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earth defense force

EDF! EDF! photo
EDF! EDF!

New EDF games bombard Europe in February


EDF! EDF!
Jan 16
// Kyle MacGregor
Europe is getting a double dose of campy sci-fi action on February 12, as both Earth Defense Force 4.1: The Shadow of New Dispair (PlayStation 4) and Earth Defense Force 2: Invaders from Planet Space (PlayStati...
EDF Mission Pack 1 photo
EDF Mission Pack 1

Earth Defense Force 4.1 has some new missions


The first DLC level pack is out
Jan 15
// Jordan Devore
Unsurprisingly, Earth Defense Force 4.1: The Shadow of New Despair is getting extra missions post-release. The first DLC pack, Time of the Mutants, released this week on PlayStation Network. It's $9.99 for 26 levels. A second...
GOTY 2015 photo
GOTY 2015

Mike Martin's picks for games that he picked in 2015


My picks bring all the boys to the yard
Jan 11
// Mike Martin
Hello everybody! Your (not so) favorite, foul-mouthed, perverted, shit-posting Community Manager here. 2015 was a helluva year for games. All bullshit aside, we are starting to see some truly amazing games come out. When I wa...

Review: Earth Defense Force 4.1: The Shadow of New Despair

Dec 08 // Jordan Devore
Earth Defense Force 4.1: The Shadow of New Despair (PlayStation 4)Developer: SandlotPublisher: XSEED GamesReleased: December 8, 2015 (NA) / February 12, 2016 (EU)MSRP: $49.99 Some of those enhancements are immediately apparent; others are hard to pin to down. Visually, this is the best-looking, best-running Earth Defense Force I've played -- which is not to say it looks good or runs all that well by normal standards, mind you. Despite claims of a "steady" 60 frames per second, the game struggles to keep up with itself. Noticeable dips are a common sight when too many Ravagers pile up near your character or when skyscrapers crumble. The drop off usually isn't dramatic enough to be bothersome, but there were a handful of moments during my initial 15-hour-or-so run through the campaign where the frame rate briefly became a choppy, unmanageable mess. This is by no means new for the series, but it is a shame these problems persist on a current console like the PlayStation 4. Thankfully, load times fare significantly better. They're quick. I often made it into levels before I even had a chance to finish reading the tips and tricks shown on the loading screen. Considering how many missions there are (89 in single-player and split-screen; 98 in online co-op), that's a huge deal. These games are heavily built around players returning to levels countless times to earn more armor and cool weapons. No one wants to rack up literal hours of waiting to get into the action. [embed]325050:61450:0[/embed] Generally speaking, EDF 4.1 feels like a remix. Developer Sandlot reused set pieces and story beats in its earlier games, and that doesn't change here. (Again, this is an enhanced version of 2025, which in turn borrowed from 2017, so it's to be expected.) Remember fighting waves of red ants on a beach? Oh, you will. You'll also take on spiders, bees, bipedal robots, and spaceships, all of varying color and form. The mission is always to kill everything (or simply survive until someone tells you the thing you're after can't be killed yet), but there's enough variety strung throughout the campaign that I rarely got bored. The pacing is good, and few levels outstayed their welcome. That said, your results may vary depending on which class you choose (Ranger, Wing Diver, Air Raider, or Fencer), which weapons the random-number generator has blessed you with, and whether or not you're playing alone. The latter three classes are more specialized, but they have better options for getting across EDF's huge environments -- whether it's flying, driving, or dashing -- and they possess some of the more entertaining toys. The Ranger is well-rounded, but he can get stale. To that last point, these games are inherently more enjoyable with a friend (or up to three, if you're playing online). The classes are designed to complement each other, so it's most enjoyable with a mix of characters. The Air Raider, for instance, can buff others, lay down shields, and manually target enemy weak points for teammates' weaponry to lock onto. As far as new foes go, there is one particular encounter worth highlighting. Sandlot has added a new kaiju enemy, Erginus, that spans multiple levels. Your superiors eventually figure out that normal bullets and missiles have no effect on the monster. Naturally, the only way to bring it down is to initiate an absurd Rock 'em Sock 'em Robots-style brawl. You get to take control of a slow-moving "walking fortress" mech and punch the gargantuan approximately three thousand times until it finally keels over. I should have known that was its one and only weakness. A later mission raises the stakes with multiple mechs fending off against multiple Erginus. My first time through, everyone got tangled up in one corner of the map and I had to wait on the AI to die before I could even get within range to throw punches. The whole thing was a stupid, beautiful mess, which is exactly what I hope to find when I play Earth Defense Force. And in case you were wondering, yes -- the mechs are carried in by choppers. Tunnel levels and vehicles are some of my least favorite elements of this series, but both are better than ever here. New lighting effects make underground areas appear as if they are, in fact, set underground, and soldiers have lights on their weapons to compensate. The atmosphere now feels far more appropriate. I still find these levels to be uninteresting and quickly get annoyed when insect bodies pile up and block my shots, but the majority of the game is set above ground. As for vehicles, crucially, you can now see where you're aiming thanks to a laser sight. It's a total godsend. And I can't tell if the handling has been improved or it's merely my imagination, but for once, I genuinely wanted to drive tanks whenever and wherever I could. It helps that one of them is shaped like a spider and can crawl on walls. Bring that one below the surface. I also got the impression that there are more NPCs on the field compared to 2025. By pressing the DualShock 4 touchpad, you can place a marker on specific buildings, enemies, or locations. I was never sure if the AI was reacting to these commands or not (those weren't suggestions, people!), but being able to highlight targets is a great feature for co-op play. Insubordinate or not, more soldiers means more goofy dialog. The strange on-the-ground banter is spontaneous, hilarious, and rarely appropriate for the situation at hand. You can spur specific sayings using the touchpad. My personal favorite is a song that sounds an awful lot like the "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." One variation of the tune goes a little something like this: "To save our mother Earth from any alien attack, from vicious giant insects who have once again come back. We'll unleash all our forces, we won't cut them any slack. The EDF deploys!" My troops have uttered those words no fewer than 50 times and they'll continue to sing on command if they know what's good for them. This is precisely the sort of silliness that makes these games endearing in spite of their technical flaws and lo-fi aesthetic. In organizing my thoughts for this review, I realized I'm not ready to stop playing EDF 4.1. That's exciting, but also scary. I don't typically stick with these games long enough to get deep into the higher difficulty settings. Reaching that point requires a lot of grinding and patience. Too much. But that's where you need to tread to earn the best, most interesting weapons. While part of me hates that the progression system isn't more respectful of our time, I understand the appeal of having something you can keep coming back to for hundreds of hours. There's comfort in that. If I were to stick with a single installment going forward, this would be the one. Some of the upgrades fall short of expectations, and a good deal of the content is overly familiar at this point, but The Shadow of New Despair still represents the series at its best. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
EDF 4.1 review photo
The bugs are back in town
I'm happy Earth Defense Force continues to exist. There's no shortage of modern video games in which your primary interaction with the world is shooting things, but so few of them are lighthearted, charming, or funny. I don't...


Review: Earth Defense Force 2: Invaders from Planet Space

Dec 08 // Jed Whitaker
Earth Defense Force 2: Invaders from Planet Space (PlayStation Vita, PS TV)Developer: SandlotPublisher: XSEED GamesReleased: December 8, 2015MSRP: $29.99 If you're like me, you've played every EDF game and know what to expect when it comes to them, and this iteration doesn't break from the formula. In this enhanced remake of the second game in the EDF series -- originally only released for PS2 in Japan and Europe -- you'll be playing as one of three classes: Infantry, Pale Wing, or Air Raider. Infantry is your basic soldier that uses weapons you'd find in most modern day armed forces: assault rifles, sniper rifles, rocket launchers and so on. Pale Wing, on the other hand, is a female soldier with a jetpack and futuristic weapons; she moves slowly and is mostly useless on the ground while being nimble in the sky. Air Raider is a new addition that wasn't in the original release, and it mostly uses deployable weapons and plays more of a support role. In my playthrough, I sampled each class before decided to stick with the familiar infantry, as they just seem like an all around fit when playing solo while Pale Wing and Air Raider might fair a bit better in multiplayer. While up to four player online co-op is available, I was not able to test the functionality before release, so I can only assume the other classes fair a bit better online. [embed]325189:61454:0[/embed] Each of the three classes have their sets of weapons that are unlockable via pickups randomly dropped by enemies. This mixed with the six available difficulty levels adds a lot of replayability, on top of completing the game with each class; if you're a completionist, you'll get your $29.99 worth here.  Initially, I was concerned this being a port of the second game in the series would mean more repetition and less variety, but I was pleased to find out that wasn't the case. EDF2 has the best collection of enemies of any of the other games in the series. Aside from giant ants and spiders there are rolly pollies, flying saucers, centipedes, and daddy long legs-like walkers that are taller than skyscrapers. While this doesn't completely quash the repetitiveness of killing giant bugs and UFOs every stage, it certainly helps. Even the notorious slowdown that the EDF series is infamous for is mostly missing. In my playthrough, I experienced maybe two or three instances of choppiness due to the amount of enemies on screen, which surprising considering the Vita isn't exactly a powerhouse.  It isn't all explosions and sunshine, though. Most levels offer a tank, a speeder bike, and a helicopter, all of which control terribly. The tank is slow and clunky, the speeder bike is too fast to be controllable and useful, and the helicopter's guns aren't strong enough to be of use if you're lucky enough to hit something with them, and flying too high causes lots of pop in. On top of the terrible driving controls, the aiming just plain sucks for vehicles, mostly due to lack of crosshairs, which are provided when outside the vehicle.  Some stages take place in the city at night, where basically everything is pitch black (to a fault) other than windows in skyscrapers that shine brightly with a fuzzy glow around them, which just looks plain awful. Otherwise, graphically EDF2 looks like basically every other game in the series, which isn't surprising considering some of the levels feel almost identical if they aren't actually identical.  Aside from those issues, the main problem I had with the game was some enemies not being aggressive, instead opting to hang around in the far reaches of maps. Nearly every level's objective is 'murder all the bugs' and there was at least four or five times I had to either hunt and search to find the last enemies hiding spot, or slowly walk across the whole map. While tedious, these walks weren't the end of the world for me, just minor inconveniences of my fun-filled destructive romp. Earth Defense Force 2 may not be a brand new game per se, but has enough original content to keep it feeling fresh alongside the other recent releases in the series. With a lot of replayability, online four-player co-op, and a budget price tag it is easy to recommend to Vita owners looking for some campy over-the-top action in spite of its flaws.  EDF! EDF! EDF! EDF! EDF! [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.] EarDefense Force 4.1: The Shadow of New Despair (PlayStation 4)Developer: SandlotPublisher: XSEED GamesReleased: December 8, 2015MSRP: $49.99
Review: EDF2 photo
Honey I Shrunk the Kids 2: Buggernauts
Two words. Giant. Bugs. Also giant spaceships, giant kaiju, and giant explosions. If you're looking for campy sci-fi action on your Vita look no further than Earth Defense Force 2: Invaders from Planet Space.

Earth Defense Force 4.1: The Shadow of New Despair still has framerate issues

Jun 16 // Jed Whitaker
[embed]294206:59108:0[/embed] After a brief hands on with the game today on the show floor at E3, it was obvious that the frame rate issues persist, although not nearly as bad as before. Running at 1080p and targeting 60fps, I'd say I still saw dips to around 30fps -- if not lower -- during explosions when there were many bugs on the screen. As the game is already available in Japan, it is doubtful frame rate issues will be fixed for the localized version. That being said this is still the smoothest EDF I've played, as previous titles had some atrocious frame rate issues. Still too early to tell if the added content and somewhat better frame rate are worth double dipping for, but fans of the series are used to it at this point and will probably pick it up regardless. If you're new to the series, this is a good place to start, especially if you have a friend for split screen co-op.
EDF 4.1 preview photo
But it is better
Earth Defense Force 4.1: The Shadow of New Despair is an enhanced and extended version of EDF 2025 adding more levels, including a giant mech versus monster fight, a first for the series, though a majority of y...

EDF 2 Vita photo
EDF 2 Vita

Earth Defense Force 2 strikes Vita this autumn


Go back to space!
May 29
// Kyle MacGregor
Everyone knows about Earth Defense Force 2017. For many of us, it was our first introduction to Sandlot's series of campy shooters, which involves saving the world from giant alien bugs. But that isn't where EDF got its star...
Earth Defense Force photo
I bet you're recoiling in shock
In the course of covering videogames, sometimes you go into an appointment knowing exactly what's going to happen. You know precisely how the game will play and what the demo will be like -- everything's just crystal clear. ...

EDF photo
EDF

Here's a giant robot fighting a monster in the new Earth Defense Force


Japan-only, for now
Sep 17
// Jordan Devore
I completely missed that there's another Earth Defense Force on the way. Earth Defense Force 4.1: The Shadow of New Despair is an updated version of EDF 2025 for PlayStation 4 with additional content. Does that sound compel...
PS4 and Vita photo
PS4 and Vita

PS4 getting Disgaea 5, Earth Defense Force, Ys, Gundam and Senran Kagura


A bunch of these are coming to Vita, too
Sep 01
// Steven Hansen
More news from Sony's pre-Tokyo Game Show conference. NIS is working on Disgaea 5 for PS4 after the recent Vita port of Disgaea 4. It's coming out in 2015. A new Hot Shots Golf meant to capitalize on the PS4's socia...

Review: Earth Defense Force 2025

Feb 18 // Ian Bonds
Earth Defense Force 2025 (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: SandlotPublisher: D3 PublisherRelease Date: February 18, 2014MSRP: $49.99 It's been seven years since the alien Ravagers and insect armies attacked, and the EDF has kept the world safe. However, it seems the insects weren't completely eradicated, and colonies were lying dormant beneath the Earth's surface, waiting for the next moment to strike. These insects are more heavily armored, stronger, and more dangerous than ever before. Luckily, the EDF is prepared with new soldier class types, and even more weapons than before. In fact, Earth Defense Force 2025 features the most weapons ever in the series, at a whopping 700 different implements of buggy doom with which to dispatch the gigantic creepy crawlers. Unlocking these weapons harkens back to the initial title, where unique weapon drops depend on difficulty level and soldier class type. [embed]269582:52354:0[/embed] EDF 2025 features the most fun soldier classes yet, and each one has their own unique advantages. The Ranger class is your typical EDF soldier, shooting from a distance with machine guns, grenades, and shotguns but not one to shy away from the heavy weapons. The Wing Divers (similar to the Palewing character of Earth Defense Force 2017 Portable) fly high above the action and rely more on high-tech long-range laser and plasma-based weaponry. While there's not much difference in your play style for these classes -- beyond the Wing Diver's limited flight ability -- the remaining two soldier classes offer a wholly new sense of control, and using them changes the way you traditionally play EDF. The Air Raider can deploy shields and health generators while attacking with more explosion-based weapons such as grenade launchers, mortars, and even call in vehicle support and air strikes. This class is best used in a support function within the game's multiplayer. Finally, the Fencer class has you getting down and dirty up close with your foes with its giant spear and thrust attack, and is heavily armored to withstand being in close proximity to the big bugs. The Fencer is also the only class that has four weapon loadouts rather than two, which allows for use of its giant shield, or even the ability to dual-wield twin Gatling guns -- while sadly sacrificing speed of movement for raw power. As with everything in EDF 2025, bigger is better. The mission types don't really vary too much from "destroy the enemy," but how you go about that, and what enemies you encounter is always full of "holy shit" moments. New spider types that drag you into their giant webs, flying enemies such as bees and swarming Ravager ships, and of course the giant walker mechs and even dragon-like creatures pull you quickly into pants-soiling moments. Ready to combat these larger foes are your own big vehicles, such as single-soldier power suits, armored transports, and tanks that carry up to three players, each with their own turret or railgun. There's just something so satisfying about shooting giant bugs that it really doesn't matter how you do it, just that you can do it. And since that's pretty much all this game is, it's a good thing it's so much fun. Shoot bugs with rockets, punch them with giant mechs, blast giant spaceships out of the sky, zoom past creatures while riding a motorcycle and sidecar: the game has it all, and yet it really boils down to blowing up bugs. And that's always more fun with friends. There's a heavier focus on multiplayer this time around, as the game not only offers two-player split screen co-op, but also four-player online co-op as well, letting each player take a different soldier class to balance out the action of taking on the game's enormous 90-level count. There's even a two-player versus mode as well, where players fight each other, though it's no nearly as enjoyable as destroying giant bugs together cooperatively. As for how it looks and sounds...let's be honest: no one plays EDF for the story, graphics, or voice acting. You're going to get a b-grade videogame equivalent of the cheapest Starship Troopers rip-off you can find. That said, this is the best-looking game in the series, and the voice acting didn't have me immediately cringing -- though the dialogue itself warranted plenty of chuckles just for the sheer cheese-factor. At least the level of destruction matches the output of your weaponry. Buildings come down after a few rocket blasts, and enemies go flying in every direction when blown up. The amount of mayhem on-screen never stops being fun, though once or twice I hit some slowdown in the framerate, but nothing as bad as the original game. I'll put it simply: if you've enjoyed the Earth Defense Force games in the past, you'll love this one. It has more missions, more weapons, more ways to play with the new soldier classes, and just more fun. If you've never played EDF, check your brain at the door and enjoy blowing the shit out of some ugly bugs. I defy you to NOT have fun with this game.
EDF reviewed photo
The more things change, the more they stay the same
In 2009, American and European Xbox 360 players got their first taste of the popular Earth Defense Force PS2 series from Japan with the game's third entry, 2017, by developer Sandlot. The cult classic budget title featured fr...

EDF photo
EDF

New trailer and screens for Earth Defense Force 2025


Four-player cooperative play touted
Jan 28
// Conrad Zimmerman
D3 Publisher is gearing up to release Earth Defense Force 2025 on February 18 in North America, and they've dropped more hype-inducing promotional material today. A new trailer, seen above, serves to remind once more th...
EDF 2025 photo
EDF 2025

Earth Defense Force 2025 lands February 18


With launch-day DLC and two more expansions to follow
Jan 21
// Conrad Zimmerman
D3 Publisher has announced the launch date for Earth Defense Force 2025 in the US. You'll be able to blast those bugs on February 18 when the game releases for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.  That's not all that is rel...
EDF! EDF! EDF! photo
EDF! EDF! EDF!

Earth Defense Force 2025 touches down in February 2014


EDF! EDF! EDF!
Oct 28
// Kyle MacGregor
Strike Force Lighting, EDF Operations here. The ravagers are preparing for another attack run in Earth Defense Force 2025 for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. The bugs are planning a joint strike on both North America and Europe i...
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Bugging out over new Earth Defense Force 2025 screens


EDF gallery
Sep 26
// Dale North
Prepare for a new infestation this February with Earth Defense Force 2025, coming to Xbox 360 and PS3. Check out these new screenshots from Namco Bandai in our massive gallery and bug out with me. Help me get ready to blast m...
Earth Defense Force photo
Earth Defense Force

The dual-wielding 'Fencer' of Earth Defense Force 2025


So-called "fourth pillar" of the EDF revealed
Apr 03
// Conrad Zimmerman
Here we have a video describing the capabilities of a whole new bug-crushing addition to the Earth Defense Force 2025 roster of unit types, which I believe is called the "Fencer," based on the trailer. The name's a bit ...
EDF 2017 Portable photo
EDF 2017 Portable

Earth Defense Force 2017 Portable is going on sale


Through the end of the month
Mar 05
// Jordan Devore
We've been given the heads up that Earth Defense Force 2017 Portable will be getting a temporary price reduction through April 2, 2013. While the original price is something I absolutely would have paid if I owned a PlayStati...
EDF 2025 photo
EDF 2025

Earth Defense Force 2025 due in June 2013


EVERYONE GETS BEES!
Feb 14
// Conrad Zimmerman
The latest issue of Famitsu has some juicy details on the upcoming Earth Defense Force 2025, including a release window. In Japan, at the very least, bugs and buildings alike will see their downfall this June. Hopefully, thos...
EDF EDF EDF EDF EDF EDF photo
EDF EDF EDF EDF EDF EDF

Giant bugs from space return in Earth Defense Force 2025


Shoot a nuke down a bug hole, you got a lot of dead bugs.
Feb 02
// Kyle MacGregor
Just when you thought you were safe from the terrifying ravagers they've have inexplicably returned in Earth Defense Force 2025. Appealing to your baser instincts this game is, once again, all about killing robots ...
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New releases: Anarchy Reigns and not much else


Start the year off with a chainsaw
Jan 07
// Fraser Brown
Have you suitably recovered from bringing in the New Year? I hope so, because the first new releases of 2013 are upon us, and they may require your attention. This week's offerings aren't particularly bountiful, but you will...
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This EDF 2025 trailer has more of the good stuff


I'm from Buenos Aires, and I say kill 'em all!
Jan 02
// Jordan Devore
If you were perhaps disappointed by Earth Defense Force: Insect Armageddon and the tweaks made to this very particular series, the embedded footage of Earth Defense Force 2025 will be a pleasant sight indeed. For the record,...
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Earth Defense Force 2017 Portable release date get!


I think I had a video game like this once
Dec 20
// Kyle MacGregor
Strike Force Lightning, EDF operations here. You may notice that your PlayStation Vitas have been equipped with machine guns. Feel free to use them to shoot the hell out of the ravagers when they return in Earth Defense ...
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Earth Defense Force 2025 descends upon the West in 2013


'The best thing to do is attack them while avoiding their attacks'
Dec 13
// Kyle MacGregor
A wise man once said "The only good bug is a dead bug." Truer words have never been spoken, and its best that you remember them. The conflict with the terrifying ravagers looks primed to spread to both Europe and North Americ...
 photo

New batch of Earth Defense Forces 4 screens surface


Robots and explosions
Nov 09
// Conrad Zimmerman
Siliconera posted a whole mess of new screenshots for Earth Defense Forces 4, showing off the Air Raiders, a sort of support class providing health and targeting benefits to teammates while using air strikes, automated turret...
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Earth Defense Force 2017 Portable targeting February


Let's save the world from aliens by destroying it, one city at a time
Nov 07
// Jordan Devore
Between the four-person multiplayer, seven new levels, and inclusion of Pale Wing, I am so ready to play through Earth Defense Force 2017 again on the PlayStation Vita. Mentally, that is -- I still don't have a Vita to play i...
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Earth Defense Force 2017 Portable coming to North America


Sep 27
// Conrad Zimmerman
Less than a week after I got to play the new handheld port of Earth Defense Forces 3 Portable in Japan, it has been announced through the game's official Twitter account that the title will be finding its way to my home...

TGS: Arachnophobic after Earth Defense Force 4

Sep 21 // Conrad Zimmerman
The webs can trap you, as well as your fellow soldiers and civilians, and must be destroyed to liberate its captives. No movement is possible at all while in a web, beyond looking to aim. Spiders will still use their silk to try and drag you in (dealing constant damage as they do) and the webs now provide another obstacle to keep track of while this is happening, as the only thing worse than being pulled toward a spider is getting stuck, health draining away, and having to focus efforts on clearing a web. Earth Defense Forces 4 is a direct sequel to 2017 and represents something of a return to form for the series, following the western-developed Insect Armageddon. Loot hunters will be happy to learn that armor power-ups and weapon drops are back in full effect, with lots of stuff littering the environment. On the flipside, however, the destructibility of the environments has changed considerably. No longer can the player just fire a rocket at a building and watching it crumble to the ground as if part of a controlled implosion. I swear that I did see one such demolition, but subsequent efforts to take down a structure with as many as twenty rockets had no noticeable effect on my target. I can't decide if I like this element. From a gameplay perspective, the heartier buildings will make the game more challenging to play, forcing the player to run through the maze of streets in a city. But when I think about it as a fan of the series, I cannot help but feel just a smidge disappointed. I take a ridiculous amount of joy from the lack of realism in this element and I fear I'll miss it in Earth Defense Force 4. That said, the game does play well and it's a significant graphical improvement over EDF 2017. With luck, we'll hear soon from D3 that they're bringing it out of Japan and into everyone's homes.
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There's a new Earth Defense Force game on its way, recently announced by D3 Publisher and Sandlot, and there are few things here at Tokyo Game Show that I was more excited to see. Here on the show floor, the Xbox 360 version...

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I never tire of shooting giant bugs, so I was thrilled to see D3 publisher with not one, but two EDF titles on the Tokyo Game Show floor. Earth Defense Forces 3 Portable is port of the game we know as Earth Defense ...

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Earth Defense Force 4 detailed in latest Famitsu


Sep 13
// Conrad Zimmerman
The new issue of Famitsu currently on stands in Japan features a preview of Earth Defense Force 4 with a whole mess of exciting information. The title, currently in development by Sandlot for Xbox 360 and PS3, is set 8 ...
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Earth Defense Force 4 announced, giant insects celebrate


Jul 12
// Allistair Pinsof
Earth Defense Force 4, the latest entry in the world's favorite giant insect killer simulator, was announced today via a teaser website. Other than that spiffy logo above, we don't know anything else about the project. From m...

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