hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

Guild Wars

 photo

Unboxing the four-disc Guild Wars 2 soundtrack


Sep 28
// Jayson Napolitano
After showing off composer Jeremy Soule's amazing 4-disc soundtrack for Skyrim earlier this year, I thought I'd extend the same treatment to the recently released Guild Wars 2 Original Game Soundtrack. We featured a review o...
 photo

Guild Wars 2 Mac beta client now available


Both versions will get simultaneous updates
Sep 18
// Jordan Devore
Upon seeing that Guild Wars 2 was getting a Mac version, I had to rub my eyes and look again. Turns out I read it correctly the first time -- the game is available for Mac OS X (Lion and Mountain Lion) right now. It'll be pla...
 photo

Guild Wars 2 breaks over 2 million in sales in two weeks


Sep 13
// Dale North
2, 2, 2! In just two weeks, and despite a short sales halt to preserve the customer experience, MMO Guild Wars 2 has moved over two million copies.  In the first week, sales of the game played it at the top of the the li...
 photo

Laugh and/or cry at this Godawful Guild Wars 2 trailer


Worst live-action trailer ever?
Sep 11
// Jim Sterling
ArenaNet is currently being laughed at throughout the Internet for releasing one of the silliest live-action trailers ever conceived. Such things are usually bad, but you'd have to work damn hard to come up with something mo...
 photo

You can now buy Guild Wars 2 from ArenaNet again


First-party sales of the MMO repopen
Sep 10
// Jordan Devore
On August 30, ArenaNet ceased its sales of Guild Wars 2 and restocking of retail inventories as a measure to "ensure that players who bought the game would continue to have the best online experience possible." We knew people...
 photo

Scammers attempting to crack Guild Wars 2 accounts


ArenaNet warns users to create unique passwords
Sep 10
// Jim Sterling
ArenaNet has revealed that scammers have a list of usernames and passwords from other websites, and are systematically trying them all on Guild Wars 2. Ah, the fun world of MMOs.  The developer puts the responsibility on...
 photo

3,000 Guild Wars 2 players banned for vendor exploit


Rules is rules
Aug 31
// Jim Sterling
ArenaNet has revealed that it banned 3,000 Guild Wars 2 players last night for knowingly exploiting a vendor error that saw them buying cheap gear and selling it on for economy-wrecking profit.  "The players we banned we...
 photo

The DTOID Show: Hearthfire, CoD:BLOPScopters, & Lococycle


Aug 29
// Max Scoville
Here's the last episode of The Destructoid Show before we all go to Seattle for PAX oh my goodness I'm so excited it's just frustrating. Guild Wars 2 is a thing that is happening all of a sudden, Bethesda's newest Skyrim DLC ...

Impressions: Guild Wars 2

Aug 28 // Chris Carter
[embed]233601:44855:0[/embed] Guild Wars 2 (PC)Developer: ArenaNetPublisher: NCsoftReleased: August 28, 2012MSRP: $59.99 (No monthly fee) [For the purposes of these impressions, I have played the bulk of my testing time with a Sylvari Guardian, and I've dabbled in every other class in the game. I've played a fair amount of PvP and WvW as well.] Since our own Jonathan Ross already nailed down the basic mechanics of the game in this awesome guide, I'm going to stick to my own personal impressions as much as possible here, and not elongate too much on basic information. There are a few things you do need to remember, though. First off, this isn't your typical MMO. There are no dedicated healers and damage soakers (tanks). Each class can do everything, and every race can be every class. It's a seemingly small yet genius design decision that lets me play the game the exact way I want to play it. Typical restrictions are gone in both party composition and questing mechanics. You can visit anywhere you've previously explored at any point, and since the game scales your level down if you're in a lower area, you can even quest in low-level zones and still get the same amount of experience. I can't stress enough how much more fun MMOs are without those prior restrictions that have been in place for nearly decades. Being able to warp to any point on the map at anytime outside of combat is ingenious. It doesn't punish the player for wanting to explore additional areas, and circumvents the mount problem (where players will get mounts and simply rush through content from quest to quest). You simply go wherever you want to, at all times. You'll want to travel as much as possible as well, given the sheer amount of dynamic quests in the game. When I say "dynamic," I really mean dynamic. For example, one quest has a group of centaurs warring with a local human keep. If you push the centaurs back to their own camp, you can quell the rebellion for some time, and the map will reflect that. If you let them push, the keep will feel the attack, and the quest will change for subsequent visitors. Although it works very well at launch, I'm fairly skeptical that ArenaNet will be able to keep this magic up in the future, given how many high-level players will naturally gravitate towards more higher-end areas. However, ArenaNet has gone on record saying that they will take note of quests that need changing, and will provide hotfixes for problematic areas. These quests also aren't the only way to get your kicks: world events will be happening all the time. Numerous times throughout my travels (more than I can count), events just started happening around me. Sometimes I was the first person on location, fending off countless waves of enemies attacking a farm or fortification, only to be joined by a mass amount of players at the last minute. It's this entropic feeling that anything can happen that permeates nearly all of Guild Wars 2, and a sign that the development team succeeded with a true dynamic quest system. It's basically like Rift's Rift world event system, but better. For more than a few instances during my initial time with the game, I was running thin on quests to do in my starting zone to get to level fifteen in preparation for the next area. I was thinking "Aw nuts, I have to grind," like I had been doing in nearly every single other MMO since Ultima Online. It wasn't until eight hours into my session that I remembered, "Oh yeah! I can just go back and do all four other starting areas in the game, and get comparable experience." Since the game levels you down (scales) accordingly, you're able to go into nearly any area in the game and have at it. Although there is a limit on upwards level progression (for instance, you won't do well in a 15-30 zone as a level eight), the scaling system is brilliant, and best of all, it actually works. You're basically free to go wherever you want -- if you hate a certain area, no problem, just warp over from Lion's Arch (the capital city for all races) to another one of the five race's individual capital cities and go nuts. Speaking of traveling, Guild Wars 2's style of cartography is the best visualization of a world map that I've ever seen. When you hit "M", the map seamlessly transitions to a beautiful hand-drawn rendition of Tyria, with every single point of interest viewable on it. You can even freely move your character around on the map itself. For the first time in an MMO, I wanted to explore everything. The design team is absolutely brilliant, somehow packing in areas that make sense geographically, but also adding in a ton of easter eggs and secret areas or quests that aren't even marked on the world map. Skill point challenges, area discovery, and vista views will keep you busy for quite some time. Vistas are the main highlight here, as they're essentially elegant platforming puzzles that will test you to your limits. Like classic 3D platforming games of all, pure skill is rewarded here, as some of the city vista challenges are absolutely bonkers. You'll earn XP for just about every single thing in the game except structured PvP -- that includes XP for World versus World, reviving random players you come across during your travels, exploration, crafting, gathering, questing, and so on. Yep, that's right: you can even earn a significant amount of levels through crafting! GW2's fun factor isn't bullet proof, however, as you can experience the same "wear and tear" of RPG questing that you can find in just about any RPG. During one of my multiple eight-hour sessions, I started to get a tad bored of doing quests. The solution? I just jumped into World vs. World, PvP, or started exploring the world at my own pace without combat -- whether it was above or below ground. Structured PvP is also wonderfully done in Guild Wars 2, as ArenaNet has catered it towards the eSport crowd, while making it fairly simple to ease into as a casual fan. When you jump into PvP, you'll instantly be scaled up to level 80, and have every single skill at your disposal -- no more arguments like "Well, he had better gear" or "Well, I would PvP if I had better gear." Funnily enough, this design of instantly getting everything also makes it easier to test out different types of skills and weapons for Player-versus-Environment purposes. Battles themselves consist of a conquest mode, where players fight to control certain vantage points (just like Arathi Basin in World of Warcraft). Even though I'm not the biggest MMO PvP fan, I was able to appreciate just how much depth there is here in the PvP system, even outside of combat. Just because you already have all of your skills doesn't mean you can't earn anything: you can still buy cosmetic PvP items with glory points you earn, and even though you don't obtain proper XP, PvP has its own level ranking. ArenaNet will also be hosting tournaments from time to time, with buy-ins. Right now, Conquest is the only game mode available, but the team has said that other modes will be considered for the future. For those of you who are looking for a more relaxed PVP experience, WvW (World versus World) is your best bet. WvW is a game mode that basically puts you in the middle of a giant RTS battle featuring hundreds of real-life players, similar to a massive player-based Dynasty Warriors map. There's siege weapons, extra WvW-specific items, and special objectives that give it a different feel from the rest of the game. Heck, there are even jumping puzzles in WvW. The best part of all this is that you earn XP for your efforts, and there are a number of dynamic quests and NPCs in the WvW battlefield to mess around with. Even if your aim is to roleplay or experience a different PvE experience and you have no interest in actual PvP, you'll have a ton of fun here. In fact, most of my time spent in WvW is probably doing roleplay-type stuff, playing around with other people, doing mini sorties and the like. When I get bored, I can just jump out. But enough about combat and questing -- what about the lore? Well, there are no "horde vs. alliance" or similar implications to worry about here when picking a race -- every race for the purposes of the game, is locked in PvE with the same goals. Of course, that doesn't mean everyone gets along perfectly, as you'll see when enacting your personal story quests. For instance, as a Sylvari, I'm generally fairly partial in my moral choices, but I make it my personal mission to dump on the smug Asura every chance I get. The writers did an excellent job making you care about each race, and regardless of whether you decide to roleplay or not, you'll at least be remotely interesting in just about pretty much every major character story you meet. To drive this point home, a few months ago, I had the chance to sit down with Jeff Grubb, resident lore master of the Guild Wars series. It was clear that he was extremely passionate about his creations, so much that you can easily see his passion in the game without having to look too hard. There are so many details in the game's dialogue, world, and character models, you'll instantly want to become a part of Tyria. In terms of story delivery, Guild Wars 2 strikes a comfortable medium between World of Warcraft's endless quest log reading, and The Old Republic's excessive voice acting for mundane quests. Low-key quests will usually just be sprung on you without having to sit and wait to sift through a meaningless dialogue wheel. You simply enter the area, a quest log notification pops up on the top right of your screen, and you go. Personal quests will offer voice acting (see if you can listen for a few familiar ones), but segments will only be a few minutes total, so they don't wear on you at all. The amazing thing is that although it is kind of lame that your personal story is told through still-models talking on a static screen, said screen is filled with the beautiful concept art by ArenaNet's insanely talented artists. I usually tend to chalk up this type of static storytelling as lazy, but considering this is one of the only ways to see said art in action, that concession is well worth it. All of this can be augmented through the use of the micro-transaction marketplace, dubbed the Black Lion Trading Company in-game. The vast majority of what the Trading Company provides are mostly cosmetic upgrades, but there are also a few extra boosts, such as an XP boost from defeating enemies for an hour. Now, normally an XP boost for cash would bother me, but the stipulations are so stringent that this really can't be abused heavily. Additionally, Guild Wars 2 is a PvE-based game -- you want other people to get ahead, as it benefits you in the end. Ultimately, as long as the microtransaction hub doesn't get too brazen, and it supports the idea of no monthly subscription fee, I'm willing to support it. In summation, Guild Wars 2 is an MMO for people who both love and hate MMOs. Outside of living a fulfilling life entirely as a crafter (à la Ultima Online), you can pretty much find solace in anything you can imagine an RPG would provide.
 photo

I was skeptical of Guild Wars 2. The original Guild Wars, by ArenaNet's own admission, was a Cooperative RPG (CORPG), and not an MMO. As a result, the game was heavily instanced, and even though it was a decent dungeon crawle...

 photo

Guild Wars 2 level 80 cap reached by player before launch


Aug 28
// Jim Sterling
Guild Wars 2 hasn't even officially launched yet, but a dedicated player in the early access game has managed to grind his way to level 80 already. French user Surfeuze is officially the first player to hit the level cei...

Your guide to Guild Wars 2

Aug 24 // Aerox
If you have any familiarity with other fantasy MMOs, here's the most important thing you need to know when selecting a character: the Trinity is dead. There are no "tanks," or people whose job it is to soak up damage and manage aggro and threat, no dedicated "healers," and no classes whose purpose is to dump out damage and do nothing else. This seems to be the number one biggest thing that people don't understand, even when I explain it to them, so I want to reiterate: the Trinity is dead. Everything you know about tanks, healers, and DPS is wrong. When I say that, I should be clear about what I mean. It's not that there is a "different kind of tanking." There is no tanking. Monsters can and will regularly attack everyone in the party, and everyone has a responsibility to mitigate or avoid the damage. There's not a "different kind of healing." Everyone has a self heal, and can spec to also have some weak group heals on long cooldowns, but healing is not and will not be a central focus of your gameplay, beyond your own responsibility to occasionally heal yourself. Every class is capable of dealing serious damage, and every class has the ability to act in a support capacity, throwing buffs (positive status effects) on their allies and debuffs (negative status effects) on their enemies (called "boons" and "conditions" in Guild Wars 2). And most classes have the ability to hand out some minor healing or regeneration to allies. Despite the notion of everyone being able to do "everything," each class feels quite different from one other because of the weapons they are able to use and their unique mechanics, so the best thing for you to do is read up on the classes and pick which one sounds most interesting. Don't fall into the trap of trying to pick based on archetypes. If you normally enjoy tanking in WoW, don't think you have to pick a Warrior or a Guardian -- there's no tanking because there's no reliable threat management. If you normally play a dedicated healer, you're not going to be standing back and healing anyone in Guild Wars 2, so find a profession that sounds cool and try it it out. Unlike virtually every other MMO on the market, every race can play as every class without any penalty or stat differences, so play around until you find a class that works best for you. Once you have your character created and you've moved through the very short introduction section, you're somewhat unceremoniously dumped right outside your city's starting zone with little direction. You'll see one green star on your map, indicating a portion of your story quest, and not much else. An NPC will direct you to what also appear to be quests -- different hearts on the map indicating people who need help. Your first inclination may be to run straight to your story quests or toward the heart quests -- after all, that's what we've been conditioned to do in almost every MMO since EverQuest. DON'T DO IT! One of the biggest fundamental shifts in thinking you'll have to do when playing Guild Wars 2 is to understand that the game is about exploration, not just running in a straight line. In most games, the best way to level is to do as many quests or dungeons as possible in a short amount of time. In Guild Wars 2, it's much different; the more time you spend wandering around off the beaten path, the more things you'll find to do. In this game, there are many ways to earn experience. You get experience for finding waypoints and points of interest on the map. You get experience for killing things. You get experience for reviving other players. You get experience for World vs. World PvP. You get experience for gathering crafting materials and making things out of them. You can even go back to old zones you never completed and get experience from them -- the game downlevels you to whatever zone you're in so you can do the content without blowing through it, while getting appropriate exp rewards for your actual level. These aren't just tiny amounts of experience, either -- they're significant. It won't be immediately apparent out the gate, but the best way to level in Guild Wars 2 is to do as many different things as possible as you play. In fact, to earn your first level out of the tutorial/intro mission, I recommend turning around, going back inside your race's major city, and exploring the entire thing. When it comes to actual "questing," the majority of "quests" in the game are randomly occurring events. As you walk around and explore the map, events will suddenly begin, or you'll move into range of an in-progress event. These events form what will likely be the core of your PvE experience, and you should always be looking to participate. Again, the best way to find these events is to just wander around exploring the map -- those who only run in a straight line to the heart and story quests will miss out. Events will occupy much of your time in the game, but if you ever get tired of them, or if feel like you are too under-leveled to move forward (and, if you only do story and heart quests and nothing else, you'll hit this point pretty quickly), remember all the other things you can do. Spend some time gathering materials and crafting items, go check out the World vs. World combat, or even check out the other races' starting areas. (Getting to them is simple, although not obvious. Lion's Gate has portals to all five major cities, and can be reached either through the portal in your own city, or by entering the sPvP lobby through your Hero Menu and taking the portal found there.) Remember -- don't focus just on quests, don't be afraid to aimlessly wander and explore, and don't be afraid to check out other zones. The more you explore, the better off you'll be. One of the other aspects of Guild Wars 2 that will probably take some adjusting to is the fact that it's a social game. Not "social game" in the sense that you're spamming farming invites to your friends, but social in that there's a very real incentive to work with other players, and luckily, doing so is simple and generally doesn't require any futzing with parties or raids. Hell, you don't even have to technically talk to anyone, but you will have to work with other people. Again, it's not immediately clear, but working with people in this game is ALWAYS beneficial. There's no kill stealing or even kill tagging. You can't take loot meant for someone else. Even gathering nodes will be unique to your character, meaning no one will swoop in in front of you and snag that ore chunk you had your eye on. If you come across other players, help them! Start attacking their monsters -- they won't mind, since you'll both get experience and treasure. Happen upon a downed or dying player? You'll want to try to revive them, since there's a bit of experience in it for you. If you see a group of people wandering around, follow them. You'll all help each other out, and there's a good chance you'll come across a random event together as a group. Similarly, if you see a whole bunch of players all running in one direction, definitely follow them. A major event is probably about to start or already in progress, and you won't want to miss out. Later in the game at around Level 30, when dungeons become available to you, you WILL have to start dealing with a party system. The dungeons are all five-mans, but, again, remember that the Trinity is dead. It shouldn't be super difficult to find a group, because virtually any group composition should be able to clear any dungeon in the game. You don't have to sit around waiting for a tank or a healer -- you can grab the four nearest Engineers and still have a reasonable chance of completing the dungeon. Simply put, if you're the kind of person who tries to play MMOs solo (which, I admit, often describes me), you're going to have to shift your thinking, or you're not going to have much fun in this game. All that said, my experience in the beta weekend has been that once all the barriers to co-operation are removed, people generally seem to act a whole lot nicer to each other. Now, we get to the combat itself. First off, your main skill set is tied to the weapon you're currently using -- the first five skills on your hotbar correspond directly to your equipped weapon. You start with only one skill in each useable weapon, but they quickly unlock as you kill things -- within two or three hours of play, you should have unlocked most if not all of your weapon skills. Your other five slots are a healing skill, three utility skills, and an elite skill, all of which you can choose from a set that you will unlock as you level up. When it comes to actually killing, throw everything you know about priority systems and rotations out the window. Guild Wars 2 isn't the kind of game where you stand in one place mashing buttons; you need to be moving CONSTANTLY. Almost every skill can be used while moving, even most channeled ones, and as such you should be constantly strafing and circling your target. Generally speaking, you have less skills overall than in most other MMOs, and the skills you do have come with significantly longer cooldowns. The time you're not spending mashing skill buttons instead goes to combat positioning and avoidance. In addition to just moving around your opponent, you also need to learn to dodge. The dodge skill is absolutely critical to survival in the game, and once you move past the first few areas, you'll find that even basic monsters can easily kill you if you're not careful. Many enemies have extremely powerful attacks that can one-shot you, so you need to learn the tells so that you can dodge out of the way. In the event you do go down, don't worry! The downed state, which you should be introduced to in the tutorial, is an expected and normal part of the game. Being downed doesn't necessarily mean you've done something wrong (although there's a good chance you're down because you blew a dodge), and you should quickly be revived by another player in the area. You can also come back from being downed by contributing to an enemy kill while downed, and it will be obvious how to do so when you first enter the state. If you do end up dying, you'll just respawn at a waypoint. As you move through areas, keep an eye out on your map for other downed players -- reviving them will grant you some experience, and they'll certainly appreciate the help. Finally, a few notes about loot, dungeons, and the "end-game." The "end-game" concept central to most MMOs is not present here. In Guild Wars 2, the time it takes to gain a level is designed to be roughly equal, whether you're leveling from 29 to 30 or from 79 to 80. Rather than gating content at the level cap, the content is more evenly spread throughout the entire game. When you do ultimately hit the level cap, you have an opportunity to go back to all the areas you've missed and try them out -- because of the downscaling system, you won't be just blowing through them without a challenge. Five-man dungeons are present in the game, and the first isn't available until level 30, but they don't exist to gear you up. Equivalent versions of all of the loot from dungeons can be found out in the world or crafted -- they instead serve as cosmetic rewards. Loot in general is significantly scaled back from many other games, and you'll find that you're pretty naturally upgrading your gear as you move through the game without any kind of dungeon or raid grinding. Instanced raids don't exist at all, but many will find that some of the major area events serve as de facto, non-instanced, mini-raids, and these are available as early as the starting areas of each race. As should be clear from the above, I spent a significant amount of time in most of the beta events, and had a really positive experience. I think a lot of you, even if you don't normally like MMOs, will enjoy the game as well. That said, I'm sure it won't appeal to everyone, and sadly I think a lot of people may be turned off from it simply because they try to play it like World of Warcraft or Old Republic. That's not to crap on those games (I still have an active World of Warcraft account and a great guild), but it's just to note that you really do have to change the way you think about and play MMOs to really "get" Guild Wars 2. If you read this guide the entire way through, you should have a pretty good idea of how to do so. See you in Tyria! [Jordan, Chris Carter, and I are planning on rolling on the server Ferguson's Crossing, and we expect a few other editors will be playing there as well. We don't have any kind of solid plans for a guild at this point, but if you're looking for a server, feel free to join us!]
 photo

With the Guild Wars 2 headstart beginning tomorrow, many of you will be playing the game for the first time. Some of you may still be on the fence about whether to purchase it or not (hint: you should). If you haven't played ...

 photo

ArenaNet recaps what makes Guild Wars 2 stand out


Jul 26
// Jordan Devore
With the last beta weekend behind us for Guild Wars 2, there's about a month left of waiting before ArenaNet's anticipated MMO launches officially. The studio has put together four videos, each highlighting a distinct part o...
 photo

Details of the final Guild Wars 2 beta weekend revealed


Jul 09
// Alasdair Duncan
With Guild Wars 2 set to be released at the end of August, developer ArenaNet has released the details of what you can expect to play in the last beta weekend before we can get our grubby little hands on the final game. For t...
 photo

Guild Wars 2 gets 4-disc soundtrack signed by composer


Jul 08
// Jayson Napolitano
Those itching to get their hands on the single-disc Guild Wars 2 Collector's Edition Soundtrack that is shipping with the game's collector's edition in late August will likely be surprised by the posting today on DirectSong, ...
 photo

Guild Wars 2 will officially launch on August 28th


Jun 28
// Chris Carter
It's official -- after hundreds of placeholders, rumored release dates, and leaked information, Guild Wars 2 finally has an official release date of August 28th, 2012 (pre-orders get early access on the 25th!). I had the oppo...
 photo

ArenaNet unveils the second Guild Wars 2 beta weekend


May 29
// Chris Carter
Not a day goes by where I don't see people clamoring for some info on the next Guild Wars 2 beta weekend. Well, today you're going to get it! Compliments of Chris Whiteside, the official times for the second GW2 beta event ar...
 photo

Next Guild Wars 2 beta event waiting on more hardware


May 23
// Jordan Devore
When is the next beta weekend event for Guild Wars 2? That question has been on my mind ever since the first one ended. With the impending long weekend ahead of us, some people had hoped ArenaNet would open the beta back up i...
 photo

Office Chat: Twin surprises in Black Ops and Guild Wars


May 02
// Conrad Zimmerman
We're all pretty floored about the new direction Treyarch is taking the Call of Duty series for Black Ops 2, as it sounds like they're making the biggest effort to evolve the franchise since Modern Warfare. I talked a b...
 photo

The DTOID Show: Halo 4, Prey 2, God of War and MORE!


Apr 20
// Max Scoville
Hey guys! Tara's off in the desert on some kind of vision quest in search of the glowing ghosts of rappers or something, so Anthony Carboni filled in. We covered some big sexy nasty sequel news, including Prey 2's non-cancel...
 photo

Soon: Guild Wars 2 beta event is next weekend


Apr 18
// Jordan Devore
Despite knowing full well that I'll eventually buy Guild Wars 2 and would really like to get into the beta sooner rather than later, I've avoided pre-purchasing the game. Well, until now, that is. NCsoft and ArenaNet have fin...
 photo

You can pre-purchase Guild Wars 2 today so do that


Apr 10
// Fraser Brown
You can't see me right now, so you'll just have to take my word for it: I'm jumping for joy. Why, you ask? Well I just pre-purchased Guild Wars 2. If you haven't done so already then you can, too. NCsoft and ArenaNet hav...
 photo

Guild Wars 2 microtransactions take a cue from EVE Online


Mar 21
// Joshua Derocher
ArenaNet has finally spilled the beans on the details of microtransactions in the upcoming Guild Wars 2. The latest blog post by Mike O'Brian, president of ArenaNet, explains what we can expect. Players will be able to b...
 photo

Guild Wars 2 Collector's Ed., pre-purchase offer detailed


Mar 13
// Jordan Devore
Fans eager to toss a wad of cash NCsoft's way for Guild Wars 2 will want to hear about the publisher's pre-purchase plan -- it grants access to all beta weekend events, a three-day head start at launch, and an exclusive in-ga...
 photo

Upcoming Guild Wars 2 closed beta set for next month


Feb 27
// Jordan Devore
During peak periods, 4,000 people per minute signed up to participate in the Guild Wars 2 closed beta. No wonder the website went down so quickly. To be fair, the game increasingly sounds like something many of us desperately...
 photo

Hot on the heels of last weekend's closed press beta, ArenaNet is now taking applications for all future Guild Wars 2 beta events. Sign-ups will only be open for the next 48 hours, so if you're interested, you should put your...

 photo

Guild Wars 2 PvP to set worlds against each other


Feb 18
// Sterling Aiayla Lyons
I'm always a big fan of when game developers share philosophies and general development methodologies behind the games that they are working on. This week, Mike Ferguson -- of the Guild Wars 2 development team at ArenaNet -- ...
 photo

In an investor call today, NCSoft confirmed that plans are moving forward on a console release of Guild Wars 2, stating that they are in a "preparation stage." Not long after, ArenaNet's Martin Kerstein took to the Guild Wars...

 photo

Guild Wars 2 coming later this year with betas in spring


Jan 23
// Fraser Brown
I doubt that it will come as a surprise to anyone, but ArenaNet have revealed that Guild Wars 2 will indeed be stealing many of our lives this year. It seems inevitable that I'll be spending a significant portion of 2012 enta...

Destructoid's most wanted PC games of 2012

Jan 12 // Allistair Pinsof
South Park: The Game (PC, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)Developer: Obsidian EntertainmentPublisher: THQRelease: TBA 2012 I haven't watched an episode of South Park in about a year. Outside a couple episodes, it's never held my interest (You Have 0 Friends" was the last great one). The episodes typically start off with a good premise, but then run that premise into the ground through repetition and dull writing. Yet, here I am looking forward to Obsidian's attempt to RPG-ify the beloved brats and bring new life into Matt Stone and Trey Parker's ever-aging lovechild. The world of South Park is a fun one I'd like to explore, and with gems like Super Mario RPG and Final Fantasy as an influence on this project, I think I'll have a good time doing it. South Park: The Game is a left turn for the developer, lacking the ambition, mature themes, and sequel-driven nature of their past projects. But, maybe a focused, immature, and original RPG might be exactly what Obisidian needs to finally make a classic. Even the overlooked glitches of past Obsidian titles will feel at home in this offbeat, crass world. Dishonored  (PC, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)Developer: Arkane StudiosPublisher: Bethesda SoftworksRelease: TBA 2012 Arkane Studios make the type of games I like to play. It so happens that these are the type of games that rarely get made these days. Beyond Irrational Games, Bethesda, and Valve, no developer wants to take the risk of spending years crafting a rich, varied world that you can explore. It takes time, money, and a whole lot of skill. And, finally, Arkane have all three of these, which is why I think Dishonored will shape up to be one of 2012's most memorable single-player games. That, and I was blown away when I saw it in action at QuakeCon last year. Arkane are taking lessons learned from their past games (Arx Fatalis, Dark Messiah of Might and Magic), while taking inspiration from Bioshock and '90s PC classics. With one of the strongest creative teams in the industry -- including key members of the Deus Ex and Half-Life 2 teams -- and a drive to finally prove themselves, Dishonored could be the gem that merges their Thief: The Dark Project worship with smart, approachable design that will make any Bioshock fan feel at home. Quantum Conundrum (PC, Xbox Live Arcade, PlayStation Network)Developer: Airtight Games Publisher: Square EnixRelease: TBA 2012 The worst thing about Portal 2 is that it ends. Thankfully, we already have a promising Portal-like adventure on the horizon to fill that void in our hearts. Rather than a knock-off, Quantum Conundrum is Kim Swift's (co-creator of Portal) debut for Airtight Games. Like her previous project, Quantum Conundrum is a charming, colorful puzzle game played from first-person. Rather than traversing obstacles with portals, the player alternates the environment's physics by swapping between four dimensions. One dimension slows time, one makes objects featherweight, and one reverses the direction of gravity. The fourth dimension hasn't been reveled yet at this time, but just thinking of the puzzle possibilities with the above abilities alone boggles the mind. After the utterly forgettable debut of Dark Void, Kim Swift's inspired puzzle adventure with Pixar-esque visuals is exactly what Airtight Games needs to win our faith back. With an entirely new rule set and environment, Quantum Conundrum could make the puzzle-platforming introduced in Portal feel fresh all over again. Honorable Mentions: Shadowrun Online, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Natural Selection 2, Darksiders II, Brothers in Arms: Furious 4 Diablo III (PC, Mac)Developer: BlizzardPublisher: BlizzardRelease: 2012 Prior to playing the beta, I wasn't so sure about Diablo III. All these years later, could it compare to the fond memories we have of its predecessors? My doubts disappeared almost immediately. It's funny how quick I was to forget that Blizzard takes its sweet time for a reason. The game is still very much the essence of Diablo, but that's not to say its designers locked themselves in a room and ignored the genre's steady advances. The attention to detail and seamlessness of it all is impressive in a way that's hard to describe through summary. It takes considerable development time to allow for high internal standards and iterative design, but you can't argue with the results. Dota 2 (PC, Mac)Developer: ValvePublisher: ValveRelease: 2012 Despite having spent hundreds of hours playing Warcraft III custom games, I never got seriously hooked on "Defense of the Ancients." The same can be said of today's growing multiplayer online battle arena (MOBA) scene, though that has more to do with a fear of hyper competitiveness and loss of sleep than anything else. Why care about Dota 2, then? Love or hate Valve's games, they're always interesting -- especially for people like me who actively think about design choices that most would consider to be largely insignificant. Given the studio's brilliance when it comes to building sustainable online communities, I have high expectations of this game. Hell, even the journey to a public beta -- remember the $1,000,000 Dota 2 International? -- has been enjoyable to watch. Guild Wars 2 (PC)Developer: ArenaNetPublisher: NCsoftRelease: 2012 I've long struggled with getting into MMOs. The promise of ever-changing worlds and the like is usually there, but boredom arrives too quickly to warrant keeping my credit card on file more often than not. Having had a decent enough time with the original Guild Wars years ago, I'm incredibly hopeful that its sequel will be the MMO to pull me back in. Repetition, particularly when it comes to killing the same old forces of evil, has always been the deciding factor. Choices which have a noticeable and persistent impact, a focus on individual player stories, and improvisational combat are among the highlights of this game for me. Not having to pay a monthly subscription fee means I'll be there on day one rather than wait and see. ArenaNet has a clear vision for Guild Wars 2 -- one I desperately want to see for myself in person. Even if some promises aren't fully met, I suspect they will, in part, influence the genre going forward. Honorable mentions: Hawken, StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm, and Super Monday Night Combat.   Additional staff picks for PC: Alex Bout: Guild Wars 2 Alasdair Duncan: Dishonored, Monaco, The Secret World.Jim Sterling: Firefall, The Secret World, Super Monday Night CombatJonathan Ross: Diablo III, Guild Wars 2, Mass Effect 3Jason Cabral: Metro: Last Light, Diablo III, Kingdoms of Amalur: The ReckoningJosh Derocher:  Diablo III, StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm, Guild Wars 2Kyle MacGregor: The WitnessAndrew Kauz: Diablo III, Torchlight IIJonathan Holmes: New games from Team Meat, Terry Cavanagh, and KonjakMaurice Tan: Torchlight II, King Arthur II, Wargame: European EscalationTara Long: Diablo III, Torchlight IIJosh Tolentino: XCOM: Enemy Unknown, Mass Effect 3, HawkenChad Concelmo: Diablo IIISean Daisy: The Witness, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Max Payne 3Daniel Starkey: Torchlight II, Prey 2, FirefallSterling Lyons: Blacklight: Retribution, Blade & Soul, Prey 2 
 photo

It's a strange time to be a PC gamer. With fewer high-profile exclusives, it has become a glorified Xbox 360. Thanks to efforts from developers and publishers, it's a superior 360 where draw distance, anti-aliasing, and frame...

 photo

Last Guild Wars 2 profession unveiled, devs put on an AMA


Dec 14
// Jordan Devore
Rounding out the eight professions in Guild Wars 2 is the Mesmer, which was revealed by ArenaNet today. This class type uses illusory magic, like clones and phantasms, to confuse and take down enemies. For years in gaming we'...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...