Gaming News, Game Reviews, Game Trailers, Tech News

dtoid   |   japanator   |   flixist   |   tomopop   |   store

Fenriff blog header photo
Fronts 2Posts 94Blogs 67Following 4Followers 21


On Destructoid:
Most Comments

more notable stories


Who updates the homepage?
Our Staff
What is Destructoid?
Long story
Can I submit a story?
Dark theme?
Site rules?
Douche lightly
Ethics much?
Read this
Common sense
Who owns my posts?
You do

Get in touch

Editorial contacts
Meet our staff
Ask a question
Get support
Story idea?
Everything else
Get in touch


Loving a game, Despite its flaws


Video games are meant to be fun. Well, unless they're made by David Cage I guess. The feeling you get when playing a game you truly find enjoyable is one of the best feelings you can get as a gamer, as it's what we strive for. Often times though, we come across games that we hope will be fun, but turn us away instead. Maybe it's the flaws, maybe it's the difference in taste, who knows. Sometimes however, we are able to look past the flaws that exist and truly fall for a game, even when we know that it's got its fair share of problems. That's what I want to talk about today.

No game is perfect, but some do have more flaws than others. For example, a game I really enjoy playing is Dragon's Dogma. I've played through it twice, and every time I know that there are problems there but I just never let them get in the way of my experience. The plot is nearly nonexistant for the entire middle of the game, the pawns don't shut up, and when they do stop talking long enough to act they often don't do what they should. I always notice these things when I sit down to Dragon's Dogma, but I never stop playing because of them. Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning is another great example of a game with plenty of problems but I constantly think "I wouldn't mind messing around on there some more." Hell, Reckoning is one of the few games I've actually platinumed on PS3, that took some time. Many of the game's sidequests feel like they were pulled right from World of Warcraft, and boy are there a lot of them. The voice acting nearly never fits to the lips of those speaking and the plot, which has you wondering just who you were before you died, leads to a pretty unsatisfying conclusion. All the same, I always have fun when I venture back into the world of Amalur, whether I choose to wield feyblade or chakram.

Every now and then a game comes out that seems to be nothing but flaws. Most recently we've seen the likes of The War Z and Aliens: Colonial Marines, both of which had fiascoes surrounding their development and releases which were arguably more interesting than the games themselves. The War Z wanted so badly to be the next DayZ (a game which I haven't played) but failed to really accomplish much of anything. It was a game that I paid for solely so I could experience just how bad it supposedly was. Of the few hours that I played it I died more to other players than I died to zombies by a long shot. Nothing about the game appealed to me, and yet people play it. They not only play it, they enjoy it. The other catastrophe is Colonial Marines, a game which played on fans emotions and nostalgia for years. Constantly being cancelled or delayed, until finally a glorious reveal by Gearbox of a game that looked like everything they had been waiting for, until those fans got their hands on it and they saw that not everything that glittered was gold. And yet, despite all of the immense hatred that went out to Randy Pitchford and Gearbox, people not only bought it, there were and are people who defend it.

I'm not here to criticize these people. Just the opposite in fact, I envy these people in a way. As I said before, games are made to be enjoyed. If a game can be incredibly flawed but still enjoyed by many, does it say more about the game or the player? To pick up a game, play it, enjoy it, and move on to the next without the disappointment or longing that others feel when playing the same game is something I only wish I could do every time I picked up a game. I don't like to not like things. When I am disappointed by something, I am truly disappointed that I'm disappointed by it, if that makes sense. I could go on for days talking about games that I liked but can see all the flaws in. Likewise I could talk about all the games that I wanted to like but couldn't help be disappointed by, despite how much others liked them, but I think I'll save that for another write up.

How about you? What games do you really enjoy despite their flaws? What is your Kingdoms of Amalur?
Login to vote this up!


Elsa   1
Fenriff   1
ManicWZRD   1



Please login (or) make a quick account (free)
to view and post comments.

 Login with Twitter

 Login with Dtoid

Three day old threads are only visible to verified humans - this helps our small community management team stay on top of spam

Sorry for the extra step!


About Fenriffone of us since 8:53 PM on 12.21.2012

Name's Josh. I'm 27, play pretty much any kind of game, and have since I was old enough to hold a controller.

Read Huge: Top Stories