that talk about RPG elements and a lack of QTEs, but I noticed that at least one of you thought this game needed more skulls and bones. So here's an extended trailer for Darksiders II that has skulls, bones, and an all-new voiceover that explains what the hell is going on. No Crips or Illuminati though.
 photo

Darksiders 2 addressing the backtracking complaints


Jul 19
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
In my preview for Darksiders II, I mentioned Death's Ghost Hook weapon which helps you navigate around levels or attack enemies. What I didn't mention was that you don't start off with the Ghost Hook right away so you won'...

Death comes for all in Darksiders II

Jul 19 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
[embed]202790:38995[/embed] Darksiders II (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii U, PC)Developer: Vigil GamesPublisher: THQTo be released: TBA 2012 THQ's presentation began with the menu. Okay, not really interesting to start off with the menu but bear with me here. Once you start up Darksiders II, you'll see main menu and Death standing in the background. Soon as you select to jump into the game, the menu disappears and the camera pans out putting you immediately into the game. Darksiders II will automatically load the last area so there's no wasted time getting into the experience.  In this case, we were about 25% into Darksiders II where I got to see the second major area, the Abyssal Plains. Unlike the first game, Darksiders II takes place in the Nether Realms and this allows the team to present more of a fantasy setting. This opens up the art direction and gives the artists more freedom when it comes to the fantastic and stylish art direction as opposed to the Earth setting of the first game. At this point into the game, Death needs to consult the Lord of Bones in order to progress on his quest. Getting to the Lord of Bones isn't a simple matter, as his throne room is located on a giant airship that is being pulled around by two giant flying serpents. Death summons the airship and what took place next was actually a pleasant surprise. A cutscene kicks in as Death performs all sorts of acrobatics to ascend the airship flying by and during the entire thing, not a single Quick Time Button popped up. Personally I feel that QTE segments are getting abused in games so the fact that you'll be able to just sit back and actually enjoy the scene instead of worrying about messing up the button prompts was a genuine nice surprise. Once on the airship, Vigil Games showed off Death's "Ghost Hook." It's sort of like the Bionic Commando arm as it helps you traverse platforms and fight against the bad guys. You'll just simply pull the right trigger and Death will extend a chain-like whip onto the nearest intractable object or pull a baddie in close. As for other gameplay elements, know that Death does get his own horse named is Despair (get it?) You'll be getting your demon horse monster a lot sooner this time around as Darksiders II is twice as large in terms of size. Despair will be useful in combat too. Like War, Death can also transform into a super creature, in his case it's called Reaper Form. Basically, Death goes all Super Saiyan as he transforms into a new form and his attacks double in strength. Death is a bit of a showoff so you'll see him in Reaper form a lot more like in cutscenes. Unlike War though, Death can't block at all and instead has a dodge ability. Whereas War doesn't mind taking the punches, Death would rather break away from a fight by dodging and look for an opening to attack instead. Death's main weapons are two scythes that can combine into one giant scythe. The scythes are great for quick attacks and can be combined in conjunction with the secondary weapons you can gain, like a gaint hammer. You'll have magical abilities as well and in my demo, I got to see the Feast of Crows attack which summons crows to attack and distract enemies. One of the biggest changes with Darksiders II is the introduction of RPG elements. Gaining experience points and loot for killing enemies and the other RPG mechanics was actually planned for the first game, but cut due to development constraints. Death has four core stats to upgrade -- defense, strength, agility and arcane -- and this opens you up to design Death into the type of warrior you want him to be. You can equip Death with different items such as boots, gloves, body armor and so forth and that all goes into making Death customizable as well. There's going to be a wide assortment of weapons, all of which will be based on different tiers and rarity. The strongest weapon level you can get is called "Possessed" and you can actually feed these demonic weapons other weapons you have to make them stronger. Eventually you will run out of room in your inventory, and like most role-playing games, gold becomes a non-issue. So instead of selling your stuff, you can just feed it to the "Possessed" weapon and get a stronger weapon that way. On that note, yes you can actually sell your items now. Before getting to the Lord of Bones, you'll make your way through a town. While this wasn't shown in my demo, the idea is that the town will be filled with NPCs that you can sell your weapons and items to, learn new skills and even get sidequests. Once at the Lord of Bones throne room, you come to discover he's a bit busy. See, the Lord of Bones is, as Vigil Games put it, the air traffic controller for souls. With billions now dead, the Lord of Bones is unable to speak to anyone. His overseer, the Chamberlain, explains that the only way to speak with the Lord is to bring back the head of a champion that grants beings a second chance at life. Death has no choice but to agree and the airship drops off Death at the arena that is home to the champion. Getting to the champion isn't a simple task either as you first have to summon him by collecting three horn pieces to place on a statue. For the purposes of our demo, two of the pieces were already in place and we only had to collect one piece. During our hunt for the puzzle piece, Vigil explained that each area of the game will have new puzzle mechanics specific for each zone in order to make the experience fresh. In this particular area, Death has to reposition statues with lanterns beaming a ray light in order to progress through the environment. Once you got the third puzzle piece, it's time to fight probably one of the coolest mini-bosses I've seen in a game. The creature first starts off as a giant skull with a long spine that moves around the environment like a snake. It'll burrow into the ground and try to attack you from below. The trick with this boss is that you have to use your ghost hook in order to stun it before attacking. After getting hurt a few times, the monster assembles all the bones from previous victims in the arena into a body to house itself. It's a really cool effect seeing the monster create this form and even better, the boss will grab it's own spine and head and swing it around like a flail against you. The demo ended once Death defeats the boss and collects the skull for the Lord of Bones. What I saw was really early so Vigil wasn't really ready to talk about too much. They did point out that they want to give a lot of community support for players, although they didn't elaborate on what that meant exactly. You won't be able to upgrade all of Deaths stats in just one playthrough, but I wouldn't be surprised if a new game plus option is given (THQ wouldn't confirm it when asked.)  While the subject of downloadable content wasn't discussed, it should be noted that THQ stated that there will be a "max level [cap] at ship." THQ knows that DLC is easy money so it's not out of the question that there will be some content post release containing extra quests, a level cap increase and more (like what Fallout has been doing.) So far, what I've seen of Darksiders II was pretty awesome. I've always been fascinated with the character of Death as he appears in all sorts of fiction so getting to play as a super badass version of him has me excited.
 photo

Death isn't happy. His fellow horseman of the Apocalypse, War, was wrongly accused and imprisoned for bringing about the fall of mankind before it was foretold. Death knows that War is a by the books kind of guy and that ther...

 photo

E3: Darksiders II on Wii U might be the best version


Jun 07
// Maurice Tan
As part of their Darksiders II coverage, Game Informer asked Vigil Games how they feel about the new Nintendo console. Vigil told them that they are still wrapping their head around most of it, but they already have some idea...
 photo

E3: Darksiders II is a launch title for Wii U


Jun 07
// Bob Muir
Vigil Games' upcoming sequel starring Death, Darksiders II, is a pretty brutal, "hardcore" game. Nintendo has traditionally had a problem with those. So it's pretty encouraging to find out that Darksiders II will be a launch ...
 photo

Darksiders code nets a free game, art and other stuff


Feb 12
// Brad Nicholson
Some brand-new copies of Vigil Interactive's Darksiders came sealed with a special card containing a 20-digit promotional code. In menacing bold letters above the code are the words "DO NOT DISCARD," something we thought abou...

Darksiders Black Tower wasn't supposed to infuriate me

Jan 19 // Brad Nicholson
“No, we didn’t go into it wanting to make that,” Adams told me over the phone, laughing as I explain how easily I get angered at games. “It’s funny. A lot of level design for us grows organically. The first thing we do is come up with a high-level thing -- what are the cool things we want you to do in that area? Then we brainstorm some puzzle ideas, boss fight ideas. We kind of put it together.”“I wish there was some master plan behind what you do. You just kind of do it and then iterate. Try something else.“It was the last dungeon we did. It was the one we were rushing to finish towards the end. It definitely didn’t get the time and care -- but I’m proud of it. There’s a lot of cool puzzles in there and stuff.”I equated my frustration with the Black Tower to Zelda Water temples in our conversation. Adams didn’t comment on that specifically because we covered Zelda earlier.Minutes before I told Adams that a lot of people are saying Vigil delivered the kind of Zelda game they’ve always wanted. I let the statement hang in the air. “I won’t deny it. Zelda is my favorite franchise of all time,” Adams said. “It kind of came out, I think a lot of games come out of this, where you’re sitting around and ‘Man, it would be cool if you could do this in this one game. But you could also do this in that other game.’Darksiders is its own game, but the Zelda influence is too overt not to talk about. It’s something I’m sure Adams is tired of doing at this point. But he pressed on, talking about the studio’s initial influences.“When we started, there were four of us. We were working on MMOs at the time and we really, really wanted to get into console development. It started with us talking about all the cool awesome games we played in our youth -- Castlevania, Metroid, Zelda, Kid Icarus, just a bunch of crazy games. “ “We got inspired and did the crazy thing and left and started Vigil.“Zelda was definitely a big influence. Mostly early on -- we’d never made a console game so we were just looking at a lot of other games and how they structured it, how they did their pacing -- but at least for us we felt like as we went through the process, the game did start to take its own identity.“It’s something that will definitely grow, if we get to continue on in the franchise -- yes.”On a personal level, I love Zelda. Part of it was like, ‘Hey man, they don’t make these enough,’ he chuckled. “I have to go years without being able to play one!” [image 1 source] [image 2 source] [image 3 source]
 photo

I hate Zelda because of Water temples. I almost hated Darksiders because of the Black Tower.The other night I finished my plod to the main boss of the Black Tower, an ebony maze in Vigil Games’s Darksiders. Its convolut...

Vigil Games specced out the Voidwalker before Portal hit

Jan 15 // Brad Nicholson
Adams admits that Portal had an effect on the design of the ‘Voidwalker’ after the team played the game. He says its impossible not to be influenced by other games. “I’m not going to say Portal didn’t influence the direction it took in some way. “But the general idea was there, of making holes in the world and moving between them. The idea definitely evolved after playing Portal. It was like, ‘Oh my god this is kind of like what we were going to do only they did some stuff cooler.’ “ “It’s nearly impossible not to be influenced by what you play. When you play an awesome game and you’re like, ‘hey that’s kind of like that Voidwalker, maybe we can do this and that.’” Games copy games. And in the zanier scenarios like this one, studios could be fiddling with the same type of mechanic. I remember listening to Pandemic designer Tom French talk about Assassin’s Creed hitting while the studio was working on The Saboteur on a not-so-recent episode of the EA Podcast. Free-climbing was something they could call their own for only a short time. “For the record,” Adams tells me, “orange and blue is a perfect set of contrasting colors. We debated that endlessly: ‘we can’t do that, that’s too much like Portal.’ But ‘yeah, they’re pleasant colors, they’re contrasting on the color spectrum …’ There’s logical reasons for doing that.”
 photo

There’s a lot of room to talk about the overt game influences featured as mechanics in Vigil Games’s Darksiders. But let’s not forget that Vigil was creating the game while some of its influences were in pro...


  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter!
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -