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DiRT

Dirt Rally photo
Dirt Rally

DiRT Rally gets a bunch of new tracks and cars


Woooo, car stuff
Jul 01
// Laura Kate Dale
If you're a fan of Codemasters' racing game DiRT Rally, then you'll probably be excited to learn a new handful of cars and tracks has been added to the game. Vroooooooooooom!!!!! So, what's been added to the game? Twelve new ...
DiRT Rally photo
DiRT Rally

You can fly off Pikes Peak in DiRT Rally


Ignore the signs
May 26
// Jordan Devore
The new DiRT game is coming together piece by piece, and today's morsel has me reminiscing about a certain scenic climb in Colorado. Today's update for DiRT Rally is a big one, and centers on Pikes Peak (both its "full fat m...
DiRT Rally photo
DiRT Rally

Codemasters brings DiRT to Steam Early Access minus the Gymkhana


DiRT Rally
Apr 27
// Jordan Devore
The next entry in Codemasters' DiRT racing series is available now on Steam Early Access and that "scares the absolute crap out of [the studio], but in a good way." It's called DiRT Rally, and if this is the first you're hear...

Deals photo
Deals

Humble Weekly Sale bundles Overlord and DiRT


Codemasters
Jan 30
// Jordan Devore
Codemasters is the latest publisher to participate in a Humble Weekly Sale and it's another one worth recommending if for no other reason than Overlord (and DiRT!). Name your price for the first Overlord and its Raising Hell ...
DiRT 3 photo
DiRT 3

Games for Windows Live is gone from DiRT 3


Codemasters' racing title will switch to Steamworks
Nov 11
// Alasdair Duncan
As we bid farewell to the Games For Windows Live service, like we would an unwelcome and bossy relative that you feel compelled to put up with, Codemasters has taken the step of removing the GFWL client from its racing title ...

Review: DiRT Showdown

Jul 11 // Ian Bonds
DiRT Showdown (Xbox 360 [reviewed], PlayStation 3, PC)Developer: CodemastersPublisher: CodemastersReleased: May 29, 2012MSRP: $49.99 For fans out there looking for DiRT 4, this simply isn't it. In fact, this title bares absolutely no resemblance to the games in the series' past. Gone is the Rally career mode, dirt tracks, and racing career. Sadly, gone also are the realistic car physics as well. When you're able to do donuts by simply laying on the accelerator -- "Look, mom, no hands on the analog stick!" -- you know you're in for some floaty car behavior. So what is left? Well, from jump, DiRT Showdown is actually more of a destruction derby title, with occasional Gymkhana events thrown in. There are traditional races too, but honestly they're peppered throughout with the focus on wrecking other cars in derby or figure-8 races being the main focus. This is further hampered by not only the car physics being so off kilter, but also by the cars themselves. The majority of the vehicles are all non-licensed generic cars that, for the most part, handle and accelerate the same. There's no real "tuning" involved, but you can upgrade your cars' performance with money earned in events -- though, to be frank, even after doing so, I only noticed a small change in acceleration or handling. At least everything looks nice. The floating sponges you'll be driving all appear sleek and sharp, with excellent particle effects as you hurtle over jumps, boosting with your constantly renewing nitrous meter. Damage effects are especially nice as you lose doors, fenders, and more smashing about each course. The menus are also sleek, but the constant "Look how extreme we are!" feel of every menu option falling from the sky as a giant metal block gets old after three or four screens. The same can be said of the unavoidable announcer, who spouts off such gems as "T-bone-arama!" as cars slam into each other. The Gymkhana events have a separate challenge mode, where players are tasked with increasingly difficult moves, such as drifting under scaffolding, clearing jumps, performing donuts, and the like. However, the word "challenge" is used loosely here, as once again the bizarre physics allow you to unintentionally complete these moves before you've realized what you've done. There is an online mode, which the developers would have you think is the main meat-and-potatoes of the title, but sadly, this seems slightly broken as well. The RaceNet matchmaking servers don't allow for much customization or choice over who you compete against or how you want to race, and the load and wait times are excruciating. Even once you finally get into a match, you can't select what you want to play -- you just keep downvoting what appears until hopefully you land on an event you want to actually play. It's like the developers only made this title to keep the license alive while they worked on the next "real" iteration of the series. DiRT Showdown is not a broken game; it's just very slap-dash, seemingly thrown together from pieces of ideas but never made fully whole. Courses repeat over and over and the difficulty never gets too high where events become a challenge, thus leaving the player almost bored with the task of completing each event. It looks nice, but it's clearly a shell of its former self, with no real connections to the series that everyone knows past the name itself.
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The DiRT series is well-known for its Rally-style racing, accurate and realistic physics, and bare-knuckle driving action. Spawned from the Colin McCrae series of Rally games, DiRT took off on next-gen consoles for fans looking for something a little different than the regular slew of gearhead and arcade racing games available on the market. This is not your father's DiRT game.

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DiRT Showdown arriving on May 29th, have a trailer


Apr 20
// Brett Zeidler
It's crazy to think DiRT: Showdown is finally almost here. Wait, didn't DiRT 3 just come out? The "Complete Edition" of it just came out last month as well. Wow, Codemasters are not wasting any time these days. DiRT Showdown...
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DiRT Showdown's damage is massive


Mar 15
// Liam Fisher
Oh hey, it's a new trailer for DiRT: Showdown, the next entry to the long running rally series from Codemasters. After DiRT 3 ruffled some feathers with it's diminished focus on pure rally racing, Codemasters decided to...
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Get your tilt on in Need for Speed/DiRT 3 on PC


Feb 15
// Liam Fisher
This one took me a little bit to wrap my head around. Flypad, available on iTunes, allows you to control PC racing games like Need For Speed: The Run and DiRT 3 with touchscreen and tilt controls by downloading the iOS ...
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DiRT 3 Complete Edition announced, adds $30 of content


Feb 09
// Brett Zeidler
I really like these re-release packages that seem to come out these days, especially when I'm not able to get around to picking up every game I want to. When the re-release package comes with a substantial amount of new conte...

Preview: Collisions are a glorious thing in DiRT Showdown

Jan 27 // Casey Baker
DiRT Showdown (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360) Developer: Codemasters Publisher: Codemasters Release: May 2012 Just to clarify, DiRT Showdown is not a direct sequel to DiRT 3. In fact, as the Codemasters guys were quick to tell me, after getting feedback from their fans on how jarring the differences between the Gymkhana events and the regular rally events in DiRT 3 were, the team decided on offering players two entirely separate games that focused on these different aspects. The next true iteration of DiRT will be focused on the deep rally racing experience while DiRT Showdown should appease the demolition and stunt junkies who appreciated where Gymkhana took the series. DiRT Showdown isn't just some expansion, nor should it be considered DiRT 3.5. The game is a fully fledged beast with around 52 events spanning 19 locations and three different play styles -- Speed, Style, and Destruction. Many will be happy to know that pretty much every event can either be played via two-player split screen or online with up to eight players. Speed encompasses DiRT Showdown's racing modes, which include Race-offs, Lap Attacks, and Eliminator and Dominator. I was able to get some hands-on time with a Nevada track in Race-off mode called "8 Ball" due to the figure eight shape of the track. Immediately after getting my hands on the controller, I noticed how much faster the game generally felt than previous entries, with boosting being an important part of getting ahead amidst aggressive drivers. The handling veers more towards arcade than simulation, so much so that I at first found myself swerving around the gravel track, kicking up dust, because I've been so accustomed to the weightier feeling of previous DiRT cars. The race itself was both fast-paced and thrilling, and at one point I got into a collision with several cars, causing my own vehicle to do several barrel rolls before somehow making it back onto the track to still come out in the lead. Style introduces the new Ken Block-branded Hoonigan events that take place in large stadiums and allow a lot of exploration. Hoonigan events include Smash Hunter, Trick Rush, and Head 2 Head mode, and all generally focus on allowing a player to wander around a stadium pulling off awesome stunts or smashing a number of blocks with finesse. I didn't get a chance to check out any Hoonigan events, though from what I'm told, they're a much more varied version of the free-roam stadiums one could unlock in DiRT 3, each with their own specific goals and career progression. Finally, Destruction is heavily influenced by the Demolition Derby events found in GRID. The modes include Rampage, Hard Target, and Knockout. I had a chance to check out a Rampage event on the San Francisco track "Golden Gate." Rampage is a pure Demolition Derby mode with a variety of interestingly designed vehicles (including a hearse) where garnering the most points involves smashing into cars with as much force and strategy as possible, then making use of the last 30 seconds of the match to garner even more points. While T-boning and colliding hard with other vehicles and causing massive damage to pretty much everything in my path, I could quickly see how this may be the favorite party mode for gamers, both online and off. While the difficulty settings in DiRT Showdown can be adjusted to ramp up A.I. intelligence (i.e. cruelty towards you and others on the track), the real focus through the career mode will be on upgrading your vehicle so that it fits your play style. If you go with a heavier vehicle, you'll probably be focusing on speed and damage upgrades, but if you go with a lighter vehicle, you may find yourself along an upgrade path towards acceleration and agility. Succeeding in events earns you the cash to access these upgrades, so Codemasters wants to make sure the game is challenging and engaging enough for anyone on any difficulty level. DiRT Showdown won't be the game to appease fans of pure rally racing, but it's gearing up to be an exciting spin-off for the stunt junkie who wants demolition, pyrotechnics, and awesome stunt-filled races to the tune of cheering crowds.
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Codemaster's DiRT series has always been known for offering gamers a rally racing series with a great physics engine and smart A.I. opponents that push back as aggressively as the player pushes them. Perhaps the greatest si...

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Bodycount developer closing down


Sep 14
// Fraser Brown
In a move that's unlikely to surprise anyone, Codemasters have started the process of closing its Guildford Studio, creator of Bodycount. The UK developer wants to focus on its racing properties and is encouraging the 66 empl...
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Dirt 3 PS3 players forced offline due to Online Pass crap


May 25
// Jim Sterling
If you needed further proof that the Online Pass was a shitty idea which inconveniences all paying customers, then here's a nice little slice of evidence. Day-one DiRT 3 buyers cannot play the hot looking racing gam...

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