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Review in Progress: XCOM 2

Feb 05 // Nic Rowen
XCOM 2 (PC [reviewed], Mac)Developer: Firaxis GamesPublisher: 2K GamesReleased: February 5, 2015MSRP: $59.99 I'm a sap. A total and complete sap. If a game has an option to individually customize characters, I will always engage with it to the exclusion of everything else until I'm happy with what I've done. Even more so in a game like XCOM where the stakes are high and characters run a high risk of dying a horrible, and permanent, death. What better way to make that loss feel real? When a squadie gets flayed by an alien soldier wielding a rail gun in my game, I'm not just out a decent Ranger, I've lost one of my friends. I'm guessing I'm not the only one who does this, because Firaxis leaned into the character creation element hard in XCOM 2. Before you even begin fighting the alien menace, you can hop into the character creator and start making your dream squad, filing them away to show up organically in your game as fresh recruits and VIP extraction targets. As I said, I know I'm a sap, but that didn't stop me from being positively giddy when I found a grizzled rifle-toting version of my brother in my first randomized squad. Unlike XCOM: Enemy Unknown, which had fairly limited customization options, there are tons of small, silly, character-establishing quirks to fiddle with in XCOM 2 when you should be plowing through missions and writing a review. Sunglasses, tattoos, cigarettes, scars, camo patterns, accents, all sorts of small ways to make your squad feel like yours. It does make me wonder why there are only a handful of possible faces to round out all these options, but that is a minor quibble. XCOM 2 seems harder than Enemy Unknown, but in a satisfying way. Whenever a game builds up a reputation as punishing, there is always a risk that the developers will take it too far in the sequel, ramp up the difficulty in ways that don't seem fair. So far, that doesn't seem to be the case. The challenge is stiffer, but it comes from a more varied and tactically interesting set of options and enemies than a brute force buff to enemy stats. While the aliens have always outnumbered the XCOM force, the imbalance is even greater here. Even in early missions you'll run into stacked odds. This is mitigated by the new concealment mechanic which allows your squad to move freely in stealth to setup a devastating ambush before the fight begins in earnest. Play your cards right, and you can trap the aliens in a crossfire straight out of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. It's almost unhealthy how satisfying it feels to drop three aliens on your very first turn of combat. Not that you'll always have time to get that ambush in motion. Timed missions and pressure conditions are more common in XCOM 2, urging you and your squad to overextend and take stupid risks in an effort to beat the clock. In these situations, trying to set up that ideal ambush situation can hamstring you in the end when you run out of turns to complete the mission. You have to get a feel for when you need to rush and when you have time to get cheeky. I've already managed to lose a couple of squad members (including Jane Kelly, the named tutorial character with spoken dialog; hope she's not supposed to show up in more story stuff later on!) and I expect they are far from the last. Despite playing hundreds of hours of Enemy Unknown and Enemy Within, XCOM 2 has done enough to change up the formula to make fighting the aliens an unpredictable, surprising, and scary experience. I wouldn't have it any other way. I'm going to need more time to beat the game, test the other difficulty options, and try out multiplayer before I'll be able to issue a final verdict. (2K Games only provided us a copy on the day before launch for some reason so unfortunately we're playing catch-up. Sorry!) So far, though, XCOM 2 is an impressive feat. A total improvement to a game that I already thought was pretty damn close to perfect. I've yet to pull out its guts, but if the first few hours are any indication, this is going to be one hell of an alien autopsy. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
XCOM 2 review in prog photo
Welcome back, commander
I've only had a few hours with XCOM 2, Firaxis Games' follow-up to its 2012 XCOM: Enemy Unknown and I can already tell it's a different beast. At its core, it is still the same isometric turn-based strategy game it has always...

GDC awards photo
GDC awards

Bethesda's Todd Howard to receive GDCA Lifetime Achievement Award


Directed Fallouts 3-4, Oblivion, Skyrim
Feb 05
// Steven Hansen
Hot on the heels of Fallout 4, Todd Howard, director of later The Elder Scrolls and Bethesda's Fallout 3 and 4, will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 16th annual Game Developers Choice Awards in March. Fallo...

Humble Monthly Bundle has 70K subscribers

Feb 05 // Jordan Devore
Graham says subscriptions are at a point where "we can make meaningful deals with game developers to secure great content, we get to write our featured charity a $30,000+ check, and, because we can predict revenues fairly accurately, we've even started funding some small gaming projects, Humble Originals, that you won't find anywhere else and that our subscribers will get to play first." Supporting charities is a big part of the company's identity, whether it's giving back ten percent of proceeds from the Humble Store, five percent from Monthly subs, or left up to the user to decide in name-your-price bundles. I asked how they arrived at that amount for this service. "It's always tricky to craft a new business model," said Graham. "When we launched Humble Monthly, we had to do a lot of guesswork about the best way to frame everything so that we could get the product off the ground. By giving ourselves more flexibility with which we can use to pay for game content, I think we have helped the product be more successful and more sustainable, which I believe will actually mean more money for charity in the long run." Today is the first Friday of the month, which means February's games are unlocked for existing members. The full lineup is Alien: Isolation, Titan Souls, Broken Age, Volume, Penarium, Dropsy, Elephant in the Room (one of the "Humble Originals" made specifically for subscribers), and a "sneak peek demo" of Planetoid Pioneers with custom content. The early unlock for next month's bundle is Ark: Survival Evolved, that open-world game with ridable dinosaurs. Folks who sign up now will get immediate access to the title, but it's too late to secure February's offerings.
Humble Monthly Bundle photo
February's games revealed
Last year, Humble began a new monthly bundle service. The basic idea is that on the first Friday of each month, subscribers receive a batch of undisclosed PC games. One of the featured titles is always announced and made avai...

Pokemon Nendoroid photo
Pokemon Nendoroid

Red and Blue battle it out as the newest Pokemon Nendoroid figures


Gary was here, Ash is a loser!
Feb 05
// Ben Davis
It's getting hard to keep up with all these awesome and adorable Nendoroid figures! Coming soon are new figures for the Pokémon trainer and his rival from Pokémon Red and Blue, as well as Mew. As with all Nendor...

Review: Tachyon Project

Feb 05 // Chris Carter
Tachyon Project (PC, PS4 [reviewed], Xbox One)Developer: Eclipse GamesPublisher: Eclipse GamesReleased: July 15, 2015 (PC, Xbox One), Jan 19, 2016 (PS4)MSRP: $9.99 Tachyon, as the name probably suggests, is housed upon a foundation that involves a cheesy cyberpunk hacking plot. Players are placed into a dystopian future of sorts, hacking police stations and corrupt governments by way of a tiny ship. In a way, it's kind of like the setup for the Sly Cooper spinoff Bentley's Hack Pack, but a lot more serious. And really, there is a bit of charm there, especially if you dig the cyberpunk aesthetic. I commend Eclipse Games for trying something other than the "menu to shooting" approach, and it helps ground the campaign a bit and give the whole affair meaning. Some light commentary during missions also helps make things interesting while you're blasting away. The soundtrack, like the story, has a muted, chill feeling to it, which I dig. While Happy Hardcore songs during bullet hell dodging is great, I like the low key electronica soundtrack here, as it meshes well with the game's dark hues and not-too-bright neon visuals. Gameplay-wise, Tachyon operates on a twin-stick control method, with two sets of power-ups mapped to two buttons. That's all you really need to know, and once you start progressing on your journey, more options will open up. The shooting bits in general work well, and I like how using your normal cannon has a recoil effect (but not jarringly so) -- forcing players to course correct and get to know their ship a bit better. Players can also min-max stats by choosing a new chassis to suit their own style of play. I'm more of the defensive health-conscious player myself. Levels primarily stay engaging because of interesting enemy types. It's mostly stuff you've seen before, but black holes that suck up bullets, kamikaze ships, and generally aggressive AI will keep you on your toes. It's also easy to tell everything apart and identify its logic, so you don't have to constantly guess what a specific enemy type is. Tachyon Project isn't a remarkable shooter, but it's well-designed on several levels. There's no multiplayer to speak here, but with a decent campaign, lots of customization, and New Game+/Endless modes, you'll be perfectly fine going at it solo. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Tachyon Project photo
Hackin' like Jonny Lee Miller
While the shoot 'em up genre isn't the king it once was, more and more gems are coming out every passing year. New development studios are taking to Steam and mobile, and even Cave is coming out of the woodwork to become rele...

Tekken 7 photo
Tekken 7

Tekken 7 Retribution updates Steven 'Don't Call Him Steve' Fox's outfit


Oh and Akuma has an EX meter
Feb 05
// Chris Carter
Bandai Namco has provided a ton of new screens for Tekken 7 Retrbution, their update of sorts to the base game, and it gives us a few new looks at characters like Paul, Hwoarang, Devil Jin, Alisa, and of course, Fox. Interest...
Dragon Ball photo
Dragon Ball

Dragon Ball Xenoverse sold the most in America


Europe was second
Feb 05
// Chris Carter
Europe may love its One Piece, but North America loves its Dragon Ball. Bandai Namco has shared the sales statistics for Dragon Ball Xenoverse, and they clock in at a massive 3.13 million copies shipped. Shipped, sold, whatev...
Fire Emblem Fates photo
Robin, Ike, Marth, Lucina
I've been playing Fire Emblem Fates this week (Nintendo sent the Special Edition cart that has all three versions) for review, and I've had a chance to test out the amiibo feature. To my surprise some folks didn't even k...

Capcom photo
Capcom

Capcom kicks off Street Fighter video series, starts with Ken


Do you call him 'Rye-U'?
Feb 05
// Chris Carter
Capcom is almost ready to unleash Street Fighter V, and it's starting a new video series to help ease in new players -- just in case you haven't heard of one of the most iconic fighters in the business, Ken. In the inaugural ...
Destructoid Rocket League photo
SW33T!
Mr. Destructoid has been around for almost 10 years now (!!), and in that time his cold steel frame has graced a few video games. First there was Bomberman Live, then came Raskulls and BurgerTime World Tour. Heck, the green m...

Fire Emblem photo
Fire Emblem

See how Nintendo altered the Fire Emblem Fates 'petting' minigame


It's basically the same
Feb 05
// Chris Carter
Fire Emblem Fates has been getting a lot of flak for cutting its "skinship" petting minigame in the western localization, but now that the game is in the hands of a select few (I got my copy earlier this week), we can se...
Platinum Games photo
Platinum Games

Platinum didn't want to make licensed games


Not at first, anyway
Feb 05
// Kyle MacGregor
Platinum Games has been in business for nearly 10 years, and in that time the studio has changed a great deal. The development team has tripled in size since 2006, and, in more recent history, transitioned from just making or...
Undertale photo
Undertale

Indie dev offers support for bringing Undertale to Wii U


The more platforms the better
Feb 05
// Chris Carter
Even though just about any PC can run Undertale, folks are still wanting to play it on consoles. It turns out that a Wii U port just isn't in the cards though for now, as the developer isn't exactly sure how to go about ...
Timmy & Tommy Nook amiibo photo
Timmy & Tommy Nook amiibo

Timmy & Tommy Nook amiibo, a Target exclusive, up on Amazon


Haha what
Feb 05
// Chris Carter
Outside of the US, you lucky folk have generally not had to deal with the exclusive amiibo nonsense. Pre Wave 5, it was pretty damn terrible, but now Nintendo has gotten it together and has started actually providing lots of ...
Destiny photo
Destiny

Bungie makes several interesting changes to Destiny PvP matches


Changing the Crucible
Feb 05
// Vikki Blake
Bungie’s weekly update has been rebranded This Week at Bungie… and that’s not the only change coming from the Destiny developer this week. There are two new Crucible playlists headed our way - Freelanc...
Grand Theft Auto Online photo
Grand Theft Auto Online

GTA Online is still making shedloads of money


So don't expect a new GTA game just yet
Feb 05
// Vikki Blake
If you thought the hype around Grand Theft Auto V - and specifically, the multiplayer component GTA Online - was over, think again. Addressing an earnings briefing (via Gamespot), CEO of Rockstar’s publisher Take-Two sa...
Unravel photo
Unravel

EA and Origin Access subscribers can play the first two levels of Unravel right now


Oooh Yarny, kumbayaaaa
Feb 05
// Joe Parlock
It’s not long now until puzzle-platformer Unravel is launched. On February 9, the world will be too distracted by how adorable Yarny is to notice many of the world’s ills, and we will at last have achieved global ...
Godus Wars photo
Godus Wars

22Cans removes microtransactions from Godus Wars after they made everyone angry


Never mix early access and paid-for DLC
Feb 05
// Joe Parlock
It’s only been a few days since Godus Wars launched on Steam Early Access, and it’s already managed to cause an uproar. As 22Cans’ early access follow-up to the infamously abandoned Godus, Wars has the diffi...
XCOM 2 photo
XCOM 2

XCOM 2 will be compatible with the Steam Controller at launch


I still need to get one of these
Feb 04
// Zack Furniss
While playing a review copy of a game that may or may not rhyme with Frying Dwight, a pop-up appeared to announce that Firaxis and Valve are implementing Steam Controller support for XCOM 2. If you have one of them fancy dooh...
Bayonetta Impressions photo
Bayonetta Impressions

Bayonetta is a showstopper in Super Smash Bros.


Stupid sexy Bayonetta
Feb 04
// Patrick Hancock
Here's the step-by-step experience I have had with Bayonetta's character in Super Smash Bros. First, take her into the training room and understand how her moves work. Then, play some matches against the CPU. Feel confident, then go online. Immediately get hit by an opponent's Bayonetta with a gigantic combo. Welp.
Tribute Games photo
Tribute Games

Ninja Senki DX looks mega good, man


Releasing February 23
Feb 04
// Jordan Devore
Tribute Games is bringing Ninja Senki DX to PC, PS4, and PS Vita on February 23. This is an expanded version of a rather good freeware action game from 2010, which, from our prior coverage, it sounds like a number of us have ...
Yuck photo
Yuck

If this is really the new Doom box art, it sucks


Who cares about the hero?
Feb 04
// Jed Whitaker
Conan O'Brien will be playing the latest iteration of Doom on his show's Clueless Gamer segment tonight with some players of the sports ball who are in the big game. In a tweet promoting the show, the box art below was shown, though it hasn't been confirmed as the final retail version just yet.
Nintendo sleep monitor  photo
Nintendo sleep monitor

Nintendo nixes plans to watch you sleep


Still into 'Quality of Life' field
Feb 04
// Steven Hansen
Nintendo no longer wants to watch you sleep and -- wait, did he write "nixes" in reference to shelved new Nintendo hardware ideas while the new Nintendo console is being referred to as the "NX"? What a clever writer, that fel...
The Witcher photo
The Witcher

Please sign this petition for Destructoid to send me to Witcher School


This needs to happen
Feb 04
// Zack Furniss
There's a real-life LARP Witcher School where you can learn how to fight with swords and bows, make potions, and combat humans dressed in monster suits. It's held at Castle Moszna in Poland, and this March 17-20, they'll be a...
Tsuro iOS photo
Tsuro iOS

Casual dragon board game Tsuro out on iOS now


I'm tsure of it
Feb 04
// Darren Nakamura
Tsuro is the type of game that hits the table during parties at the ol' Casa de Nakamura. It caters to people who aren't especially experienced with modern board games, it doesn't take up a lot of table space, and it seats up...
XCOM 2 photo
XCOM 2

Look at this XCOM 2 release schedule map while you wait for our review


Prepare yourself, commander
Feb 04
// Zack Furniss
XCOM 2 is almost here! This handy 'lil map will help you determine when you'll be able to start sending your soldiers (that you named after your best buddies, you monster) to their inevitable deaths. I think I've made th...
Gray blue PS4 photo
Gray blue PS4

This limited-edition Uncharted 4 PS4 is $400


That controller, though
Feb 04
// Jordan Devore
Sony is preparing a limited-edition 500GB PlayStation 4 bundle in time for the release of Uncharted 4 on April 26, 2016. The console is gray blue, with a touch of gold lettering on the front that says "Sic Parvis Magna" (grea...

F.A.N.G is a poopy pigeon in Street Fighter V

Feb 04 // Steven Hansen
[embed]338701:62136:0[/embed] You see the above image of F.A.N.G seemingly flapping about with his giant sleeves? He does that. Homie will literally go airborne and carpet bomb the entire horizontal plane with poison bombs like an awkward pigeon dropping shits on businessmen. Actually I love everything about F.A.N.G's movement, not just a special that looks like you modded a humanoid character model rigged onto a small bird's animations. Even his walk is a Looney Tunes style creep complete with hunched shoulders and craned arms like a goofy t-rex or Montgomery Burns. What I love less is my inability to use the character to annoy people. You see, F.A.N.G is a charge character, requiring second-long maintained button presses in various directions to properly execute moves and my slow ass just plays Ken in Third Strike so I'm screwed. Look at this hieroglyphic shit.  The only "charge characters" I want to know about are the digits of the credit cards I steal. The good news? I performed admirably with Chun-Li after years of disuse, enjoyed the hell out of Laura (like souped up Yoga Bro Ken and Chun-Li, her kicks are dynamite). Actually, question: is it more or less racist if F.A.N.G isn't Chinese? Because he looks like an XCOM Thin Man, but when I was playing as Chun-Li she noted that his favorite number, 2, was not written out in proper Chinese characters on his shirt and questioned if he's really Chinese at all. We might just have a really big Mickey Rooney Breakfast at Tiffany's fan who really wants to blow Bison for some reason.
First hands-on with FANG photo
Plus move list because I can be helpful
I know what you're thinking with Street Fighter V (PS4, PC) less than two weeks from release: everything is mined. There was the big reveal that Arcade mode will have standard text and art stories to be followed by a post-lau...

Square Enix photo
Square Enix

Square Enix's Adventures of Mana is out now


For mobile worldwide, PS Vita in Japan
Feb 04
// Kyle MacGregor
Adventures of Mana, a remake of the Game Boy classic Final Fantasy Adventure -- the first entry in Square Enix's Mana series, is now available worldwide on iOS and Android for $14 / £10.50 / €14. Of course, there's also a PlayStation Vita version, but for some reason it's exclusive to Japan.

Review: COUGAR 450M Optical Gaming Mouse

Feb 04 // Joe Parlock
Product: COUGAR 450M Optical Gaming Mouse Manufacturer: Cougar Input: One USB 2.0+ Port MSRP: $49.90 First, the numbers. With a maximum of 5000 DPI and a polling rate of up to 1000 Hz, the 450M is fantastically sensitive and responsive. Adequate mouse sensitivity is down to personal taste to an extent, but with that 5000 DPI maximum, I severely doubt anyone is going to find this thing too slow. I played about an hour of Far Cry 4 on it, and noticed absolutely no delay between me and the movement on-screen, which is great.  Using Cougar’s UIX software, the 450M can support up to three different profiles that can contain everything from three DPI settings, which can be swapped between using the on-the-fly DPI switch button, to the more advanced settings like angle snapping, lift distance, and polling rate. The amount of control you’re given over how the mouse works is utterly fantastic, and the UI is easy enough that I was able to get it up and running just how I like it within a couple of minutes. There are four extra macro buttons, two on either side, which can be bound to any function you like in UIX. Personally, I have my top left button bound to my screenshot key, and my bottom left bound to a particularly handy ‘sniper’ function, which lowers your sensitivity and allow you to line up shots more easily while it’s held. I’ve seen this as its own advertised feature with a dedicated button on other mice before, so seeing it simply thrown in as an optional extra for any of those four buttons sure is nice. The thing that surprised me the most, though, is how comfortable the 450M is to hold. I have the dubious luck of having huge ham hands, and so far I’ve very few problems with how the mouse sits. It’s big enough for me to comfortably hold it in a full palm grip without my fingers peeking out over the top of the buttons, which is something I’ve never been able to say about a mouse before. The easy-grip texture on the flanks of the mouse aren’t rough enough to be uncomfortable, but provide just enough grip to make sure your hands don’t slip during gaming. Unfortunately, there are three minor negative points which do take away from the comfort somewhat. Firstly, the glossy finish of the mouse means that people with clammier hands may have trouble getting a decent, comfortable hold on it after a while. It also means if you’re a stickler for clean peripherals, you’ll be forever wiping off finger and handprints from it. Secondly, the mouse is pretty dang thin, meaning the sides of my hand couldn’t get enough lift off of my coarse mouse mat and would wind up rubbing up against it. If you have smaller hands, this might not be a problem, but I would’ve liked the mouse to be a bit wider just to reduce the contact area between my hand and the desk. Lastly, the extra macro buttons on either side of the mouse are placed slightly too far forward for me. I have to stretch to hit the top button on either side, which can be uncomfortable if they’re bound to a function I need to use regularly or kept held during gameplay. None of these are major, deal-breaking problems, but they’re things that also could’ve been easily avoided during the design process. Build quality is a bit of a mixed bag, and is honestly where most of my complaints about the 450M lie. It’s not all bad, of course. The Omicron Micro switches under the buttons are really responsive and 'clicky,' with absolutely no smushing feeling when pressing them. The mouse wheel is also one of the best I’ve ever seen, with it being coated in chunky tire-style rubber. The wheel isn’t set inside the mouse, but occupies a gap in between the two buttons, which makes it easy to clean from all angles. I never thought I’d give so many words to something as nondescript as a mouse wheel, but this one is seriously nice. Unfortunately, the 450M feels more cheaply made than others in this price range that I’ve used, being made out of lightweight and glossy plastics that aren’t as resilient looking as I would’ve liked. For £40-50, I would want something strong and chunky that I know would last many intense gaming sessions, but I just don’t think the 450M would be able to stand the test of time. The Cougar 450M Gaming Mouse is really nice in a lot of ways: it’s comfortable, responsive, and has a vast array of customisable settings. It’s just a shame that there are definite areas for improvement, mostly in the build quality. The mouse is the peripheral which gets the most use, so making sure you have one that both feels good and won’t die on you is important. If you spot this on even a slight discount somewhere, I can wholeheartedly recommend you pick one up. At the price range it’s normally at, there are probably better alternatives out there. [This review is based on retail hardware provided by the manufacturer.] Using Cougar’s UIX software, the 450M can support up to three different profiles that can contain everything from three DPI settings, with can be swapped between using the on-the-fly DPI switch button, to the more advanced settings like angle snapping, lift distance and polling rate. The amount of control you’re given over how the mouse works is utterly fantastic, and the UI is easy enough that I was able to get up and running just how it like it within a couple of minutes. There are four extra macro buttons, two on either side, which can be bound to any function you like in UIX. Personally, I have my top left button bound to my screenshot key, and my bottom left bound to a particularly handy ‘sniper’ function, which lowers your sensitivity and allow you to line up shots more easily while it’s held. I’ve seen this as its own advertised feature with a dedicated button on other mice before, so seeing it simply thrown in as an optional extra for any of those four buttons sure is nice. The thing that surprised me the most, though, is how incredibly comfortable the 450M is to hold. I have the dubious luck of having huge ham hands, and so far I’ve very few problems with how the mouse sits.  It’s big enough for me to comfortably hold it in a full palm grip without my fingers peeking out over the top of the buttons, which is something I’ve never been able to say about a mouse before. The easy-grip texture on the flanks of the mouse aren’t rough enough to be uncomfortable, but provide just enough grip to make sure your hands don’t slip during gaming. Unfortunately, there are three minor negative points which do take away from the comfort somewhat. Firstly, the glossy finish of the mouse means that people with clammier hands may have trouble getting a decent, comfortable hold on it after a while. It also means if you’re a stickler for clean peripherals, you’ll be forever whipping off finger and handprints from it. Secondly, the mouse is pretty dang thin, meaning the sides of my hand couldn’t get enough lift off of my coarse mouse mat and would wind up rubbing up against it. If you have smaller hands this might not be a problem, but I would’ve liked the mouse to be a bit wider just to reduce the contact area between my hand and the desk. Lastly, the extra macro buttons on either side of the mouse are placed slightly too far forward for me. I have to stretch to hit the top button on either side, which can be uncomfortable if they’re bound to a function I need to use regularly or kept held during gameplay like. None of these are major, deal-breaking problems, but they’re things that also could’ve been easily avoided during the design process. Build quality is a bit of a mixed bag, and is honestly where most of my complaints about the 450M lie. It’s not all bad, of course. The buttons are responsive and ‘clicky’, with absolutely no ‘smush’ when pressing them. The mouse wheel is also one of the best I’ve ever seen, with it being coated in chunky tire-style rubber. The wheel isn’t set inside the mouse, but occupies a gap in between the two buttons, which makes it easy to clean from all angles. I never thought I’d give so many words to something as nondescript as a mouse wheel, but this one is seriously nice. Unfortunately, the 450M feels more cheaply made than others in this price range that I’ve used, being made out of lightweight and glossy plastics that aren’t as resilient looking as I would’ve liked. For £40-50 I would want something strong and chunky that I know would last many intense gaming sessions, but I just don’t think the 450M would be able to stand the test of time. The Cougar 450M Gaming Mouse is really nice in a lot of ways: it’s comfortable, responsive, and has a vast array of customisable settings. It’s just a shame that there are definite areas for improvement, mostly in the build quality. The mouse is the peripheral which gets the most use, so making sure you have one that both feels good and won’t die on you is incredibly important.  If you spot this on even a slight discount somewhere, I can whole-heartedly recommend you pick one up. At the price range it’s normally at, there are probably better alternatives out there.
Gaming Mice photo
Feels a bit flimsy, but works great
I’ve never had much luck with gaming mice; either there’s too many moving parts and I break it, or the shape doesn’t fit my hands and feels uncomfortable to use. So when I got Cougar’s 450M ambidextrou...


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