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Live show: Chill Bros play Guitar Hero pro gamer Ecstacy

Want to see how a Guinness World record holder plays Guitar Hero?  Tune in! Put your Guitar Hero thrashing skills to the test against one of the world champions, Annie "Ecstacy" Leung. She joins us today on Justin.tv/Destruct...   read

 
 
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Mindjack contest winners and gallery

Last week we held a contest where readers altered photos of Mindjack for a chance to win the game.  After careful deliberation and kicking in various groins, our panel of editors picked out g4torturedsoul's animated Donkey Kong tribute...   read

 
 
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Destructoid Live is done, how'd we do?

Update: And that's a wrap!  We hope you enjoyed our first ever YouTube live stream of the Destructoid show! Max and I talked about some of 2011's most anticipated games like Dead Space 2, Bulletstorm, Portal 2, Duke Nukem Forever, L.A...   read

 
 
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From our community  

Destructoid's MAGFest 9 Iron Chef team

Destructoid, I present to you your MAGFest 9 Gamer Iron Chef team. Changston: Master of slicing, dicing and wearing sunglasses inside. Founder of Destructoid's Iron Chef Kickass Superteam (D.I.C.K.S.) 2011. Evil Cheese: Handsome, debonair, ...   read

 
 
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This Solid Snake GameBoy Color graffiti is sick

I'm not normally a fan of even "artistic" graffiti, but I have to confess that this random discovery of Solid Snake's GameBoy Color sprite plastered to a wall is pretty damn fabulous. You might have caught this image on the Internets alread...   read

 
 
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Z.H.P. trailer might be greatest trailer in the universe

Just...just watch the trailer above. It's for the latest game from the team behind Disgaea: Z.H.P. ~Unlosing Ranger VS DarkDeath Evilman~. Damn skippy. See that? SEE THAT? That's the effing title of the game. It's stunning, and you should ...   read

 
 
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BloodRayne: The Shroud coming to 3DS!

This is one of those stories that got buried under the slew of news that tumbled from E3, but I am nevertheless kicking myself for not hearing about it sooner. As a huge fan of BloodRayne, it gives me great pleasure to declare that the fran...   read

 
 
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E3 10: E3 is over, thanks for joining us, more to come

Well, it's done. E3 has come and gone another year, and what a year it was. Some crazy ass stuff went on at E3 this year, and while we'll be bringing you content for days to come thanks to it, it is time to move on and look forward. Forward...   read

 
 
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Bungie explains the "What the hell?" Activision partnership

It's no surprise that Bungie has wanted to branch off and away from the Halo universe. Despite its strong support of the franchise, red flags were raised from the studio gained independence from Microsoft in 2007. Rumblings that the Seattle...   read

 
 
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Contest: Win some Capcom goodies!

Capcom Europe are a bunch of amazing people who feel exactly the same way I do about videogame communities. So they opened up a mystical cupboard in their offices and threw a bunch of goodies at me to give away here on Destructoid! Sinc...   read

 
 
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Dtoid PAX East community plans for Saturday

Friday PAX East was pretty amazing. I had an epic pie eating rematch with P.B. Winterbottom folks (video to come), the Frag Dolls party was amazing, The Protomen rocked the concert and we all a blast over at Uno. Today will be no different!...   read

 
 
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Review: Final Fantasy XIII

If you're a hardcore Final Fantasy XIII fan, prone to emotional outburts and so defensive of Square Enix's latest effort that you'll get upset by harsh criticism, then you're advised to not read this review. If you don't want to see somebod...   read

 
 
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Even more people downloaded the Bad Company 2 demo

Following an earlier report on the massive success of the Battlefield: Bad Company 2 demo, DICE is back with some fresh new stats. The number of downloads has been upgraded from 2 million to about 3.5 million. Insanity, I tell you! Other cr...   read

 
 
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No More Heroes 2 vids bring the butts, blood, and tigers

You are not ready for No More Heroes 2. I don't care who you are. I don't care what you've seen before, or what you think you know; this game will pull the rug out from under you and then spank your ass with it. Hard. It looks like you pla...   read

 
 
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Destructoid's 25 days of giving keeps on giving

What is Destructoid? It's this thing! We publish it. We love our readers. We have unleashed a string of contests so awesome that babies and whales are reportedly melting. But first, a matter of business. I'd like to remind everyone, before ...   read

 
 
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New releases: Dragon Age, Lego Rock Band, Rabbids & more

This week's major release is Dragon Age: Origins for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and PC. It's the latest and greatest from Bioware and takes gamers to the past rather than the future. Oh, and it's going to let Brad Nicholson ride dragons ....   read

 
 
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From our community  
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dTunes editor's week, day 9: Joseph Leray

[dTunes is a community-organized blog showcasing the musical tastes of Destructoid's users. For two weeks, the editorial team is commandeering the series because, hey, we like music too. To further expand your horizons, make sure to check ...   read

 
 
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The biggest UT 2004 explosion you'll see today

Disclaimer: this isn't nearly as good as the Crysis "Raining Men" video, or most of the other "spawn a bunch of objects, it'll be funny" CryEngine 2 videos, for that matter. However, it is certainly worth watching anyway...   read

 
 
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This shirt is TOTALLY not Left 4 Dead related

Looking at the header image, you might think this shirt has something to do with a certain extremely popular Valve game. Let's be clear -- the girl in this ad is obviously not Zoey, and this medkit does not resemble any medkits from any pop...   read

 
 
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Super Street Fighter IV screenshots appear!

In an effort to write as many stories about Super Street Fighter IV before it's officially announced, here's another one -- French Web site JV247 has some images now! (Yes, that's their watermark on that image up there.)The site appears to ...   read

 
 
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EA teases bringing back SSX

During my time here, there has always been one game that seems to be met with universal praise whenever it gets mentioned, and it's a game you might not immediately think of: SSX Tricky. When the conversation turns to that of snowboarding v...   read

 
 
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Inafune wonders: Could Capcom and Bungie one day team up?

Keiji Inafune, who is known best for his involvement with Mega Man, Onimusha, and Dead Rising, recently stopped by Bungie's Seattle-based studio. Ordinarily, this wouldn't be a big deal in and of itself; what made the trip so special was a ...   read

 
 
indie developers, and even made an appearance on the show floor of last year's Tokyo Game Show and Games Convention in Leipzig.

I'm not here to rewrite the Wikipedia entry. We all know what happened when the PS2 launched, how it went down, and what led Sega to become a software developer. Instead, what follows is simply my own humble tribute to my favorite console of all time, based on my own experience. I'm sure you have your own memories to share as well, and I invite you to do so in the comments and community blogs afterward so we can all celebrate the Dreamcast's 10th aniversary together.

By its very name, the Dreamcast represented something awesome. That's often overlooked, but let's think about it for a moment. Dreamcast. Broadcaster of dreams. A machine for projecting one's wildest imagination. At the time, that's what it did for many of us. The games it played were unlike anything we'd seen before, and not just in terms of graphics, but gameplay as well. It was host to some of the most original and inventive titles the world had ever seen, and may have even been responsible for launching a genre or two. More on that tomorrow.

Although it was far ahead of its time and in many ways ushered forth the future of gaming, the Dreamcast also represented the last of a dying breed of machines, in that it was a gaming console. Period. You could listen to CDs on it, sure, but it didn't boast that. It wasn't trying to be a DVD player or a PC or some home media center like current-gen systems. It was just a machine built to play games. The same could be said of the GameCube, but did that let you exchange save data with arcade machines? And let's not even begin to compare software libraries. The Dreamcast was a gaming console that was still aggressively serious about itself. When you boil it down, there was really nothing else like it.

As if it weren't already unique enough, there were a number of special edition versions of the console and its hardware. These ranged from the ridiculous to the ridiculously awesome, with console bundles for Seaman, Biohazard: Code Veronica, Sakura Taisen, Sonic, and yes, even Hello Kitty, in both pink and blue. 

There were also limited editions in various colors, even silver and gold. Case mods became the hotness, and I think I was the only one within my circle of friends who didn't have a purple, blue, green or clear Dreamcast. One guy I knew even had a chrome one. Custom cases were easy to swap out and mod yourself, and the same went for controllers. There was no mistaking what hardware belonged to who when the party was over and it was time to pack up.

That's another thing that was great about it. It was so compact and light that you could toss it into a backpack and take it to a friend's house without even thinking about it. It wasn't an issue. And it was durable enough that if somebody had one too many beers and dropped it down the stairs, chances were, you could plug it in and forget the incident ever happened.

-Controller-



That D-pad. Ohhhh sweet heavens, that D-pad. It may have been a thumb-destroying cheese grater for fighting games, but when it came to shmups, it was bliss. Many will argue that an arcade joystick is the proper way to play an STG, and they'd be absolutely right. But if I have to do it with a D-pad, this is the one, thank you very much. For a genre often requiring pixel-by-pixel movement, it's about as good as they can possibly get.



If you're a RetroforceGO! listener, you've heard me go on about the polymer ball. To illustrate this point, and so that you can stop looking at me like a fucking crazy person, I took one of mine apart so you can see what I'm talking about. The center of the Dreamcast's D-pad has a flared cylinder in it, and the silicone membrane that connects it to the circuitboard has a little ... well, ball thingy embedded in its center. The idea here is that the component itself sits at just the right height atop that ball, allowing for a full range of motion so you can smoothly float to diagonals and back again. Not only that, but the leverage it adds makes for more precise, definite recognition of true up, down, left and right, so that no matter what you're trying to do, there's no blaming the hardware if you fail.

The point of all this yammering about something seemingly insignificant? R&D, people. Sega put an unprecedented amount of thought into this, and it's about time they got some respect for it.



As for the rest of the controller, it was big, it was awkward, and after spending a few years with its six-button sister on the Saturn (best controller ever), it wasn't very comfortable. What you can say about it, however, is that it was innovative and influential. If you want to start an argument about that, I suggest you go have a look at what came with your 360.

It was the first standard controller to launch with a reasonably-placed analog stick, and for all intents and purposes, that was pretty decent, too. Responsive, pressure-sensitive dual triggers and four perfectly acceptable face buttons made for an altogether impressively functional set of components, albeit housed in a goofy-looking shell. There was also a small recess where you could clip in the cord to keep it out of the way, situated in a 2-slot box that held a rumble pack and/or one of the coolest things ever to come out of console gaming ...

-VMU-

It wouldn't be a proper Dreamcast retrospective without paying homage to the console's wildly imaginative take on a removable storage device, the Visual Memory Unit. In the short-lived era during which memory cards were thought to be the wave of the future, Sega blew the doors off its competition by equipping theirs with a tiny LCD screen, a small speaker, two action buttons and a (surprisingly functional) little D-pad. It had an 8-bit CPU and 128 KB of flash memory, and while that isn't exactly a powerhouse system, it still beat the fuck out of your N64 memory card, which did ... well, nothing.

First and foremost, it was still a removable storage device, and a widely-supported one at that. Some of Sega's NAOMI arcade cabinets sported a slot for the VMU, allowing you to share data between the home and arcade versions of a game. Unlocked Morrigan in Marvel Vs Capcom 2 on your Dreamcast last night, did you? Well, now you can use her when you play it at the arcade, too. At least you could in 2000, back before they turned it into a Sunglass Hut.



Not only did it serve as  the Dreamcast's memory card, but when plugged into the controller, many games made use of the VMU as an auxiliary display for whatever you were playing. Ikaruga, for instance, used its LCD screen to show your chain status. It was an awesome little feature that added a lot of fun and personality to the titles that have since lost it upon being ported elsewhere.

When not plugged in, the VMU became a micro handheld gaming platform, with some Dreamcast titles featuring minigames that could be downloaded to it and played on the go. If it was time to turn off the console and head to work, you could carry along your VMU and level up your Chao on the subway, then load the now-boosted versions back into Sonic Adventure when you got home.

Sony answered back in Japan a few months later with its PocketStation, but aside from launching DokoDemo Issho (still one of my favorite Sony franchises), it was never quite as cool. In later years, a homebrew scene even sprung up around the VMU, some examples of which you can see below.

[embed]147743:22206" data-vidtitle="

Destructoid celebrates 10 years of the Sega Dreamcast Ten years ago today (9/9/99), the Sega Dreamcast made its debut in North America. For M. Bison, it was a Thursday. For the rest of us, it was the day that forever changed console gaming as we knew it. Bad timing? Yeah. Histor...  
Full story

" data-purl="destructoid-celebrates-10-years-of-the-sega-dreamcast-147743.phtml" data-vidsummary="" data-remodal-target="watch"> photo
8===D
indie developers, and even made an appearance on the show floor of last year's Tokyo Game Show and Games Convention in Leipzig.

I'm not here to rewrite the Wikipedia entry. We all know what happened when the PS2 launched, how it went down, and what led Sega to become a software developer. Instead, what follows is simply my own humble tribute to my favorite console of all time, based on my own experience. I'm sure you have your own memories to share as well, and I invite you to do so in the comments and community blogs afterward so we can all celebrate the Dreamcast's 10th aniversary together.

By its very name, the Dreamcast represented something awesome. That's often overlooked, but let's think about it for a moment. Dreamcast. Broadcaster of dreams. A machine for projecting one's wildest imagination. At the time, that's what it did for many of us. The games it played were unlike anything we'd seen before, and not just in terms of graphics, but gameplay as well. It was host to some of the most original and inventive titles the world had ever seen, and may have even been responsible for launching a genre or two. More on that tomorrow.

Although it was far ahead of its time and in many ways ushered forth the future of gaming, the Dreamcast also represented the last of a dying breed of machines, in that it was a gaming console. Period. You could listen to CDs on it, sure, but it didn't boast that. It wasn't trying to be a DVD player or a PC or some home media center like current-gen systems. It was just a machine built to play games. The same could be said of the GameCube, but did that let you exchange save data with arcade machines? And let's not even begin to compare software libraries. The Dreamcast was a gaming console that was still aggressively serious about itself. When you boil it down, there was really nothing else like it.

As if it weren't already unique enough, there were a number of special edition versions of the console and its hardware. These ranged from the ridiculous to the ridiculously awesome, with console bundles for Seaman, Biohazard: Code Veronica, Sakura Taisen, Sonic, and yes, even Hello Kitty, in both pink and blue. 

There were also limited editions in various colors, even silver and gold. Case mods became the hotness, and I think I was the only one within my circle of friends who didn't have a purple, blue, green or clear Dreamcast. One guy I knew even had a chrome one. Custom cases were easy to swap out and mod yourself, and the same went for controllers. There was no mistaking what hardware belonged to who when the party was over and it was time to pack up.

That's another thing that was great about it. It was so compact and light that you could toss it into a backpack and take it to a friend's house without even thinking about it. It wasn't an issue. And it was durable enough that if somebody had one too many beers and dropped it down the stairs, chances were, you could plug it in and forget the incident ever happened.

-Controller-



That D-pad. Ohhhh sweet heavens, that D-pad. It may have been a thumb-destroying cheese grater for fighting games, but when it came to shmups, it was bliss. Many will argue that an arcade joystick is the proper way to play an STG, and they'd be absolutely right. But if I have to do it with a D-pad, this is the one, thank you very much. For a genre often requiring pixel-by-pixel movement, it's about as good as they can possibly get.



If you're a RetroforceGO! listener, you've heard me go on about the polymer ball. To illustrate this point, and so that you can stop looking at me like a fucking crazy person, I took one of mine apart so you can see what I'm talking about. The center of the Dreamcast's D-pad has a flared cylinder in it, and the silicone membrane that connects it to the circuitboard has a little ... well, ball thingy embedded in its center. The idea here is that the component itself sits at just the right height atop that ball, allowing for a full range of motion so you can smoothly float to diagonals and back again. Not only that, but the leverage it adds makes for more precise, definite recognition of true up, down, left and right, so that no matter what you're trying to do, there's no blaming the hardware if you fail.

The point of all this yammering about something seemingly insignificant? R&D, people. Sega put an unprecedented amount of thought into this, and it's about time they got some respect for it.



As for the rest of the controller, it was big, it was awkward, and after spending a few years with its six-button sister on the Saturn (best controller ever), it wasn't very comfortable. What you can say about it, however, is that it was innovative and influential. If you want to start an argument about that, I suggest you go have a look at what came with your 360.

It was the first standard controller to launch with a reasonably-placed analog stick, and for all intents and purposes, that was pretty decent, too. Responsive, pressure-sensitive dual triggers and four perfectly acceptable face buttons made for an altogether impressively functional set of components, albeit housed in a goofy-looking shell. There was also a small recess where you could clip in the cord to keep it out of the way, situated in a 2-slot box that held a rumble pack and/or one of the coolest things ever to come out of console gaming ...

-VMU-

It wouldn't be a proper Dreamcast retrospective without paying homage to the console's wildly imaginative take on a removable storage device, the Visual Memory Unit. In the short-lived era during which memory cards were thought to be the wave of the future, Sega blew the doors off its competition by equipping theirs with a tiny LCD screen, a small speaker, two action buttons and a (surprisingly functional) little D-pad. It had an 8-bit CPU and 128 KB of flash memory, and while that isn't exactly a powerhouse system, it still beat the fuck out of your N64 memory card, which did ... well, nothing.

First and foremost, it was still a removable storage device, and a widely-supported one at that. Some of Sega's NAOMI arcade cabinets sported a slot for the VMU, allowing you to share data between the home and arcade versions of a game. Unlocked Morrigan in Marvel Vs Capcom 2 on your Dreamcast last night, did you? Well, now you can use her when you play it at the arcade, too. At least you could in 2000, back before they turned it into a Sunglass Hut.



Not only did it serve as  the Dreamcast's memory card, but when plugged into the controller, many games made use of the VMU as an auxiliary display for whatever you were playing. Ikaruga, for instance, used its LCD screen to show your chain status. It was an awesome little feature that added a lot of fun and personality to the titles that have since lost it upon being ported elsewhere.

When not plugged in, the VMU became a micro handheld gaming platform, with some Dreamcast titles featuring minigames that could be downloaded to it and played on the go. If it was time to turn off the console and head to work, you could carry along your VMU and level up your Chao on the subway, then load the now-boosted versions back into Sonic Adventure when you got home.

Sony answered back in Japan a few months later with its PocketStation, but aside from launching DokoDemo Issho (still one of my favorite Sony franchises), it was never quite as cool. In later years, a homebrew scene even sprung up around the VMU, some examples of which you can see below.

[embed]147743:22206" data-vidtitle="

Destructoid celebrates 10 years of the Sega Dreamcast Ten years ago today (9/9/99), the Sega Dreamcast made its debut in North America. For M. Bison, it was a Thursday. For the rest of us, it was the day that forever changed console gaming as we knew it. Bad timing? Yeah. Histor...   full story

" data-purl="destructoid-celebrates-10-years-of-the-sega-dreamcast-147743.phtml" data-vidsummary="" data-remodal-target="watch">  Watch Video

Destructoid celebrates 10 years of the Sega Dreamcast

Ten years ago today (9/9/99), the Sega Dreamcast made its debut in North America. For M. Bison, it was a Thursday. For the rest of us, it was the day that forever changed console gaming as we knew it. Bad timing? Yeah. Historically bad. The...   read

 
 
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8===D

No More Heroes 2 details emerge, courtesy of Nintendo Power

Whether or not you think Suda51 makes good games, it is an undeniable fact that the guys makes interesting games. That's enough for me to justify posting some new details about the sequel last year's No More Heroes, gleaned from the latest ...   read

 
 
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8===D

Penny Arcade's Cardboard Tube Samurai a playable in Tekken 6

The Twitter feed tekkenbob, the official feed for Tekken 6, dropped an interesting twitpic today. Along with a tweet mentioning that he "got a sneak peek at something I can't talk about yet" was the above picture. Who does that lo...   read

 
 
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I am Destructoid's former Editor-In-Chief. I love corgis. I make music.

 


 


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Retrofraction

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To some, #Dtoidis a website full of good, eccentric people who shouldnt exist in the SJW-filled But for me, #Dtoidis

 
Kerrik52

Completing my second blog made me realise my writing I list a bunch of mini topics and start Thanks to everyone who gave me advice I also managed to go from 1800 words in part one to 3800 in the Editing is for the weak!Bump

 
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GOT A DEEP FRYER IN MY BEDROOOOOOM

 
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Went to see Storks with some Was a surprisingly funny movie that got quite a few laughs out of

 
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Welp now I need to both try to loose some weight and put on some muscles too, because when I asked my boyfriend if he would like if I got all muscley so I could dom him even better he got really, really, reeeaaaaaalllly It was

 
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Persona5ImportAdventures: Finally figured out what the outdoor theme is Luuuuuuuuv Beats Persona 3 & 4s respective

 
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Surprisingly, Bitch Planet might be one of the most important books that have come out in a long The questions it asks about the equality of the modern woman hit extremely Above all else, its just a damn good

 
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My mental state when doing assignments for a required college course I have no interest in:

 

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