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Crytek

Kojima photo
Kojima

Crytek really wants Kojima to come visit its studio


He's currently in Europe
Jan 27
// Chris Carter
Right now, Hideo Kojima is on tour with Sony's Mark Cerny due to their recent partnership. Crytek noticed that it's pretty close to the duo, and solicited a potential visit to their headquarters in Frankfurt. "We hear yo...

First hands-on with Crytek's newest game The Climb

Dec 15 // Steven Hansen
The Climb is simple. Once you strap into an Oculus virtual reality headset, two disembodied hands appear in front of you. Pulling the left or right triggers on the Xbox controller clenches the respective fist. "Aiming" the hand at a divot in the cliff, by way of moving your head towards where you're trying to grab, prompts the hand to appear as if it's reaching a bit more urgently, signalling to you it's ready to grab. And that's it, hand over hand, you're climbing rock. I played a course in south east Asia on easy difficulty, which only necessitates two types of grips. The most technical thing I had to do was let go with one hand and quickly grasp the same hold with the other. That and you'll want to occasionally hold the bumpers to chalk your hands so they don't start bleeding down your players' hip fitness wristband. I might be stereotyping, but I'm pretty sure it read, "YOLO" at some point. But that was it. There was some hand over hand lateral movement across a plank and a jump or two to otherwise out of reach handholds, but it's mostly about the physical intimacy of climbing up a giant rock and occasionally physically turning your head around to soak in the beautiful vista. Miles of CryEngine rendered landscape juxtaposed against surrogate fingertips. "The engine gives us that ability to do the distance, the scale, the largeness and intimacy," Crytek's Director of Production David Bowman said. Crytek came out hot in 2013 with three big releases: Crysis 3, Warface (hah!), and Ryse: Son of Rome. The first and third were sales letdowns. The second has a name that gave me immense pleasure for a year or so and might have made money in Asian and European markets where is launched sexy female soldiers. Its 2014 announcements -- a Johnny Come Lately MOBA Arena of Fate and Darksiders follow up from former Vigil employees Hunt -- have been radio silent in 2015. Its other known project is a VR game with dinosaurs. Bowman noted that Crytek is, "going to continue to make traditional great, fantastic games," but said that, "VR gives us a new toolset, a new platform, a new media that plays to our strengths. It plays right into what we do better than anybody. This is our chance to really shine." Virtual reality is an important part of Crytek's future. Where Ryse was basically an Xbox One tech demo, a piece of impressive "next gen" looks, The Climb is something like that for VR, albeit with a lot more substance than the QTE-heavy movie knockoff. Bowman calls it, "one of the premier Oculus content experiences," and says it will be released "early" in the Oculus' life cycle. "They love it," Bowman said. Oculus made a smart decision pairing its still-not-dated, still-not-priced Rift VR headset with a strong piece of software in EVE: Valkyrie. The Climb may not have that pack-in position, but Bowman says the simplicity is what will sell VR to a wider audience. "The approachability of this, we have really high hopes for it as far as bringing in people who might not consider themselves gamers. And if you are a gamer, there's a lot of sport here. It's free climb solo. That level of danger in real life means you're not going to go out and do it probably yourself, but here you have this extreme sport that's now accessible to you. "What every hardware platform needs is that application that you can say, 'Hey, I bought this, I have fun with it, and now I'm sharing it with my friends and family, and I feel good about it because they're able to appreciate it.' And now all of a sudden they're going, 'I had fun doing that, so I'm going to buy one,' and it tends to snowball. That's how hardware adoption happens." And while Bowman maintains Crytek will continue to make "traditional" games, the company has, "probably the largest VR team, the largest that I'm aware of anyway." "We're trying to position Cryengine to be the best toolchain to work in VR," Technical Director Rok Erjavec added. More people using the engine for good VR experiences increases the likelihood of VR somehow catching on where something like 3D has failed. "2016: Early adopters. 2017: Friends and family of those early adopters going, 'I want one too,'" Bowman said. "By 2019, I'm saying this is going to be one of those ways you access all sorts of experiences, not just games, but data in general. We want to be riding that curve, that wave." It starts with The Climb. "When we started doing climbing originally during our tech demos...we realized, 'Hey, this is fun. This a fun thing to do, just inherently." It took some time to get there, of course. The Climb started with a full pair of disembodied arms, but testers of different size felt out of sorts with the one-size-fits-all proportions, so the team lopped the arms off and reduce the interface to floating hands.  "We thought it'd be really fun to fall and hit the rocks and bounce and stuff. Man that makes you so sick. Don't do that." The sweet spot for falling -- to put that knot in players' stomachs without leaving them retching -- turned out to be 2.3 seconds of freefall and then a fade to black. "A lot of our developers and our QA team, god bless them, they have had to endure some really fun experimentation," Bowman said. He was cagey on how many staffers puked, but noted that during early prototyping, the team had to account for the fact that a developer might have to get out of the thing after about an hour of work due to nausea. Now, level designers work in the visor all day. "We had people run to the bathroom, though." Well, if anyone did puke during those early phases of prototyping, it's between them and their porcelain god. Bowman was cagey on just how much stuff would appear in The Climb, too. "We have a set amount of content and we're well under control as far as delivering that...and we're going to be expanding that content hopefully in the future as well," is all I got when I asked about different regions, or weather conditions. As for changes to the time of day, "absolutely." Beyond the physical interaction and varying locales, the team seems excited for the latent speed run and otherwise competitive angle to satiate the hardcore or give greener climbers something to keep them coming back.  To that end, VR does offer technically bombastic experiences pared down in a way that "non-gamers" might find appealing without being patronizing -- like I said, The Climb was simple, but plenty of fun. "When I put a strange controller in your hand and say, 'Okay, I need you to press this combination of buttons,' you've instantly alienated a lot of people," Bowman said. The Climb also supports touch controllers and features a, "solution set that works for a variety of different input devices," so hopefully we'll be bringing you Donkey Konga free climb speed run videos next year. As for other simple experiences that turned out to be "inherently fun" in VR that Crytek might want to explore? "Can't talk about them yet because we're going to use them."
Preview: The Climb photo
Crytek goes in with engaging VR
Is free solo climbing cool? I'm sure there's been some virality in its danger in the YouTube era, but we've had, what, Cliffhanger, which was more about guns and biceps than cliff hanging, and then the arbitrary opening Missi...

Back to Dinosaur Island photo
Back to Dinosaur Island

Crytek's VR adventure Back to Dinosaur Island free on Steam


Not the same as Robinson
Nov 18
// Darren Nakamura
Is it possible to go "back" to Dinosaur Island without ever having been there in the first place? Apparently it is, because Crytek just released a short virtual reality demo on Steam called Back to Dinosaur Island. From the r...
Robinson: The Journey photo
Robinson: The Journey

Crytek shows off its VR dinosaur game Robinson at Paris Games Week


Don't get squashed
Oct 27
// Darren Nakamura
There was but a whisper of Robinson: The Journey back in June, and now developer Crytek has shown off a bit more of it during the virtual reality portion of Sony's Paris Games Week press conference. The trailer features not o...

Just curious photo
Cry-sis
I was thinking about crying recently (that is, about the physical act of crying, not planning on having a cry) and about how I'm a big baby whom cries a bunch with respect to creative media, or when an animal dies, or even in...

Games with Gold photo
Games with Gold

Tomb Raider and Crysis 3 are in Games with Gold


I need to rewatch The Descent
Sep 16
// Jordan Devore
We're in the second half of September and that means fresh Games with Gold. With an Xbox Live Gold membership, you can nab Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition (Xbox One) and Crysis 3 (Xbox 360) at no extra cost. I doubt I ever wo...
Robinson: The Journey photo
Robinson: The Journey

Crytek is developing VR game Robinson: The Journey


Crash land on a dinosaur planet
Jun 15
// Darren Nakamura
Whenever a new Crytek game is announced, the comments go to the meme of "will it run on my machine?" For Robinson: The Journey, the answer to that question is likely "no," unless you are running a virtual reality headset. To ...
Crysis: Analogue Edition photo
Crysis: Analogue Edition

Haha sure: Crysis board game on Kickstarter


Tactical battles and chest-high walls
May 14
// Darren Nakamura
Crysis Analogue Edition - The Board Game. Huh. Okay. I have been pleasantly surprised in the past with video game shooters turned into tactical board games, but I'm still a bit skeptical about this one. I mean, Crysis's bigg...
Homefront delay photo
Homefront delay

Homefront: The Revolution delayed into 2016


Developed by Dambuster, which is comprised largely of Crytek UK veterans
Mar 12
// Steven Hansen
Homefront: The Revolution, the sequel to 2011's Red Dawn: The Game, has been delayed into 2016, according to publisher Deep Silver.  Deep Silver acquired the Homefront rights from Crytek in 2014. Crytek acquired the Home...
Warface photo
Warface

Warface is noface, to be displaced and not replaced on the Xbox 360 marketplace


Face, off!
Dec 05
// Chris Carter
Crytek hasn't been doing so hot critically lately, with the recent releases of Ryse and Warface. I would have completely forgotten that the latter game had existed if it weren't for the ridiculous name, which immediately...
Ryse photo
Ryse

Ryse: Son of Rome is coming to Steam in October


Perfect for a deep, deep, deep Steam sale discount
Sep 04
// Chris Carter
Ryse: Son of Rome is coming to the PC on October 10th for $40. I'll arrive bundled in with all the DLC included so far and a full soundtrack (for pre-orders), as well as 4K resolution support. In case you missed our coverage ...
Crytek photo
Crytek

This trailer for Crytek's Arena of Fate is painful


'Achieved with CryEngine'
Aug 15
// Jordan Devore
Ooh boy. This trailer for Crytek's "action-packed online multiplayer game" Arena of Fate sure is something. First impressions are important and that grating narration doesn't leave a good one. Looking on the bright side, I w...
Ryse on PC photo
Ryse on PC

Ryse: Son of Rome on PC shows tons of detail, runs at 4K


But you'll need a pretty nice rig
Aug 14
// Dale North
This fall, Xbox One launch game Ryse: Son of Rome comes to the PC with some significant visual upgrades. This morning at gamescom, we met with Crytek's Brian Chambers, senior producer on Ryse, to check out the PC build for the first time. It looks goooood.
Ryse: Son of Rome photo
Ryse: Son of Rome

Was Ryse legendary? Because it's getting a 'Legendary Edition'


Maybe in Belgium it was
Aug 11
// Brett Makedonski
Since its E3 reveal and through its launch alongside the Xbox One, a lot of people have had some not-so-great things to say about Ryse: Son of Rome. Despite the fact that it wasn't necessarily a critical darling, Microsoft's ...
TimeSplitters photo
TimeSplitters

Crytek still has the rights to TimeSplitters


Damn
Aug 07
// Jordan Devore
Crytek obtained the rights to TimeSplitters after picking up the studio responsible for the series, Free Radical Design, which was later renamed Crytek UK. Recently, that team and the game it was working on, Homefront: The Re...
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Ryse comes to PC with 4K resolution upgrade


Coming this Fall
Aug 07
// Dale North
Ryse: Son of Rome makes its way to PC this fall. Crytek worked in 4K resolution support so this already great-looking Xbox One game is now going to burn images into your retina on the PC.  Crytek will handle digital dist...
Crytek photo
Crytek

Development of Crytek USA's Hunt: Horrors of the Gilded Age moving to Frankfurt studio


Those former Vigil (Darksiders) devs can't catch a break
Jul 30
// Jordan Devore
The big news out of Crytek this morning was that the company is selling its Homefront intellectual property to Koch Media and Deep Silver -- which is where Crytek UK's work on Homefront: The Revolution will continue, under th...
Homefront photo
Homefront

Deep Silver acquires Homefront IP


Homefront: The Revolution finds new home at Deep Silver
Jul 30
// Alessandro Fillari
It looks like things have finally come to a head at Crytek. The troubled publisher and developer behind Ryse, Crysis, and the upcoming Homefront: The Revolution has taken major steps to secure its own future. Crytek has sold ...
Cry-tek photo
Cry-tek

Crytek insists it's okay, has secured capital amid allegations of trouble paying staff


Boys don't cry-tek
Jul 25
// Steven Hansen
A lot of sources have come forth to talk about Crytek studios bleeding staff, cancelling games (including a sequel to Xbox One exclusive Ryse), and struggling to pay staff. Crytek finally issued a statement to ...
TimeSplitters photo
TimeSplitters

'Everyone' at Crytek UK wants to do another TimeSplitters


You can't always get what you want
Jul 14
// Jordan Devore
"You would not believe the amount of times people ask for TimeSplitters," Crytek UK (formerly Free Radical) animator Mark Jackson told OXM at last week's Develop conference. "[Another installment is] just waiting for the righ...
Crytek photo
Crytek

Crytek UK has stopped work on Homefront: The Revolution


Staff has gone unpaid over a month as pressure mounts on new title
Jul 03
// Alessandro Fillari
Amid recent reports of unpaid employees and mismanagement at Crytek, we are now seeing clear signs of trouble within the development studio. The UK branch of Crytek, which is actively working on Homefront: The Revolution...
Crytek troubles photo
Crytek troubles

Crytek allegedly having trouble paying staff, cancels Ryse sequel


Thirty staff have left Crytek UK since 2011
Jun 25
// Steven Hansen
Crytek's various studios have been bleeding staff, cancelling games (including a sequel to Xbox One exclusive Ryse), and struggling to pay staff, according to sources speaking to Kotaku and Eurogamer.  Kotaku's ten ...
Homefront photo
Homefront

Video: Homefront: The Revolution looks way better than its predecessor


E3 2014 impressions from Max
Jun 13
// Jordan Devore
Homefront: The Revolution presents a future in which the Greater Korean Republic has successfully invaded the United States. Philadelphia has been lost, and that's where you're living, so naturally it's on you to lead a revo...
 photo
News that's good to the last drop
There's a hot drizzle of news leading up to E3, and Max is here to suck it down and spit it back at you! A sequel to Homefront is actually happening, for some reason. Ed Boon officiates the new MK as Mortal Kombat X (as in E...

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New Crytek game Hunt: Horrors of the Gilded Age coming to PC and consoles


Four-player co-op monster hunter
Jun 03
// Dale North
Newly announced Hunt: Horrors of the Gilded Age is a third-person, four-player cooperative action game that is set in the late 19th century, coming to PC and unnamed consoles. It comes from Crytek USA, a studio built from fo...
 photo

Apple announces Metal to bring console-quality graphics to iOS


Dramatically reduced overhead
Jun 02
// Dale North
Apple announced their new technology, called Metal, today during their press conference in San Francisco. Metal reduces the overhead between game and hardware with up to ten times faster draw recall rates for A7-powered Apple...

Use an open world to fight for freedom in Homefront: The Revolution

Jun 02 // Brett Makedonski
Because the American citizens are at a serious disadvantage in this scenario, any hope of regaining their freedom must be done through guerrilla tactics. This aims to be Homefront: The Revolution's calling card. Rather than engage in constant over-the-top first-person shooting sequences, Crytek wants to push the battle to asymmetric warfare. One such example is equipping a remote-controlled car with explosive devices, driving it under a moving North Korean vehicle for cover, and then detonating it at a gate to both gain access and cause panicked mayhem. This is only a single example of the many possibilities for igniting an uprising. To keep things from becoming too scripted, Crytek's creating an open-world game that puts the players in charge of the revolution. As different areas of town are hit by the revolution, everything evolves accordingly. When actions like taking out guards and smashing security cameras are performed, uprising points are awarded, presumably bringing that particular section that much closer to liberation. It also means that the North Koreans will be on their toes, and more wary of your presence. No one will have to fend for themselves though, as resistance cells can be formed in online cooperative play. [embed]275756:54145:0[/embed] While the resistance may be sort of a ragtag lot, they're still equipped in their own special way to deal with opposing forces. The world is replete with resources that can be scavenged to create improvised weaponry. However, it may be cellular technology that proves the most useful. The phone seems as if it'll be a central device to Homefront: The Revolution, as it not only serves as a map, but also as a gadget for identifying and marking enemies. Crytek seems as if it has the right take on Homefront -- after all, do we really need another linear first-person shooter? But, it's the implementation of the studio's engine that strives to pull everything together. CryEngine 3 (which is already known for creating some of the most stunning visuals in videogames) is in use, and looks to add a sense of believability to the open-world through day/night cycles and changing weather effects. Whether that believability is achieved remains to be seen. Crytek has an ambitious project on its hands. One that could easily change the legacy of the Homefront name, or one that could just as easily succumb to overextending itself. When it hits PC, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Mac, and Linux in 2015, we'll know if this is a revolution worth fighting for.
Homefront: The Revolution photo
Developed by Crytek
As a result of THQ's fire sale at the beginning of 2013, several IPs were ushered off to new homes, just waiting for someone to advance their stories while being published under a new banner. One such example is Homefront, wh...

Arena of Fate photo
Arena of Fate

Crytek's Arena of Fate pits legendary characters against one another


A roster from both history and fiction
May 22
// Brett Makedonski
What would it look like if Frankenstein fought Little Red Riding Hood? Or if Jack the Ripper and Robin Hood teamed up to take on Nikola Tesla? Crytek's newly announced game, Arena of Fate, is going to make these scenarios ha...
CryEngine photo
CryEngine

Crytek to offer royalty-free CryEngine subscription


It's a good time to be an indie developer
Mar 19
// Jordan Devore
Well, would you look at that. After hearing Epic Games has plans to roll out a $19.99-per-month subscription plan for Unreal Engine 4, we've know learned Crytek has announced a similar approach for its own CryEngine. But unli...
Crytek photo
Crytek

Crytek adds native Linux support to CryEngine


Angry toad is pleased
Mar 11
// Jordan Devore
In detailing its plans for next week's Game Developers Conference, Crytek has announced native Linux support for CryEngine. The newest iteration of the engine will also include the features that made Ryse: Son of Rome's creat...

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