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MacGyver trick juices up your 360 WiFi


Dec 03
// Tristero
 How does it feel to pay a hundred smackers for a 360 Wireless Network Adapter, when the teensy little Wii comes with a free Mitsumi 802.11b/g wireless module, right out of the box? After absconding from the Amazon wareh...

Interview with Surfer Girl, darling tipster of the industry underground

Nov 13 // Tristero
Destructoid: A couple of months ago you had the idea of running ads on your site to support charity. Have you decided on the best way to implement this, and if so, what charity would you be most likely to support?Surfer Girl: No, it was more of an idea for a system that would donate ad revenue to charity.D: Have you seen how groups like The Hunger Site and Free Rice run their ads?SG: Yes. Those sites are admirable, but I forget to do that everyday.D: Yeah, it's tough to keep up with when there are at least 100 sites or so in the constant daily rotation. Your blog’s given some attention to the inner workings of Wikipedia, with mentions of the Lost/Gabon incident, as well as some things about the Blackwater controversy. Do you feel that currently Wikipedia is being run in the best possible fashion, and if not, do you have any suggestions to improve the way it functions?SG: D: Do you find that you get a lot of private feedback for the political segments of your site? Those sections tend to get less public comments.SG: No, sadly. I find those posts far more important than anything about games or whatever. My initial intention was for the posts about games to attract attention to the political posts, but it did not work out that way.D: I wouldn't have found your site without the game news, but I ended up sticking around for some of the political links. I especially liked the clip of the MSNBC commentator giving the impassioned speech against water boarding. I forwarded that to a lot of friends. With the more attention your site gets, it seems that your comment sections get bombarded with questions about everyone’s pet videogame projects they’re interested in. Remarkably, you take the time to answer almost every single question. Did you envision your site becoming the magic 8-ball of videogame news?SG: I don't answer every question. I have comment moderation because people ask the same thing twenty times.D: It does seems like the comment sections have been huge lately, though, and that most of the activity on your site happens there. Are you happy with the new direction your site has taken? Is it still fun for you?SG: I have a blog, not a site. I really have not paid attention to what direction the site takes, but I don't enjoy this as much as I did before. I'm considering stopping all game related posts and concentrating on other things.D: Are you ever afraid that there will be repercussions for the secrets you’ve been divulging? I also work in the film industry and between that and the videogame world I’m swimming in a sea of NDAs. There are topics that I would love to talk about publicly, because I think people will be excited to hear about them, but I’m deathly afraid that the hounds of the law will hunt me down. What motivates you to spill the beans?SG: I have not broken an NDA yet.D: Do you just not sign them?SG: Nothing I've said so far has applied to one.D: Why all the secrecy then? You often reveal your information in a cryptic, playfully mysterious fashion. What’s it all leading up to? Do you have a master scheme? Will there be a huge showdown on the roof with the coppers? Or are you going to reveal that it’s all been a big joke on us? SG: There are topics I cannot talk about because of NDAs.D: Does that mean you're getting permission to tell us the things you've said so far?SG: Nothing I've said so far would be a breach of an NDA I have signed because I've talked about nothing that’s under an NDA. The ears, the mouth, the eyes are my sources, primarily. Not so much the nose.D: You've said you're an industry insider. What attracted you to work in videogames in the first place?SG: Videogames seemed far easier than other things. There are things that happened that made me slide away from being a journalist. Maybe this blog is me attempting to justify that college degree.D: Do you have a personal passion for videogames? SG: I like games, sure.D: I've read statements by you bemoaning the lack of creativity from publishers. What’s one thing that’s holding the industry back that you would change if you could?SG: Hesitancy, I'd eradicate that like Ron Paul wants to do with the federal government (like a crazy, crazy irresponsible man).D: Do you mean hesitancy to embrace new ideas?SG: Yes.D: I personally think misogyny is a big problem in the videogame industry that needs to be addressed, both in the actual developer/publisher side as well as the fans and press who comment on it. From the perspective of someone who works in the industry, would you agree?SG: Definitely, definitely.D: I feel that the problem, while not necessarily larger than what goes on in other subcultures, is both more ignored and at the same time more “in-your-face” in the world of videogames. How do you think these attitudes became so entrenched and what do we do to fix them?SG: The females in creative roles are still forced to output things that conform with male interests.D: Does this mean we need more females in producer roles? More self-funded/developed games?SG: We need females who are willing to express themselves. Jade Raymond is not doing anything remotely unique. Assassin's Creed is great, but it is just another game. But then you have someone like Kellee Santiago with a passion and drive to do something different and something mind-blowing results.D: Is she the one with that worked on Cloud?SG: Yes. She's producer and president at thatgamecompany. She has produced my favorite PS3 game thus far [fl0w], which is just an expansion of a Flash game.D: Are you in a position where you could one day see your ideas for games realized?SG: In a way, that already occurs. Sorry that I cannot elaborate on such a vague statement.D: Do you have plans to reveal your identity eventually to the public? Or will this be a long-running mystery?SG: D: From statements on your blog, it looks like we’re both fans of the author Thomas Pynchon. My pen name that I write under is Tristero, from The Crying of Lot 49. Your public persona has some similarities to the reclusive author. You’ve inspired a similar following with wild speculation and fanatacism. What appeals to you most about his writing? Which books have you tackled?SG: I never thought of it that way, but that prospect of any similarity is actually somewhat inspiring.D: People enjoy scavenger hunts. It's part of the whole mystique.SG: He is far more entertaining than I am and far more verbose, but verbosity should not be feared. Gamers should read beyond Halo 3: the Novelization.D: No kidding. I feel like some of us are afraid of books, or films, or anything else for that matter taking supremacy over the precious games. I like games, but they're just one facet of my life. It's hard to keep them from taking over.SG: But the text in some of these Japanese RPGs that has to be read are like tomes that rival five Ayn Rand books stacked high in volume. Similarly pointless and redundant as Rand's work, without the manifesto. Maybe now that BioShock did well, Atlas Shrugged: the Game will not be so far off.D: I do like how BioShock played off of Rand's ideas, but showed how awful they could be in practice if actually implemented.SG: If Rand had a cameo, I'm sure male gamers across the land would be declaring it "the scariest game of all-time."D: Any last cryptic comments you'd like to give the readers of Destructoid? You do know every word you say leads to ten different google searches, right? Want to throw any more hints to the crowd?SG: Because I feel gamers do not read enough, I am considering launching Surfer Girl's Book Club. I'll be like Oprah.D: Do it! I'll read your books. Good luck with everything. It's been fun.SG: Thanks, same to you as well.  
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If you've had your ear to the ground, then you're probably aware of the feisty diva of gossip and news who splashed onto the videogame press scene this year. Surfer Girl Reviews Star Wars has quickly become one of my favorite...

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Super Mario Galaxy available: Best Buys break street date


Nov 08
// Tristero
If you want it, here it is, come and get it, but you better hurry cause it's going fast. Rumors about the purported release of Super Mario Galaxy are scorching the internet tonight like a California wildfire. In particular, t...
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Destructoid Interview: Castlevania's Koji Igarashi


Oct 22
// Tristero
Koji Igarashi leads a busy life. When he's not breathing new energy into neglected classic games like Rondo of Blood, he's touring the world, fedora poised perfectly atop his head somewhere between arch-ironic and humble sinc...

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This week's VC releases: prove you're tough edition


Oct 15
// Tristero
 A new challenger, Gate of Thunder, has entered the Virtual Console's already formidable shmup cage match.  One of the pack-in release games for the TurboDuo, Gate of Thunder is an excellent, albeit unoriginal game ...
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Bargain Bin Laden #26: Taito Legends 1 & 2


Oct 11
// Tristero
[Hey all, Linde here. I know it's been awhile since I've been regular with the BBL updates, but what with review crew and Podtoid and all, keeping it up to date has been kinda tough. But rather than let the ol' column fizzle ...
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Miyamoto depressed when creating Lost Levels, suggests Nintendo executive


Oct 05
// Tristero
When thumbing through the pages of The Ultimate History of Video Games, by Steven L. Kent,  I came across a striking statement from Howard Phillips about Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels. For those of you not old enoug...

Destructoid Interview: the diabolical Tilman Reiff, co-creator of PainStation

Sep 24 // Tristero
Tell me about the concept of pain in the PainStation. What element do you think it introduces to video games?There are games that cause fear, but I think for PainStation, it's the element of danger. It's the threat of being maltreated that puts your whole body on red alert and makes it such an intense experience.When you play the PainStation, whom do you personally hold responsible for the pain you experience? The other player or the computer?Yourself! You get punished if you miss the ball, so it's always your own fault. And since Pong is so easy to play you can't even blame the controls! But the real satisfaction comes from returning the ball and seeing your opponent fail to get it.  Not only because you see him suffer, but also because it is a moment of relief for yourself: the short time where the threat of getting punished is paused.When participants are done trying the game, does the aggression from the game experience transfer over to real life? Are they angry at the other player for causing them this pain? Or does the mediation by the computer keep the players neutral toward one another?If you watch people play the game you will hardly notice aggression at all. The interesting thing is that people are enjoying themselves and are having a blast being maltreated, most of the time laughing and screaming. They are oftentimes shaking and cold-sweating after the game, but I have the experience that aggression is rarely involved at all. It is rather relief that arises after a game.You mentioned you had a lot of difficulty in bringing the game to San Francisco and have decided that the obstacles were too high to bring it back to America again. Tell me about this experience.The law situation in USA makes it very dangerous to put such a machine in public. See the release form people had to sign at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco during 2004. They had the machine completely fenced off when no attorney was present.Do you think there's a difference in the way the United States views the concept of pain compared to Germany or other parts of Europe?No, I think it’s mainly the law.How does the PainStation change the way we think about video games as a solitary or isolated experience?This game is only fun to play against a human opponent, probably the most fun the better you know the person. It is also very fun to watch people play this game. There usually forms a crowd around the machine at exhibitions. So this is really very different from "ordinary" gaming. We started building games like this in 2001, and today Nintendo has picked up very similar concepts (involving the body, making the game fun to watch) and is marketing them successfully. It is most obvious for us with a commercial project we did for Continental, a sponsor of the European Soccer Championship. The interface we designed is so very similar to the Wii Balance Board (which was revealed only a couple of months later) that it is almost frustrating. You can check the video at our Web site. We will stay poor artists and they are making the big bucks. Even though we are having the ideas first. [Laughs.] How did you and Volker team up? Did you each do art projects individually before working together?No, not really.  Volker is a former hit producer and space electonics technician and I studied information science. We met at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne while studying art. We moved in together and shared a studio where we started building PainStation after a while. Volker was driving the project forward and i started to do the programming at certain point.So is there an idea man and a tech guy? Or do you both share the duties equally?Due to our backgrounds, Volker is doing the electronics, sound, and video editing and I am doing all the programming, websites and such. When it comes to the hardware and the building of things we work together equally very well.What project do you personally feel most proud of?All of them, but it's still the most fun for me to watch people play PainStation because it delivers such an intense experience to players and it shows in their reactions so much. Very satisfying for the creators!What's your next big project?It seems like our biggest project will always be PainStation, so it’s hard to have your career start with your biggest hit and then having to try to top that with all the subsequent projects. But you'll never know!
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  I like to think of myself as a member of that special breed of videogame connoisseurs who actually enjoys it when games dole out cruel punishment. There's something perversely delightful about missing that ledge j...

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NextFest 07: Electroplankton invades reality, then 'plays itself'


Sep 15
// Tristero
File this under W, for "way cooler than Sea-Monkeys." Japanese electronics scholar Satoko Moroi has created what amounts to a real life version of Electroplankton. After spending hands-on time with her art installat...
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NextFest 07: Mutant hamster genius takes gamers to school


Sep 14
// Tristero
A hamster named Luden virtually murdered me in a videogame today. I happened upon the little fella by chance at Wired's NextFest in Los Angeles, the annual technology expo aimed at dethroning the Chicago World's Fair as Ameri...
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Hands-on: Medal of Honor Heroes 2


Sep 08
// Tristero
As a committed pacifist, I can't believe what I'm about to write. I played a war game at EA's offices this week and found it downright delightful.  Those of you who follow the Medal of Honor series closely probably found...

Destructoid review: Metroid Prime 3: Corruption

Sep 04 // Tristero
I'm sure you've heard by now: the most revolutionary aspect of this game is also what makes it such a blast to play. Metroid Prime 3 controls like an absolute dream. In simple terms, you use the nunchuk analog stick to move Samus about, and point the Wii remote to aim and fire. The golden combination here is the option to employ advanced reticule sensitivity (in which the "dead zone" of movement is at its smallest on-screen) coupled with a handy lock-on bound to the Z button. This gives you the ability to center your screen on a particular enemy while still shooting at anything that crosses your vision. Locking onto enemies is a godsend when you want to perform precision strafing or circle around an enemy, but it's not essential to success; those who stick to free-firing can certainly do so. What makes this control scheme so unique is that it actually works. Retro Studios has created a functional Wii first-person shooter, and in doing so has also crafted the most successful installment yet on a console.I never had a problem with the control scheme in previous Prime titles, but after playing Metroid with the ability to look around freely while moving, to dodge a boss while also aiming and shooting as you’re running away -- it makes the older system feel downright antiquated. The new control scheme lends a tremendous sense of engagement to the battles that was lacking before, not just from the Metroid series, but from the entire lineage of first-person shooters. The movements are so fluid and natural that this game is sure to draw new converts to the genre. There are a few other touches sprinkled throughout that take full advantage of the Wii's capabilities. You've got the ability to rip shields off of enemies by slinging your nunchuk, as well as several lever pulling tasks to gain entry to locked rooms. Much more than janky add-ons, these aspects have the cumulative effect of creating an unparalleled sense of immersion. Never before have I felt so close to physically being inside a game’s world. Beyond the phenomenal control updates, however, the core gameplay mechanics have remained largely the same. This is definitely another chapter in the Metroid Prime series. Corruption features only a few new suit upgrades that weren’t included in previous Metroid games, and generally unremarkable ones at that. While it’s always good to see the old Ice Missiles and Plasma Beam, it’s time for Samus to learn some new tricks. In their favor, Retro has been very upfront about this by naming it Metroid Prime 3, rather than Turbo Ultra Metroid Wii-tastic.But even if you lower your expectations by that tiny notch, you'll still be impressed by the unparalleled execution in the game's essential design. The previous Prime titles were marked achievements in art direction for the previous generation of game consoles, but I wasn’t expecting to see many graphical improvements in this installment. Perhaps that's why I was so floored when I encountered complex textures, normal mapping, and lush organic environments at every turn. There’s a round, fleshed out feeling to everything in the game that isn’t made of metal. If you were impressed by the way the GameCube handled Resident Evil 4’s lighting effects, then prepare yourself for the light show this game has in store for you. Explosive colors saturate each of the planets, providing a captivating backdrop to every puzzle or battle. You might find yourself using the Screw Attack just to watch the circular yellow flashes arc across the screen. There are dozens of breathtakingly pretty scenes to traverse through that will give you that classic “Metroid” tingling down in the pit of your stomach. Long-time fans will know what I’m talking about: those rare moments where you experience the harmonious fusion of art and entertainment. Don't be put off by all this art talk if you're looking for hardcore action gaming; Prime 3 is no cakewalk and offers a fine challenge with its frenetic shooter showdowns. Much of this challenge, however, comes from not knowing exactly what to do in a particular boss battle or puzzle and fighting to stay alive while you figure it out. Figuring out the game’s mechanics and patterns will give you a bit of an advantage if you play Normal mode first, so those players looking for a truly tough experience would do well to start out on Veteran mode. These options are both available for first-time players at the game's start. Speaking of bosses, Corruption features some of the best boss battles we've seen in recent years outside of Shadow of the Colossus. As massive and epic as previous titles, Corruption shakes things up with several bosses equipped with a slew of alternate forms at their disposal. Some even have up to nine different mutations they can swap on the fly, constantly keeping you on your toes. The variety in combat and inventive boss design schemes prevent the battles from resembling the sluggish grinds of attrition in earlier Prime titles and are a definite highlight of the game.When you’re not tearing alien bat-dragons to shreds, Metroid Prime 3 also happens to be an adventure gamer’s paradise. The environmental puzzles in this game are phenomenally complex and enthralling. You’re given Herculean tasks to accomplish that are brought about by dozens of interlocking tiny missions. The payoff and sense of personal satisfaction is immeasurable -- "I built that destructive device with my bare hands before I dropped it on that city! I am the king of my living room!"Unfortunately, Corruption is not without a handful of confusing tasks that are counterintuitive and don’t seem to flow naturally. These sections that leave you wandering around wondering what to do next can bring tedium to the game's otherwise measured pacing. They're not game-breaking, but they're enough to demand better environmental or textual cues for problematic sections where players tend to get off track.What’s worse is that sometimes the game’s hint system can be downright misleading. There are a few instances in the game that will easily throw off a player who isn’t devoting their time to reading every piece of scanned information. I’m fine with venturing out on my own without a nanny computer coddling me through the game -- striking out in the wilderness and exploring is one of my favorite things about this series. The problem, though, is with the hint system’s inconsistencies. I never developed a solid relationship with the game’s hints where I felt like I could trust it to lead me in the right direction at that moment. A player shouldn’t be led off track by extending the game’s messaging system the courtesy of actually believing it.Another detracting factor for the game is its horrendously weak opening. The first section of the game seems loaded with needless filler, whereas in the other Metroid Prime games they toss you into the action immediately. In Corruption’s first hour the action just seems stalled compared to the rest of the game; the setting is terribly bland and starts things off on the wrong foot. I don’t see any reason for such a great game to begin without firing on all cylinders. The addition of human, speaking NPCs in Corruption feels out of place and subverts the isolation that has become the series hallmark. The whole “stranger in a strange land” vibe is effectively destroyed with the inclusion of English-speaking military types -- how lonely and existential can you feel when you’ve got soldiers piping through your headset every hour?Thankfully, the human NPCs reappear at only a few rare points throughout the game. But each time they do, it’ll give you the same sinking feeling you experience whenever your favorite band does a song for a fast food commercial. Somebody at Retro was sippin’ a little of the Halo syrup and the game certainly suffers from it. There’s even a squad based attack section with these squishy-faced losers which was, admittedly fun to play, but it absolutely does not belong in my Metroid series. That’s right, I get final say.Keeping in line with another series tradition, you’ll often find yourself backtracking to collect last minute items that will help you access the final boss. Corruption, fortunately, really shines in this department compared to its predecessors. The backtracking is not a last minute afterthought employed as a cheap gimmick to extend the game’s running time. When you backtrack in Corruption, entirely new sections open up on the old planets you’ve already explored -- not just pockets with missile expansions once too high to reach without a double-jump. There's no need to brace yourself for a boring, 3-hour slog through useless errands or needless item collection. The game quickly builds to a suiting finale, and while the final boss battle may disappoint some after the long trail of ferocious bosses that precede it, I doubt anyone will find much to harp on about the game's closing chapters.After the unadulterated fun I’ve had this week with this title, I don’t even mind that my Wii might be merely two GameCubes taped together. All I care about it is that I can finally use it to play a uniquely beautiful and exciting game that would be impossible to experience on any other console. If you like action games, adventure games, puzzle games, shooters, or if you simply want to see where the future of game development is headed, this is the game for you. For those of you without a Wii, this is the excuse you've been waiting for to pick one up. Metroid Prime 3 is the definitive entry in the Prime series that delivers on the long-awaited promise of the Wii as a console that caters to the hardcore crowd. Verdict: Buy it!Score: 8.5/10 
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If you own a Wii, chances are you’ve spent the last month biting your fingernails to the quick in anticipation for the final installment in the Metroid Prime series, Corruption. For the hardcore crowd, there’s a l...

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Wii're not gonna take it: GarageGames chats about Nintendo and indie development


Aug 30
// Tristero
Remember that time you got really motivated, gathered your thoughts, threw away all the cheetos and Maxims cluttering up your living room, cleaned off your desk and actually took on that project you'd been dreaming about? You...
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PAX 2007: Dead Head Fred hands-on


Aug 28
// Tristero
PAX 2007 was a veritable maelstrom of partying, gaming, schmoozing, pavement pounding, murder scene investigating, and sexual assault. The Destructoid crew represented at PAX in full force by booking the crooks that have been...

NES Reproductions: a classier way to get your dirty mitts on Earthbound

Aug 06 // Tristero
First of all, LeonK, thanks for your time. How old are you and at what age did you begin playing video games? I'm 31 years old. I've been married for three years to the most amazing woman and I live in Toronto, Canada. I started playing games when I was eight years old. At the time, my parents took my brother and I to a toy store to buy us a birthday present. I'm two years and a day older than my brother, so we always celebrated our birthdays and gifts together. We ended up coming back home with an Intellivision. Two years later, we immigrated to Canada. It wasn't until the early 90's that we got our first NES. And so the love affair with video games continued... What motivated you to take up the reproduction project? Did you begin making them for yourself first? I was visiting Digital Press about four years ago, when a discussion of reproducing NES games came up. At the time, I wasn't aware that there was an entire community around NES development, hardware reverse engineering, etc. The post talked about how to create a reproduction of Earthbound. It seemed very technical for the average Joe. Luckily, my father was an electrician in his previous career, and from a young age, he had me working with circuit boards and such. At that moment, I decided to reproduce a game for myself, for three reasons: 1) To have the game. I was an avid NES collector by then with a few hundred games in my collection. 2) To prove to myself that I could do it. 3) To see if I could provide a service to other collectors that didn't have the skills or the drive to create a reproduction for themselves.At no time did the idea of making reproductions for profit cross my mind. I was actually doing it, and in many ways still do, to fill an itch I have to work with circuit boards and memory chips. The fact that I can mix it together with a long time hobby was just a bonus! Also known as The Awesome LevelsWhat kind of response have you been getting? People have spoken very highly of you on several websites. Has the general feedback been good? "Shock and awe" is the best was I can describe it. People are shocked to find out that this can be done, especially to games they've always wanted to play on the NES, but were stuck playing on a PC. Awe when they get the cart and can't believe how good it looks. I've had customers from as far away as South America, and all over Europe. I always wonder how people find out about my service. Give us a broad outline of the steps involved in your process. Do you have an EPROM programmer? If so, what kind of HEX editor do you use? It's no secret in regards to what I do -- the exact steps have been documented in many different web sites. The gist of it is as follows: First, you convert .NES ROM image to its base components (most times, .PRG and .CHR files) Next, write these files onto EPROM memory chips (I have an EPROM burner and EPROM eraser to assist me). Then, you open the donor cart  and clean/restore the pins to like new condition. Once you've done that, remove old ROM chips and solder on EPROM chips (this is the most technical part, since EPROM chips and ROM chips in most cases are not pin compatible). If required, install a battery holder, battery circuitry and battery onto main circuit board. Following that, print the game labels at 2400dpi on an industrial color laser printer. Then, just laminate and trim the labels to size. The old plastic carts get their labels removed, and are cleaned down to the gray plastic shell. Install the label onto the cart, put the circuit board back onto place, and then test the game for a second time. Then, the game is shipped back to you. All this takes about 45 minutes on average per game. If you don't know, don't ask Was there a lot of trial and error involved when you first began? Have any big disasters along the way? Oh yeah! Lots of trial an error. Anything from getting a good supplier of memory chips, labels, laminate, etc. The most difficult part of this is getting the small details that no one documents right. What wire to use? How do you cleanly and efficiently remove old ROM chips? How do you cleanly remove the old labels? What's the best way to install new labels? All this took years to master -- some things I'm still changing around. I'm always trying to improve the quality of the end product. What's been your most popular reproduction? Mother? Zelda Outlands? Earthbound and Zelda Outlands are always popular. Other games are seasonally popular such as Tecmo SuperBowl and RBI Baseball. [Note: these are the classic NES sports games updated to reflect current player rosters.] Tell me about your custom orders. Can someone just send you a homebrew ROM and then you'll send them back a physical cartridge? Are there any limitations as to what you'll be able to reproduce for a NES cart? That's about it for custom orders. They also need to provide their own labels which I can print and stick on the cart for them. Image resolution and such are all discussed via e-mail. But most importantly, I need to make sure it can be done. You need to e-mail me your custom ROM, and I can test it and tell you if a valid donor cartridge exists, and what it is. Are you involved in the homebrew scene yourself and have you ever created a physical cartridge out of any of your ideas? Not at this time. I am a C / C++ programmer by trait. I actually develop the C / C++ compiler for a big IT company. So working with assembler and such isn't that difficult for me. If I have some spare time from my busy schedule, I might look into getting something done. I'm not sure what yet, though. Homebrew Zelda: the other white meatDo you have any games you'd love to make available but can't for technical reasons? Any forthcoming games we should know about that aren't listed on your website yet? I have a few ROM images of games that were never officially released to the public. I promised the owners that I wouldn't share, and I'm a man of my word. I also have made a few reproductions for customers which I simply don't have the time to put pictures of on my website. It seems life is taking over my time, and hobby. Are there other video game projects floating around in your head to accomplish next, or are you going to stick with the reproductions for now? A couple years back I build my own MAME arcade machine. It's an old arcade machine which I refurbished back from the dead, which included fixing the monitor. It works and plays great, but it's lacking art and that "cool factor." I'd love to spend some time this coming winter and finish this long term project. What's your favorite 8-bit Nintendo game of all time (including imports, homebrew, bootleg, Cheetah Men 2)? Easy question. Super Mario Bros 3. It's the best game ever made. Do you keep up with current video games, and if so, what's grabbed your interest lately? Very much so. My wife got me an Xbox 360 for my last birthday, so it's been keeping me busy. I've already completed Gears of War, Saints Row and Lost Planet on it. Can't wait to get my hands on Halo 3 and GTAIV. Do you ever read Destructoid.com? Also, cocks? I wasn't aware of the site until recently! I'm always looking for a new exciting web site to add to my 20 folders / 100+ bookmark collection. Damn, son. You needs to bookmark that shit. I know we made the cut.
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[This little gem just screams out to the collector inside of me, as well as the rest of the staff. No, really. I had half the staff yelling at me to promote this story. It's a little hard to do from Boston on a BlackBerry tha...

Destructoid interview: Lost's Jorge Garcia

Aug 02 // Tristero
Have you seen the trailer yet for the Lost videogame? Jorge Garcia: Yeah, I saw it recently online, actually. Did you know you were going to be in the Lost game? Or was it a surprise to you? I didn’t know exactly what they were planning on doing, but I knew there was a good possibility I’d be in there, because that would help move the game if they involved the actors on the show. So you didn’t have to go in and do any scans similar to the McFarlane toys? No, I haven’t done anything for the game yet. I haven’t been contacted about doing voice or anything. What are your first thoughts on the game and on seeing yourself represented as a video game character? It looked pretty good. I think they got it from the show and I think it transferred well. For a lot of people, part of the visceral thrill of playing videogames is getting to do things they couldn’t in real life, whether it’s something benign like gaining super powers or something darker like hijacking cars. Now that you’ll actually have a representation of yourself in a video game, are there things you’ve been dying to try, if you’re a playable character? Yeah, it’ll be fun just to kind of abuse my cast mates and stuff like that, put them in different situations and positions. Are there some hidden aggressions you’d need to take out in the videogame? Oh, no. It’ll be strictly in fun. But I’ll probably try and record it so I could share it later with friends. Speaking of abusing the cast, there’s some racy fan fiction that’s floating around on the Internet. Have you read any of the love triangles between you, Sawyer and Jack? Me, Sawyer and Jack? No I haven’t. That’s an update. Around season one we found some of these fan fiction stories. We printed them out and passed them around to other cast mates and we’d have them read these stories that featured themselves in various rough situations and combinations. They all had a good laugh about it. People who play video games worry about movie tie-ins. Putting it nicely, they don’t have a reputation for being very good. There have been recent exceptions like the Godfather and Scarface games, and The Warriors. Are you at all worried about Lost: The Game? Do you have your fingers crossed that it won’t suck? Yeah, of course. I think that there’s almost a higher level of scrutiny for a game based on a TV show. It’s been in the works for a while, so hopefully, with that lead-time ... you know, they didn’t just rush something out to the market. But yeah, I’ve got my fingers crossed. Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse (two of the show’s producers) announced at Comic-Con that they had a Lost writer working pretty closely with Ubisoft. That got my hopes up. From what I saw in the trailer, it definitely captured our sets very well. The Hatch was pretty detailed. From what I saw it looked pretty good. I’ve definitely heard you’re a fan of videogames. When did you get into them and what kind of games do you enjoy? I’ve been into them for a while, when I was a kid, you know with Atari and the NES. Then I kind of put them aside when I was in college. I knew if I owned a system it would occupy a lot of my time. Later, a buddy of mine who worked for a company that makes games, he got me a Game Boy Advance, and that was my first step toward getting into video games again. And then at a silent auction I won an Xbox, and since it was for a charity I got to write off my Xbox purchase. After I moved to Hawaii a buddy and I both got Xbox Live accounts so that we could catch up that way. Since then, I’ve tried to keep pretty up to date. Having a little disposable income benefits that. I bought the PS2 just so I could play Guitar Hero. I have a Wii now and an Xbox 360. Are there any particular games for the Atari or NES that you remember fondly? For the NES, I loved Kid Icarus. I used to love the challenge of it. I also enjoyed Castlevania. Especially once you got the boomerang. It made it so much easier. Are you downloading any of the games off the Wii’s virtual console? No. I haven’t connected my Wii online yet. I have my cable internet connection reserved for my 360. The games I have for Wii are Rayman, Super Monkey Ball, Call of Duty 3, Trauma Center, Zelda, Excitebike and Red Steel. I keep going back to Wii Sports. It’s the most fun with a group of friends when people come to visit. It’s fun to play tennis and make each other’s little faces. That’s my favorite part about the Wii. Have you played Wii Sports against any of the Lost cast members? No, just friends and family so far. Have you heard of the Xbox Live celebrity tournaments called “Game with Fame”? They’ll have people like Jack Black or the guys from Green Day come on and play against the public. Is there any game you’d totally kill us in if we ever challenged you? I’ve never heard of that. That’s cool. I’d need at least a week to try and get good at a game first. I don’t know. Whenever I’ve gone out and played against the public, I get creamed! It’s impossible! But that’s an interesting idea. It could be fun. Usually my buddy and I do co-op missions when we go on Live. The last game we went through was G.R.A.W. I just got out my old Xbox to play Future Tactics again. Are you and Dominic still kicking those PSPs around? Yeah, for the PSP we used to play FIFA. He turned me on to Lemmings. He got that early from the UK. I’ve also got Katamari and LocoRoco. You’re somewhat known for your good taste in music. One of our readers loved your Clap Your Hands Say Yeah recommendation. Do you have anything else for us? Oh man. No pressure, huh? I did just recently see the movie Once and I immediately went out and bought the soundtrack. Straight from the theater to the store to buy the soundtrack. Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova do most of the stuff. They’re the songwriters in the movie. I had to just go out and buy it. One last question, Carlton Cuse announced at Comic-Con last week that Libby will return for the fourth season of Lost. A lot of Hurley admirers consider your storyline with her in the second season one of the high points of the show. Do you miss working with Cynthia Watros? Are you excited about the news that she’s coming back? Yeah, of course! Without question, some of the most fun I’ve had on set was with Cynthia just hanging out in between takes. So if she comes back I’ll be very excited. Thanks so much, man. You’ve been very generous with your time. I’ll have to send you a Destructoid t-shirt in the mail! Cool.
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Some people call him the hatch cowboy; some people call him the gangster of love. But to us he’s just Hurley, the immensely likeable everyman on the TV show Lost. For series stalwarts, Jorge Garcia has become the main...


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