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Motion Controller

Scalebound photo

Scalebound originally starred a young, female protagonist

Was shelved twice before this version
Oct 01
// Laura Kate Dale
Scalebound is one of those games I've just been excited about since it was shown off at E3 last year. A new game from Platinum, the master of character action, about riding dragons into ancient combat while modern music blare...

Review: Commander Cherry's Puzzled Journey

Aug 14 // Jed Whitaker
Commander Cherry's Puzzled Journey (PS4, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Grandé GamesPublisher: Grandé GamesRelease Date: August 11, 2015 (PS4), August 14, 2015 (Xbox One)MSRP: $13.99 Think of the most basic indie platformer you've ever played with minimal graphics and okay at best platforming mechanics, because that is what Commander Cherry's Puzzled Journey is, only worse.  Commander Cherry has to get from one side of the ten available levels to the other, using snapshots of your body taken with the Xbox One Kinect or the Playstation Eye as platforms. When posing for pictures you'll have to position yourself so the edges of your body touch red circles causing them to light up, thus making them collectible for Commander Cherry. These yellow dots must be collected to allow advancement to the next part of the level and granting you a rating of yo, yoga, or yogawesome depending on how well you performed, then rinse and repeat for what felt like a billion times. Here's the thing about capturing your body in crazy poses: in theory it sounds great, but in practice the functionality blows. The Kinect was picking up like half my arms, half my face, and half my legs. On top of that, the detection wasn't that great, often times leaving wide areas of the room behind me in the picture, instead of cropping me out. So don't be fooled by Commander Cherry's original trailer, it certainly doesn't work as well as I was led to believe it was; foolish me. [embed]304686:59976:0[/embed] As far as the actual platforming goes it could be better. Early on you're asked to press a button that shows you all what all the controls are, only you can't do two of the functions yet: double jump and laser. You can only double jump if you have a power-up that turns your weak mustache into a long wizard-like beard, but the game doesn't tell you that as the control screen just says "Hold A to double jump" which isn't even how you double jump once you have the ability! The laser is granted to you in later levels allowing you to cut through your snapshots of yourself, which helps a great deal and should have been available from the start. Speaking of available from the start, double jump should have been as well. The platforming isn't exactly smooth, and most of the time I only found myself able to make it through sections when I had the power-up. The double jump power-up is lost upon falling to your death or hitting the weird eyeball grass and oranges that shoot flames, much like the super mushroom power-up in Super Mario Bros. The big difference between this and Super Mario Bros. is the added double jump ability; getting hit as Mario makes you smaller and harder to hit versus in Commander Cherry it just causes you to lose functionality and makes the game harder. Because of this I started to purposefully kill myself three times in a row when I lost the double jump ability, as it causes a power-up to spawn for you. Nothing says "this might not be a great idea" like someone playing your game and killing themselves deliberately to make your game even remotely possible let alone enjoyable. I'm clearly not in shape, at all -- though Seaman once told me round is indeed a shape -- but I didn't have much trouble posing to complete the platforming puzzles. Poses start with just making basic platforms to guide your character across, but eventually add other mechanics, like avoiding touching grass-like eyeballs, blocking firebreath from oranges, and bodies that move when you have Commander Cherry jump on them. The problem is it gets tedious when sometimes you're asked to make up to six poses for one section while holding the controller in your hand and contorting your body in all different positions. It just wasn't fun, and eventually I had to take a break as my knees, and back started to ache a bit. Later on I figured out I could just play while sitting in my chair closer to the camera, and totally cheesed my way through the final levels with no shame.  All the levels look pretty similar, just bland textureless polygons, and what music there was was pretty forgettable, just like the rest of the game. With only ten levels you'd think Commander Cherry's Puzzled Journey was over far too soon, but it was quite the opposite; I couldn't wait for this yoga-like Hell to be over. Knowing the game was made by only two people makes me feel a bit like a yogasshole by saying this game is yogawful, but this is one cherry pit I couldn't wait to spit out. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Review: Commander Cherry photo
"A game that captures pictures of you when you pose to build levels for your character to platform on? This is gonna be a blast," I thought naively as I excitedly volunteered to review Commander Cherry's Puzzled Journey, "Finally something I can use my Kinect for!" Note to self: Never, ever, ever volunteer to review a Kinect game again, no matter how cool it might look.

Kinect photo

Has Microsoft killed Kinect?

Kinda. Maybe. Possibly?
Jun 16
// Vikki Blake
Talking of backwards compatibility... did you notice what wasn't on that list of playable titles? Kinect games. There are no Kinect games. No Kinectimals, no Kinect Sport, no Dance Central. It seems that Xbox's all-singing, a...
Delta Six controller photo
Delta Six controller

Backers of crowdfunded Delta Six controller hit by friendly fire

It's all fun and games till someone shoots their eye out
Feb 21
// Jason Faulkner
The Delta Six controller is the latest entry in my inadvertent series on crowdfunding drama. Hot on the heels of news that The Stomping Land was abandoned by its development team, details have emerged of project mismana...

Your brain photo
Anthony Carboni explains it all
Number 56 on the master list of 235 "Things that I say that sometimes annoy people who play videogames" is that it's very rare for a game to have "bad" controls. Most of the time when people say that, they are focusing too m...

Xbox One photo
Xbox One

There's going to be a Fruit Ninja Kinect 2

Sure, why not?
Jul 11
// Jordan Devore
A ratings board listing has outed the existence of Fruit Ninja Kinect 2. You cool with that? Fruit Ninja was one of the rare titles for Xbox 360 that made decent use of the motion-sensing device, so it makes sense that the ne...

Myo is a hands-free alternative for the Oculus Rift

Uses your muscles to determine your motions
Mar 15
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The Oculus Rift is a great piece of equipment, and up until now you needed to use motion--based controllers to simulate your own arms in some Rift games. Myo looks to take things one step further by freeing up your hands, th...
Apple buys Kinect company photo
Apple buys Kinect company

Apple definitely bought the original Kinect company

Nov 25
// Joshua Derocher
Apple confirmed that they bought PrimeSense, the company behind the original Kinect, for $360 million dollars. A spokesmen told the BBC that "Apple buys smaller technology companies from time to time, and we generally do not ...
Kinect photo

Kinect 2.0 tech demos showcase a more responsive system

No really, it's better this time
Oct 03
// Abel Girmay
Ever dedicated to evangelizing the usefulness of Kinect 2.0, Microsoft has released two tech demos showcasing the camera's improvements over its predecessor. The first video focuses on how the Kinect 2.0 interacts with your ...
Kinect photo

Xbox One's Kinect won't work anywhere but on Xbox One

That's not terribly surprising
Jun 28
// Brett Makedonski
When Kinect launched for Xbox 360, it was immediately compatible with Windows PCs. When Xbox One's Kinect launches, that won't be the case. Microsoft confirmed that the Xbox One's Kinect sensor was built specifically with the...
Double Fine photo
Double Fine

This is what Double Fine's Leap Motion game looks like

First images of Dropchord
Mar 07
// Jordan Devore
Following the release schedule for the Leap Motion Controller and tease that Double Fine would have a game of its own for the device, more details have come out. This new title, "a music driven score challenge game" designed ...
Kinect photo

Microsoft is interested in using Kinect tech for tablets

Easier said than done
Mar 06
// Jordan Devore
Some of us aren't so keen on using Kinect for playing most types of games, but that's not to say the technology doesn't have its applications elsewhere. Can you imagine Microsoft integrating Kinect with laptops or tablets? Ch...

Witcher 3 gets horses and fire, Beyond gets Willem Dafoe

The Destructoid Show's 420th Episode Takes The High Road
Mar 01
// Max Scoville
As we do every Friday (except for sometimes) we did a live Destructoid Show. CD Projekt Red announced some stuff about The Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt, and then dropped some new screens. Some stuff is being released in May...
Science photo

Study shows videogames can help create better surgeons

Trauma Center, eat your heart out
Mar 01
// Darren Nakamura
This isn't the first time that a scientific study has come up demonstrating the benefits that videogames can have on budding surgeons, and it surely won't be the last. It makes sense: spend time developing hand-eye coordinati...
Myo photo

Play videogames with a gesture control armband

Interact with the digital world in a whole new way
Feb 28
// Taylor Stein
Controllers and keyboards are standard tools in every gamer's repertoire, but what if I told you that a high-tech armband could be the next step in control interface evolution? Built by Canadian start-up firm Thalmic Labs, th...
Leap Motion photo
Leap Motion

Finger-tracking Leap Motion all set for a May release

New motion controller for computers
Feb 28
// Jordan Devore
The Leap Motion Controller is one of those devices that looks cool enough to buy even if it ends getting used, at best, infrequently. Thankfully, in this case, the device is $79.99 which is reasonable enough for promising yet...
DualShock 4 photo
DualShock 4

Sony reveals DualShock 4

It's pretty much what we showed you last week
Feb 20
// Conrad Zimmerman
Sony has just officially revealed the DualShock 4 controller, which is pretty close to the photo we published last week. Mark Cerny, PS4 Lead System Architect, showed the controller during today's live stream event ...
Resident Evil Revelations photo
Resident Evil Revelations

Resident Evil: Revelations lacks Wiimote pointer controls

Only the GamePad is being focused on at this time
Feb 12
// Tony Ponce
I hate to be the one to crush the hopes and dreams of the affable Jonathan Holmes, but it looks like the Wii U version of Resident Evil: Revelations will not offer a Wii Remote + Nunchuk option. Oh yes, we'll get lovely off-T...

Trends of this Generation: Waggling with motion controls

Feb 11 // Daniel Starkey
I started thinking about all of this a few weeks ago, wondering what trends and innovations would be influential for gaming. What will forever change the face of this industry as we know it? After some discussions with the rest of the staff here, we’ve got it down to a list of a few things whose impact will probably be with us for some time to come.   Motion Controls The Wii, Kinect and Move. If there’s one development that could really sum-up this generation, motion controls might be it. It started back in ’06 with the release of Nintendo’s Wii. Instead of trying to keep up with the graphical race between Microsoft and Sony, Nintendo chose to use an innovative control mechanism, banking on the idea that developers would use it to create games that were compelling enough to draw in casual gamers and the core crowd alike. It worked, more or less. At just under 100 million units, the Wii is still *technically* the most successful console from this generation. I say technically, because Wii sales have been largely stagnant for a couple of years, giving both the PS3 and 360 quite some time to catch up. Early on, however, no one knew how the whole thing would play out. Initially, the Wii was selling so fast that it looked like it was a real contender to surpass the PlayStation 2. The other two companies, realizing the mass appeal of motion controls, Microsoft and Sony moved to produce peripherals that would give their respective consoles functionality that rivaled that of the Wii. At E3 2009, Kinect and Move were shown for the first time. While each unit was met with different levels of success, they were indicative of something more -- a desire to simplify, to cut back on the growing complexity of traditional console controls. For all of its imperfections, motion controls allowed easy translation of subtle, nuanced movement between player and the screen. Games like Wii Sports and Dance Central rode the wave of popularity and saw pretty substantial success. Kinect showed, for the first time, that a peripheral not initially bundled with a console could not only be financially viable, but see incredible mainstream acceptance, selling over 8 million units in the first 60 days and setting a world record for the fastest selling consumer electronics device ever released. While it’s not certain whether the "Nextbox" or the PS4 will keep up with the motion control standard, but the Wii U, the first console of the 8th generation, has already taken the legacy of its predecessor and built upon it. Microsoft has also been unusually dedicated to Kinect, and I honestly don’t see them dropping that support anytime soon. This is perhaps one of the most pernicious and frustrating new bits of tech I’ve seen in some time. I’ve written before about the need for games that are open and accessible to people who may be differently abled, and that sentiment hasn’t changed. Motion controls, indeed, can be very helpful for some individuals, but it seems that more often than not it is a restriction. Playing the Wii for example can be tiring, even if it just means holding your arm in one specific place for extended periods of time. Motion controls, more often than not place an additional barrier between the player and the game.  Standard console controls have been fine-tuned for years and it’s pretty rare to see even the worst games completely screw them up. Anytime a new Kinect or Move game comes out, however, the first and most important discussion that’s had is whether or not the controls are even competently implemented. The simple act of not screwing something up is now seen as an exceptional accomplishment because just being okay is the new bar. Maybe I’m wrong, but within the past few years I haven’t seen anything pull off new control schemes quite as well as games like Wii Sports or Dance Central, and they are meant for very general audiences and are very liberal with what kinds of movements they will accept as being correct. This tech isn't really ready for prime time and probably won’t be for a while- not to the degree required to justify the cost. When I was young, my mom told me that eventually all games would be controlled with the whole body. Even back then, I knew that was a bad idea. I’m not necessarily against change in the abstract, but at no point have I seen anything that justifies two expensive add-ons and an entire console that’s a generation behind. Creativity on the part of the developers brings innovation. Messing with the most fundamental aspect of a machine (its interface) undoes everything people have learned since gaming has… been. People can say what they like, but this is one shift that gives me a lot more stress, physical pain, and hours of frustration than it should have. At the end of the day, ask yourself- do you want Red Steel or do you want Portal? [image courtesy of SlamDunk! Studios , I'm a Gamer Too, and Kotaku Australia]
Motion Controls photo
Many embarassing Facebook images later
If current estimations are to be believed, the current console generation will be the longest we’ve seen in the history of gaming. As of right now, just a little less than one-third of my life fits between November 16, ...

Kinect 2 dev kits? photo
Kinect 2 dev kits?

Rumor: Motion control kits for next Xbox 'in circulation'

I hope they come up with a better name than Kinect 2
Jan 17
// Jordan Devore
For all of Microsoft's commercial success with Kinect, the device still seems to draw a lot of criticism for its lack of compelling supported games, and rightfully so. Perhaps things will be different with the successor to th...

CES: MAG II gun controller needs no sensor bar

Works with any display
Jan 09
// Dale North
I sprayed virtual bullets all over the CES game section today trying out the MAG II gyroscopic gun controller. This "wireless magneton induction" controller uses a gyroscope and on-the-fly calibration to let you aim in first-...

J.S. Joust designer on art, failures, and motion control

"Game design is like black magic"
Dec 06
// Jonathan Holmes
Last week's Sup Holmes (now on iTunes) was a real instant friendship time. Douglas Wilson is probably the most down-to-earth, PhD-educated videogame developer I've met all year. There was no subject he wasn't willing to roll...

The DTOID Show: Sony's New Controller, God of War & THQ

Also: The Wii U is awesome now.
Nov 30
// Max Scoville
We were live earlier today for The Destructoid Show, and if you missed it... Shame on you. But here's a recording anyway. Sony patented a new controller that's kinda cool, but also stupid-looking. THQ's in the latest Humble ...

Sony patents DualShock/Move hybrid that breaks in two

Something about how it looks like testicles
Nov 30
// Jim Sterling
A new patent from Sony has revealed a unique little idea that potentially hints at future PlayStation plans -- a hybridized controller that blends both the DualShock and PlayStation Move into one gestalt beast.  The quir...

CVG looks back on the origins of the Wii

Fascinating send-off for Nintendo's most successful home console
Nov 17
// Tony Ponce
On the eve of the Wii U's launch, it's time to pay our final respects to the console its replacing, because unlike the PS2, no company is going to be supporting the Wii from here on out. The Wii was a treasure trove of potent...

Jimquisition: Touch Waggle Touch Waggle Swipe

Jimquisition happens every Monday!
Nov 12
// Jim Sterling
Over half a decade of frustration is about to be unleashed with glorious fury. It's been six years, the tech has been demonstrated, yet still the tech demos come. So few games have found a way to implement new interfaces gra...

Describing Johann Sebastian Joust is arguably one of the most difficult things I've had to do since I saw the game back at E3. The best I've managed to come up with is: "It's kind of like tag... But it's also got some elemen...


Skid to victory in this Wii U Sports Connection trailer

Sep 13
// Brett Zeidler
No, I didn't come up with that hilariously horrid pun in the title. That one was courtesy of Nintendo themselves in this new trailer for Ubisoft's Sports Connection on Wii U. Oh, you think they'd stop there, but no,&nbs...

The DTOID Show: Tony Hawk, Sleeping Dogs & Metro's Spider

Jul 18
// Max Scoville
The big news today is the newly announced voice cast for Sleeping Dogs, which includes Lucy Liu, Tim Wilkinson, Robin Shou, and oddly enough, Emma Stone. A video walkthrough of the E3 demo of Metro: Last Light is now online,...

DTOID Extra: LEAP's motion-control makes Kinect look dumb

Jul 18
// Max Scoville
The LEAP is essentially a precision Kinect that senses various types of gestures in a 3D space, and can be used for a whole ton of stuff besides Fruit Ninja and dance games. The video on the LEAP's website makes it look...

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