hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

nostalgia

 photo

Adding old box art to new videogames makes them awesomer


Apr 15
// Tony Ponce
During the hustle and bustle of PAX week, there were quite a few bits of Internet awesomeness that unfortunately slipped under everyone's noses. I always hate being the last guy to find that "cool new thing," because it feels...

PAX: Double Dragon: Neon is Double Dragon-y

Apr 07 // Tony Ponce
Once again, you and a buddy hop into the shoes of Billy and Jimmy Lee, out to rescue Marian from a bunch of thugs who have nothing better to do than piss in your Cheerios. A few people have expressed concern towards the art style in still screens, and those concerns are most definitely founded. Even in motion, the characters look and feel very stiff, not to mention that the levels themselves are flat and extremely barren. You've got your basic set of moves: punch, kick, jump, and throw. Then you can use the shoulder triggers to dash or set up a rolling evasion. Throwing is really sketchy because you can't immediately pick up enemies, as you must wear them down a bit before you are allowed to grapple. You've also got your familiar motley crew of baddies: batt-swinging punks, whip-wielding biker skanks, and Abobo, of course. The weapons enemies drop can still be picked up and use in your war against crime. There are a couple of cool highlights. The soundtrack features delicious remixes of classic Double Dragon jams, which have always been stellar and are even better once run through a synth rock, 80s anime filter. Also, when you lose your health, there is a small window in which your partner can come and revive you, accompanied by a cute animation of rewinding the tape on an audio cassette. The demo ends on a pretty kickass note, with the Lee brothers walking into a pagoda that shoots into space like a rocket. There, you meet the game's big bad, this really Yoshimitsu-looking mofo, before the screen cuts to black. If publisher Majesco prices this low, Double Dragon: Neon could be a fun distraction on a lazy weekend when it launches this summer. Just be aware that this is shaping up to be nothing more than an NES game given a polygonal facelift.
 photo

As you may have heard, Double Dragon: Neon by WayForward is being showcased on the PAX show floor. Now, Double Dragon II on the NES may just be my favorite co-op brawler of all time. I have a lot of good memories of my dad an...

Oooooohh! Regular Show's J.G. Quintel and I talk games

Apr 03 // Tony Ponce
00:27 -- Regular Show was green-lit as part of a push to "age up" Cartoon Network. 01:25 -- "2 in the AM PM," one of J.G.'s short films that served as prototypes for Regular Show, contains cursing and drug use. Yep, definitely child-safe material! 02:09 -- "Weekend at Benson's" is an episode that spoofs the 1989 comedy Weekend at Bernie's, with the important distinction that Benson isn't actually dead. 04:00 -- J.G.'s first game console was the Sega Master System, while his friends all had an NES. 05:51 -- Several notable SMS games from J.G.'s youth include Double Dragon, Time Soldiers, Shinobi, Thunder Blade, Psycho Fox, R-Type, and Snail Maze, which was built into the machine and could be played when no cartridge was inserted. 08:12 -- So sad! J.G. is too busy with work to be able to play games anymore! 09:06 -- Other TV shows suck at demonstrating typical gamer posture and button-pressing. 10:55 -- In Regular Show, J.G. tries to demonstrate that videogames are the "equivalent of reading a book or watching a TV show," just as in reality. 13:20 -- For a proper Regular Show videogame, J.G. would either want a co-op brawler similar to old Konami arcade games or a chill, two-player, exploration-based title just like ToeJam & Earl. 16:25 -- "Video Game Wizards" is an episode that spoofs everyone's favorite movie / commercial, The Wizard, right down to the Power Glove. The episode first aired last week, so I obviously hadn't seen it when I conducted this interview. 18:39 -- Regular Show: The Slack Pack, which just came out today, is a compilation DVD that contains 12 staff- and audience-favorite episodes. 19:50 -- "Over the Top" is an episode that spoofs the Sylvester Stallone arm wrestling movie, Over the Top. It features one of the many deaths of Rigby throughout the series. 20:35 -- The world of Regular Show is caught in a time warp, where 80s culture reigns supreme but little bits from later decades manage to worm their way through.
 photo

Last February, I wrote an article about Cartoon Network's Regular Show and how it speaks to the 80s generation of gamers with genuine love and attention to detail. Whereas other shows make only cursory, often disparaging ref...

 photo

Retro City Rampage cereal is a download for your face


Apr 01
// Tony Ponce
"I can really taste the graphics!" How many videogames can you play as well as eat? Inspired by Ralston's nasty-ass Nintendo Cereal System from back in the day, Retro City Rampage: The Cereal brings the pixelated action of R...
 photo

NES JAMS is a half-and-half blend of piano and chiptune


Mar 23
// Tony Ponce
You got chocolate in my peanut butter! Well, you got peanut butter in my chocolate! And this guy put piano arrangements in my NES music! Is nothing sacred anymore!? For the magical price of "whatever," you can grab a copy of ...
 photo

Today is a fine day for a FREE EarthBound tribute album


Mar 22
// Tony Ponce
Any day is a fine day for free music of any kind, but EarthBound is a game that strikes a particularly harmonious chord whenever it is mentioned. Maybe if fans believe in the power of friendship and magic enough, Nintendo of ...
 photo

ScrewAttack uncovered a bizarre PSA from the early 90s


Mar 20
// Tony Ponce
Hop into your time-traveling phone booth and go back to the early 90s, when pastels and neon were all the rage and Hulk Hogan was still a real American who fought for the rights of every man. The boys at ScrewAttack were doin...

Review: Abobo's Big Adventure

Mar 11 // Daniel Starkey
Abobo's Big Adventure (PC)Developer: Team BoboPublisher: Team BoboReleased: January 11, 2012 MSRP: FREERig: Intel i7-820QM @3.06 GHz, with 8GB of RAM, GeForce GTX 480M GPU Abobo's Big Adventure is a minimal game, a tribute to the NES generation in which everyone from Donkey Kong to Ryu Hayabusa makes an appearance in some form or another. Focused on punishing difficulty and an assumed proficiency on the part of the player, Abobo is a juxtaposition of the modern and the classic, a tangential parody of the youth and innocence of the NES era that melds grotesque physical comedy (read: poop rockets and bloodsport) and the simple gameplay of times long past. Drawing purely from the comedy of anachronistic allusions, Abobo constructs a caricature of everything about contemporary video game culture and feels like nothing less than a snarky shot at the 21st-century gamer. In my experience, a delicious cocktail of allusion and parody are the highest form of comedy. They necessitate prior experience and knowledge as well as engagement and immediate reflection upon the consumed work. Abobo fits right in that niche, tapping into the collective experience core gamers have with the NES. In much the same way that Greco-Roman art can be said to be the foundation of Western culture as a whole, the monomyth of the gamer would be the marriage of Mario, Mega Man, Metroid, and more. It is an aspect of our culture that we all share to some degree, even if the days of the NES weren't our own. [embed]222925:43027:0[/embed] While never quite reaching the comic brilliance of Portal or Psychonauts, Abobo has more than a few "laugh out loud" moments. More often than not, however, it warrants a mild "heh." Solidly constructed in general, the game still steps into the realm of excessive too often (like the aforementioned poop rockets). It was originally made as a free Flash game for Newgrounds and has that classic Newgrounds toilet humor. It fits the audience well.  Stepping outside the allusions, Abobo doesn't have much depth, though in this instance, that's not necessarily a bad thing. Controls are very simple -- you move with the arrow keys and execute techniques with "A" and "S," effectively using the keyboard like an inverted NES controller. Actions are context-sensitive, as the levels are a wildly varied smorgasbord of 8-bit staples. You can go from fighting down Double Dragon alleyways, questing through a penis-shaped Zelda dungeon, and touching gloves with Punch-Out's Little Mac.  Playing just like their respective sources, from a mechanical perspective alone, the stages are damn near perfect. While often a bit too hard for my tastes, they never veers into the realm of absurd (see I Wanna Be the Guy). The title relies on technical skill, not raw trial and error, so if you die, it is your fault. This, like everything else, feeds into the theme of evoking nostalgia for an adult gaming audience. Then there are the boss battles, glorious indulgences in third-generation gaming that amount to simple tests of skill. The 80's aesthetic is matched with gusto, placing the protagonist side-by-side with engines of unbridled nostalgia. Clocking in at around two hours, Abobo manages to pack a lot of content in a very small space -- each of the eight levels contains several dozen references to the NES. Though I realize that the game is meant to throw the audience into the wayback machine, I also realize just how far games have come since then. Even if you are only playing for challenge, there has been a resurgence of modern games that are better in nearly every way (e.g. Super Meat Boy). This isn't to say that Abobo is bad, but it isn't as good as other, newer-feeling games. Still, the experience as a whole is unique and definitely worth a look, especially if you grew up the late 80's or early 90's. Its referential humor is fun and not something that can be found anywhere else. Abobo's Big Adventure is a competent, very short but sweet throwback to our Golden Age. The referential humor and absurd juxtaposition of modern sensibilities on older mores is great, but it's all been done already and better. The game does nothing wrong, in the strictest sense, but it just doesn't have that "pop," that "wow" that leaves a truly lasting impression. That said, it is free, so if you're a gamer on a budget or someone just looking for a few yucks, it's definitely worth it to follow Abobo on his journey, at least for a little while.
 photo

The NES era was a special time for a lot of us. Many of the staff here at Dtoid will always have a certain attachment to the period, myself included. Abobo's Big Adventure is a tribute to all those who grew up with the gaming gods of old. This free Flash game is quite fun and funny, definitely well worth a trip down memory lane.

 photo

Max Payne (and others) derezzed for 8-bit home computers


Feb 01
// Tony Ponce
What if, instead of Max Payne 3, the next chapter in the saga was a retro throwback for old-ass computers like the ZX Spectrum or Commodore 64? You watch the video above and, at first, it doesn't look all that bad. Then you ...

The joy of pinball

Jan 26 // Chad Concelmo
Sadly, the above scenario is becoming less and less common. And not just because there are fewer and fewer arcades left in the world. In the small number of arcades still remaining, pinball machines themselves are becoming a rarity, being rapidly replaced by massive Dance Dance Revolutions and driving games so expensive they drain your wallet after only a few plays. And that is a real shame. Because playing pinball is one of the greatest joys in the world. I will never forget my first experience playing pinball. I was six years old and accompanying my parents to their weekly bowling league. I remember those trips to the Bowl America like they were yesterday. While my parents were bowling, a friend of the family would always bring me to the bowling alley's arcade: a small, modest room hidden behind the snack bar. I would look forward to this arcade trip every week. As my parents would try their best to pick up splits, I would melt into the world of Crystal Castles, Star Wars, and Centipede. I was in heaven. Outside of the minimal number of cabinets, the arcade had only one pinball machine: Haunted House. It was a ridiculously rad pinball machine -- one of the rare "triple level" machines with sets of flippers on platforms above and below the main table. Yup, below. It was that rad. Being so young, though, I could never reach the machine. I was too short to play it. One night, however, my parent's friend lifted me up and let me try Haunted House for the first time. I got to insert the quarter into the glowing red slot. I got to pull back the plunger. I got to activate the flippers. And I got to do this all by myself -- well, outside of the woman with the glorious perm struggling to hold me up. The first time I saw the metallic ball bounce off a bumper and slide through a gate, I was mesmerized. I had fallen in love. All these years later, my love of pinball has not changed. I am just as obsessed as I was as a child. Every time I walk into an arcade or bar, I immediately check if the establishment has a pinball machine. Or, even better, multiple machines. If they do, that is where I spend my night. Just me, a pinball machine, and a draft beer resting on the sloped glass top. This joy I get from playing pinball comes from many different things. There are the technical reasons: the unpredictability of each game; the engineering that goes into creating each machine; the way pinball machines have evolved over the years; the physical interaction between you and the game. But, for me, there is so much more to it than the flawless, mathematical design that goes into building a successful table. For me, pinball is an experience like no other. It is some kind of unique hybrid between the interactivity of videogames and the passivity of, well, watching a shiny metal ball roll around. It's a strange, exciting, communal experience that no other form of entertainment can duplicate. Every since I was a child, I have been obsessed with the beauty of pinball machines and the way their design can result in such a surprisingly exhilarating experience. I used to build my own makeshift tables using bulletin boards, rubber bands, and marbles. I would even name the darn things. Adventure Lair. Pirate's Cove. Chad's Pinball Madness! (Yeah, they weren't the best names.) The amount of money my poor mother had to spend at office supply stores because of my obsession was staggering. But it wasn't just designing these tables that gave me so much pleasure. When I would pull the rubber band back and let loose the marbles, watching the colorful balls make their way through the push pins and thumbtacks would bring a huge smile to my face. Every single time. Heck, it still does! Regardless of the size or age of the table, the experience is the same. The randomness of the ball's path. The unexpected sounds and flashes of light. The marvel of seeing a table full of impossible-looking loops and spirals (the more loops and spirals the better!). The feeling of standing at a machine, hands pressed comfortably against either flipper, knowing you have to react at a moment's notice to control the mayhem playing out in front of you. The satisfaction of mastering the "flipper hold" and launching a ball up a jackpot-activating ramp. The loud clack that echoes throughout the entire arcade when you match numbers and are granted a free game. All of these factor into the joy that is playing pinball. And don't even get me started on multiball. Okay, get me started. For me, there is no powerup in game history that will ever top the excitement of getting multiball. Yeah, getting the spread gun in Contra is great. Kuribo's Shoe is fantastic! But when you are standing at a pinball table ... and you lock a few balls ... and then those balls are released to the fanfare of flashing lights and sounds ... and you frantically start slamming the flippers, not even sure what the heck is going on ... and the chaos starts to grow and grow as your points multiply at an alarming rate? My God. There is nothing greater. Keeping multiball alive for a long period of time is the closest I will ever get to an athletic achievement. From the simple joys of Target Pool to more recent masterworks like Twilight Zone, Addams Family, or Indiana Jones, no matter how old or new the table, I will always look at pinball machines as things of classic beauty. And as much I love videogame pinball (Pinball FX2 is, hands down, my most played XBLA game), nothing can top the wonderful, nostalgic feeling of playing at a live table. With the rate they are disappearing -- and STERN Pinball, the only maker of pinball machines left, quietly shrinking -- who knows how long pinball will still be around? Even the thought of pinball machines being a thing of the past makes me sad. I would ask you to stand up and take action, but I have no idea how to start stuff like that! I guess play more pinball? Support more arcades? Write a letter to ... someone? Chain yourself to a machine and refuse to leave until ... something happens? I have no idea. #occupypinball? I guess the best thing you can do is just enjoy the hell out of pinball machines while they are still around. I know I am. In fact, I think I am going to go play one right now. Bride of Pin-bot, here I come.
 photo

You walk into an arcade. Whether you just finished playing miniature golf, swinging a bat in the batting cages, or just decided to make your way to one of the few remaining standalone arcades hidden in some random downtown no...

 photo

ScrewAttack asks who or what your favorite retro boss is


Jan 13
// Tony Ponce
With a title that I would have expected our own Chad Concelmo to concoct, ScrewAttack has kicked off a new series entitled The Best EVER! The premise is quite self-explanatory: folks ask SA their opinions on the best "whateve...
 photo

A collection of videogame maps drawn from memory


Jan 13
// Tony Ponce
Here's a novel idea: ask gamers to recreate stage layouts and overworld maps from their favorite games... without any sort of reference! The result is Mapstalgia, a place where folks can upload hand-drawn game maps spawned en...
 photo

Japan's Super Potato has got all the bomb frostings


Dec 08
// Tony Ponce
Any gamer with an interest in visiting Japan will most undoubtedly be aware of Super Potato, the famous retro game store in Tokyo's Akihabara shopping district. You might have even sen a few videos that tour the joint, but o...
 photo

Remember The Nightmare Before Christmas: Oogie's Revenge?


Oct 29
// Jim Sterling
It's the weekend before Halloween, and my mind turns to thoughts of the spooky. After recently re-watching The Nightmare Before Christmas, I suddenly remembered its sequel, Oogie's Revenge. Never heard of the sequel? Well, it...

Guilty pleasures/unsung classics of my SNES childhood

Aug 22 // Max Scoville
Mickey Mania: The Timeless Adventures of Mickey Mouse I’ve never been a Disney kid. I saw the movies, but unlike a lot of people my age, I’ve never been to a Disney theme-park, or had a favorite Disney home video that I watched on repeat. That being said, Mickey Mania: The Timeless Adventures of Mickey Mouse is one of my favorite Super Nintendo games. The premise is fairly generic; Mickey’s been sucked through a cartoon time-warp by some evil wizard, and you’ve gotta guide him through a greatest-hits collection of his animated adventures via pixelated platforming. If there's one thing I can't stand about SNES generation's games, it's that depressing grey palette.  This mediocre concept was executed quite well. The first level was based on Steamboat Willy, Mickey Mouse’s cartoon debut. It was rendered almost completely in black and white, a concept that’s rather uncommon when creating a product for children. Mickey ran around throwing marbles at various goons and jumping on things. Later levels had him escaping a charging moose and riding a gurney through the halls of a mad scientist’s castle. All in all, a very charming game. Super Baseball 2020 I don’t like sports, and because of this, I’m generally pretty bored by sports games. Unless, of course, they take place in the future and involve robots. Super Baseball 2020 is a baseball game set in the far-off year of 2020. It’s just like regular baseball, except it’s co-ed, with men and women competing together, while wearing power armor, computer sensors, and jetpacks. And also, some of the players are robots. It's basically a prequel to Super Metroid, where Samus is on a baseball team with robots and her cute friends, and they all shower togeth-- Oh. Uh. Sorry. I’ll be honest here: I have no idea how regular, present-day baseball works, so any differences between the actual sport and Super Baseball 2020 are beyond me. I just think robots and jetpacks are really cool. Hopefully, in 2020 A.D., eight years from now, Super Baseball will be a real sport, because I have a feeling I’d be super-good at it. PLOK I’m not sure how to preface a game like Plok. I’ve spent almost two decades knowing what Plok is while still having no idea what Plok is. As near as I can tell, he is either a humanoid starfish, or some kind of mutant Ku Klux Klan member. Plok lives in a world where everything is named after different types of fabric. After his flag is stolen, he goes on a rampage through this strange textile-themed island nation. By rampage, I mean he goes around collecting a bunch of seashells and hurling his own limbs at rabbits made out of burlap sacks. Actually, I'm not sure if they're rabbits, they might be potatoes. And also Plok sometimes transforms into a football player or a sawblade. This would've been a very controversial game if anyone had any f***ing idea what was going on. I don’t understand Plok, and I can’t even tell if I enjoy the gameplay. However, I love the game because it's a shining example of batshit-crazy weirdness that video games often had in the early nineties. I just can’t imagine a team of marketing people sitting around in a boardroom, analyzing trends or sales figures, trying to streamline Plok to be appealing to children. At the same time, I don’t imagine a small team of developers trying to create a work of art. Plok was just Plok, and thinking about the game makes me smile. So someone obviously did something right. Urban Strike (The Sequel To Jungle Strike) One of the things I miss most about a kid is the simplicity of buying games. We didn’t read reviews, we didn't argue in forums. We just kind of went with what we thought was cool. In the case of Urban Strike, the justification was “Dude, the box for that game has a picture of a stealth helicopter blowing stuff up in a big city.” I now know that Urban Strike was the third game in the Strike series, preceded by Desert and Jungle Strikes. Back then, I just thought “Urban” just sounded cooler. Thinking back to the summer of 1995, I don’t remember Urban Strike having much of a plot. Reading up on it now, it sounds like some intense Modern Warfare business. According to Wikipedia, Urban Strike takes place in the year 2001. A billionaire media mogul, former presidential candidate, and cult leader is plotting to destroy the World Trade Center with his super-laser. So, basically the bad guy is Osama Bin L. Ron Paul Murdoch. How can we ever face such a threat? Well, with action-packed isometric helicopter rescue mission combat, obviously! With some on-foot missions too.  Look at that strike. It's just so... Urban.  As a nine-year-old, this was not an easy game. The chopper’s controls were clumsy, and it had terrible mileage. If you ran out of fuel, you would crash, explode, and die. If you ever got far enough into the game for the on-foot missions, they were stressful and terrifying. Why do I have fond memories of this game? I have no idea. But seriously, dude. Look at the box. It has a helicopter on it. And it’s blowing stuff up in a city. That's awesome. Secret of Evermore Squaresoft’s RPGs are some of the Super Nintendo’s most respected games. Final Fantasies IV and VI (or II and III, as they were known back in my day) are practically hallowed, and Secret of Mana is right up there with them. To the ire of many a Japanophile friend, my personal favorite has always been Secret of Evermore, the bastard spin-off of Secret of Mana. I spent a good portion of my real-life childhood loitering outside adult movie theaters in the bad part of town. Secret of Evermore is an American-made action-JRPG that really, really wants to be a Lucasarts title. Most people fault it for not being Secret of Mana, but that’s actually why I’ve always liked it better. Secret of Mana was a pretty typical JRPG story: you’re chosen to save the world and there’s some magic life tree or something. My issue was that it wasn’t relate-able. It was a fantasy world built from the floor up, too far removed from anything I was familiar with as a kid. Plus, everything was way too colorful. I mean, really. The hero character dressed like Cyndi Lauper. Secret of Evermore, on the other hand, was about a kid from a boring little Podunk town (it was actually named Podunk) who got sucked into a mysterious land that was all loosely inspired by different stages of history. Your only other party member was your dog, and he took different forms depending on which area/time period of Evermore you were in. In the self-explanatory prehistoric realm Prehistoria, the dog was a giant wolf. In the futurisic land of Omnitopia, he was basically a flying toaster that shot lasers. In the medieval/Victorian Gothica, the dog was a pink poodle for some unexplained reason. You get a poodle and a bazooka. Your move, Secret of Mana.  When I was a kid, concepts and design decisions like this were much more interesting to me than those of Secret of Mana. Secret of Evermore was childhood fantasies and daydreams, except squeezed into the snug, fluorescent pants of a Japanese RPG. I, too, wished to be sucked out of mundane small town life and plopped down in a world where I could kill bouncing cat-mummies with acid rain spells. Secret of Evermore delivered that. Don't tell me that. You're ruining the magic, jerk. So, there you have it. A completely inconsistent list of video games that I don’t think get the respect they deserve. Everyone always brings up the fun times with Mario, Link, and Samus; I'm just as grateful for the Super NES for filling my childhood with helicopter explosions, robot baseball, and men tearing off their own limbs and throwing them at stuff. Happy birthday, Super Nintendo. You are my favorite grey and purple plastic box.
 photo

It’s the 20th anniversary of the release of the Super Nintendo! To celebrate, Destructoid is offering a week's worth of SNES-related content. Join us for “Seven days of the Super Nintendo!” The Super Nintend...

 photo

New Once Upon a Monster trailer is good old family fun


Aug 12
// Brett Zeidler
It comes as no surprise that Microsoft has an overly pretentious family enjoying the Kinect in this trailer. Looking past that, the video does a great job showing off how damn fun this game looks. It also gets me all nostalg...
 photo

Megamalgamation: 375 iconic Mega Men


Jul 12
// Daniel Starkey
Alright, I'm not going to lie -- I really like seeing people take their own spin on characters or artwork. For example, while not exactly a brony myself, I spent way longer than any grown man should browsing the My Little Pon...
 photo

Super Mario 3DS to feature more classic suits


Jul 05
// Jim Sterling
The return of the Tanooki suit has been a big talking point for Super Mario 3DS, but Nintendo has revealed that it won't be the only famous costume to make a return. Mario will get to dress in a few other togs from yesteryear...
 photo

Sonic the Hedgehog 20th anniversary figure looks classy


Jun 17
// Jim Sterling
SEGA has revealed a commemorative 20th anniversary Sonic the Hedehog figurine. In keeping with the theme of Sonic Generations, the figure pays dual respect to both "classic" and "modern" Sonic, with the green-eyed version pos...
 photo

Regular Show, representing the retro gamer


Feb 18
// Tony Ponce
If you visit this site frequently, chances are you've heard us name-drop Cartoon Network's fairly recent masterpiece Adventure Time. The Destructoid staff, in particular one Jonathan Holmes, loves to draw attention to it when...
 photo

Destructoid: Carmen Sandiego, Gang Bangs, and The PSP2


Jan 28
// Max Scoville
Good news everyone! We've just completed work on the latest episode of The Destructoid Show. In this episode, our heroes discuss WTF the 411 on the PSP2, AKA the NGP is. OMG. If that's not portable Sony news for you, w...
 photo

Wanna be part of The Destructoid Show's Holiday Special?


Dec 21
// Max Scoville
As you might have noticed, we've entered Holiday mode. In the gaming community, this takes many strange forms. From the guys who made Bulletstorm launching torsos at a Christmas tree, to SEGA actually sending Jim Sterling som...
 photo

Game SERIES Debate to the Death! Valkyrie Profile series!


Sep 14
// Tom Fronczak
In the previous debate we reached way back to one of the oldest RPG series of all time. Despite release dates spanning about two decades, Ultima fans proved to be every bit as varied as the series over the years. To have an a...
 photo

Rare spills guts about company's history


Sep 05
// Tony Ponce
Rare has been kicking around for about 25 years, and despite having a low or two recent years, it has had a great impact on gaming. Known for being a bit camera shy, Rare tends to hold its secrets close to its chest. That's n...
 photo

Game SERIES Debate to the Death! Ultima series


Aug 24
// Tom Fronczak
In the last debate, we had one of the closest voting races I've ever seen. Persona 4 would take the lead by two or three votes, and then Persona 3 would strike back with a few votes of its own to tie it up. This continued abo...
 photo

Final Fantasy, Ghosts N Goblins and more themes for piano


Aug 07
// Jonathan Holmes
Nobou Uematsu's record label, Dog Ear Records, is primed and ready to release its next collection of NES themes. Pia-Com II provides us with piano arrangements for music from Commando, Final Fantasy III, Castlevania, Spelunk...
 photo

Medabots DS is still happening, here's some concept art


Feb 04
// Jim Sterling
We haven't heard about Medabots DS since last September, but a small update has recently surfaced in the form of some funky new concept art. The doodles show off the character Kabuto, and feature a range of quirky designs for...
 photo

Dude, relive the 90s with these rad game ads


Oct 01
// Jordan Devore
Our friends over at Bitmob recently scrounged up some ancient videogame magazines that date all the way back to the mid 1990s, and yes, they were nice enough to share their shocking archeological find with us. Depending on wh...
 photo

Tim Schafer on Monkey Island: 'I get instantly happy'


Aug 13
// Ben Perlee
By now you've heard about the multiplayer for Brütal Legend, as well as the yet-unseen 4v4 mode. But, as we all know, Tim Schafer is a man of many hats, and one of the hats he wore was writer for the original The Secret ...
 photo

When Nostalgia Attacks: Pole's Big Adventure video


Jan 23
// Jonathan Holmes
Did you own a Genesis back when the console was in its prime? Did you watch the first three seconds of this video yet? If you answered yes to both questions, then you know what it's like to be attacked by a wave of nostalgia....

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...