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kind of a big deal

MGSV data transfer photo
MGSV data transfer

More details on transferring data between MGSV: Ground Zeroes and The Phantom Pain


You're a legend in the eyes of those that live on the battlefield
Mar 16
// Jason Faulkner
Konami has released a bit more info on what will be involved in transferring data from Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes to Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. Unfortunately, you can't use data from any version of Ground Zeroes for any version of The Phantom Pain. However, Konami made a handy chart to help us out.
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Kingdoms of Amalur gets special GameStop midnight release


Jan 31
// Victoria Medina
Regardless of how you feel about GameStop, you have to admit they have some pretty great promotions and incentives, like what they're doing for the Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning midnight release. Three different stores will h...
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This Liara T'Soni figurine remodel looks better, right?


Oct 16
// Tony Ponce
Remember last month when I told you that Japanese figure house Kotobukiya teamed up with BioWare to design a statue of Mass Effect's Liara T'Soni? That discussion devolved pretty quickly, didn't it? Let's try that one more ti...

Fans upset over anime-ized statue of Mass Effect's Liara

Sep 04 // Tony Ponce
I'm not saying that I personally like the style of the Bishoujo line -- some pieces are fine while others seem too awkward and lifeless. In this particular case, there are certain criticisms that I can stand behind, such as her breasts' being too big or her legs' being too long. However, the commenters' biggest concern is that she looks too "anime-ish." That's the whole point of the Bishoujo line! If that's the big problem folks have with the statue, no amount of redesigning is going to satisfy them. Another major concern is that her appearance is over-sexualized. Despite her being fully clothed with no exposed skin, the commenters complain that she is putting too much of herself out there. Is it the boobs? Sounds like a rather uptight response, especially coming from fans of a game series that allows you to pursue romantic relationships with various love interests then engage in PG-13 intercourse. Saying that this statue makes Liara look like "an underaged porn star" is akin to Fox News slamming the game itself as pornography. It's beyond me. I'm guessing a large reason for the negative reception is that, for most people, anything Japanese-y is a big turn off, especially when the look is applied to a property that represents a contrasting set of ideals and expectations. It's the reason why the JRPG has lost favor in the Western market. For them, the style is associated with various unappealing tropes and cliches, even if said tropes and cliches are a generalization brought about by limited familiarity with Japanese media. There really isn't much anyone can do to change their minds. Comic book fans (and I'm talking about the ones who actually buy comic books and associated merch, not the ones who are only familiar with the movies and cartoons) exist in such a niche that there's likely a heavy overlap with manga and anime fans, hence why the Marvel and DC Bishoujo statues aren't entirely scorned. It's understandable why the population that enjoys what Mass Effect represents would be taken aback by the Liara figure. Still, it's unfortunate that in this current media environment, in which the East and West draw so much inspiration from one another, often joining together to create conglomerations that are neither completely Eastern nor Western, there are still people who believe ideas from one side cannot be compatible with ideas from the other. P.S. Don't let those people catch wind of the Mass Effect anime! They would implode! Bioware gives a preview of Kotobukiya Bishoujo Liara to mixed reactions [Tomopop]
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I remember when the Western anime craze really started to boom in the late 90s. Not only did media distributors start licensing every single Japanese property under the sun, distinctly Western properties began to demonstrate ...

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YooStar 2 launch trailer featuring me!


Mar 11
// Hollie Bennett
Today sees the launch of YooStar 2: In The Movies, for Xbox 360 and Kinect. The game allows the players to record performances of various famous roles, which become chopped into the movie itself, making it another game perfe...
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Samurai Warriors Chronicles trailer


Jan 19
// Jim Sterling
Where there is a new system, there is a new Warriors game, and Tecmo Koei is on hand with a trailer for its first 3DS hack n' slasher, Samurai Warriors Chronicles. You can expect the usual cavalcade of Eastern Medieval butto...
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Dtoid Live: Lucha Libre: Heroes Del Ring


Jan 13
// Neranjan 'Venom' Bissoon
Today on Destructoid Live we take to the ruff and tumble world of Mexican wrestling and play Lucha Libre: Heroes Del Ring. Yes, Jon Carnage Asada, Pico De Gallo and El VENOM will be doing battle with all the rudos and tecnico...

It's a Kinect for Xbox 360 launch coverage bonanza!

Nov 03 // Nick Chester
Microsoft's Kinect for Xbox 360 is now officially available for purchase in North America, and that means our launch coverage has begun. We threw a slew of stories online all at once, but here's a handy guide in case you're looking to follow along at home. {{page_break}} The Hardware Review: Going controller-free with Kinect for Xbox 360 The Games Review: Dance Central Review: Fighters Uncaged (coming soon) Review: Kinect Adventures Review: Kinectimals (coming soon) Review: Kinect JoyRide (coming soon) Review: Kinect Sports Review: MotionSports (coming soon) Review: Sonic Free Riders (coming soon) Review: Your Shape: Fitness Evolved The Other Stuff Kinect launch from New York City, Times Square photos This post will be updated over the next few days, so keep it bookmarked for all of our coverage surrounding Kinect's launch! Have any questions about Kinect games or hardware I can answer for you? Ask in the comments, and when I wake up from this Kinect-induced coma (my legs hurt), I'll do my best to answer what I can.
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Microsoft's Kinect for Xbox 360 is now officially available for purchase in North America, and that means our launch coverage has begun. We threw a slew of stories online all at once, but here's a handy guide in case you're looking to follow along at home. 

Review: Alan Wake

May 05 // Jim Sterling
Alan Wake (Xbox 360)Developer: RemedyPublisher: Microsoft Game StudiosReleased: May 18, 2010MSRP: $59.99 Players take on the role of the eponymous Alan Wake, an internationally famous novelist who is suffering from a two-year writer's block. He and his wife Alice (seriously) take a vacation to the Pacific Northwest mountain town of Bright Falls, a quiet yet eccentric place with more than a little Twin Peaks flavor. However, it's not long before things take a turn for the sinister. Alice goes missing, and Alan starts finding manuscript pages for a book he doesn't remember writing, a book that is slowly becoming true and dictating a war between light and dark.  Alan Wake is split into six chapters, with each one carrying a distinct theme, narrative thread, and self-contained gameplay. Although primarily an aesthetic choice, the decision to split the game into chapters works surprisingly well, helped along by some appropriate (and unexpected) song choices that close each stage of the game and make for quite an unexampled videogame soundtrack. Although most of Alan Wake is spent in the creepy forests of Bright Falls, each chapter still manages to feel different, with an ultimate objective that ties into the larger story.  Narrative style is certainly Alan Wake's strongest point, and the plot is delivered with undeniable confidence and sleek production values. The story itself can be a little over-the-top in places, and players are expected to just "go" with some of the more extreme concepts and dialog, but ultimately the "80's TV series" feel of Alan Wake is an impressive accomplishment. Even when the game borders on the cheesy and downright silly, a strong sense of character and occasional dash of humor manages to make up for it. By the time the story winds up to its sequel-hungry ending, there ought not be many players left feeling unsatisfied.  As far as the gameplay itself goes, things are slightly patchy. There's more hit than miss, to be fair, but a few glaring errors snatch Wake away from perfection. Most notably, the combat is quite spotty and relies far too often on ambush attacks and cheap shots to maintain a sense of challenge. The dodge button also seems very unreliable and can often back Wake into a wall or even send him falling from a cliff. The majority of deaths I suffered in Alan Wake came from bad dodges, cheap shots, and falling off of things, none of which felt like my fault.  It's a shame, because the combat system is very cool in spite of its faults. The enemies, known as the Taken, are human beings possessed by darkness, with light being their principal weakness. While consumed with darkness, they are invincible, so Wake has to expose them to light and make them vulnerable. Shining a torch on them and cranking the beam up (at the cost of rechargeable battery life) is the most common way of doing this, and once the darkness is expelled, Alan can finish them off with one of several standard firearms. There are also "poltergeist items" -- inanimate objects possessed by darkness -- that need to be eradicated with prolonged exposure to light. As the game's "Dark Presence" grows stronger, it possesses cars and combine harvesters, leading to some rather hefty boss fights. During the course of the game, Alan Wake will stumble upon all sorts of useful weapons, such as flares that keep Taken at bay, flash grenades that can clear the area of foes in a snap, and environmental tools like spotlights and "safe haven" lamps that protect Wake, refill his health, and decimate any Taken chasing him. Spatial awareness, making sure to keep watching your back, and keeping a flare handy is key to victory, and some of the bigger battles can make for tense gaming. The fighting is let down by the lack of an efficient targeting system that leads to Alan occasionally missing shots, and the aforementioned tendency for Taken to land cheap shots and back attacks without sufficient warning, some of which can reduce health by well over halfway.  As well as combat, very simple platforming and limited QTE-sections will rear their heads. Starting generators by pressing the "A" button in time with a spinning disc is particularly effective, and can be quite scary when you're trying to power a light with an army of Taken on your back. As far as the platforming goes, the game is let down with some very dodgy hit detection that sees Wake struggling to land properly on certain surfaces and sometimes just falling off a ledge. Nearly every jump Wake makes, whether crucial or otherwise, seems to end with him colliding badly and struggling to regain a standing animation. It doesn't have a huge impact on the overall game, but it's a strange quasi-glitch nonetheless. Remedy certainly scores points for atmosphere, which Alan Wake provides in abundance. The way in which light and dark are contrasted, and the sense that players are always being chased and monitored by a sinister "Dark Presence" that frequently chews up the surrounding forest is magnificent and makes for one of the most memorable and unique experiences to have hit the Xbox 360 in a long time. A huge, huge credit also has to go to the Taken themselves, with their garbled speech patterns and bizarre taunts based on their previous lives as humans (for example, a former park warden screaming about taking care of bears). The Taken make for absurd enemies, yet effective, unnerving, and unforgettable ones as well.  The game manages to be one of the most visually accomplished 360 games out there. While it's not going to beat out any of the latest PS3 games in terms of raw graphical power, the game has a fantastic and evocative artistic style, and there are some wonderful setpieces and lighting. That said, the torchlight effects can sometimes be a little too overbearing, and can actually make some objects -- like hidden photosensitive messages scattered around the environment -- harder to see as opposed to easier. The sound department is first rate, with quality voice acting, outstanding music, and plenty of spooky sound effects. The facial animations could have used more than a little work, however.  Alan Wake has some very definite faults, but this is still a superb experience that manages to outweigh all of its problems with some truly unique and special moments, tons of character and a story that manages to be convincingly inventive despite its tendency to veer into somewhat silly territory. Anything it could do to irritate the player is quickly made up for with a consistently striking character, intriguing cutscene, or thrilling stand-off against an encroaching force of possessed and gibbering mountain hicks. Alan Wake wears its own anomalous sense of style with pride and that alone earns enough credit to spend on inefficient dodging or unfair ambush attacks. In short, it's a must-have Xbox 360 title that provides a freshness and dynamism that horror games have been achingly lacking for the past several years. And it's done all of this without an awkward, unwarranted, ill-fitting sex scene! Score: 9.0 -- Superb (9s are a hallmark of excellence. There may be flaws, but they are negligible and won't cause massive damage to what is a supreme title.)
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Alan Wake is a game with a long, long history. First announced in 2005, this "psychological action thriller" was originally in development for the Xbox 360 and PC. But aside from a few scant details, the game's developer rem...

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Capcom knows that the West is important


Apr 12
// Conrad Zimmerman
Hi, Japan. We're the western world. We're kind of a big deal. We might not have been able to say that a few years ago and expect them to listen. But Japanese developers and publishers have been realizing that the North Americ...
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Are the Bit.Trip guys suing the hell out of Anthony?


Mar 08
// Jonathan Holmes
I probably shouldn't be writing this, as it may not be good for my friend and coworker Anthony Burch, but he's on his way to GDC and I can't get a hold of him. There is the chance that posting this will somehow negatively eff...
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Oh, the horror: This year's Spike VGAs won't have a host


Dec 08
// Jordan Devore
While far from perfect, the Spike Video Game Awards are pretty much all we've got these days for our mainstream game award show coverage. People have been quick to point out how silly the show is, but personally, I wouldn't h...
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The final word on Modern Warfare 2's beta (or lack thereof)


Aug 20
// Jordan Devore
So you know how everyone keeps assuming that Modern Warfare 2 is going to get a public beta? Well, it's definitely, probably, maybe not ever going to happen, according to Infinity Ward's Robert Bowling. "We'll do an inte...
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Download the DTOID PlayXPert in-game software


Apr 07
// Daniel Husky Lingen
It feels like just yesterday Destructoid was first telling the masses about PlayXPert; an in-game overlay tool designed to put a little less wear on your alt+tab keys. Just recently we got the chance to once again c...
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Teammates for life: Destructoid presents the Halo Wedding


Jan 27
// Colette Bennett
You might have heard of that little game called Halo (or as some of us fondly call it around here, "teh Haloz"), but you know that you have to really be passionate about  a game to theme your entire wedding on ...
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Format does a videogame feature, our boy Chester does us proud


Nov 06
// Jim Sterling
Just in case you haven't heard, Destructoid is kind of a big deal, so when Format decided to run a special videogame feature, it's only natural that they came to our editor-in-chief, Nicholas St. Chesterfield. Our boy Nick Ch...
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PopCap founder: we can destroy the depth of console games


Feb 13
// SRVSLPS
To most people, they are the often played but little known name stashed away in their favorites folder for when the boss isn't around, but PopCap games doesn't like to think of themselves that way. With over a billion total d...
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GameTap adds 1,000th game to library, conquers universe


Nov 16
// Savant
Mark your calendars, folks. Today, GameTap adds two more titles to its already staggering amount of games to finally hit the magic number of 1,000. This makes GameTap easily the largest on-demand gaming service ever created. ...
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PS2 turns lucky seven, Sony gushes about the past


Oct 25
// SRVSLPS
Just last week the anti-Sony brigade were busy foaming at the mouth when Deutsche Bank (no, I didn't make that wonderful name up) analyst Jeetil Patel commented on September's NPD results -- and how they signaled to him at le...
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Destructoid featured in Games(tm) Magazine: We're a blogging highlight!


Aug 22
// Jim Sterling
Destructoid's greatness knows no bounds, especially if UK readers do as I did and picked up a copy of this month's Games(tm) magazine today. Purchasing it on a whim after getting my hair lovingly cut in an Eltham backalley, m...
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E3 2007: Nintendo Press Conference impressions


Jul 11
// Colette Bennett
We joined the cluster around the Santa Monica civic auditorium this morning slightly groggy from the adventures of the previous evening, hoping for more to write home about than Miyamoto’s famous Wife-O-Meter speech of ...
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Bethesda has good taste in gaming sites. It likes Destructoid, after all


Jun 29
// Jim Sterling
Let me show you our industry pals. Our industry pals, let me show you them. All of our fans already knew that Destructoid was made of epic win and sugar-coated awesomesauce, but for those who are yet to be swayed by the velve...

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