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Survival Horror

FNAF fan film photo
FNAF fan film

Five Night at Freddy's fan film is short and creepy


Small run time, big spooks
May 08
// Nic Rowen
Horror movie trailers always give away the best bits of the film, and this fan made short for Five Nights at Freddy's by Typhoon Cinema is no exception. You've got all the greatest hits, spooky music, fuzzy security cameras,...

Review: Forgotten Memories: Alternate Realities

May 07 // Jed Whitaker
Forgotten Memories: Alternate Realities (Android, iOS [reviewed on an iPhone 6 Plus], Playstation Vita, Wii U)Developer: Psychose Interactive Inc.Publisher: Psychose Interactive Inc.Released: April 23, 2015 (iOS) / TBA 2015 (Android, PlayStation Vita, Wii U)MSRP: $4.99 Rose Hawkins wakes up after being shot in the face, only remembering that she was searching for a missing girl named Eden. She doesn't recall who shot her, how she is alive, or where she is.  Upon exiting the room Rose is greeted by a hallway formed in red curtains, the kind you'd find at any theater. An antique dictation device is waiting for her, and a message plays automatically from a woman named Noah who has been waiting for her. Noah knows Rose by name, and promises her more information on Eden if she can free her nurse friend from the asylum she is about to enter. Rose comes face to face with Noah in a throne surrounded by mannequins one last time before entering the asylum, Noah still talks through audio dictation for some reason. This is the kind of tone you can expect from Forgotten Memories. [embed]291661:58457:0[/embed] Like any psychological survival horror game, the story is deep, twisted and leaves a lot of questions unanswered. Most of the lore you'll come across in case files, notes, and a couple of cutscenes. Forgotten Memories is very old school in this regard, but still manages to have an engaging story worth searching for. Old school is a  word that can be used to describe most parts of the experience, for better or for worse. I almost didn't finish the game due to how difficult the game is, just because the developers felt the need to shove in old school mechanics for old school sake. Saving the game requires tracking down a computer and using a floppy disk, an item that is extremely limited in the game. While classic survival horror games used this save game mechanic, most notably the original Resident Evil series, it sucks for a game on mobile, especially when the game is brutally difficult. Forgotten Memories' app store description originally warned prospective buyers to only purchase the game if you are a hardcore gamer due to the level of challenge involved. They weren't joking -- I almost didn't finish it to how quickly and often I'd die. Luckily I must not have been the only one as the developer quickly released an update that included an easy mode. It provides players with unlimited saves, more ammo, easier enemies and more medkit pickups, among other tweaks. Even with this easy mode I found myself in situations with a sliver of health, no medkits and some distance between myself and the nearest save point.  Touchscreen controls were a mistake, plain and simple, and hopefully they don't carry over to the Vita and Wii U versions of the game. The left side of the screen controls character movement, while the right side controls the camera and aiming. The first place touched on the left side of the screen acts as a center axis, and Rose will move in the direction of your fingers position in reference to said axis. Camera and aiming control seems inconsistent on how much movement there is, often times leading to needing multiple swipes just turn around. On the right side of the screen are also icons that allow you to run or go into an aiming mode with your flashlight or weapon. With a weapon drawn tapping anywhere on the screen will cause Rose to attack. The pipe, the only melee weapon I found in my playthroughs, can be used three times consecutively to perform a powerful combo attack that pushes enemies backwards. Since this piece of junk is your main weapon, combat boils down to letting enemies get close enough to attack, performing the combo, rinse repeat. It leaves a lot to be desired. Shitty controls aside, Forgotten Memories nails the survival horror atmosphere unlike any game I've played in years. Haunting violins can be heard as you search for clues and keys, pounding drums mixed with noise play during combat, and the intro music is haunting, a mainstay of the Silent Hill series. I found my heart beating in my chest with my breath held as I ran past enemies to escape rooms. Hearing distorted singing coming from a shadow-like child that is just down the hallway where you need to go is fucking horrifying. While it is indeed a horrifying affair, it ends all too abruptly at just under an hour and a half on my first playthrough.  Having been in development for years, Forgotten Memories feels like it was purposely cut short to allow for sequels or download content. That being said, the pacing is tight and there is no filler whatsoever, but it still feels like the first chapter of a longer game. Aside from the brevity, awful controls, and dull combat, the game is easily recommendable for those looking for that Silent Hill feel. Though only the desperate should pick up the mobile version, or those that have a compatible controller, otherwise wait for the console and PC releases sometime this year. While the graphics are some of the best I've seen on mobile, they can only be better elsewhere. Forgotten Memories: Alternate Realities is about the best you can do for survival horror currently, if you can stomach the control scheme. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Forgotten Memories review photo
Horror-ible controls
Survival horror has always been one of my favorite genres, with Silent Hill being the absolute king. When I heard about a game inspired by and with voice actors from Silent Hill 2, arguably the best in the series, I was ...

P.T. taken off PSN photo
P.T. taken off PSN

P.T. is no longer available for download, even if it's already in your library


Konami has gone full Flappy Bird
May 06
// Nic Rowen
If you thought the story surrounding Konami's falling out with Kojima, P.T.'s delisting off the PSN store, and the cancellation of Silent Hills couldn't get worse, I have some gross news for you. As of now, P.T. has been comp...
Kodoku photo
Kodoku

PS4, Vita horror game Kodoku still looks as creepy as ever


New trailer
May 05
// Chris Carter
Every time I see an update for Kodoku, I want to partially look away. Not because it looks bad, mind, it's just filled with incredibly creepy imagery. For months we've been looking at stills in a mostly visual novel-like sen...
Horror photo
Horror

This new AR project wants to turn your house into a horror game


Is this the real life? Is it just fantasy?
May 04
// Vikki Blake
If just wandering down the corridor in P.T. was enough to send you screaming from the room, how would you cope if a Lisa-like entity came at you in the hallway of your own house?  Night Terrors -- a "highly immersive, ph...
Five Nights at Freddy's photo
Five Nights at Freddy's

Do you 'get' Five Nights at Freddy's?


In less than a year, there's four games and a movie planned
Apr 29
// Chris Carter
I consider myself lucky that I have a number of younger kids in my life (neighbors, local extended cousins) to help educate me on the latest trends. It's not that I feel like I need to keep up with anything per se, I'm past t...
Shout out to P.T. photo
Shout out to P.T.

P.T. scared me more than any other videogame


Don't look upstairs
Apr 28
// Jordan Devore
There was a moment in P.T. that terrified me. I mean truly terrified me. Between the endlessly looping hallway and the haunting cries of a disfigured fetus in a sink, I knew strange things were afoot. It's a disorienting game...
P.T. photo
P.T.

PSA: This is your last day to download P.T., the playable teaser for Silent Hills


For free
Apr 28
// Chris Carter
P.T. was one of the most entertaining games I played in 2014. Even though it was just a demo, the "playable teaser" for Silent Hills was a perfect horror experience, nailing a lot of elements that current horror games complet...
Dementium photo
Dementium

Dementium: The Ward could have been a Silent Hill game


'Konami said they wouldn't let a 'team like us' handle the Silent Hill property'
Apr 28
// Vikki Blake
As the Internet continues to blink with incredulity at Konami's decision to spike one of the most exciting E3 teasers of all time, Silent Hills, here's another head-scratcher of a decision made by the Japanese ...
Forgotten Memories Stream photo
Forgotten Memories Stream

Can a game on mobile fill the gap left in our hearts by Silent Hills?


Let's find out together!
Apr 27
// Jed Whitaker
Forgotten Memories recently released for iOS devices, and looks genuinely creepy. The game clearly takes a lot of influence from the Silent Hill series, going as far as including voice actors from Silent Hill 2, but can a gam...
Five Nights 4 photo
Five Nights 4

First look at the 'final' chapter of Five Nights at Freddy's


Riiiight
Apr 27
// Jordan Devore
When there's this much money to be made, the series must go on. Developer Scott Cawthon is teasing Five Nights at Freddy's 4: The Final Chapter with a horrifying image I'd like to erase from my mind. I don't know what I'm loo...

Review: Uncanny Valley

Apr 27 // Stephen Turner
Uncanny Valley (PC) Developers: Cowardly Creations Publisher: Cowardly Creations   Released: April 23, 2015  MSRP: $8.99 (10% off until April 30) Things start off well enough with a panic-inducing nightmare, followed by a car journey through the pixelated wilderness. As Tom, the new night watchman at Melior -- an abandoned robotics facility -- it's your job to keep the pilot light running until the place gets bought up by new owners. Tom's only companions are Buck, a grouchy and overweight guard, and Eve, a cleaner who takes a keen interest in the new arrival. But while Tom suffers from nightmares of the past, his rounds at the facility quickly draw him into something much, much worse. Sure, there's a mystery to be found, but like a kid trying to pull a prank on you, it reveals its hand far too soon. In fact, with so many audio tapes freely scattered around the workplace, you'll figure out the major twist before you make it past the first night. Overall, Uncanny Valley is a good story poorly executed. It's choppy and muddled due to a reliance on repeat playthroughs and a presentation of two distinct halves. In the first half of the game, you're given a seven-minute work shift. In that time, you're allowed to go anywhere on four separate floors, where you can read emails, collect audio tapes, or play the arcade machines. Once the time limit is up, you have a choice of snooping around for longer (in which case, Tom eventually collapses from exhaustion) or getting back to your room for a good night's rest. Whatever happens, you're always thrown into a nightmare sequence that can be completed or failed without much consequence, beyond the reward of more backstory. [embed]291010:58344:0[/embed] Then after several shifts, time management is suddenly dropped in favour of a more traditional survival horror experience. It's an odd design choice; one minute, you're scrambling around to fit an investigation into your work schedule, and the next, you're given all the time you need, right before the point of no return. And it's in the second half that Uncanny Valley falls apart. It's certainly more engaging, even if it does wear several influences on its sleeve. There's a health system lifted from Call of Cthulhu: Dark Corners of the Earth, where injuries slow you down, make you louder, or ruin your aim, while the hide-and-seek gameplay intentionally evoke memories of Clock Tower. Unfortunately, and especially for long standing horror fans, it's the consequence system and vague puzzles that turns all the goodwill into a frustrating experience. For example, after your first enemy encounter, you're conditioned to stay out of their way, but then a door puzzle requires you to get attacked, just so you can control an enemy and let it aid you into the next room. There's thinking out of the box and then there's going back on everything you just said. The consequence system, while subtle early on, ends up being a detriment to the narrative. Get knocked out at one point and you go from Scene A to Scene C, skipping Scene B and its vital exposition in the process; all because you didn't react quickly enough or even know there was a choice. Tailored, unchangable choices are fine, but in one ending, a character shows up injured from a scene I never encountered. In another ending, a suspicious group wait outside for Tom without an introduction or a reminder of their identity. You just had to play better to know. And for that, beyond the facility's macabre history, you never really get enough motivation to care. Your decisions are informed by player experimentation rather than character incentive. In Clock Tower, Jennifer has the option to escape early on, mainly because of Scissor Man and a sense of self-preservation. Here, in an obvious homage, Tom chooses to run away simply because you stumbled upon Buck's car keys, long before you encounter the horrors in the scary basement. As previously stated, Uncanny Valley is intentionally designed for repeated playthroughs, but after the second, third, and fourth try, it feels like a chore as you piece together the core plotline from different decisions. Detours aren't forbidden in storytelling, but with several listless endings on offer (plus one or two deliciously disturbing ones), it never feels definitive. Once you get the gist, there's no need to go back for dimishing returns. But there are positives lurking under all this frustration. For a short game (clocking at 2 hours at best), it does panicky horror quite well; holding off on the worst elements and planting the seeds early on, like the only working generator in the woods. It's more a case of when things strike, not what will strike. Once alerted, enemies smash through doors and chase you down until they fall apart. The shadowy horde that follow Tom in his nightmares are another horrific highlight. The pixel art is equally vivid and grim, with body horrors roaming the hallways and disturbing sciences haunting the background. The soundtrack flicks between reflective melancholy and weighty industrial themes, and the voice acting on the audio tapes is perfectly pitched as offbeat and ominous. All in all, it captures the doom-laden mood of '70s sci-fi perfectly; though, why the game chooses to make all the in-game dialogue as one-lined text is just puzzling. Unfortunately, I never finished my fourth run. Another save bug deleted a key item from my inventory and progression ground to a halt. I felt that after several endings and Tom's history explored, I'd seen enough. All of which brings us back to that original dilemma, for which I'll sadly say that, no, Uncanny Valley isn't worth it. It's a game that rewards you for being better on the next attempt, which means a lot of players will get that same jarring and incomplete experience as I did, early on, only for it to be replaced by waning interest as repetition sets in. I wanted to enjoy Uncanny Valley, especially with its opening concept and jump scares, but despite all the assurances and hard work with those patches, it just wasn't to be. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
PC photo
Should've taken that job at the fireworks factory
I didn’t have the greatest of starts with Uncanny Valley. After only 15 minutes of play time, I’d wandered into one of the “bad” endings seemingly by accident. On my second attempt, I encountered so ma...

P.T. delisting photo
P.T. delisting

You only have a few days left to be spooked by P.T.


There was a Playable Teaser here, it's gone now
Apr 25
// Nic Rowen
It's time to “shit your pants,” get off the pot, and download P.T. if you haven't already. Because come April 29, its going to disappear from the PlayStation Store.  P.T. may only be considered a demo or teas...
Resident Evil photo
Resident Evil

Resident Evil HD Remaster has a million sales under its umbrella


Ella ella ella ay ay under its umberella ella ella ay...
Apr 24
// Brett Makedonski
As it turns out, people still love some old-fashioned scares. That's evident by the latest news coming out of Capcom's camp: Resident Evil HD Remaster has broken one million units sold since its January release. That's a...
Don't Starve Together photo
Don't Starve Together

Don't Starve Together adds Reign of Giants DLC for free


Still isn't out of its testing phase though
Apr 21
// Chris Carter
Don't Starve was released all the way back in 2013, but developer Klei Entertainment still isn't done with it yet. In addition to the Reign of Giants expansion/DLC in 2014, Don't Starve Together, a multiplayer game currently...
The Evil Within photo
The Evil Within

The Evil Within debuts 'The Consequence' DLC today


Starring detective Juli Kidman
Apr 21
// Chris Carter
The Evil Within didn't live up to everything I thought it would be, but it's still a very unique survival horror title in a sea of action-oriented affairs. Today you can grab the second major bit of DLC, titled The Cons...
Alan Wake photo
Alan Wake

Remedy plans to Wake up Alan once more


Developer says horror sequel may still return
Apr 21
// Vikki Blake
I loved Alan Wake. Maybe it's because I overdosed on Stephen King as a kid and have always had a particular penchant for that whole fiction-becomes-fact thing (if only to keep alive the dream that one day, McDreamy is go...
Underwater horror photo
Underwater horror

SOMA is in beta, but we can't play it (and that's probably for the best)


It's just you and me now, Omnitool
Apr 15
// Jordan Devore
The next spooky game from the team behind Amnesia: The Dark Descent is officially in beta. No, you can't play it yet. Neither can I. But around 40 people are testing a "pretty much" content-complete build of SOMA right now, w...

Narcosis explores the horrors of the deep ocean with intense VR gameplay

Apr 14 // Alessandro Fillari
[embed]283983:56360:0[/embed] Narcosis (PC)Developer: Honor Code, IncPublisher: Honor Code, Inc  Release: Fall 2015 Set at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean at an underwater research center, you play as an industrial diver who must fight for survival after a sudden and catastrophic accident leaves him stranded and alone. With the research center mostly destroyed and its crew killed, the lone survivor must retrace his steps and find a way to the surface. But with horrifying underwater predators roaming the surroundings, and a damaged diving suit with diminishing oxygen, the diver must keep a strong head -- or else nature or even his own wavering psychological state could overcome him. Referred to as a "slow-burn" experience by the creatives behind the game, this 'survivor-story' features a more atmospheric take on traditional horror titles, blending the show-don't-tell school of storytelling from Gone Home with the dread and somewhat other-worldly feel from Silent Hill. Humanity has only explored a small percentage of our planet's oceans, and with many aquatic environments and creatures left undiscovered, it's an incredibly interesting and captivating place to explore for a horror experience. On the surface it seems just like the film Gravity set underwater, and while that's not too far off, there's a strong focus on setting and interaction with the elements. We don't really get too many games set in the depths of the ocean, let alone a horror game taking place on the sea floor. And Narcosis definitely does a lot to play up the mystery and isolation to a very tense and anxious effect. Speaking with David Chen, the lead writer for Narcosis, he spoke at length about how they sought to convey their interpretation of survival horror. "We're kinda struggling to label the game, as it has many of the hallmarks of survival horror," said lead writer David Chen. "There are no zombies or a viral outbreak, it's really about seven or eight hours of this guy trapped at the bottom of the ocean. So we think it's a really, relatively unique premise for a game, as a lot of other titles have you saving the world, revenging your family, or bottling up some ancient evil -- but here, you're trapped alone in the dark on the bottom of the ocean." While underwater gameplay is almost notoriously awful in most games, Narcosis does the smart thing by keeping it simple. Movement is slow and hulking, which makes sense as you're wearing a heavy diving suit under large amounts of pressure from the ocean. Walking is your top-speed, but with the aid of charge pack, you can boost for short-distances. As you maneuver around the ocean floor and the ruins of the research center, you'll have to be mindful of your surroundings as there are many dangers ahead. With only your suit lights and some flares giving you clear vision, you'll often times find yourself in total darkness. Moreover, you'll have to monitor your oxygen and health levels, which can be restored by pickups found in the debris. By far the biggest threat is the presence of underwater predators. Resembling nightmarish squids and over-sized crabs, these creatures stalk for prey, and they see the diver as their next target. Some creatures are large in size, which may require you to evade their gaze. While you have a knife to defend yourself, attacking with it is slow and somewhat clunky -- which of course is by design, as the weight of the ocean and your suit makes movement slow. During one encounter, I came across a squid creature that nearly destroyed the diver's helmet with its powerful tentacles. Using a well-timed knife attack, I was able to strike it down as it charged at me. But of course, there's yet another issue to contend with. Given his perilous situation, and the fact that the diver only has his thoughts to keep him company, his psychological and emotional state can often become compromised. As you maneuver through the disturbing, alien landscape of the dark and claustrophobic ocean floor, and through the horrific aftermath of the destroyed research center, the diver's mental state will begin to decay, which gives rise to horrifying hallucinations. During my exploration of the research center, I had to trek through the remains of the station to look for clues to reach the surface -- all the while avoiding predators that have taken up residence, and finding the floating remains of the scientists and divers that died in the accident. With oxygen getting low, and finding many empty diving suits eerily standing up in hallways, as if they were looking at me, I finally came to a small room which housed four suits. Once I stepped in, I looked around for any clues, but I soon realized that the door had disappeared, and I was suddenly surrounded by diving suits, all staring back at me with their blank and empty helmets. As I kept turning, looking for a way out, I found that the room had suddenly given rise to a narrow hallway, with parallel rows of diving suits on each side. Each of them were facing each other in a somewhat ceremonial fashion, as if they were greeting me or welcoming me back home. Once I reached the end of the hallway, I finally found my destination: a small room housing computers with sensitive data. Once I turned around, the hallway and many diving suits weren't there; the lone survivor had just simply stepped into the room. Referred to as "Narcosis moments," there will be times when the diver's paranoia warps his perception, resulting in surreal moments that blur the line between reality and imagination. Bare in mind, I playing with the Oculus Rift during the demo, which made me so incredibly anxious. Moreover, this was all happening in real-time with no cutscenes or breaks. It was like witnessing some strange trip that wouldn't end. As I got more nervous, the sense of dread kicked up significantly, which made exploration all the more tense. While Narcosis is totally playable without the use of virtual reality, the developers found that the new technology helped to amplify a lot of the visual and atmospheric moments they created. "We describe it as a very understated use of VR, as in it's not flashy or flamboyant, but the core fiction of the game really lends itself to the use of VR as it accurately shows your limitations," said Chen while discussing their use of the tech. "It really lends itself to the sense of immersion, a sense of place, and the feeling of suspense." "It's a narrative-driven game, it's a story-based game, so we want to have appropriate emotional beats," Chen continued. "It's not intended to be a relentless freakout, but as the game has developed with VR, we discovered ways to try new things with it, as opposed to the more obvious 'aaaaaahhh' [motions jump-scare] moments. [...] While we definitely have some freaky stuff, we're trying to be more tasteful." Even during my fairly brief session with Narcosis, I was quite impressed with the VR. As opposed to relying on horror tropes and gimmicks, such as jump scares or stalking foes that appear all-knowing and invincible, this title lets the environments and its clever visual tricks do all the talking. I felt nervous during key sections, and knowing that only a few hits from predators could destroy my suit, simply hesitating and watching my oxygen meter sink was stressful. Set for release later this year, Narcosis is an intellectual and subdued take on survival horror. Which isn't all that common today, given that we're often using guns and other gadgets to overcome enemies. Going more for a general experience rather than a super 'gamey' affair, it seeks to show that the horrors of the deep ocean, and nature itself, are an uncaring and unwavering force that outmatch man on nearly every level. And there's certainly no greater foe than nature itself.
Narcosis preview photo
Deep deep down
Last year during Game Connection Europe, Steven had some special hands-on time with developer Honor Code, Inc's upcoming underwater survival horror title Narcosis. As a psychological-horror survival game, players find themsel...

Alien glitch photo
Alien glitch

Maybe Ripley's arms are made of fire?


Amanda? More like Ash
Apr 13
// Brett Makedonski
In what was probably an alternate ending to Alien: Isolation, Amanda Ripley looked down and noticed that her arms were fire. How she went through decades of life without realizing that her limbs were constant chemical combus...
Resident Evil Vita photo
Resident Evil Vita

Resident Evil: Revelations 2 creeps to Vita in summer


Some online features delayed to hasten the release
Apr 10
// Kyle MacGregor
Resident Evil Revelations 2 is on its way to PlayStation Vita this summer, according to Sony. The Vita version will contain all four episodes packaged with any downloadable content released up to that point, aside from consum...
Survival Horror photo
Survival Horror

Uncanny Valley '101 Trailer' shows us the gory joys of working the night shift


'I was watching. I saw the whole thing. First it started falling over, then it fell over.'
Apr 08
// Stephen Turner
Do any of you remember the movie Nightwatch? No, not the Russian one with the iffy sequel. I mean the one with Ewan McGregor as a security guard at the local morgue, constantly harrassed by a presumably drunken Nick Nolte an...
P.T. story photo
P.T. story

P.T.'s puzzling story explained in depth


That freaking fridge
Apr 07
// Jordan Devore
The timing on this video could not be better. As a new PlayStation 4 owner, one of the first games I knew I had to download was P.T., a playable teaser lead-in to Silent Hills. It's a weird game -- "experimental," if you lik...
Fatal Frame Wii U photo
Fatal Frame Wii U

Nintendo is bringing Fatal Frame Wii U west in 2015


Yes, please!
Apr 01
// Kyle MacGregor
The latest Fatal Frame game is coming western Wii Us later this year, Nintendo just announced. For months fans were nervous  this wouldn't get localized, but now we have solid confirmation that it will be hitting western shores roughly one year after the original Japanese release.
Silent Hills photo
Silent Hills

Kojima Productions logo removed from Silent Hills website


Maybe it's nothing, but things are getting concerning
Apr 01
// Laura Kate Dale
In the midst of all the recent rumblings regarding Hideo Kojima potentially leaving the Metal Gear series behind after Metal Gear Solid V is released, today it turns out there's yet another troubling sign on the horizon. Repo...
Forgotten Memories photo
Forgotten Memories

Forgotten Memories iOS debut on April 23, watch the launch trailer now!


Wii U, Vita, Android, and PC will have to wait an ickle bit longer
Mar 30
// Stephen Turner
As you may recall, Forgotten Memories: Alternate Realities came out of near-nowhere with its Silent Hill 2 cast additions, after several years off the development grid. If you're still wondering what Guy Cihi's delightf...
ATARI photo
ATARI

Atari's buggy, unfinished Asteroids MMO is out now


...on Steam Early Access
Mar 27
// Kyle MacGregor
Atari has taken a break from bullying indie developers to release Asteroids: Outpost, a gross and twisted cash-in on the beloved space shooter that first delighted arcade patrons in 1979. The "open world sandbox survival game...
More Alan Wake plz photo
More Alan Wake plz

The Alan Wake franchise has sold 4.5 million units (so make another game already!)


You know you wanna
Mar 25
// Jordan Devore
According to Remedy CEO Matias Myllyrinne, who is "happy on behalf of the team," the Alan Wake franchise has sold more than 4.5 million units across Xbox 360 and PC to date. I can't hear numbers like that and not call for a s...
Slender: The Arrival photo
Slender: The Arrival

Slender: The Arrival is out on PS4 and Xbox One today


I'm holding out for Svelte: The Comebackening
Mar 25
// Darren Nakamura
Do people still think Slenderman is scary? I don't really know; it seems like the well-dressed humanoid has faded from the collective consciousness lately. Maybe it's just that I don't visit meme websites any more. Slender: ...
Xbox One & PC photo
Xbox One & PC

State of Decay: Year One Survival Edition debut trailer, releases April 28


GOTY 2013, if you don't mention The Last of Us to me
Mar 19
// Stephen Turner
State of Decay was one of those pleasant surprises back in 2013. Sure, the sandbox/RPG-lite horror game was a little rough, but it was an intense experience full of free flow situations, base building, and likable survivors....

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