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Forza 6 photo
Forza 6

Forza 6: now with more Halo skulls


I only ever use Grunt Birthday Party
Aug 19
// Vikki Blake
Forza 6 will feature a range of new mods, based loosely upon the Skulls feature from the Halo games, and some will be rarer than others.  "Mods are game modifiers, similar to perks in Forza Horizon 2 or Skulls in Halo 4,...
Forza Motorsport 6 photo
Forza Motorsport 6

The Forza 6 team is way too hyped about rain


They recreated every damn puddle y'all
Aug 04
// Kyle MacGregor
Look, Forza Motorsport 6's dynamic rain features might be all well and good, but to your average dude that just wants to race cars real fast, these guys are way too stoked about some puddles.

Forza Motorsport 6 certainly plans on making a big splash

Jul 02 // Brett Makedonski
Did you think the rabbit hole ended there? Turn 10's not offering water physics just anywhere -- only in the places that it makes sense. An example Cooper gave us was that it never rains in Dubai so players will never see rainfall there. From our understanding, there isn't even the option to set up a custom race with rain on that track. If Turn 10's obsession with water sounds a bit like overkill, well yeah, maybe it is. It got to the point where another journalist and I just said "Rain" to one another whenever we crossed paths for the rest of E3. I attribute it to what I call the "EA Sports Complex." The racing in Forza has been carefully honed over the course of a decade now. Just like EA Sports and its titles such as Madden and FIFA, Turn 10 can afford to focus on the smaller facets of its game in an effort to inch ever closer to realism. We have no real indication how well all this rain will actually turn out. The hands-off demo we saw looked great, but it was obviously a tightly-controlled environment. Notably,Project CARS attempt at rain was where the game was visually at its best, but it also took a significant toll on the Xbox One and caused gameplay issues. If anyone has the best chance of skirting that problem, it's Turn 10 who's a first-party developer and presumably has the full support of Microsoft's resources. If the game isn't optimized well enough to handle all these effects, you'd have to assume they wouldn't be such a priority -- not yet, at least.  Rain usually means gloom for most people in real life. Turn 10's pinning its hopes on rain making for a fun and realistic experience in its video game. After all, who doesn't love speeding through giant puddles? And, all that water should have those cars at their absolute shiniest.
Forza Motorsport 6 photo
Raindrops keep fallin' on my hood
When I looked at my E3 schedule this year and saw I had a Forza Motorsport 6 meeting at the Microsoft booth, I expected they wanted to talk to me about cars. That's the crux of Forza after all: cars racing real...

Forza cars photo
Forza cars

Dom! Forza Horizon 2 got a (wolf) pack of cars!


Eight cars, five dollars
Apr 07
// Brett Makedonski
Some of us live a quarter mile at a time. Some of us are always fast and furious, not just when we're Fast and Furious. Some of us have nitrous oxide for blood, and a gas tank for a brain. If speed's your everything, your re...

Review: Forza Horizon 2

Sep 25 // Brett Zeidler
Forza Horizon 2 (Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Playground Games (Xbox One) / Sumo Digital (Xbox 360) / Turn 10Publisher: Microsoft StudiosReleased: September 30, 2014MSRP: $59.99 (Xbox One) / $49.99 (Xbox 360) If you're familiar with the first Forza Horizon, you'll feel right at home. The Horizon Festival is taking place again, except this time it's all the way over in southern Europe by way of France and Italy. Your role is, yet again, to become the top Horizon racer by collecting different colored wristbands as you win championships and work your way up the ladder. Your progress is tracked a couple different ways. Obviously an overall level is raised by completing activities, and every level gives you one Wheelspin. The Wheelspin is a slot machine that either gives you a credit payout or a free car. I've gotten some sweet rewards from this thing. Tracking your progress is really easy with a win/loss ratio, but in Horizon it's all about how cool you look while doing all this. Drifting, near misses, getting air, and destroying things in the world can all add to a skill chain if done in a row. After accruing up a certain amount of points, these unlock skill points that can be spent on perks. Everyone loves perks. These are pretty standard, and increase things like bonuses, XP, or unlock certain abilities that make life easier.  There's a couple characters that interact with you over the course of the game; Ben and Ashley. Ben is the guy. He's the type of guy everyone wants to know, party with, and, in Horizon 2, he's that guy everyone wants to drive with. He's the guy leading the Horizon Festival, after all. Be prepared to hear him say "mate" at the end of every single race. I promise it gets funny eventually. Ultimately, he ends up helping the player learn the mechanics of the game, suggesting where they should go next, and even hooks them up with new rides every once in awhile. Ashley is the mechanic that fixes up all those new rides, and that's all she's really present for outside of being a support character. As far as story and character development goes, that's as in-depth as it gets in Horizon 2. That's really all one expects from a racing game, anyway. It's non-intrusive (nor over the top) to -- and provides a good foundation for -- the real focus: racing. Forza Horizon 2 doesn't attempt to shake up the tried-and-true racing formula. The championship event races break down into one of two types: beat everyone to the finish line in one long sprint or in a traditional lap-based race. Instead of structural variety, Horizon instead relies on locale and visual variety to keep players interested. This was totally the right call. Forza Motorsport 5 was already a visual treat, but the heavily modified engine used in Horizon 2 is absolutely breathtaking. All of the 200-something cars are painstakingly detailed (interiors and all) as always, and are convincingly true-to-life. Southern Europe features back country, densely packed urban areas, coast towns, and everything in-between. It's a very, very big world that's incredibly open and just begs to be explored. For the first time, Forza now has a dynamic weather system. Truly, this is the standout visual element in the game. Sunsets and sunrises are amazing, and never look the same as the cloud placement/density changes their appearance every single time. At any moment, thick clouds could fill an entirely blue sky and, suddenly, there's a downpour of rain. Radio personalities will also comment on this when it happens, which is also pretty cool the first few times it happens. This isn't just a visual trick either, as rain will puddle up in the roads, bead up on the cars (and windshields), and create slick conditions. The visual effect on the windshield is particularly jaw-dropping; light will refract off of each individual bead of rain and cause visual interference just as it does in real life. Windshield wipers will automatically clear the windshield, and will leave a line of water wherever their turn radius ends. You have never seen something like this done in a racing game before, and it's something you really need to see for yourself. In motion, everything comes together to create one of the best-looking titles out there right now. Horizon 2 runs in full 1080p at 30 frames per second, never dipping below that. Some may have an issue with a racing game running at 30 FPS, but it's honestly no problem here. Everything runs incredibly smooth and feels perfectly responsive. If I wasn't told it ran at that frame rate, I would've been none-the-wiser. Having a vast, detailed world can still feel empty fairly quickly if there's not a lot to do, and thankfully Horizon 2 does not come up short in activities to partake in. Outside of over 150 championship events, there are Showcase events, barn finds, Bucket List activities, speed traps, and online modes. Showcases have the player up against some type of machinery (not a car) in a head-to-head race. They're easily the craziest out of all the events, and, despite being blatant smoke and mirrors, created some of the most memorable moments in the game. Since there's so few of them, I won't spoil any of the surprise. Definitely be on the lookout for these every few championship events. Barn finds are nothing new, and still task the player with finding an old, rusted-out vehicles in abandoned barns around the map. They're actually pretty difficult to find. I found an army jeep in one of them, which felt particularly silly to bring into a racing event, but things like that fit right in with the rest of Horizon. It's just a fun atmosphere. Bucket List activities are pretty straightforward as well. These also involve finding cars around the map, placed on the side of roads. However, these cars are usually the best in the game and give a taste of what they're like by completing small activities in them (with varying degrees of difficulty). Speed traps are simply just cameras that radar how fast you're going on a particular road. Sometimes I'd try and beat my personal best on these over and over before I realized I spent a good twenty minutes doing this. At any point, two button clicks will take you to the online lobby system. No menu navigating or lobby juggling needed, as it just works within the game and brings you together with strangers or friends in the full game world. You can participate in road trips, championship events, or explore parts of the map together. It's the type of thing where the structured events are certainly fun, but I imagine the community coming up with pick-up games that add to the multiplayer's longevity. The avoidance of too much menu navigation extends into the rest of the game as well. If you have a Kinect hooked up, a digital personal assistant named ANNA can take your commands and make life a whole lot easier. ANNA allows you to just about play the entire game without ever using a menu of your own doing. Say you know you just want to do the next championship event -- you can have ANNA set the GPS navigator to take you to whichever one is nearest. She'll also provide suggestions of things to do occasionally, or you can just outright ask her what it is she thinks you should do next. This system creates a nice flow, and truly enhances the experience. It's the perfect use of the Kinect. I'm all about a stellar soundtrack, and Horizon 2 nails it. There's something to be said about driving a Lamborghini through a super dense field somewhere over 150 mph, barely able to see, with Chvrches is playing in the background. A soundtrack where Chromeo, The Clash, or Thee Oh Sees are just as likely to play as Vilvaldi, Schubert, or Tchaikovsky excites me like nothing else. Playground Games really knows how to make a road trip playlist. With the original Forza Horizon, we were a little disappointed in the frequency and length of the loading screens. Unfortunately, that's still the case here. Again, the loading screens aren't overwhelmingly long, but they appear before and after every single race. All that time adds up to quite a lot. It's understandable that they're there, but I could've done with less of them. If you were a fan of the original or its simulator brother, there's no reason to pass up Horizon 2. It's simulation enough to not lose longtime fans, while easing the realistic driving just enough to allow new players to jump in and not feel like the car physics are working against them the whole time. Every element in Forza Horizon 2 adds up to an exceptional experience. The story isn't over the top so as to get in the way of racing, driving feels as good as it ever did in Forza Motorsport, there's a ton of things to do, and the game looks absolutely beautiful -- especially the long-awaited dynamic weather system. Forza Horizon 2 is a must-have on the Xbox One.
Forza Horizon 2 review photo
Good racing, mate
The original Forza Horizon impressed us back in 2012 with its ability to incorporate what we already loved about Forza Motorsport into an absolutely massive open-world sandbox racing game, while not completely ditching its si...

Forza Horizon 2 photo
Forza Horizon 2

The new Forza Horizon 2 cars are mostly vehicles you'll never drive in real life


I bet you could swing a 1977 Ford Escort, though
Aug 05
// Brett Makedonski
The new batch of cars revealed for Forza Horizon 2 brings about a bit of a staunch reminder that open-world racing games aren't all that realistic. Let's face it -- there's a slim chance you'll ever be behind the wheel o...
Forza photo
Forza

Forza Motorsport 5's Hot Wheels Car Pack is silly


They're not, like, miniature die-cast cars or anything
Jul 01
// Jordan Devore
Hot Wheels? I'll admit it -- I got slightly excited. Those plastic orange tracks were my jam as a kid. But Forza Motorsport 5's Hot Wheels Car Pack, the last of the monthly car packs for the game, is really just more real-wor...
Forza photo
Forza

Forza Motorsport 5's game of the year edition is lacking


You're better off buying the game on sale
Jun 06
// Jordan Devore
Turn 10 Studios announced a Racing Game of the Year Edition for Forza Motorsport 5 by way of IGN, scheduled to arrive on July 22, 2014 for Xbox One for $60/£50/€70. Given how much DLC there is for the game, you'd b...
Forza photo
Forza

Forza Horizon 2 will display at 1080p, running at 30 frames per second


The difference between a game with set tracks, and an open world
Jun 06
// Abel Girmay
So it seems Forza Horizon 2, unlike Forza 5, will not be running at 60 frames per second. While it will still display in 1080p, the open-world nature of Horizon doesn't seems to play nice with the idea of a locked 60fps rate,...
Forza photo
Forza

Turn 10 is adding 20 more cars to the Forza Motorsport 5 season pass


Good for them
May 23
// Jordan Devore
The Forza Motorsport 5 Car Pass will give owners more than initially promised, which is the kind of sentence I rarely if ever get the opportunity to write. Let's cherish this moment. Specifically, Turn 10 Studios has plans fo...
Forza photo
Forza

Forza Motorsport 5 gets another free track tomorrow


And more cars, if you're a season pass owner
Apr 09
// Jordan Devore
Additional tracks for Forza Motorsport 5 is a very good thing indeed, I think we can all agree. Especially when they're delivered as free DLC. Like the Road America track before it, Turn 10 is giving away another course, sout...
Deals photo
Deals

Forza 5 free with Xbox One purchases in the US


For a limited time starting next week
Mar 06
// Jordan Devore
Next week, Microsoft will roll out a deal in the United States which includes a free digital copy of Forza Motorsport 5 with Xbox One purchases at "select retailers." This pack-in will be available for a limited time, accordi...
Forza Motorsport  photo
Forza Motorsport

Forza 5 gets free Road America track today


Plus five new cars, if you have a Season Pass
Feb 18
// Jordan Devore
It's a pleasant sight indeed to see "Forza Motorsport 5 DLC" and "free" in the same sentence. The game, which one in three Xbox One owners have picked up, according to Microsoft, is getting a free track based on Road America...
Forza photo
Forza

Forza 5 unlikely to get night racing or weather


If it does happen, it's going to be a long wait
Dec 13
// Jordan Devore
Speaking to IGN about the possibility of Forza Motorsport 5 getting night racing or weather effects, creative director Dan Greenawalt emphasized the amount of work that would need to go into such additions to the game. "When ...

Gran Turismo 6 vs. Forza Motorsport 5

Dec 06 // Dale North
Cars: Gran Turismo 6 I picked cars as the first entry for this comparison so I can rant a bit. People were loud and mad at Forza 5's 200 or so available cars. Yes, GT6 has 1,200 cars, but I'm willing to bet that most gamers won't touch many of the cars in the bottom ranks. I mean, a Daihatsu hatch isn't something you'd brag about. And Gran Turismo games offer several variations on one model. Cut the ones you'd never drive and the variations and the number would go down quite a bit. Forza 5's cars look incredible. Given the next-gen advantage, I'm sure GT6's cars would look just as nice. But, right now, Polyphony Digital's work can't touch Turn 10's. They're eye poppers. Wowzers. And Forza has all the cars you'd like to drive (or own), with none of the duds or duplicates.  Still, GT6 has the number advantage, so it wins for me. It's so nice to be able to flip through all of the offerings and drool over virtual vehicles -- it's like a game in itself. And there are some strange offerings to keep things fun, like the moon rover. The fun of experiencing so many different types of vehicle types is what really keeps me coming back to GT6's career mode -- Forza 5 doesn't have that for me. At the end of the day, we play these games because we like cars. More cars wins. Tracks: Gran Turismo 6 My biggest complaint with Forza 5 is that there are not enough tracks to keep me entertained. The tracks are both beautiful and ridiculously detailed, but I would have rather had less shine on these tracks if I could trade that for more places to race. Again, the 14 tracks that are included are great, but you see them so often in career mode that you start to tire of them. The lack of variety is bothersome, but the lack of fan-favorite tracks really stinks.  GT6's tracks may not have the photorealism and high detail of Forza 5's tracks, but the number of tracks makes up for this many times over. GT6 has 37 locations and 100 layouts. Add in the variable weather and environmental changes and there's more than enough variety to keep things fresh for hours on end. They're all so impeccably crafted that I think tracks feel better on Polyphony Digital's side. Graphics: Forza Motorsport 5 Man. No contest. The graphical leap between current-generation and next-generation visuals is huge. A side-by-side test is painful. It seems like there's just enough power under the hood of the PS3 to make for a fine racing videogame. But you can't help but think that they ran out of power when you look at GT6's static scenery, pop up book trees, and jaggy edges. The cars look great, as do many of the tracks, but you don't have to look hard to find rough edges. There's so much more headroom with the Xbox One that Forza 5 gets 1080p 60fps visuals with some of the best lighting and detail work I've ever seen in a videogame. Polygon counts are much higher, and everything from car damage to shadows looks much more detailed.  Again, no contest. Control: Gran Turismo 6 The same difference in processing power between the two systems should point to Forza 5 coming out on top when it comes to control, right?  In my mind, the Gran Turismo franchise has always won out on driving physics. GT6 has new physics that dig down deeper into its already great feel. Handling feels better than ever now, and that's why I enjoy playing GT6 just slightly more than Forza 5.  I wouldn't be surprised to hear that there's much more going on under the hood of Forza 5 -- It certainly feels like there's a lot more going on. Forza 5 feels more dynamic, and there's certainly more visual feedback for what's going on in its simulations, but all the calculations in the world won't matter if they don't feel good. To be clear, Forza 5's driving feels great. But GT6's driving feels fantastic.    Career Mode: Gran Turismo 6 Gran Turismo 6 sticks to its guns, once again putting players of its career mode through a progression that has them working up from a little turd of a car to the fastest cars in the world. While I've never loved the license tests, I do enjoy the slow burn of the GT career modes, and I always appreciate having to earn my way into the best cars. There's also the joy of experiencing so many different types of cars along the way. GT6 keeps that spirit, so know that its career mode will take you a long while to work through. On the other hand, Forza 5 lets you hop into whatever you'd like and tackle any race that interests you. Pure freedom. You can just stay in one car if you'd like.  If you're a casual racing fan, you may not enjoy the two laps at 75 MPH in a budget hatchback that you have to get through early on in GT6. But, for me, I want to work through it all. And there's so much more to do in GT6 with its weather races, endurance tests, mini challenges, coffee breaks and more.  AI: Forza Motorsport 5 GT6's AI is better than ever, but there's better out there. I'm glad to say that gone are the days where you'd find that the second- and third-place drivers would magically appear behind you when one tire touches even the smallest patch of dirt or grass. It seems less about cars following scripted paths this time around, though I can't help but think that the heat is artificially turned up near the end of the last lap. GT6's AI is good, but it still needs work.  Forza 5's Drivatar system has the worst name ever, but it's a game changer when it comes to AI. By taking real players' driving tendencies up into the cloud and then down into your AI opponents' cars, single-player racing has never felt more real.    Online: Gran Turismo 6 Flat out, there are simply more cars, courses, and race options to play with in Gran Turismo 6. Polyphony Digital has set the stage for online that should keep you entertained for years. Controller support: Gran Turismo 6 [Edit: There are two $399 Xbox One steering wheels for Forza 5. This still doesn't beat GT6's back support, though.] Forza 5 only supports the Xbox One controller. That's it. GT6 has back support for several of the Thrustmaster, Driving Force, and G series of wheels. That's all great news. It's too bad that GT6 does not support the DualShock 4 controller, though.    Microtransactions: Gran Turismo 6 Since this comparison is coming from me specifically, I'm picking the game that doesn't seem to be built around making more money later. I love Forza Motorsport 5, but I could never shake the feeling that it was designed around a DLC strategy. From the lack of fan-favorite tracks to the ever-present reminders that you can buy credits to level up faster, an underlying feeling of being asked to pay more weighed on me a bit. I can't claim to know Turn 10's intent, but if I ever found out that they held tracks back to be sold later, I'd be very disappointed. Gran Turismo 6 does give you the option to buy game credits to let you skip over having to earn them through races. It's simply a shortcut to fast cars. While I think that skipping over GT6's wealth of vehicle and race types to get the fastest car defeats the purpose, I can appreciate that not everyone has the time required to work through its career mode. Furthermore, car pricing seems to be in line with what it was in Gran Turismo 5, so nothing seems shady so far.  While I'd rather that Polyphony Digital skipped the microtransaction option altogether, it's not intrusive, and you're never prompted or reminded. More importantly, nothing seems like it's missing from Gran Turismo 6. It's a full game that you can play for years on end without feeling like you need to buy something.    Load Times: Neither OH MY GOD. Both are terrible. Polyphony Digital has improved load times over their last release, but pre-match loads sometimes take 30 seconds or more. GT6 has a slow Blu-ray drive. What's your excuse, Forza 5? Summary: Again, you can't go wrong with either. I'm really glad I have both.  I think of Forza 5 when I want to race, while I think of GT6 when I want to drive. That's what it really comes down to for me. I go to Forza for the flash and spectacle, I go to Gran Turismo when I want to play in an automotive toy box. Hopefully that makes sense to you.  But, if I had to pick one racing game to take to a desert island to play for the rest of my life, it would be Gran Turismo 6.
GT6 vs. Forza 5 photo
Head-to-head comparison
[Edit: We updated the controller section as there are two $399 Xbox One steering wheels for Forza 5.] There's a racing simulation showdown taking place on gaming consoles this holiday season between PS3 racer Gran T...

Turn 10 responds to Forza Motorsport 5 economy feedback

Nov 27 // Brett Zeidler
Starting this Friday and ending Sunday, all cars will be 50% off (both credits and tokens). Forza 5 VIP members will receive a 2013 Lotus E21 Grand Prix, and if they have already bought that they will receive a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO. Players who have purchased the LaFerrari car pack or car pass will have the LaFerrari placed directly in the garage. For the entire month of December, credit payouts will be significantly increased through Forza Rewards. Turn 10 did not stop there, and issued an apology specifically to players who bought the limited edition of the game and were mislead to believe the 1,250 tokens included with the edition would be enough to purchase any car available in the game, which turned out to not be the case. Sometime between today and December 16, a page will go live that will allow these players specifically to add any car of their choosing directly to their garage. This is definitely a good start, but the vague promise of future permanent changes to the economy simply is not good enough. The presence of free-to-play microtransaction pricing (or microtransactions at all) used to hold back content with the intent of nickel and diming consumers in a $60 game is extremely off-putting and should have never been included in the game in the first place. If anything, these apology programs should be permanent until future revisions to the economy are made. It's a shame, because the game outside of these decisions is really good. Given the franchise's history, it's hard to believe the direction taken with this entry is entirely Turn 10's fault and probably came from higher up at Microsoft. We can only hope they understand this is not the way to go in the future.
Forza 5 economy changes photo
Implementing temporary programs to hold players over for permanent changes
If you've been playing Forza Motorsport 5, you're probably very familiar with the game's awful microtransactions. If not, basically the game uses tokens you buy in-game that can be used to purchase cars if you don't have enou...

Forza 5 & the cloud photo
Forza 5 & the cloud

Forza 5 only 1080p, 60fps because of the Xbox One cloud


Man talks about cloud
Nov 08
// Steven Hansen
When asked why Forza 5 was billed as, "only possible on the Xbox One," Turn 10 creative director Dan Greenawalt explained, "we could have done cloud-powered opponents last generation, but we would have had to have done all ...

Forza Motorsport 5: Finally, some real quality time

Nov 06 // Dale North
Forza Motorsport 5 (Xbox One)Developer: Turn 10Publisher: MicrosoftRelease Date: November 22, 2013 In spending a fair bit of time with Forza 5, one of the biggest surprises for me was just how different the AI is compared to previous series titles. Turn 10's Drivatar AI system has a silly name, but it is legit, and it makes a huge difference in how races feel. Gone are the pre-programmed lines for AI cars to follow. They're replaced by cloud-fueled profiles, each containing the data of your friends, and each assigned to different AI cars in your races. This means that you're now racing against the tendencies of real people. Fellow Forza fans need to know that AI cars are no longer predictable, meaning that your old tricks won't work. This alone is a game changer! Again, in previous hands-on sessions, I never got a feel for the Drivatar system. This time around, the system was populated with the Drivatars of the Turn 10 staff as well as others that have had a chance for an early test or two. In Forza 5's career mode, even in my early races, I found that the challenge level is greater than any previous series game. Simply put, if your friend drives like an asshole, so will his Drivatar. One of Turn 10's staffer Drivatars had no problem plowing me or faking me out in passes. I'll say that I easily whizzed past Larry Hyrb's Drivitar, though. Now, instead of mindlessly trying to weave through AI cars to finish the early races to work up to more interesting cars, as would normally be the case in previous games, I was already wrapped up in the action from the beginning, playing like I was up against real people. In this early case, I was trying to take the asshole-ish Drivatar down while placing at least third. Even in my starter car, a 2013 Subaru BRZ, I found myself fully engaged in the first five minutes of play. The very first race was fun! How many racing games can you say that about? Don't get me wrong: I loved all the previous Forza games. But after experiencing Drivatar's depth and realistic level of challenge, I don't know if I can play the older titles anymore. Another surprising discovery was how much of a difference the difficulty level setting made when it came to enjoyment. Instead of your standard easy/normal/hard setting options, Forza Motorsport 5's difficulty settings are tied to the Drivatar system. Picking from the six available options (easy/medium/hard/pro/veteran/custom), I got cocky and picked Hard at the beginning. Among other challenges, I found that the asshole Drivatar was doing his part to hold me back in subsequent races, which had me placing 6th in one. I eventually backed off the difficulty to Medium, which changes assist settings and XP payout bonuses, but also turns down the intensity of the Drivatars players are up against. Trying Pro, I failed miserably. Easy wasn't a challenge. I found that setting the difficulty so that I was just barely placing in the top three brought the most enjoyment.  Forza 5 builds a Drivitar for each player from their race data. The system collects how you race, pass, hit apexes, and more, and then generates your Drivatar to be sent out to the cloud to race on your behalf on others' systems. I'll apologize in advance for my Drivatar. After a few hours of play I found that I had generated a Drivatar so evil that it made the Turn 10 opponent from earlier look like an angel. I don't need to go into how gorgeous this game is, do I? We've gone over that plenty of times before. You've never seen a racing game look this good. Forza Motorsport 5 has the looks that makes you happy about spending hundreds on a new console. The screenshots and videos you see online do it no justice. I had a blast working through the first few hours of Forza Motorsport 5's Career Mode, and that had a lot to do with the freedom it provides. You no longer have to constantly switch cars and race types. Turn 10 explained that players could stay in their beginning car for their entire career if they wanted. I stayed in my BRZ for many races, though the siren call of sleeker sports cars and unlimited credits eventually took over. All the cars I'd want in my own garage, including the Jaguar XKR-S, Mercedes Benz C63 AMG, and the Lexus IS F, had to be taken for at least a couple of laps before my time was over. I played as long as they would let me, cruising around the photorealistic Bernese Alps, or Sebring in America. I was too busy losing to enjoy Bathurst in South Wales, Australia, and too focused on my turns to get a look at a new course, Yas Marina, in Abu Dhabi, UAE. I laughed as I plowed through obstacles like trash bins and signage on the Top Gear test track in Dunsfold, England.   They literally had to stop me and pull me away. I can't wait to get Forza Motorsport 5 in my Xbox One later this month.
Forza 5 is goooood photo
More than just a few laps
Forza Motorsport 5 has been on my Xbox One launch list since its announcement; I knew this was a game I had to have from the beginning. I've played it several times over the past years at trade shows and other events, but eve...


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