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Here are some recommendations for Club Nintendo's new massive reward dump

Feb 02 // Chris Carter
The Wonderful 101 (Wii U - 600 Coins) I put this first because it pretty much needs to be the first game you pick up. It's one of the most original games of the past few years, and the Nintendo and Platinum partnership has definitely proven itself with titles like this and Bayonetta 2. Seriously, why are you reading this? Go get it now, then look at the rest. Super Metroid (Wii U - 200 Coins) Every year I go back and beat Super Metroid. It has a special place in my heart and it's not just due to nostalgia -- it's one of the best platformers ever made. With just the right amount of boss battles and a brilliantly creepy atmosphere, it's a joy to play and isn't so difficult that you're pulling your hair out deciding where to go. If you enjoy Metroidvanias and somehow haven't played Super, this is your next purchase. Game & Wario (Wii U - 600 Coins) I think Game & Wario gets a bad rap. It's always been a fairly niche series, but Nintendo tried some new things with Game and some of them didn't pay off for a large amount of people. Playing it with my spouse however was a joy. We loved trying to figure out where all of the hidden objects are with the "Shutter" minigame, passing the Wii U GamePad to each other when we spotted something the other didn't. We spent hours playing Sketch with parties, and Islands with each other on the couch. Fruit is a massive hit with friends as well, forcing up to four other players to "catch" and identify one thief, who sneakily uses the GamePad to hide in the crowd. If you have lots of friends over and an open mind, give Game a chance after you've picked up some of the other games on this list. Doc Louis's Punch Out!! (Wii - 250 Coins) I know what I said about non-native Wii U games, but hey, this one is exclusive! Once it's gone it's probably gone forever, and is only being offered because the service is closing down. For those of you who couldn't get into the series, you probably won't be all that impressed with what is essentially a small demo battle with one of the most iconic characters. But if you're a Punch Out!! fan, this is a piece of the franchise's history. Get it before it's gone. Kersploosh! (3DS - 150 Coins) This strange game about falling down a well is something I come back to very often. Every few months or so I'll get the itch to beat my last high score, or try out another trinket. Your object is to basically survive until you hit the bottom, utilizing a variety of different objects like pebbles, watermelons, or even a fragile egg. For a mere 150 Coins it's a great distraction if you're looking for something unique. Donkey Kong Country Returns 3D (3DS - 600 Coins) The 3DS version of Returns eliminates the only major problem I had with the original -- forced motion controls. With a tactile setup it feels identical to the Donkey Kong Country games of old, and earning every tricky collectible is now that much more attainable with a more direct control scheme. The first time I booted up Returns 3D, I spent 10 hours straight playing it. It's addicting as hell, and a must-have in your 3DS library. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (3DS - 200 Coins) This is still among the greatest handheld RPGs of all time. Out of all of the Zelda games ever made I think this one stands up as one of the easiest to pick up and play, and the DX version makes that even easier with a colorful new visual style. At 200 Coins it's a steal. Super Mario 3D Land (3DS - 600 Coins) If you want more retail games on the 3DS (or for your upcoming shiny New 3DS), 3D Land is the perfect starting point. Nintendo really outdid itself this time, adding in plenty of new concepts without resorting to a host of yawn-worthy "New" tropes. The 3D also works great, and some of the game's environments are breathtaking, even on that tiny screen. This is easily one of my top core Mario games to this day. Donkey Kong (3DS - 150 Coins) I don't think anyone expected the Game Boy version of Donkey Kong to be this good. It turned what was basically an endless arcade game into an RPG-like affair, bringing you through completely new zones and concepts. It's still the best iteration of the classic Donkey Kong formula. Kid Icarus Uprising (3DS - 700 Coins) Uprising isn't for everyone, but on a personal level I consider it one of the best games Nintendo has crafted in the past five years. It's full of charm from start to finish, from the clever and adorable script to the pitch-perfect voice acting. Every member of the cast sounds like they're having fun, and a lot of that rubs off directly onto players. The control scheme isn't perfect and I had to take breaks every hour or two because of cramping, but the adjustable difficulty slider is an excellent way to bring in newcomers and veteran shooters alike. With tons of twists and turns it's also exciting throughout, and a lot longer than I expected. This is one of the more expensive pickups, but if you have the extra coins and remember when Saturday morning cartoons were cool, you may find yourself falling in love with Uprising. Of course, this list is non-exhaustive; it just includes a few of my favorites. Make sure to recommend other pickups in the comments! Jonathan Holmes' bonus list of recommendations: Doc Louis's Punch-Out!!! The Wonderful 101 A Kappa's Trail HarmoKnight Earthbound Excitebike World Rally Sakura Samurai Tokyo Crash Mobs Donkey Kong (Game Boy)
Club Nintendo rewards photo
Lots of great stuff in there
Nintendo dropped a bomb on us today. A delightful digital bomb of over 100 games to download off Club Nintendo in exchange for your precious Coins. The service is gearing up for a remodel, but before then, all your Coins must...

BurgerTime World Tour photo
BurgerTime World Tour

BurgerTime World Tour is $5 now through April 30 before it disappears forever

Forever ever? For-EVER EVER?
Apr 17
// Brittany Vincent
MonkeyPaw Games is holding a funeral one last sale for BurgerTime: World Tour, allowing players to snap it up for only $5 before it's yanked from the digital distribution channels forever on April 30. You may be thinking th...
Club Nintendo rewards photo
Club Nintendo rewards

A Link to the Past, Metroid among Club Nintendo rewards

Let them eat cake!
Nov 05
// Kyle MacGregor
Nintendo wants to reward fans for your unrelenting fealty and has seen fit to toss some blue ribbon table scraps your way through Club Nintendo this month. In anticipation of the looming release of The Legend of Zelda: A...
Retro City Rampage photo
Retro City Rampage

Retro City Rampage has a birthday, you get the gifts

WiiWare and Steam giveaways for this weekend
Oct 12
// Jonathan Holmes
Retro City Rampage was released a year ago this week, and has gone on to great success. According to VBlank Entertainment's Brian Provinciano "It's moved 180K units now (more revenue this year than last year!), quite up sinc...

Chris' Top 5 Mega Mans photo
Chris' Top 5 Mega Mans

Ranked: The five best Mega Man games (Carter's picks)

The Blue Bomber's best, ranked
Jun 25
// Chris Carter
It's no secret that fellow Destructoid author Tony Ponce and I enjoy a hearty serving of Mega Man on a daily basis. While I'll let Tony speak for himself in his own "Ranked" article, the reasons why I love the Mega Man series...
Nintendo Download photo
Nintendo Download

Nintendo Download Europe: Link, he come to town

Oracle of Seasons and Ages have arrived
May 27
// Tony Ponce
Big doings across the pond this week, as the The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons / Ages arrive on the 3DS Virtual Console. These Capcom-developed Game Boy Color adventures are two standalone parts of an overarching ta...
Swords and Soldiers 3D photo
Swords and Soldiers 3D

Swords and Soldiers 3D is a thing

Here's video proof
May 06
// Chris Carter
Swords and Soldiers is one of my favorite time wasters ever. As a castle defense game, you're basically tasked with building units, sending them off in a straight line to fight, and hoping your enemy doesn't counter or outwi...

Retro City Rampage sales, threshold hopes, XBLA regrets

Brian Provinciano breaks it down
Mar 30
// Jonathan Holmes
Retro City Rampage was in development for over six years, costing thousands of dollars and sleepless nights to develop. Brian Provinciano, the creator of the game, is finally getting a return on his investment. You may see so...

Review: Vampire Crystals

Mar 16 // Tony Ponce
Vampire Crystals (WiiWare)Developer: Shanblue InteractivePublisher: Shanblue InteractiveRelease: December 20, 2012MSRP: 1000 Wii Points As you learn in the prologue, vampires and zombies have formed an amicable partnership in a place called Creepyland. This symbiosis is disturbed when the evil dragon Ghoros inspires the zombies to revolt, thus a pair of young zombie-hunting vampires must pick up their boomsticks and mow down their former allies through 18 levels across three worlds. You can play with the Wii Remote and Nunchuk, using the pointer plus the B trigger to aim in any direction, but twin-stick purists will prefer the Classic Controller configuration. Simply tilt the right stick in the direction you want your bullets to fly and keep on pushing through the waves of foes. Very simple, very basic -- it just works. You have two objectives in each level: defeat a certain number of enemies and collect a certain number of crystals, both within the time limit. Aiding your campaign are randomly spawning weapons and items, from a Contra-inspired spread gun to hunks of ham that can distract enemies from attacking. The further into the game you progress, the better the selection of items become. Every sixth level is a boss showdown, in which you must contend with a giant monster while also warding off an infinite swarm of minions. The boss' own attacks are never as much of a headache as all the other action happening at once, so encounters boil down to how well you can distribute attention towards both threats while being mindful of the ever-present timer. [embed]248791:47585:0[/embed] The game quickly falls into a routine of repetition. The levels themselves are enclosed arenas, and you'll be running around in circles picking up freshly spawned crystals while avoiding freshly spawned baddies, over and over again until your eyes grow weary. I actually started nodding off in later stages, despite the unrelenting chaos. There's simply no way any game can maintain such high intensity without burning you out. When beset by throngs of skeleton warriors and goblins, the camera view often makes it difficult to properly see what your character is doing. On the upside, you can select one of three camera angles at the character select screen. On the downside, you can't make adjustments to it once in play, minimizing the effectiveness of camera control. Then there are the difficulty spikes that appear without warning. You could be breezing along fairly unimpeded and suddenly hit a wall of frustration. The second boss in particular is unlike anything else you'll face in the game -- it's an ogre that can only be damaged from the rear, frequently enters an invulnerability state with the side effect of imbuing all minor enemies with enhanced speed and strength, slows your movements with ground pounds, and launches volleys of flaming boulders, all while monsters harass you and mutant plants spit rapid-fire seeds. It's almost as though these challenges were scaled with multiplayer in mind, and to hell with solo adventurers. Speaking of multiplayer, there is no drop-in co-op, a missed opportunity for a title so firmly rooted in old-school arcade sensibilities. Even worse, solo and co-op modes have separate save files. So that ogre boss I just mentioned? If you invited a couple of buddies over to try to take the beast on together, you'd be surprising to learn you have to start all the way back in World 1-1. What excuse is there for that? After beating the final boss, the story pulls a Ghosts 'n Goblins and forces you to replay the entire campaign for the true ending, only now the levels take place at night and enemies are unfathomably more aggressive. I died three times during the revamped first stage before dropping the controller and saying, "No more." Clearing the three worlds once only requires a handful of hours, but the tedium that sets in early on makes it feel like far more time has elapsed. There was no way I was suffering through all that again. I can appreciate the classic arcade spirit of Vampire Crystals, but it does little to mask the shortcomings of old-school design while adding its own set of issues. Playing it single-player is chore, but convincing a group to play with you might be even more laborious. There just isn't enough meat on these dusty old bones.
Vampire Crystals review photo
Smashed TV
The rare act of generosity aside, support for WiiWare has been reduced to almost nothing, leaving the platform to shuffle along until the earth swallows it up. How fitting then that one of its few releases in recent months wo...

Retro City Rampage photo
Retro City Rampage

Retro City Rampage Wii version a '$20,000 gift to fans'

Brian Provinciano doesn't expect to profit from WiiWare release
Mar 02
// Kyle MacGregor
Brian Provinciano wanted to keep his word. That is the reason Retro City Rampage released on WiiWare earlier this week. Its developer has no expectation of turning a profit on the platform, calling the move a "...
Retro City Rampage photo
Steam version will also receive prototype via update
Retro City Rampage for WiiWare missed its January release window, but creator Brian Provinciano has set his foot down and stated that the game will finally arrive next week on February 28. RCR's entire development history has...

Mega Man 10 concept art photo
Mega Man 10 concept art

Check out some sweet, sweet concept art for Mega Man 10

Some of these concepts are way better than the final design
Feb 04
// Chris Carter
The Mega Man Network has shared some Mega Man 10 robot master concept art from the R20+5 blowout book, and man is it interesting. Most of these, I think, look better than the final designs. Some of them in particular are much...
Retro City Rampage photo
Find that shoe!
Retro City Rampage was one of the most interesting releases of 2012. Written and designed largely by one man, the game was in development for years, leaving hungry fans to lay in wait. Xbox 360 and Wii owners may still b...


Retro City Rampage set to drop in January on WiiWare

Dec 24
// Chris Carter
Ever since Retro City Rampage hit pretty much everything other than WiiWare (and XBLA), fans have been waiting patiently for any sort of Wii release date news. Finally, we now have a soft release window of "January 2013," whi...

Nintendo Download 11/22/12: Thanksgiving Edition

Gaming makes a great escape
Nov 22
// Dale North
Stay young. Or single. Getting hitched changes everything. Thanksgiving turns from a joyous occasion of mindless gorging to a tricky affair at best, with in-laws, planning, babies, and stress to deal with. I'm going to use th...

Nintendo Download 11/18/12: U Day Edition

Did you get your Wii U?
Nov 18
// Chris Carter
Today, on the launch of the Wii U (on what shall be known as "U Day"), you can nab five eShop games, and a bulk number of full downloadable titles (I hope you have your external HDD ready!). On the eShop side of things w...

Nintendo Download 11/15/12: Mickey Edition

What's the time? Disney time
Nov 15
// Chris Carter
The 3DS has a decent amount of bulky titles this week, like Monster Shooter ($6.99), Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion ($39.99), Hotel Transylvania ($29.99), Myst ($29.99), and American Mensa Academy ($29.99). DSiWare is rocking...

Nintendo Download 11/8/12: Paper Edition

Paper Mario!
Nov 08
// Chris Carter
The 3DS eShop is bringing some high price items to show off this week, with Pokedex 3D Pro ($14.99 -- wait, what?!) and Paper Mario: Sticker Star ($39.99). Remember that the Paper Mario digital download is included in the Don...

Nintendo Download: Gnome Edition

David would be proud. Maybe.
Nov 01
// Chris Carter
You like gnomes, right? Of course you do! When they're not creeping you out or stealing your underpants, I guess they can be alright. Well today you're getting your weekly dose of gnome-age, whether you like it or not, with 2...

Review: Retro City Rampage

Oct 31 // Tony Ponce
Retro City Rampage (PC [reviewed], PlayStation Network, PlayStation Vita, WiiWare, Xbox Live Arcade)Developer: Vblank EntertainmentPublisher: Vblank EntertainmentRelease: October 9, 2012 (PC, PSN, Vita) / Q4 2012 (WiiWare, XBLA)MSRP: $14.99 (PC, PSN, Vita) / TBA (WiiWare, XBLA) Retro City Rampage has had quite the colorful history. Originally conceived as the NES homebrew project Grand Theftendo, Brian decided to shift development to PC in order to escape the NES' limitations. From then on, the game started to gain an identity of its own. RCR may be an open-world sandbox, but a GTA clone it is not. It is a melting pot of ideas and inspiration, a conglomerate of cameos and pop culture references that are woven into the fabric so seamlessly that it feels like they truly belong together. It's Brian's own Who Framed Roger Rabbit, and the in-game world of Theftropolis is his Toontown. So rich is the city with heartfelt nods to cherished icons of yesteryear that you can't even go 30 seconds without being slammed by a parade of nostalgia. As you cruise the streets, you may notice the Ninja Turtles' Party Wagon or the A-Team's van driving by. Environments and objects straight out of Super Mario Bros., The Legend of Zelda, Sonic the Hedgehog, and more dot the landscape. There's even a boxing gym operated by a man who is totally a dead ringer for Doc Louis from Punch-Out!! [embed]237235:45596[/embed] A lot of these references are window dressing, so it might be easy to pass RCR off as lacking substance. That couldn't be further from the truth. The biggest references of all are built into the missions themselves, straddling the line between parody and homage but always with love and attention to detail. In one mission, you break into the home of the very Batman-esque Biffman, don his costume, and patrol the streets in search of Biffman's nemesis the Jester. In another mission, you bust onto the set of a Saved by the Bell knockoff during a live taping, beat up the high school boys, then take the girl back to your place for some "iced tea." In yet another mission, you have to dive into the reservoir to deactivate bombs in a recreation of the infamous dam level from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles on the NES. These are the kinds of adventures you'll embark upon during the main missions, but you might want to kill some time driving around the street, jacking cars, and mowing down pedestrians instead. The more carnage you create, the more your notoriety grows, attracting the attention of ever more aggressive cops and eventually the military. As with GTA, there's something morbidly cathartic about spreading wanton chaos and destruction -- even more so when the world is populated by pixelated, toy-like caricatures of beach bums, gymnasts, and mariachis. Like I metioned, there is an overarching story. You are a hired thug known only as "Player," who is hurtled through time after stealing Bill and Ted's phone booth in front of a convenience store. Stranded in the future, you are fortunate enough to bump into Doc Choc, who's willing to let you use his DeLorean time machine if you can help repair it. Thus, you must track down the missing pieces of the machine, following leads and taking odd jobs along the way. During your quest, you frequently cross paths with your former employer, A.T. Corp., which holds a monopoly on nearly every industry in Theftropolis, from the media to software development. The biggest thorn in your side is the company's lead scientist, Dr. Von Buttnik, who rides around in a wrecking ball-swinging pod like a certain blue speedster's nemesis. In a stroke of hilarious cleverness, Player's conflict with A.T. Corp. sidesteps all player agency concerns. Player claims to be disgusted by A.T. Corp.'s nefarious business practices, which would seem at odds with his penchant for city-wide mayhem. When asked about this contradiction directly, Player flatly states that the two behaviors are not mutually exclusive. By embracing such a contradiction, Retro City Rampage allows you to have your cake and eat it too! Beyond the core levels, you unlock sub-missions that task you with using a specific weapon or tool to destroy a number of pedestrians or cars or to earn a certain amount of points within a time limit. You are then rated on your performance with a bronze, silver, or gold medal, and your score is posted onto the leaderboards. While scoring is typically very straightforward -- link kills together for a streak bonus -- I had serious issues in sub-missions involving handheld explosives like grenades or dynamite. Destroying people or vehicles with these items yields very few points, so the trick is to cause a chain reaction by using the explosion of one vehicle to destroy nearby ones. For some odd reason, this doesn't always result in a substantial amount of points. Maybe I've yet to discover exactly what triggers scoring chains when it comes to explosives, but I find them to be very random, making these some of the most difficult portions of the entire game. Then there are the guest mini-games, starring Commander Video from the BIT.TRIP series, Meat Boy, and even Harley Morenstein and Muscles Glasses from Epic Meal Time. Commander Video's game is an abridged version of BIT.TRIP RUNNER, Meat Boy's takes its cues from Rad Racer (use 3D glasses for stereoscopic mode!), and the EMT crew's closely resembles "Test Your Might" from Mortal Kombat. Clearing these games unlocks the characters' likenesses in either Free Roaming Mode or in the plastic surgery office alongside the Dtoid crew's mugs. The EMT game is not all that hard, but the BIT.TRIP and Meat Boy ones may make you want to smack your head against a wall. They start easily enough, but the challenge quickly ramps up. Particularly in BIT.TRIP, I was having extreme difficulty bouncing off alligator heads using the Xbox 360 controller. When I switched to the keyboard instead, jumping became far more responsive. That may have simply been a mechanical problem with my controller, but as I didn't have any similar issues elsewhere, I'm left to wonder. Customization is another major feature of RCR. You can change the border around the game screen to look like various monitors or arcade cabinets, add CRT scanlines, or apply color filters to simulate the look of old console, handheld, or computer software. If you want to pretend you are playing on an old VGA monitor, you can! If you want to recreate the feeling of squinting at the Game Boy's tiny spinach-colored square, that's possible too! Whatever tickles your nostalgia bone, there's an option available to satisfy your desires. Options extend to play style as well. By pressing and holding the fire button, you will lock onto the nearest target in your line of sight, but you can also use the right stick on a controller to enable twin-stick shooting, Smash TV style. You can dispatch enemies either by shooting them, bashing them, or running over them. n addition, you can pull a Mario and jump on their heads, a quick means to escape a tight squeeze when you are besieged on all sides. There's even a basic cover system for fans of Gears of War because... hell... why not? I haven't even touched upon the amazing chiptune soundtrack, composed by notable game composers Leonard "Freaky DNA" Paul (Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 2, NBA Jam 2010) and Jake "virt" Kaufman (Shantae, Double Dragon Neon) as well as game music arranger extraordinaire Matt "Norrin_Radd" Creamer. Their tunes can be heard on the various radio stations while cruising through Theftropolis, the pulse-pounding bass and melodies giving voice to RCR's marriage of anarchy and candy-coated nostalgia. Unfortunately, the on-screen action at any time can be so overwhelming that it drowns out the music. At its worst, the soundtrack sounds like chaotic noise, hardly the catchy rhythms we associate with 8-bit gaming. That isn't so much the soundtrack's fault as it is the sheer concentration of activity that fills every second of play time, but it's nonetheless disappointing. It's this chaos that serves as both RCR's greatest triumph and biggest failing. To go anywhere and do anything, to never go a minute without being bombarded by visual and aural stimulation -- that all sounds good on paper; in practice, it often comes off as distracting. It's a jumble of events that fly past so quickly that your sense of focus will fall apart if you aren't completely devoted. But that was always going to be a problem, considering the ambitious decade-long journey Brian embarked upon. He wanted this to be his magnum opus, a love letter to everything that ever influenced him or made him smile. At the very least, the game never feels bloated or drawn out -- if you only attempt the main story missions, you'll be done in a matter of hours. However, if you want to lose yourself in the city or embark upon an Easter egg quest, the size and scope make for the perfect playground. Will there be people who don't like Retro City Rampage? Of course. In many ways, it bites off more than it can chew, especially when it comes to some of the one-time gimmick missions. Regardless, it is an ambitious achievement that celebrates everything that gaming has been and ever will be. It's clever, funny, outrageous, and even a bit frustrating, but there is a genuine respect for both the players and the sources of all the referenced material. I've barely scratched the surface of what secrets and activities are in store, but I'll leave the rest to you to discover on your own.
Retro City Rampage photo
Grand Theftendo
[Full Disclosure: Not only do current and former Destructoid staff appear as unlockable character skins in the game, there's also a main story mission during which you go inside a giant Mr. Destructoid robot. For these reaso...


Nintendo Download: Liberation Edition

Liberation Maiden headlines this week
Oct 25
// Chris Carter
Nintendo starts things off with a bang today with two high profile titles: Liberation Maiden (3DS eShop) and NightSky (3DS eShop) -- expect our reviews soon for both. For the 3DS Virtual Console, there's Ghost'n Goblins (eSho...

Nintendo Download: Vic Viper Edition

It's Gradtastic
Oct 18
// Chris Carter
Today is a decent day to be a 3DS owner, as a heap of stuff is headed your way. First off we have Sparkle Snapshots 3D (3DS eShop, $5.99) and Gradius (3DS VC, $4.99) headed to the eShop, along with a Moshi Monsters Moshlings ...
Dtoid staff in a game?! photo
Dtoid staff in a game?!

How to unlock Destructoid staff in Retro City Rampage

Look, mom!
Oct 09
// Conrad Zimmerman
So, by now, you've obviously bought and downloaded Retro City Rampage (or are desperately waiting for it to arrive on your platform) because I made it pretty clear a couple of hours ago that this was a thing you were go...

Nintendo Download: Cave Story Edition

Oct 04
// Chris Carter
Nintendo Downloads are usually nothing to go bonkers over, but today, a number of you might be bouncing off the walls at a chance to buy these offerings. Firstly, if you don't own Cave Story four times already, you can pick u...

Nintendo Download: I hate snakes edition

Sep 20
// Chris Carter
Pictured: the best Indiana Jones movie. This week is dedicated to La-Mulana (1000 Wii Points), the remake I thought would never see the light of day on WiiWare. If you haven't experienced this game before and enjoy a cha...

La-Mulana launch trailer shows development timeline

Sep 19
// Conrad Zimmerman
La-Mulana releases on WiiWare today and, to celebrate, Nigoro looks back on the long road which brought them to this day. Starting at the beginning of development on the free version all the way back in 2001 and moving ...

Be a big cheater: Watch this La-Mulana beginner's guide

Sep 17
// Chris Carter
The La-Mulana remake will arrive on WiiWare soon (September 20th) for 1000 Wii Points ($10) in America, Europe, and Australia! In honor of this joyous occasion, Nigoro has concocted a "beginners guide" video and shared i...

'All' VC and WiiWare games confirmed for Wii U transfer

Sep 13
// Chris Carter
Back at E3 2012, our own Samit Sarkar reported an interesting tidbit of news: Nintendo was "working" on the ability to transfer old Wii digital software over to the Wii U.Well, as of today, we finally have an answer. Accordin...

A WiiWare trailer for La-Mulana surfaces

Indie platformer soon to make long-awaited arrival on service
Sep 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
As you may have heard me mention recently on Podtoid, I've become quite absorbed by La-Mulana of late, playing the enhanced PC version, making maps and taking notes. It's an incredibly refreshing experience, one which d...

La-Mulana IS coming to WiiWare after all on September 20!

Aug 29
// Tony Ponce
Good things come to those who wait! When Nicalis decided that it would not be publishing the WiiWare version of La-Mulana, it felt like a bitter end to an extensive but ultimately fruitless dev cycle. It was eventually releas...

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