Why is Kirby so angry in the US, anyway? - destructoid

Why is Kirby so angry in the US, anyway?

8:00 PM on 04.28.2014

Jordan Devore

Managing Editor

In Japan, cute (i.e., normal) Kirby 'brings in the most people to play'

Have you ever noticed how Kirby has mean-looking eyebrows on box art in the US? It's one of those things that can't be unseen, like the little arrow in the FedEx logo. Anyway, I've never understood it -- Kirby is such a feel-good franchise -- but we have an explanation.

Or at least an attempt at one. "What we have heard [from Nintendo of America] is that strong, tough Kirby that's really battling hard is a more appealing sign of Kirby, so that's what we feature in the US," Kirby: Triple Deluxe director Shinya Kumazaki told GameSpot.

"For the Japanese versions we are, at HAL, involved in everything throughout development, including the package design. The most powerful image of Kirby is that cute image, we think that's the one that appeals to the widest audience."

Ahead of Triple Deluxe's release this week, I've been playing a bit of Kirby Super Star. The game is many things -- including one of the best titles in the franchise and an essential part of the Super Nintendo library -- but, like newer installments, it isn't angry. It's, y'know, the opposite of that.

Why is Kirby always angry in the US? Nintendo explains [GameSpot]


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