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Mad Max Parody photo
Mad Max Parody

Mad Max: Mario Kart Fury gets murderously Miyamoto


The mashup you've been waiting for
May 24
// Niero Gonzalez
Get angry that you didn't think of it first. Uploaded two days ago, Kris Sundberg's mashup parody of Mario Kart and Mad Max: Fury Road has already racked up 1.4 million views and counting, possibly from all the repeat v...
Nuclear Throne teaser photo
Nuclear Throne teaser

Amazing Nuclear Throne teaser inspired by Doom 4


Fish can lol
May 18
// Nic Rowen
Rami Ismail of Vlambeer was inspired by today's super hot, extra informative Doom 4 teaser to whip up a little something for Nuclear Throne. This tantalizing glimpse of the frenetic early access title (that you can play right now) is a conundrum wrapped in a riddle. I know I'll be spending the rest of the day breaking apart this teaser frame by frame and comparing my findings on reddit.

Jacob 'Humble' Browe talks Minelands: Call of the Border

Feb 07 // Brittany Vincent
Minelands: Call of the Border, from Triple-A Developer Entertainment, is Browe's baby, the product that's single-handedly responsible for his rise to prominence. It's received dozens of perfect 10/10, 5/5, 3/3, 2/2, and 1/1 scores from outlets just like this one, and none of us have even gotten to play the game yet. It's a thrill ride to be sure, but the game isn't the only reason he's becoming a household name. After putting out a series of daily developer diaries, a photo documentary series with stills from each minute of his day (including videos from each of his Starbucks jaunts), Browe has gained a following with fans as well. His Twitter features up-to-the-minute news and opinions sponsored by now-defunct "energy" soda Vault, where he speaks only in lowercase, using bizarre syntax and phrases like "v cool" and "p sure." When it comes to the industry he grew up shunning to ensure he could still impress vapid women in high school, no detail can go overlooked. Browe was the picture of patience and humility during our chat in the Gaylord Hotel suite he so lavishly recommended that I reserve with my credit card. I had requested my own room, but he was gracious enough to suggest we share the executive suite because, as he put it, "There's way too much space in here for one lonely guy." He spent much of the interview posted up at the minibar alternating between downing shots like a fish desperately seeking the glistening life force of water and checking his iPhone 6 Plus, making moves on his fantasy football team roster. It's like I wasn't even there, which actually allowed me to capture an even more intimate portrait of one of gaming's rising stars. When he did talk though, I definitely felt a sort of camaraderie I hadn't felt in some time from other devs. Chatting in the dimly-lit suite's makeshift "living room" area felt a lot like, well, home. Over a steaming cup of hotel brand coffee, Browe opened up about Minelands: Call of the Border, and why he thinks it has struck a chord with reviewers, who were privy to fifty 30-second trailers over the course of a three-month period before release. "Obviously everyone's excited because my game is taking creative risks like no other company out there. Minelands is doing something completely and totally new," Browe gushed, with a twinkle in his eye that could have been all the booze he had taken in before and during our talk. "For the first time in history, players can use two weapons at once. So if you're trying to kill an enemy and make sure he's dead, you could use your shotgun and your AK at the same time to dual-wield. You can even reload independently. And you don't even have to hold two weapons at a time if you don't want to. It's not required at all. " Technically, Browe reminded me earlier on when we met, Minelands is a first-person shooter, but its host of envelope-pushing features ensure that it defies classification. For instance, you'll be able to save your progress anywhere in the game. Rather than waiting for checkpoints, you can go to the menu at any time -- whether on PC, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, or N-Gage -- and save. Female characters, I was told, would play a major role as well.  "Commander Hua Wei is a fellow operative from China, and as you play through the game as Captain Guardevoi she's by your side every step of the way. She'll give you waypoints from her command center, and appear before you as a hologram of sorts for in-game interactions. This is the first time there's ever been a female commander in a shooter, let alone one that gives you orders as you go along. Of course, there's still plenty of time for romance in the game. Hua Wei may be your colleague as you trek across the Minelands to defeat the nefarious Hangdog Mack at the Border, but there's no battlefield too big to let love in." Though he didn't share much else regarding the title that's launched him into the gaming celebrity stratosphere, Browe did invite me out for dinner next week, where he's ordered that I come dressed in heels and a revealing dress so that we can talk about his creative process. But what about how the players feel about the actual game? I'm dying to know myself. Minelands has been released to the public already, but technically won't be going on sale for another couple of days, and then only at retailers like GameStop and Bed Bath and Beyond. Some members of approved media outlets who've seen the multitude of trailers are keeping mum about the game thus far other than the quotes okayed for the promotional materials: "Fantastic!" proclaims a prominent games magazine. "Brilliantly!" exclaimed a digital publication. Browe had quotes on hand, but he wasn't so forthcoming about sharing them with me, keeping silent so as not to give anyone a taste of what's already being called Game of the Year material. I did see something along the lines of "Brilliantly terrible," but I'm almost certain the "terrible" was a typo and it was something like 'Brilliantly, terribly genius" from Video Diversion Educator Magazine. But they wouldn't get the last word on things. That pleasure belonged to Browe as he gave me his parting words to pass on.  "Please subscribe to my Patreon and support independent video game development. Buy me a vanilla bean frappuccino if you end up liking Minelands: Call of the Border. I also accept major credit cards. It's all for the fans, and I'm planning on making something even bigger soon involving player choice. Two words: Branching dialogue options." Browe had wiggled his eyebrows seductively toward me after divulging this information, and even as I pen this piece now I'm astounded. Truly, Jacob "Humble" Browe is a visionary.
Minelands photo
A rising star speaks
Jacob "Humble" Browe is a visionary. He's just shipped a multi-billion dollar game to hundreds of retailers across the United States and Canada, with additional release dates staggered across the world. After running a succ...


Stanley Parable photo
Stanley Parable

Mega64's Stanley Parable video is about guys who aren't Stanley


Anything to hear that narrator's voice again
Apr 07
// Brett Makedonski
Mega64's latest video is about one of my favorite interactive experiences from last year, The Stanley Parable. But, these people look confused. Maybe they don't share my enthusiasm for it. Alternatively, maybe they're confus...
Doom photo
Doom

What if Doom were produced today?


Screen full of jelly, soft drink ads, and DLC!
Nov 19
// Alessandro Fillari
Doom was an immensely popular and genre-defining game back when it was released in 1993. It paved the way for many titles that followed and is still seen as one of the purest forms of first-person shooter gameplay. But thing...
 photo

What if Star Wars was made by Nintendo instead?


Super Smash Wars: A Link to the Hope
Nov 06
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
James Farr loves to take Nintendo characters and cross them over with movies. We saw his work previously with his Ghostbusters and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles crossover, now it's Star Wars turn. This reinterpretation sees t...
Final Fantasy VII photo
Final Fantasy VII

Sunday Funny: Final Fantasy 7's Ruby Weapon sure was hard


I'd say that's pretty accurate
Nov 03
// Wesley Ruscher
It's Sunday, so why not end (start?) the week with a laugh. Featured this week is Oney Cartoon's latest parody titled "Pointy Bits." It starts off a little crude, but for the most part nails some of the game's more tedious e...

Review: Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures

Sep 26 // Tony Ponce
Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures (3DS, PC [reviewed], Wii U)Developer: FreakZone GamesPublisher: ScrewAttack GamesReleased: September 20, 2013 (PC) / 2014 (3DS, Wii U)MSRP: $14.99Rig: Intel Core i3-380M, 6GB of RAM, GeForce GT 425M, Windows 7 64-bit The games that the Nerd typically plays fall under one of three categories: otherwise decent games that feature relentless difficulty, average games with a number of very curious or backwards design choices, and outright festering ass. The last group is his main claim to fame, but for an official Nerd game to work, it would have to draw inspiration from all three categories while at the same time being enjoyable enough to play over prolonged periods. In other words, FreakZone had to take shit and simultaneously make it not shit. Quite the paradox, but one that FreakZone achieved quite handily. On the surface, Adventures is both an homage to and parody of the AVGN web series. The Nerd and his friends are sucked into the television and transported to Game Land, divided into eight levels inspired by the show's many themes. There is "Assholevania," a send-up of James Rolfe's own love for the Castlevania franchsie; "Beat It & Eat It," a puerile domain filled with the sights and sounds of Atari porn software like Custer's Revenge; "Blizzard of Balls," a wintry hell born out of the AVGN Christmas specials; and others. [embed]262392:50644:0[/embed] Long-time Nerd fans will note many nods and Easter eggs to the show's history in everything from the enemies and items to the obstacles and backgrounds. You consume Rolling Rock to refill health and acquire tokens to summon the Glitch Gremlin or Super Mecha Death Christ. You fly atop the board from Silver Surfer, go toe-to-toe with Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and find Shit Pickle hiding in various locations. Then there's the final stage, a foul monument to one of the Nerd's most despised game companies. Several classic Nintendo games are also paid tribute. In the introductory level, you get instructed by Naggi, the green-hued cousin of Ocarina of Time's Navi, much to the Nerd's displeasure. The disappearing blocks from Mega Man and the giant goblin heads from Air Man's stage in Mega Man 2 feature prominently, as does Doom's Cacodemon, remade out of feces and appropriately dubbed "Cacademon." Even FreakZone's own MANOS is acknowledged with a boss battle pulled straight from that title. But what really gives Adventures the AVGN touch is the running commentary. Every so often, the Nerd will make some kind of rant or observation, although the fact that it's text-based makes it difficult to read during particularly harrowing platforming segments. Whenever you die, the Nerd will spout one of his famous curse-laden analogies (e.g. "This game is rotten fungus coming out of a badger's sphincter!") with keywords randomly generated from a pool of submissions from the game's Facebook page. The current pool isn't all that big, thus many phrases are repeated; perhaps ScrewAttack will continue to update the game with expanded word banks. All the references and potty humor in the world wouldn't be enough if the core game wasn't compelling. Thankfully, there is a solid quest beneath the surface dressing that even those completely unfamiliar with the Nerd's exploits would be able to enjoy. If you happened to have played MANOS, you'll notice that Adventures feels like an extension of that, with many shared elements and environmental hazards -- I wouldn't consider that a knock against this game, though. There's a classic "Nintendo hard" degree of challenge, but it's tempered by very solid controls and enough checkpoints and beer bottles to carry you towards the boss. Oh, and it's got a pretty bangin' soundtrack to keep your fighting spirit high! You begin the game as the Nerd with a multi-directional NES Zapper for a weapon, and careful searching will lead you to three additional party members -- Guitar Guy, who can run fast and shoot wave beams through walls; Mike, with a super high jump and the ability to spot destructible walls and invisible platforms; and Bullshit Man, who can double jump and lob extra powerful lumps of poo. Only by swapping characters on the fly and using their abilities can you reach formerly inaccessible areas filled with 1-ups, health, and weapon upgrades. You may even spot a few NPC cameos, like brentalfloss, Egoraptor, and our very own Jim Sterling and Mr. Destructoid! Every obstacle in the game operates on very simple patterns that can be observed from a distance before being approached. Spikes that emerge from the floor? Fire pillars or laser turrets that trigger at regular intervals? Maces that circle the bricks they are chained to? Just count the seconds and time your progress. Your mistakes are entirely your own. Naturally, the last level throws everything plus the kitchen sink at you at once, but that's what last levels are supposed to do. However, there is one persistent obstacle -- a skull-faced block that causes instant death upon touching -- that caused me great grief. Such blocks appear in clusters and typically blink in and out with the same rhythm as the disappearing blocks. They are everywhere, in every single level without fail, yet they always feel completely out of place. I mean, death blocks that kill you with a mere graze? What's up with that? In a way, death blocks are a quick and easy way to bump up a stage's difficulty without the need to create unique environmental hazards. Sounds rather creatively bereft, no? But if you were the Nerd, wouldn't such an obstacle become the focus of your rage and frustration, the breaking point after which righteous obscenities start flowing like wine? If the designers' goal was to put you in the Nerd's shoes, such an evil element would be necessary to trigger that transformation. Adventures is no insurmountable wall, but neither is it a welcome wagon. On Normal mode, you are given 30 lives and unlimited continues, which should allow anyone with enough drive to at least make it to the final boss within a couple of hours -- whether you can actually beat the final boss is another matter, the god-modding bastard. Beyond that are even tougher difficulty modes that prevent saving between levels and reduce your amount or health and retries. As a pseudo NES-era throwback, it nails the careful balance between cruel and inviting. As a tribute to the Nerd, it does a decent job covering his entire career, although repetitive dialog lessens the humorous impact on repeated playthroughs. As an authentic Nerd "experience"... well... your mileage may vary, but I'd like to think it is. Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures is not a cowa-fucking-piece-of-dog-shit, that's for certain!
AVGN Adventures review photo
He's gonna take you back to the past...
For years, James "Angry Video Game Nerd" Rolfe has suffered the worst that retro gaming could toss at him for the sake of your amusement. Why does he do it? Is he a masochist? Does the rage that burns inside with every sudden...

Aladdin photo
Aladdin

Make way for DLC!


I can show you the world...
Sep 15
// Tony Ponce
OH MY GOD! I am dying, you guys! I'm dead! This isn't the only parody that YouTuber SMNtoob slapped together (OH SNAP! It was our own Genki-JAM the whole time! Why didn't I read the video descriptions more carefully?). He's got a Mulan one from last month. I don't even mind the bad signing, 'cause this sh*t is golden! Make Way For DLC! - An Aladdin Parody [YouTube via NeoGAF]
Nick Arcade photo
Nick Arcade

Nick Arcade, the 21st century Mega64 reboot


The game has changed, my friends
Aug 17
// Tony Ponce
One of the coolest game shows from back in the day was Nick Arcade on Nickelodeon. For those too young to remember or living outside the US, it was a quiz show with a videogame hook. There would be "Video Challenge" rounds i...
brentalfloss photo
brentalfloss

Never, ever buy a videogame console at launch


Schoolhouse Rock! for the gaming age
Aug 08
// Tony Ponce
Comedy music man brentalfloss and animator Sean DePew last teamed up for the wonderfully sweet "Baby Mario & Papa Yoshi" music video. Their latest collaboration is a kickass parody of Schoolhouse Rock!, which if you neve...
No One Lives Forever photo
The studio behind James Bond almost stopped Cate Archer in her tracks
We've been hearing little snippets of information concerning No One Lives Forever recently, like how no one actually knows who has the rights to the IP. A new interview on the Jace Hall Show reveals how the original game may ...

Xbox One photo
Xbox One

Xbox One: A Space Oddity video paints a grim future


'I'm afraid I can't do that'
Jun 07
// Brett Makedonski
When all is said and done, hopefully this turns out to be more parody and less foreshadowing. I don't want to be "all-in-one," whatever the hell that means.
VG a cappellas photo
VG a cappellas

The ecstacy of Smooth McGroove's VG a cappellas


Two months of Sonic, Chrono Trigger, DuckTales, and more
May 25
// Tony Ponce
I've tried my very best to avoid sharing too much of Smooth McGroove's kickass a cappella arrangements. Not because I think he's lost his Midas touch, but because I didn't want to be held responsible for making heads explode...
Minecraft music video photo
Minecraft music video

PSY is a minin', craftin' grieferman


Minecraft parody of PSY's "Gentleman"
May 17
// Tony Ponce
Everyone was totally diggin' Korean pop sensation PSY when his "Gangnam Style" music video became an international hit. Then he just kept riding it... and riding it... and riding it. Then he starred in a pistachio commercial...
AVGN Adventures photo
AVGN Adventures

Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures bound for 3DS, Wii U


Unfortunately, plans for an NES port fell through
May 01
// Tony Ponce
James Rolfe's retrotastic digital quest, Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures, recently passed through Greenlight, securing a spot on Steam's virtual storefront. According to a post on the game's Facebook page, developer ScrewAtt...
brentalfloss photo
brentalfloss

Snag brentalfloss' unreleased YouTube jams for $0.59 each


Or the whole album for $7.99
Apr 25
// Tony Ponce
[Video uploaded by bedsidecargo] Internet songman brentalfloss has uploaded many funny and creative music videos to his YouTube page over the years. Among those, he cherry-picked a few choice tunes, re-rerecorded them with im...
Insane Ian photo
Insane Ian

Go cop Insane Ian's new VG / pop music parody medley


Mess up the mix, mix up the mess!
Apr 23
// Tony Ponce
In case you've forgotten that Destructoid is staffed by beautiful, talented people, let me remind you that we've got artists, singer-songwriters, scientists, and former reality show stars amongst our ranks. We are some gifted...
Mario Busters 2 photo
Mario Busters 2

The Mario Busters answer the call once again


Death is but a warp pipe, time is but a magic painting
Apr 17
// Tony Ponce
I appreciate Flash animators with quick turnaround between projects. Just a couple months ago, James Farr was able to deliver Super Mario Busters, a kick-ass mashup of Super Mario and Ghostbusters, and already he's hammered ...
AVGN Adventures photo
AVGN Adventures

Check out Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures in action


The parodic platformer has passed through Greenlight and will release on Steam
Apr 17
// Tony Ponce
The Angry Video Game Nerd's assault on all things sh*tty and retro will soon break from the confines of live-action footage and into the digital world. Following last week's teaser trailer, here comes pre-alpha gameplay of A...
Dark Souls Evangelion photo
Dark Souls Evangelion

Prepare to watch this Dark Souls and Evangelion mash-up


Shinji is up for some jolly co-operation
Apr 10
// Chris Carter
A new video has taken the world of Dark Souls and put it up against the entire intro of Neon Genesis Evangelion. The mash-up is faithfully recreated, from the half second cuts all the way to the scrolling sketches. Dark Soul...
Pokémon photo
Pokémon

Stay gold, Pokemon... stay gold


What is going on in this Pokémon rap video?
Apr 06
// Tony Ponce
Ummmm... wut? This Pokémon rap, a parody of Trinidad James' "All Gold Everything," is so ridiculous that I have to wonder how anyone in the video could keep a straight face. Thugged-out Pokémon trainers wearing...
Dr. Seuss photo
Dr. Seuss

These Dr. Seuss game-to-book parodies are delightful


Would you kindly in a box? Would you kindly with a fox?
Apr 06
// Tony Ponce
Watch out, Ashley Davis! You are not the only one capable of turning violent videogames into adorable children's entertainment! Aussie artist DrFaustusAU has a talent for emulating the distinctive style of Dr. Seuss book cove...
BioShock photo
BioShock

What if BioShock was a Disney musical?


College Humor has the answer
Apr 02
// Allistair Pinsof
BioShock Infinite may be all the rage lately, but I've had the original BioShock on my mind and so has College Humor. One part BioShock Cliffs Notes, one part Little Mermaid cover, College Humor's latest original is a joyful...

Review: The Organ Trail: Director's Cut

Apr 02 // Jim Sterling
The Organ Trail: Director's Cut (PC)Developer: The Men Who Wear Many HatsPublisher: The Men Who Wear Many HatsReleased: March 19, 2013MSRP: $4.99Rig: Intel i7-2600k @3.40 GHz, with 8GB of RAM, GeForce GTX 580 GPU (SLI) The Organ Trail sounds like a one-note joke, and newcomers would be forgiven for assuming such a joke wears thin long before the closing credits. However, the game is remarkable in just how much staying power it has. Yes, it's basically just Oregon Trail with zombies, but the Director's Cut adds smart twists and constantly keeps the pressure on players to the point where it easily stands out on its own, more than a simple parody. Players assume the leader of a band of survivors, and must travel from one coast of the United States to the other in a beat up station wagon. Structured very much like its namesake, gameplay consists of driving from landmark to landmark, dealing with supply shortages and random setbacks along the way. Maintaining health, acquiring stores of food, repairing the car and ensuring there's enough fuel to reach the next stopping point are all crucial factors to consider, and things can happen along the way to further jeopardize the journey.  Travel between locations is automatic, and random events can occur along the way. A character may get sick, something in the car might break, or a bump in the road could cause fuel cans to fly off the roof and get lost. More hands-on hindrances involve hordes of zombies, which you can choose to sneak or fight through, or encounters with fellow survivors, offering dialog choices that could lead you into trouble or reward your decision making. More often than not, however, trouble will be the result.  A general rule of Organ Trail, once again like its namesake, is that if anything can go wrong, it will. The game is almost demoralizing in just how willing it is to assault your survivors with problems. When ammunition is low, expect one of your survivors to accidentally drop some out of the window. If you have no spare tires, a bandit is more than willing to shoot one of yours out, stranding the party between destinations and forcing the player to wait for passing traders with the right gear. Food can go rotten, mufflers can fall apart, and party members can get bitten by the undead.  Should a character get bitten, they can generally survive without turning into a zombie. If their health gets too low, however, the risk of turning becomes more likely, and players will have to decide whether or not to kill them. Putting down a party member requires pulling the trigger yourself, and losing any survivor means having one less chance to make it through the game's finale alive.  At landmarks and rest stops, players can shop or trade with fellow survivors, use scrap metal to repair the vehicle, and purchase upgrades for both the car and player character. Here, the party may also rest to regain health (at the cost of food), or use medkits for the treatment of more serious injuries. Jobs can also be taken on, as can scavenging missions to gain supplies and cash. These options require the successful completion of a range of action-based shooter modes.  Shooting sections retain the retro feel of the rest of the game, and the rudimentary controls make for a distinctly nerve-wracking experience. In scavenge mode, zombies swarm in from the edges of the screen while the player picks up randomly spawning supplies. There are also defense challenges, which fixes the player behind a wall and requires all encroaching zombies be killed, and shootouts with bandits, a somewhat frustrating mode in which players must keep cover and shoot at human opponents -- who are also shooting and covering in an excessively annoying game of cat-and-mouse.  The player moves slowly using the WASD keys, and has to shoot by first holding down the left mouse button, pulling back to aim, and letting go. It's a deliberately awkward system that results in regular misses and forces the player to stop and aim carefully. Such design runs the risk of becoming infuriating, but Trail's focus on survival, ammo conservation, and general fear of failure means it works excellently in compounding one's terror. Despite the game's prehistoric graphics, it's remarkable just how much of a survival horror atmosphere is maintained.  It's a good idea to pay attention to the zombie activity before heading out to scavenge. Ranging from low to deadly, activity determines how hard it'll be to avoid zombie contact. To successfully scavenge, you just have to collect items until the time runs out, but if a zombie touches you once, you'll fail, lose some of what you collected, and take a hit to the health bar -- which player characters can only replenish with expensive medkits. Even in areas with low zombie activity, there's enough competition to keep one challenged -- and that activity can change between missions, so one always needs to keep an eye on it. To make things even harsher, the Director's Cut version adds random boss zombies, such as mutant bears and dogs, which take a ton of damage to put down and are generally hard to avoid.  On the road, some other action-based challenges may occur. Bike gangs can assault the station wagon, or a herd of zombie deer may give chase. In these events, the car is moved up and down a section of road with the W and S keys, and must be used to either smash bikes off the road or avoid undead animals, respectively.  Though the main mode is short, the constant fear of failure and sense of urgency provides more than enough anxiety for one sitting. There's also an endless mode with a set of extra challenges that unlock skulls. Skulls, in turn, unlock new endless scenarios and gameplay conditions, providing potentially tons and tons of gameplay on top of the campaign.  Though one could potentially spend hours with the game, the gameplay is simplistic enough to not quite provide that kind of compulsion. Once the campaign's beaten, endless mode is, essentially, more of the same, even with extra conditions. You're still trundling from place to place, trading gear, scavenging items, and shooting white squares and bright green zombies. It's fun while it lasts, but the amusement factor and the jokes only have so much mileage.  One thing that Organ Trail deserves immense amounts of praise for is its brilliant soundtrack. Merging DOS-style bleeps and bloops with deeper percussion, the game's infectious music imbues nostalgic sounds with the kind of dread-inspiring sound made famous in such films as 28 Days Later. It's a fantastic score, and one of the most game-appropriate I've encountered in a while.  Organ Trail: Director's Cut has a few things going against it. It's a parody game, which is always a risk, and it involves zombies; an increasingly tiresome creative crutch. But through wit, ingenuity, and good old fashioned sadism, it manages to succeed against the odds and provide a truly rewarding spin on a number of classic ideas. For the price, you really couldn't ask for more.
Organ Trail review photo
Dysentremendous
If there's one thing that's more overplayed than zombies, it's reviews for zombie videogames talking about how overplayed zombies are. Truly, nobody can win anymore. We're worn out on the zombie thing, and worn out by our own...

Game Over, the poster photo
Game Over, the poster

Game heroes died so that you can have this poster


Hang brentalfloss' "The Game Over Tinies" up on your wall
Feb 26
// Tony Ponce
Did you guys get a chance to check out "The Game Over Tinies" in brentalfloss the comic? Once again, co-writers brentalfloss and Dan Roth and artist Andrew Dobson created an abecedarian comic of videogame character deaths -- ...
The Game Over Tinies photo
The Game Over Tinies

Even more 'Game Overs' in storybook rhyme


The remaining letters in brentalfloss the comic's "The Game Over Tinies"
Feb 22
// Tony Ponce
A couple weeks back, brentalfloss the comic began an arc parodying the dark comedy children's book The Gashlycrumb Tinies -- that book's author, Edward Gorey, is the subject of today's Google Doodle, by the by. Anyway, "The G...
Street Fighter photo
Street Fighter

Street Fighter III's Q is a sexual Kermit the Frog


brentalfloss sings "The Total Destruction"
Feb 18
// Tony Ponce
The enigmatic Q from Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike is a freak. That we know. His Total Destruction technique certainly doesn't leave much room for ambiguity. You do have to wonder what must be going on through his / hers / ...
 photo

Reddit uncovers the PS4 controller's true functionality


The shocking truth
Feb 14
// Niero Gonzalez
Priceless. [Artwork by Farrow on NeoGaf. Thanks, Cybii]
Comedy Gold photo
Comedy Gold

Dig Dug parody video takes Ke$ha to the arcade


Courtesy of our own Ian Bonds!
Feb 09
// Conrad Zimmerman
Destructoid contributor Ian Bonds was seemingly too humble to post this video. Either that, or he doesn't really love us as much as I thought, because this music video created to accompany his parody of Ke$ha's "TiK ToK" is the kind of thing you really ought to be showing the people you claim to care about. 

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