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Review: Inazuma Eleven photo
Review: Inazuma Eleven
by Wesley Ruscher

When I was a young kid, I loved nothing more than playing classic sport video games like Bases Loaded, Blades of Steel, Double Dribble, Tecmo Bowl, and Mike Tyson’s Punch-Out!!. While I enjoyed the likes of Super Mario Bros. and Zelda, hitting a game winning homerun was inherently more rewarding than sticking a silver arrow in Gannon's forehead ever was.

As I pushed through my junior high school years though, my tastes in games began to change. It was in these years that I was introduced to my deepest of video game loves: the Japanese RPG. Chrono Trigger and Lunar: The Silver Star opened my eyes to a much deeper world; a world where story was just as important as gameplay, and more importantly, could actually have meaning.

Nowadays, I find myself satisfied having quick flings with any action game that I can finish in a weekend. I still love RPGs and sports games, but the commitment to fully enjoy them is more than I can usually spare. If only there was a way I could enjoy both genres simultaneously; a way to go back to the days where time was in abundance.  

Inazuma Eleven is the time machine I’ve been looking for.

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11:15 AM on 02.20.2014

Don't forget: Every Guild 01 and 02 3DS game is on sale

Weapon Shop de Omasse, the one missing game that needed to be localized to complete Level-5's Guild 01 and 02 collections on the 3DS eShop, is finally here. But if you haven't checked out the rest of the pack, they're al...

Chris Carter



Review: Weapon Shop de Omasse photo
Review: Weapon Shop de Omasse
by Kyle MacGregor

Level-5's Guild series started out as a bizarre anthology of pint-sized experiences from industry veterans. Initially released in Japan during the spring of 2012, the package would come to western shores later that year. Well, sort of. It was dismantled, shipped across the ocean, and sold piecemeal via the Nintendo eShop. 

One by one, the games trickled onto the handheld's online store -- with one notable exception. Weapon Shop de Omasse was oddly absent. For more than a year the final piece of the puzzle remained on the back burner, that is, until now. Better late than never.

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2:45 PM on 02.19.2014

Level-5 reports Yo-Kai Watch has sold over 500,000

Perfect timing, right?Just this morning Level-5 reached out to its western fans to see if there was any interest in a Yo-Kai Watch localization due to its high amount of success in Japan. Following that inquiry, the deve...

Chris Carter

7:08 AM on 02.19.2014

Level-5 wants to know if you want Yo-kai Watch

In Japan, Level-5 has crafted a game (for 3DS) and anime series called Yo-kai Watch. It stars a boy named Keita who opens up a capsule toy and finds a magic watch that can identify ghosts, to hilarious results. He a...

Chris Carter

4:23 PM on 02.13.2014

Inazuma Eleven drops on the 3DS eShop...today!

Remember when we reported that Inazuma Eleven was probably releasing in North America on the 3DS eShop, and then the listing mysteriously disappeared? Well it looks like Level-5 was saving it for today's Nintendo Direct, as it will be available on the eShop today. Sweet!

Chris Carter





4:22 PM on 02.13.2014

Weapon Shop de Omasse to be released this month

When the Guild 01 and 02 Collections dropped overseas, we were missing one game -- Weapon Shop De Omasse. We already reported that the lack of a localization was due to a large amount of text, but eventually I guess the juice was worth the squeeze, and it was announced for a worldwide release. Billed as a "comedic RPG," Omasse will be released on February 20th on the 3DS eShop.

Chris Carter

11:00 AM on 01.09.2014

Guild 01's missing Weapon Shop game getting localized

America may have gotten the vast majority of Level-5's Guild 01 and Guild 02 collections, but it was missing one game -- Weapon Shop De Omasse. According to Level-5, the game would have taken far too long to localize given al...

Chris Carter

7:00 AM on 01.07.2014

Level-5 wants to 'surprise' fans in 2014 with new game

Fantasy Life took off in Japan, and as a result, has substantially raised Level-5's coffers beyond all of the other successful projects they had in 2013. Speaking to 4Gamer, a few key developers noted that the Fantasy Life&nb...

Chris Carter

11:15 AM on 11.08.2013

Mega-fan re-scores Ni No Kuni out of respect for composer

Despite its shortcomings, Ni No Kuni is one of my favorite games of this year, bar none. In fact, depending on how I feel at the end of December, it may even be my outright Game of the Year, amidst everything I've playe...

Chris Carter

7:00 PM on 09.25.2013

Level-5 JRPG Wonder Flick gets a PS4 teaser trailer

Our previous look at Level-5's adorable new RPG scored by Final Fantasy's Nobuo Uematsu was tempered because it is a free-to-play mobile title. It's meant to release in Japan this November on Android and iOS. However, some w...

Steven Hansen

7:00 AM on 08.28.2013

Layton series has sold over 15 million units

Level-5 has kicked the fans in the collective nuts with the complete tonal shift that is Layton 7. That must mean the games are on their last legs and can no longer make bank on Nintendo handhelds alone, right? Not likely if ...

Tony Ponce

5:00 AM on 08.28.2013

Layton 7 for 3DS and mobile is not MY Layton

I... I brought this upon myself. I said that Layton Brothers: Mystery Room was a great game. I said it was an excellent iOS companion to the traditional Layton series. I never should have had faith that a major gaming compan...

Tony Ponce

4:30 PM on 08.26.2013

Level-5's next role-playing game is Wonder Flick

Level-5's got a new role-playing game that has a cutesy art style (yay!) and composer Nobuo Uematsu (double yay!) but it's a free-to-play mobile title. The basic hook of Wonder Flick is that commands are issued by flick...

Jordan Devore



Review: Layton Brothers: Mystery Room photo
Review: Layton Brothers: Mystery Room
by Tony Ponce

Despite my affection towards the Professor Layton series, I felt no compulsion to download Layton Brothers: Mystery Room when it released a couple months back. I'm not against mobile gaming, nor do I believe it's impossible for a traditionally home / handheld console franchise to make a successful leap into the mobile space. But I'm not so proud that I can't admit to still being somewhat biased.

And so weeks passed. While flipping through the App Store just the other day, I noticed that the first few chapters of Mystery Room were free. I figured it wouldn't hurt to give the game a quick spin to see if it deserved my money. Okay game, I thought, convince me!

Mystery Room does exactly what a good spin-off ought to do, which is to craft an experience distinct from yet complementary to the mainline series. With a focus on solving murders rather than "I haff twelve metchsteek" puzzles, it's less Professor Layton and more Detective Conan -- a blend of anime antics and crime drama that works perfectly on a mobile platform.

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Review: Attack of the Friday Monsters! A Tokyo Tale photo
Review: Attack of the Friday Monsters! A Tokyo Tale
by Jonathan Holmes

Children see the world from a lower vantage point than adults. They're closer to the smaller things, the things they're more able to control. They're also more able to stand back and see the bigger picture in ways that adults may be too preoccupied to notice. The catch is, they may not have the life experience needed to put that picture in proper perspective.

What may feel like a tiny inconvenience to an adult may be a huge problem to a child. If Mom and Dad have a argument about laundry, the child may feel like they are witnessing a battle between giants. Likewise, larger problems like World Wars, the destruction of the environment, or a floundering economy may not feel that big to a kid if they're kept far enough away from their day-to-day experience. How big something feels compared with how big it actually is can be tough for the child to determine.

This space where children exist allows for concrete reality and unintentional fantasy to co-mingle without hesitation, allowing for the unfathomable to become everyday routine. Not coincidentally, videogames exist in a similar space, which is why some say that they are as close as we can currently get to entering each other's dreams. 

These ideas are what make Attack of the Friday Monsters! A Tokyo Tale an emotionally and intellectually engaging, mostly-adorable narrative vacation game.

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