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Street Fighter

Yep, Ultra Street Fighter IV on PS4 sure looks great

May 26 // Chris Carter
[embed]292798:58682:0[/embed] At this point there are 44 characters in all, and you can select a fighting style from every different iteration of the game. It's pretty comprehensive, but again, most people aren't going to dig into all of the configurations for every fighter. In other words, if you already have a previous version of Ultra, especially on the PC, you'll probably just want to stick with that, as it's proven to work well at this point. 1080p60 on a console is nice, and only the most trained veterans will be able to notice the minor input lag from the previous generation to the PS4 -- since it's going to be the new de facto build for tournies, you can only assume this will be patched soon, but nothing has been confirmed yet from Capcom. The menus are a bit slower compared to other versions, which seems like a bug -- still, it's not a dealbreaker unless you compete at a high level. In terms of my netcode testing, all of the matches I've played have been very smooth. My main issue has been finding games, which you can likely chalk up to a launch-day "wait and see" crowd. I can't predict the future in terms of the adoption rate on PS4, but so far I don't have any major issues to report. We'll update you if that changes. Oh, and as community member Beelz points out, PS4 USFIV is the standard for this year's EVO. Ultra Street Figher IV [PSN]
Ultra Street Fighter IV photo
But there's a few bugs to squash
[Update: Players have been reporting various bugs with the PS4 version across the net. While I didn't encounter any of these in my roughly 20 hours of testing outside of the ones mentioned here, it's important to be aware of ...

Fighting games and roguelikes are my personal school of hard knocks

May 26 // Nic Rowen
Titles like The Binding of Isaac, FTL, Nuclear Throne and (my latest obsession) Darkest Dungeon make it their business to stymie and frustrate your futile attempts to get to the credits screen. They delight in throwing a wrench into the works, tearing apart promising looking runs or dungeon crawls with a few merciless rolls of the RNG. They move around the win conditions and goalposts from the traditional idea of “I gotta get to the end and dunk on the last boss!” to “oh God, please just let me survive a little longer this time.” Victory isn't just marked by, well, victory, but by discovery and learning. Seeing a new enemy, figuring out a new trick or strategy, and learning to avoid whatever awful thing killed you last time. Those small successes are what dubs a run a win. It's tough to turn that switch that demands progression off in your brain. It has been dutifully conditioned by years of games where victory is the expected outcome. But it's those wild unfair swings in a roguelike that completely mess you up that makes them so satisfying. The emotional roller-coaster of suddenly losing a beloved party member, or picking up an item that completely gimps your current build, or getting screwed by a few unlucky rolls that leave you facing almost certain doom. These factors that push you out of your comfort zone and force you to come up with new strategies broaden your horizons, you have to think about the game and really consider all of your options rather than relying on one or two recipes for success. Those runs that truly are hopeless? Well, they just let you appreciate the good ones a little more. It took me a long time to realize it, but fighting games are much the same when you get right down to it. While you always want to win a fight, just adding more notches to your W/L ratio isn't, and shouldn't be, the goal. What you really should be aiming for is learning. When Street Fighter IV came out, I was very hot-to-trot for some online play. I remembered dominating at SFII in grade school, all the hours I sunk into collecting every ending in Alpha 3 on the PS1, the times I used to rush through Marvel Super Heroes on one quarter in the arcade. I thought I was good at fighting games, and was looking forward to a chance to prove it. I swagged online like I was O'Hara from Enter the Dragon, obnoxiously breaking boards in front of Bruce Lee like it meant something. My fights ended up going about as well as his did -- Boards, and CPU opponents, don't hit back like the real deal. [embed]292757:58670:0[/embed] I'll be completely honest, I almost quit playing fighting games at that point. Nobody likes to lose, especially when you're losing at something that used to be a point of pride for yourself. Thankfully, despite its rough and tumble exterior, the fighting game community actually has a great attitude about these things. EVERYBODY loses. It's what you take away from those losses and how you come back from them that defines you as a player. Shortly after SFIV came out, I was introduced to David Sirlin's Playing to Win, a book that is all about the philosophy of fighting games and is as close to a bible for the fighting game community that exists. I remember when I first read it I distinctly thought “this guy is an asshole.” Playing to Win can be a very abrasive read if you come from a background of playing fighting games for fun. If you ever thought your next door neighbor was cheap for constantly sweeping in Mortal Kombat 2, or angrily called someone a “spammer” for repeatedly tossing out fireballs from across the screen, or think there is such as thing as too many throws in one round (a philosophy I can no longer recognize except in direct reverse), Sirlin's opinions will probably rub you the wrong way. These self-imposed rules and ideas about how the game should be played are the foundation for what he considers a “scrub mentality,” a mental framework that will always limit how far you can go in fighting games, and ultimately, how much joy you can derive from them. Embarrassingly, I saw a lot of that “scrub mentality” in myself. The way I'd get angry at “coward” Guile players for tossing endless sonic booms, or frustrated with people constantly choosing the blatantly over-powered emperor of Muay Thai, Sagat, for easy wins. But when you stop looking at what other players are doing as “cheap,” and start looking at your losses as learning experiences rather than straight out defeats, a lot of that frustration evaporates. It takes real effort and time, but when you internalize that outlook, fighting games become less stressful, more enjoyable, and infinitely more beautiful. Of course people are going to throw sonic booms as Guile, he's a machine made by the Air Force to do exactly that. It may be true that Sagat (or whatever character) is over-powered and easier to win with and disproportionally popular as a result, but how can you blame people for making a choice that will tip the odds in their favor? You have that choice and opportunity too, and if you decide to stick with a different character you'll just have to make peace with the fact that you'll run into tough matches and try and develop a strategy to deal with them. You can either get frustrated, stomp around, and quit/uninstall the game forever, or you can thicken your skin. Learn how to roll with the punches, and take something away from the mistake. Either figure out ways to avoid it in the future, or come to peace with the idea that sometimes things are out of your control. These are not new concepts, ideally we should always be trying to find the positive side to a set-back or learn from a mistake. But to me, at least, nothing else crystallizes the idea of learning from a loss into a rock hard truth than pitiless rougelikes and fighting games. And after spending so many years immersed in both genres, I like to think that I've been able to take those lessons and apply them to other areas of my life. It's not always easy, and I won't claim to be some kind of Zen master who never gets frustrated, but I know I'm definitely a more patient person now than I was five years ago.
Learning from failure photo
Learning from my (many) failures
The last few years of games for me have been all about defeat. Constant, unending, expected defeat. I think I'm better for it. It wasn't always like that. In fact, for most of my life, games have been all about completion, vi...

SFV photo
SFV

Street Fighter V will be playable for the first time next month


At CEO
May 25
// Chris Carter
CEO (Community Effort Orlando) is an annual fighting game tournament held in Orlando Florida, and this year, they have quite a bit announcement in store for fans -- Street Fighter V will be playable for the first t...
Ultra Street Fighter photo
Ultra Street Fighter

Ultra Street Fighter IV PS4 supports PS3 fight sticks


1080p, 60fps
May 22
// Steven Hansen
If you thought that the announcement of Street Fighter V meant that, finally, Capcom couldn't squeeze out another Street Fighter IV release, you were wrong. Ultra Street Fighter IV is coming to PS4 May 26 packed in with all t...
M. Bison photo
M. Bison

M. Bison was revealed today in Street Fighter V, of all days


For him...
May 19
// Chris Carter
Like there was any doubt Street Fighter V would ship without M. Bison? Capcom, by way of IGN, has revealed the character with a brand new gameplay trailer. You'll find plenty of psycho-action and some really neat p...
Mad Catz photo
Mad Catz

The next round of Mad Catz FightPads are coming with Street Fighter V


Wait until then
May 04
// Chris Carter
While arcade sticks are generally the preferred way to go for a lot of fighting game fans, there are a lot of people out there who like to play on pads. Mad Catz has done well by those enthusiasts for some time now, with its ...

How to make Ryu an interesting character in Super Smash Bros.

Apr 19 // Patrick Hancock
Sprite GIFs used are all from the Street Fighter Wiki. Give him an EX meter and EX moves So, let's assume Ryu has his Hadoken, Shoryuken, Tatsumaki Senpukyaku, and some fourth move like a counter or his Joudan Sokutogeri. What would make Ryu unique isn't so much his actual set of moves, but what he can do with them. Give Ryu an EX meter, similar to Little Mac's KO meter, and allow him to build it up and use it. It could build just like it does in Street Fighter IV, by connecting with attacks or getting attacked. Spending this meter can work in a few ways. One would be double-tapping the B button to use an EX move instantly. Double-tapping is weird and I'm not sure it would work in Super Smash Bros., but it's an idea. Another option is to allow Ryu to consume an EX bar to make his next move an EX move. For example: when there's at least one bar of EX glowing, Ryu can hold B to drain it and store it, similar to how many characters store a charged up move. Then, the next special move Ryu executes will be an EX version of that move, with different properties.  If Nintendo really wants to get fancy, it could even work with Capcom to include Street Fighter V's mechanic of spending an entire EX meter to make a character "super-charged" until he is knocked down.  Art by DeviantArt user kupbot Make Ryu's alternate costumes like Bowser Jr.'s Whether Nintendo meant to or not, they set a precedent with Bowser Jr. and his alternate costumes. Ryu is a perfect candidate for this method of alternate costume since there are plenty of Shotokans for Nintendo to choose from. Since each character has seven alternate costumes, here is what I've come up with for Ryu's alternate costumes: Ken, Akuma, Dan, Sean, Gouken, Sakura, and Evil Ryu. Let's be honest, Ryu is boring. He's the "guy on the box." Sure, he's recognizable, but most people tend to gravitate to someone else in Street Fighter. He's a wonderful beginning character and incredibly important to the franchise, but I will be way more willing to use Ryu if I can actually play as Sean or Dan. Sure, it may only be an aesthetic change, but to some, aesthetics really matter. Speaking of which... Give Ryu custom moves from other Shotokans While it is incredibly disconcerting that Mewtwo does not have custom moves at the moment, I am still holding out hope that DLC characters will eventually come with or get their own custom moves. Considering it's one of the biggest new features in this entry of Smash Bros., it only makes sense to do so. Assuming Ryu does get some customs, why not take them from the characters that make up his alternate costumes? Here's some basic ideas: Hadoken custom move ideas: Dan's wimpy Gadoken Gouken's angled Hadoken Sean's basketball (I really like Sean, okay?) Fireball multi-hit Shakunetsu Hadouken Tatsu custom move ideas:Note: This is assuming Ryu's basic Tatsu moves him horizontally  Dan's multi-hit Dankukyaku Stationary Tatsu Vertical Rising Tatsu Shoryuken custom move ideas: Ken's fiery Shoryuken Sean's Dragon Smash The multi-hitting Shoryureppa Since the fourth move could be a multitude of things, I'll just stop here. I think the point is clear: there are a ton of variants on these moves, and it would be a shame to see them go to waste! Two different Final Smashes Luckily, Street Fighter's Ultras convert directly to Super Smash Bros.'s Final Smash. So why not give Ryu two of them? Everyone already expects the Shinku Hadoken to be his Final Smash, but what if, by hitting B and a direction, he could execute a different one? He could have the Shin Shoryuken or even the Shinku Tatsumaki Senpukyaku.  I honestly have no idea if this would be possible, but it sure would be cool! The bottom line is, Ryu is possibly going to be in Super Smash Bros., but without going the extra distance, he'll be a character not many people will be interested in playing. If Nintendo and Mr. Sakurai give Ryu the same care and attention I know they are capable of giving, Ryu could be a favorite character for many players. Roy on the other hand...
Ryu in Smash done right photo
Listen up, Nintendo!
Street Fighter's Ryu is currently rumored to be coming to Nintendo's newest entry into the Super Smash Bros. series, thanks to some hidden files in the most recent update to the game. It makes a lot of sense; Capcom...

Street Fighter PS4 photo
Street Fighter PS4

Ultra Street Fighter IV strikes PlayStation 4 on May 26


Once more, with feeling
Apr 17
// Kyle MacGregor
Ultra Street Fighter IV is coming to PlayStation 4 on May 26, Sony just announced. Capcom is asking for $24.99 for the latest revision, which comes packaged with all the characters, levels, and DLC created for the fighter sin...
Smash Bros. photo
Smash Bros.

Could Street Fighter's Ryu be coming to Smash?


Sound files point to possible inclusion
Apr 16
// Laura Kate Dale
As many of you will be aware, Super Smash Bros. received a patch yesterday on both Wii U and 3DS adding Mewtwo to the game's already large roster and applying a number of smaller balance changes to the game. Far tech savvier ...
Not the killer photo
Not the killer

Street Fighter V will be 'something that nobody is expecting'


And it isn't killing Ono!
Apr 13
// Steven Hansen
Capcom has been polishing that Street Fighter IV diamond for seven years now. An entire generation of consoles. This isn't lost on resident lovable, worked-to-death producer Yoshinori Ono, who told Edge that all that wax on, ...
Samus and Sagat photo
'Ah-merr-ica you're gettin' burger hungry'
[Samus and the burger by Evazhou] If you live in the Northeastern United States, you are well aware of the historical snowfall we endured this winter. Everyday existence in Boston this past February was like living inside of...

Butts photo
Butts

Laura's Gaming Butts: Street Fighter


Use an ass to destroy your enemies
Mar 13
// Laura Kate Dale
Hello all and welcome to Laura's Gaming Butts, Destructoid's weekly YouTube show about butts in videogames. Yep, it's a video podcast where I get guests in to talk about butts. Professional journalism at its finest. This wee...

Holy hindsight! Five series that should have been on Wii

Mar 10 // Tony Ponce
In a 2009 interview with Kotaku's Stephen Totilo, Nintendo of America President Reggie Fils-Aime expressed frustration regarding why the biggest third-party titles were skipping Wii: "I've had this conversation with every publisher who makes content that is not available on my platform. The conversation goes like this: 'We have a 22-million unit installed base. We have a very diverse audience... We have active gamers that hunger for this type of content. And why isn't it available?'" The unfortunate reason was that, prior to Wii's launch, most publishers didn't have faith in Nintendo's unconventional strategy, especially coming off of GameCube's lukewarm performance. By the time they realized that Wii mania was real, they were too entrenched in HD development to easily shift gears. When support did come, it was in the form of minigame collections and low-priority efforts farmed out to C-team studios, most of which seemed to target the stereotypical "casual" gamer while ignoring the rest of the audience. The Wii wasn't conceived as a "casual machine," but rather a low-risk development option that could ideally satisfy everyone -- with a focus on videogame newbies, true, but not an exclusive focus. From the beginning, there was enormous interest among the enthusiast crowd for more substantial software, but as the years slipped away and their needs weren't met, they simply turned their attention elsewhere. There were sporadic attempts to appeal to enthusiasts, though most typically fell into the mid-tier category -- the types of games that, on a well-served platform, would help round out the library. But without headliners to attract an audience in the first place, the MadWorlds and Little King's Storys of the world were stuck playing an empty venue. It's clear that the Wii was no powerhouse and wouldn't have been able to realize many of the eventual HD hits in a satisfactory fashion. However, you can't tell me that publishers weren't sitting on golden preexisting properties that could have easily been adapted to the hardware -- properties that had a near guaranteed chance of finding success, which would in turn have led to a greater influx of auxiliary Wii software and a healthier third-party ecosystem overall. Just to name a few examples... Kingdom Hearts Remember the rumors years ago that Kingdom Hearts III on Wii might be happening? A series whose chief draw is allowing you to visit famous Disney worlds and battle alongside famous Disney heroes seemed like the obvious choice for a Nintendo platform, where family-friendly entertainment is the order of the day. Square Enix thought so too, just not in the manner we had hoped. Following Kingdom Hearts II in 2005, numerous word-building side stories and interquels were released on portables, with the bulk appearing on Nintendo machines. One in particular, Dream Drop Distance for 3DS, was even billed as a lead-in to the eventual Kingdom Hearts III. Meanwhile, the series was completely absent on home consoles. This would have been a perfect opportunity for Square Enix to port KHI and II onto Wii in their "Final Mix" forms. That way, those who followed the series on PS2 would be able to transition smoothly, while others with little exposure to the games would have the perfect entry point. And with all these returning and newly minted fans on Wii, maybe the PSP-exclusive Birth By Sleep would have had another platform on which to score sales, which were otherwise soft in Western territories. Metal Gear When Super Smash Bros. Melee was brought out West, it introduced players to Marth and Roy, two unknown characters from a Japan-exclusive franchise called Fire Emblem. The warm reception these fresh faces received gave Nintendo the incentive to start localizing future installments in the tactical RPG saga. I had hoped that Solid Snake's appearance in Super Smash Bros. Brawl would have led to a similar decision regarding Metal Gear, but no dice. Why was Snake in Brawl to begin with? Definitely not because of his rich history on Nintendo platforms -- Metal Gear did more for PlayStation than it ever did for NES. No, it's because Hideo Kojima practically begged Masahiro Sakurai to put him in. Regardless of how the arrangement came about, Snake was a welcome addition to the Smash roster, quickly rising to the top of many players' lists of favorite fighters. A smart publisher would have tried to capitalize on that kind of exposure. Konami could have tested the waters with a Wii reprint of The Twin Snakes, which had become quite rare in its original GameCube format. Follow that up with with MGS2 and 3 ports, possibly an up-port of Peace Walker as well. MGS4 was never going to come over for obvious reasons, but hey, 360 didn't get it either, and Xbox and Metal Gear are good buddies these days. Instead, the only Metal Gear to appear on a Nintendo platform post-Brawl was Snake Eater 3D, which was made redundant a few months later with the release of HD Collection on Vita. One of the most popular characters in Nintendo's all-star roundup wound up being nothing more than advertisement for competing platforms, even though he didn't have to be. Street Fighter Did you know, if we disregard the combined-SKU Resident Evil 5, that the original Street Fighter II for Super Nintendo is the single best-selling game in Capcom's history at 6.3 million copies? It also happens to be the best-selling third-party game in the SNES library -- and that's before we even factor in the various updates! Among Wii owners were a fair number of lapsed gamers -- people who may have gamed in the arcades or on an NES or SNES back in the day but have since lost interest. I guarantee a significant cross section of that group were former SFII players itching for a proper follow-up. And since the goal of the Street Fighter IV project was to make the series accessible again to the widest possible audience, it would have behooved Capcom to include in its multi-platform plans the console built entirely around the concept of accessibility. You can't tell me that SFIV was dependent on high-end hardware -- it was designed to be a traditional 2D fighter with 3D window dressing. The fact that a spot-on port was later developed for 3DS, with static backgrounds as the sole concession, should be all the proof that a Wii version could have looked and played just fine. If you want to argue that SFIV was ill-suited to Wii because the Wii Remote was an inappropriate fighting game controller, I think you're overestimating the general game-playing public's need for the "perfect gaming controller." Besides, anyone who desired a more traditional pad would have made the effort to buy one -- such as with Tatsunoko vs. Capcom. Speaking of TvC, there's a game that strikes a fine balance between technical skill and accessibility. Although I appreciate the effort it took to localize such a licensing nightmare, that seahorse in the logo was the kiss of death -- only hardcore anime aficionados had the slightest inkling who these strange new characters were. It's odd that Capcom would invest in TvC yet couldn't be bothered to hammer out an adequate SFIV port, which would have had a significantly larger shot at finding a receptive audience on Wii. Persona Atlus has enjoyed a wonderful working relationship with Nintendo since the former's founding in 1986, and that relationship thrives to this day. In fact, over the past generation, the bulk of Atlus' in-house productions have found an exclusive home on Nintendo platforms, including new IPs like Etrian Odyssey, Trauma Center, and Radiant Historia. Of important note is how Atlus has gradually been shifting the entire Megami Tensei franchise back into the Nintendo camp, beginning with Devil Survivor on DS and culminating with Shin Megami Tensei IV on 3DS. One particular MegaTen sub-series, however, has remained with Sony: Persona. It's apparent that Atlus was reluctant to jump into HD development right away. Releasing Persona 3 as a late-gen PlayStation 2 title was one thing, but sticking to PS2 for Persona 4 as well? That earned the company quite a few stares. But if Atlus was insistent on squeezing out every last ounce from legacy hardware, why not prep those Personas for simultaneous release on the low-spec Wii as well? Atlus already had a Wii development pipeline in place, so the financial risk would have been extremely minimal. Wii versions could have only added to those games' success. The series has finally come to Nintendo in the form of Persona Q on 3DS, although the game's main selling point -- the crossover of P3 and P4 characters -- would feel more appropriate had those two titles actually appeared on a Nintendo platform prior. Grand Theft Auto "Nintendo has done all it can to persuade Take-Two Interactive Software to bring the Grand Theft Auto franchise to Nintendo consoles, and it is now up to the third-party publisher to decide whether Rockstar Games' immensely popular series will appear on Wii." Reggie Fils-Aime shared this nugget in December 2006, shortly after the Wii's launch, to let the world know that Nintendo desired the violent crime series on its hardware (those Game Boy Color and Advance titles don't count). Sadly, Take-Two didn't seem to want to play ball and even laughed at the notion just one year later, when then-executive chairman Strauss Zelnick asserted, "[T]here are other titles better suited to the Wii than Grand Theft Auto." Nonetheless, talks continued, and Take-Two and Rockstar Games eventually decided to give Nintendo a shot... with a DS game. That's not what fans were asking for, but baby steps, we figured. Take-Two CEO Ben Feder did state that Grand Theft Auto: Chinatown Wars was an important step in the company's relations with Nintendo and suggested that this new title could pave the way for future developments. The rest is sick, sad history. Chinatown Wars earned rave reviews, becoming the highest-ranked DS title on Metacritic, yet sold just under 90,000 copies in the US in its launch month. Not willing to take any chances, Rockstar quickly announced PSP and mobile ports. Mature games were reaffirmed as poison on DS, and all hopes of another GTA on a Nintendo platform vanished. Let's try to understand why Chinatown Wars failed. First, GTA is not a handheld series. Some brands are simply better suited to home consoles than handhelds or vice versa -- Monster Hunter, for instance. Yeah, both Liberty City Stories and Vice City Stories on PSP were million sellers, but those sales were a drop in the bucket compared to what the console installments regularly pull in. Those were ported to PS2 months later too, so it's not like Rockstar had full confidence in them either. Still, both LCS and VCS sold much better than Chinatown Wars, which brings me to my second point: GTA only became a phenomenon with GTAIII and the leap into the third dimension. Taking the series back to its top-down roots was never going to appeal to all the same people who fell in love with the real-world atmosphere and fully voiced and acted cutscenes, no matter what kind of review scores it earned. Need further proof? Although you can find copious news bites around the web lamenting the poor sales of Chinatown Wars on DS, you'd be hard-pressed to find any mention of sales of the PSP port. It's safe to surmise that it tanked even worse than on DS, because Take-Two would have said something otherwise. The mobile ports likely outsold those two combined, though it's difficult to draw a solid conclusion there when sales were aided by rock-bottom mobile pricing. Grand Theft Auto: Chinatown Wars was the wrong game for the wrong platform. From day one, Rockstar should have been working on a Wii game in the desired 3D style as Nintendo had originally intended. It would have been more expensive to produce, though I doubt anywhere in the range of GTAIV's $100 million price tag. If Rockstar didn't want to take that gamble, it could have assembled a PS2 trilogy collection, or ported the PSP games, or anything! We're talking about the biggest home console of all time, after all! If you still doubt the viability of GTA on Wii, consider Call of Duty: World at War, which sold over a million copies on Wii. Big deal, you figure, since sales of the PS3 and 360 versions vastly outstripped it. But also consider that Activision has repeatedly withheld information regarding the Wii versions of Call of Duty installments up to and sometimes even after release, limiting awareness to those who had prior knowledge or had seen one of the rare TV commercials. Somehow, the game still broke a million -- can you imagine how much better it could have performed had Activision given it exposure comparable to the HD builds? How could Take-Two wholeheartedly say, during a period when Wii was selling faster than any other home console before or since, that the audience wasn't there? Grand Theft Auto is one of the biggest gaming brands of all time! Its most recent entry has shipped 45 million units across all platforms! Its consumer base includes every type of gamer, from kids to adults, from the hardest of the hardcore to those whose only other gaming purchase in a year is the latest Madden! If Take-Two honestly believed that there was little to no chance of success in adapting Grand Theft Auto to Wii, it means that either its marketing department is completely clueless as to what makes GTA so appealing, thereby attributing each record-breaking achievement to blind luck, or everyone in management simply didn't give a shit. As you can see, I'm not suggesting that publishers should have thrown millions at unproven concepts. All it would have taken to get the ball rolling was some low-risk ports based on established, popular brands. Even if some of these franchises wound up not resonating with the Wii audience, most are powerful enough that they would have been accepted without question. Had key third-party tentpoles been established and found success on Wii early on, smaller studios would have felt comfortable in producing Wii content. Instead of the sudden decline as casual players lost interest, Wii could have maintained a steady momentum by serving the enthusiast crowd low-tech yet feature-rich software, in turn extending its life. By the time Nintendo introduced a follow-up console, publishers would have been far more willing to offer support than they wound up being with Wii U. Though we can only speculate precisely how such a movement would have affected Wii and the industry overall, it could only have been a net positive -- for Nintendo as well as third parties that struggled to stay in the black or simply wanted to grow their consumer base. You can blame Nintendo for certain Wii shortcomings, but third parties are at fault for letting painfully obvious opportunities slip through the canyon-sized cracks.
Wii got shafted photo
Third parties missed some major opportunities
By the end of 2014, Xbox 360 had slid past Wii to become the best-selling seventh generation console in the US. While a fantastic achievement for Microsoft, this event also punctuates the drastic shift in Nintendo's market do...

Street Fighter V release  photo
Street Fighter V release

Street Fighter V gets a rumored release date


Pump the dragon
Mar 07
// Jason Faulkner
On a post about PAX East mechandise, Capcom Unity may have accidentally let the cat out of the bag about Street Fighter V. The description for the Street Fighter V Ryu key art t-shirt states: "Everyone is fired up for Street ...
Street Fighter V photo
Street Fighter V

What did they do to poor Charlie Nash in Street Fighter V?


Online beta in North America detailed
Feb 24
// Jordan Devore
That hair is unmistakable but, Charlie, is that really you? Besides whipping out a new trailer and screenshots, Capcom has announced the Street Fighter V beta, which it's calling "the largest and most ambitious online beta p...
Samus and Sagat photo
Samus and Sagat

BBC Special Report: Samus and Sagat


News
Feb 22
// Jonathan Holmes
Samus and Sagat: BBC Special Report.
Samus and Sagat photo
If Ridley and Ryu had a baby, it would be this guy
Like the initial entry of any epic trilogy, the first two episodes of Samus and Sagat worked to establish the characters. Now that we're finally into act two of the story, we can start moving into the real meat of this drama...

Samus and Sagat: Prepping for Street Fighter V and Super Metroid II

Feb 05 // Jonathan Holmes
Also, how about a contest? Make a gif from either this episode or episode one of Samus and Sagat. It's easy and fun with this free website, but you can go beyond what the site offers if you want to, with captions and explosions and other added dressings as you see fit. From there, upload your gif and tweet it to @tronknotts along with a link to either this Dtoid post or to this episode of the show on YouTube and you'll be entered to win a copy of a new retail videogame of your choice. Sadly, it has to be a game that I can buy for you from a store in the U.S.A. because I am just going to go to the store and buy you a game. Nothing fancy about that! Just me going to the store, like any other guy. Also, no requests for special editions or hard-to-find games, please. Anything in the $40-$70 range is OK. I hope you enter the contest, and thanks again for watching the show! Entries so far (not including those in the comments) [embed]286940:57204:0[/embed] Charlie Maxwell [embed]286940:57205:0[/embed] [embed]286940:57206:0[/embed] Liam Troy Fullbester Roth Sothy (composer on Xeodrifter!) The Nintenbros Alphadeus [embed]286940:57209:0[/embed] Patty If I missed yours, please drop it in the comments below!
Samus and Sagat photo
Exciting adventure, fashion, and fame
[Update: We've gotten a lot of great entries in the gif contest! It seemed a shame to leave them out in the cold, so I've embedded the animations that never made it to the comments into the post below. I also forgot to tell ...

Bonus stage photo
Bonus stage

Real life Ryu wrecks car with his bare hands


Bonus stage
Jan 29
// Steven Hansen
I hope that car was non-running and cheaper to junk than fix, or else that's a waste of a perfectly good little car. Not that we all haven't thought about letting the aggressions out and possibly hurting ourselves while destroying some property. Just think about taking a baseball bat to some cheap, boardwalk-prize glassware. I could go for one of those right now.
Samus and Sagat photo
A new show about Metroid's star and Ryu's rival living as roommates
[Animation and thumbnail by EndShark] I've done a lot of video series on YouTube over the years -- Teenage Pokemon, Talking to Women about Videogames, Constructoid, Sup Holmes, Art Hawk, and of course, The Dtoid Show. None o...

SFV Poll photo
SFV Poll

EventHubs Street Fighter V character poll reveals a terrible crime


How can you mess with perfection?
Dec 27
// Nic Rowen
Fighting game mega-site EventHubs is running a poll to see which Street Fighter characters fans want to see return the most in SFV. Considering SFV is still pretty early on in development, there is the slim, outside chance th...
Guile's birthday photo
Guile's birthday

Happy birthday, Guile


Looking good!
Dec 23
// Jordan Devore
You thought we forgot? Not a chance. Happy birthday, Guile! Rock-solid abs, a full head of hair, that sprightly glimmer in your eye -- you're looking fabulous. Destructoid is home to plenty of adoring fans who post daily trib...
Mon Hun dress-up photo
Mon Hun dress-up

Felynes can dress up as Dante, Blanka, and Chun-Li in Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate


Nice chest hair, Blanka
Dec 15
// Jordan Devore
I'm no Monster Hunter player but I'm liking the cross-game costumes for Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate. Well, most of them. In line with today's Devil May Cry re-release news, Capcom has shown a Felyne outfit based on Dante. That...
Street Fighter V photo
Street Fighter V

Street Fighter V being exclusive might not be the worst thing ever


Not as bad as a bowl of noodles on your head anyway
Dec 14
// Nic Rowen
Ok, yes we all hate third-party exclusives. It's especially grating for a franchise as venerable and well loved as Street Fighter. This is a raw deal for the world warriors out there who have already plunked down money on an ...
Street Fighter V photo
Street Fighter V

This Street Fighter V trailer signals Charlie's return


He's alive!
Dec 14
// Kyle MacGregor
Street Fighter V made another appearance at yesterday evening's Capcom Cup, which, amidst the bout between Ryu and Chun-Li, provided a brief flash of a third fighter. That sure looks like Charlie Nash, Guile's military comra...

World's first Street Fighter V match premieres at Capcom Cup

Dec 13 // Alessandro Fillari
In person, SFV looked very sharp and very colorful. The new visuals show a lot more action and detail during matches, and it runs at a very solid pace. Though it looks to take major influences from its predecessor, which is understandable, there were a number of noticeable changes. For instance, stages are far interactive and can be destroyed to force players into new areas, and characters have new moves and abilities not present in past titles. Further more, the producer of SFV Yoshinori Ono teased that each character in the upcoming fighter will feel more unique and different than ever before. I'll let the video do the game justice (and pay attention to Chun-Li during the second match), it has definitely got me excited to see more of what Capcom's got in store. And the fans definitely share my sentiment. Being in the same room where it was unveiled for the first time was an incredible moment. One that will certainly be remembered by fans for a long time.
Street Fighter V photo
Mike Ross and Combofiend throw down in SFV
Closing out the incredibly tense Capcom Cup, Capcom producer Yoshinori Ono surprised the audience with a live demo of Street Fighter V. With the audience giving them their full attention, Mike Ross and Combofiend, both legendary players within the fighting game community, took the stage to compete in the world's first public match in Street Fighter V.

Street Fighter V photo
Street Fighter V

Xbox to make amends for Street Fighter V exclusivity


Phil Spencer would rather invest in Killer Instinct
Dec 09
// Kyle MacGregor
Over the weekend, Capcom announced Street Fighter V for PlayStation 4 and PC. Naturally, some folks were upset the fighting game wouldn't be coming to their preferred platform. Others were curious about Xbox boss boss Phil Sp...

Street Fighter V confirmed as PS4, PC exclusive

Dec 06 // Kyle MacGregor
[embed]284676:56569:0[/embed]
Street Fighter V photo
GET HYPE!
Street Fighter V is coming "exclusively" to PlayStation 4 and PC, Sony and Capcom announced today onstage at the PlayStation Experience in Las Vegas, Nevada. The fighting game will support cross-platform play, meaning PS4 ow...

PS4 Street Fighter IV photo
PS4 Street Fighter IV

Ultra Street Fighter IV strikes PS4 next spring


Spinning bird kick!
Dec 06
// Kyle MacGregor
Ultra Street Fighter IV is coming to PlayStation 4, Sony announced today at its PlayStation Experience keynote in Las Vegas, Nevada. Capcom's fighting game will debut exclusively on PS4 sometime next spring. Xbox One might be getting it at a later date. Or never. Who knows? In other, more exciting news, Street Fighter V is coming to PS4 and PC. Get hype!
Street Fighter V leak photo
Ryu, Chun Li, and kicking confirmed
There is a big PlayStation event happening this weekend, and as is customary for big events in this industry, we have been granted a nice pre-event leak to chew on. Unlike the big Smash Bros. leak from earlier this year, thi...


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