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Wasteland

Kickstarter photo
Kickstarter

inXile Entertainment launches Kickstarter for The Bard's Tale IV


Going for the hat trick
Jun 02
// Alessandro Fillari
Just when you thought Kickstarter had plateaued, there comes another campaign set to reignite the fire for crowdfunded game development. After the successes of other titles such as Yooka-Laylee and Bloodstained from different...

Review: Wasteland 2

Sep 23 // Alasdair Duncan
Wasteland 2 (PC [reviewed], Mac, Linux)Developer: inXile EntertainmentPublisher: inXile EntertainmentMRSP: $39.99/£29.99Released: September 19, 2014 inXile head Brian Fargo has talked at length about how Wasteland 2 was rejected by numerous publishers over the years. It's a traditional, old-school PC RPG in almost every way -- so much so that it feels like a follow-up to the original Fallout games.  The world of Wasteland 2 is still the irradiated wastes of a post-apocalyptic USA. The only form of law enforcement is the Rangers, a group of former military engineers operating out of a base called The Citadel. Starting with a party of four characters, players will roam the the Southwest, initially hunting for clues to solve the murder of a Ranger but gradually uncovering a new enemy. What's interesting about the Rangers is that they're not universally liked; despite your best efforts, you won't always be able to change people's attitudes about your specific team or the Rangers in general. Not everything is black and white and your crew is going to have to make tough choices to achieve its goals. The wasteland is a dangerous, unforgiving place. Although the Fallout series has always had some dark humor to it thanks to the retro-futuristic setting, Wasteland 2 is mainly played straight -- there's not a lot of joy to be found in the irradiated wilderness. [embed]281221:55635:0[/embed] At the start, you'll get to select a team of four characters that you can either pick from a pre-set group or design on your own. All the named characters have a predefined set of skills to suit certain roles, like a medic or sniper, but you're free to generate a custom character and choose their skills as you please. As with a lot of role-playing games, you're shown many stats, abilities, and attributes when you pick a character and it's hard to know what to invest in. Wasteland 2 is the type of game where after a few hours of playing, you'll realize you've got a bad or otherwise ineffective combination of skills and will want to just start over. That's echoed with a lot of the quest design where there's often the urge to reload a much earlier save because you've either missed something or your party didn't pick up a vital piece of equipment from an earlier mission. You're not going to see everything on the first playthrough so don't be disappointed when there's some unresolved loose ends in the story when the credits roll. However, certain early missions just seem to lead into other ones without feeling resolved and you're left with unfinished business in your log. The game could do a better job of keeping you informed of where the most pressing mission is happening or let you know before you leave an area that there's still things to be done. Eventually, you can recruit for your team and add up to three extra party members. They all have their own attributes, gear, and stats but are prone to losing their cool under fire and ignoring your commands. Most of the time this actually works out fine as they charge into battle, shooting enemies as they go but sometimes they'll walk into a trap and just cause trouble. Early on, it's worthwhile to take an extra teammate or two with you just to at least have another person for raiders and mutants to focus on instead of you. One way the game could stand to improve is sharing resources between party members; dragging and dropping items to a member's icon more often than not led me to just dump items on the ground instead. Combat is based on action points that the player can spend to do things like move, shoot, and reload. Positioning and use of cover is key but it can be frustrating when you've got party members who are armed with melee and short-ranged weapons fighting in a big open area. An action queue is displayed at the top of the screen, showing the order of characters and who will act first, which is based on their initiative skill. Action point usage is displayed pretty clearly -- like when you hover over an enemy to see how much AP it will take to shoot them, or to throw a grenade, for instance. Keeping characters out of harm's way is a good idea as you can roll some unused action points over into that character's next turn. While it's possible to just push your way through early battles, you'll need to make good use of your party's skills to beat large groups of enemies.  It's easy to see where Wasteland 2's fairly modest, Kickstarter-generated budget has gone. Close up, the character models are basic, even compared with previous-gen console games. They're almost PlayStation 2-era graphics -- but they're not the reason you're playing the game. A few darker areas could have used some extra user-interface prompts to help players pick out their party and traps, and there's a strange lack of consistency with character's painted portraits and their actual 3D model in the game. One of my custom characters had a picture portraying him as a clean-shaven black man even though the actual 3D model showed him being white and having a grey beard. It's not a major problem at all, but it was jarring every time it popped up. Something else that's noticeable is the voice acting, or lack thereof. While your main contact General Vargas is fully voiced and you'll hear plenty of radio chatter with other characters, more often than not it's only the first and last line of a conversation that has spoken dialogue -- the rest is just text. Again, not a problem in the larger scale of things, but it's noticeable. If these sound like nitpicks, then it's because they are really the only problems that are due to how the game was made. Other issues come from the fact that this is a real old-school RPG, the kind that most developers haven't made made in a while (Divinity: Original Sin is a recent exception). It's the type of game that sticks with the "dice rolls in the background" mechanic and there will be times when you have a 99% chance to succeed and you'll still fail. There are separate skills for lock picking, safe cracking, and bypassing alarms. That's been part and parcel of the genre for years so if that kind of thing doesn't put you off, you're going to enjoy your time here. Wasteland 2 is an expansive game that demands to be replayed again and again to get the best out of it. While a lot of the detailed mechanics feel somewhat archaic, they're not going to hold back dedicated players who want to micromanage and really role play their group of characters. It has all of the familiar elements and even if some aspects of its presentation are not quite up to modern standards, its design and gameplay are timeless and welcome.
Wasteland 2 review photo
This Kickstarted RPG delivers exactly what was expected
[Disclosure: I backed the Wasteland 2 Kickstarter and as such received an Early Access copy of the game.] Wasteland 2 is one of the projects that saw success in the wake of Double Fine's Broken Age. Just a month after Tim Sch...

Wasteland 2 photo
Wasteland 2

Wasteland 2 will be released on September 19


Just one month to go for the post-apocalyptic RPG
Aug 19
// Alasdair Duncan
Just a few weeks ago, we let you know that the much anticipated Wasteland 2 was being delayed a few weeks into September. Now we've gotten word from inXile head Brian Fargo that the game will finally be with us on September 1...

Father of the Wasteland: How to trust your fans and revive a classic

Aug 05 // Alessandro Fillari
The original Wasteland was released in 1988 for the Commodore 64, PC DOS, and Apple II. Players were dropped in the role of a Desert Ranger, the peacekeepers in post-apocalyptic USA. Set in the Southwest of North America, the game tasked you with exploring and combating the dangers of life after a nuclear war. As a choice-driven game, you can freely explore the ruins of the old world while forging your own path in the grim future. I know what you're thinking: this sounds like Fallout. That's because Fallout was a successor to Wasteland. "I think Wasteland, in a way, was one of the first sandbox type gameplays," Brian Fargo said. Taking influence from the then-popular Ultima series, the post-apocalyptic setting was an enticing change of pace for many. Fargo and his team at Interplay wanted to allow players to make their story and choose where they wanted to go. Years after work on Wasteland, Interplay went on to create Fallout, which was a spiritual successor to Wasteland, set in post-nuclear-war USA. Fargo and his team at Interplay had always been interested in creating a direct sequel to Wasteland, but licensing issues and fickle publishers prevented them. "I didn't know what I was going to do with the company at the time. Honestly, I just stopped pitching titles to publishers," Fargo said. "After hearing so many horror stories, it was just a waste of time."   Following the success of DoubleFine's Kickstarter project, which would become Broken Age, many others raced to create their own Kickstarter campaigns. While there were many that would not make it, inXile's own campaign would prove to be another success story for the crowdfunding site. With close to $3 million dollars raised from over 60,000 backers, Kickstarter allowed Brian Fargo and inXile to get a second chance at making the game they've always wanted. "We've been given such an incredible opportunity," Fargo said. Because of this -- and the high rate of failure and/or disappointment of most Kickstarter projects -- the developers at inXile wanted to pull out all the stops and make the game that would surpass expectations. "I wanted to make sure we over-deliver and go beyond anyone's expectations for what they thought they were gonna get," Fargo said. "For me, not only from my backers that put faith in me, but other fellow developers who said 'don't screw this up, Brian. You know you need to do a good job.' "What a lot of people don't know is I've spent twice as much money than we raised on the Kickstarter on this project to just blow it out all the way, to do something just huge in scope." As a direct sequel to Wasteland, players will join the ranks of the Desert Rangers and explore the post-apocalyptic landscapes of Arizona and Los Angeles. You will be able to create a brand new character with unique skills and weaponry, acquire loot and allies, and explore both hand-crafted and procedurally-generated locations with their own unique quests and events.  "The budget for this game is much closer to five million, but that's because I poured in more of my own money and money from our sales from Bard's Tale and sales from Early Access, because I wanted to do something more ambitious. We could've kept it at the Kickstarter budget, but I wanted to knock this out of the ballpark and have people point and say 'that's what Kickstarter can do!' So I felt it was worth the risk." And going all out was exactly what they did. They filmed a live-action opening cinematic featuring cosplayers from a post-apocalyptic convention in the desert of Nevada. They used a children's choir to sing gospel songs for the dangerous and God-fearing cult of Samson. Much of the game is voiced, bringing out words from writers who have written for the original Wasteland, Planescape: Torment, Fallout, and Baldur's Gate. The developers want the narrative to be the centerpiece of Wasteland 2's design. "With Chris Avellone, Colin McComb, Nathan Long, Michael Stackpole, we take writing very seriously," Fargo said. There are over 500,000 lines of written dialog. "We feel it adds so much to the game and I feel it needs to be taken seriously. We have more words in this game than the Lord of the Rings trilogy. "For Wasteland 2, I like to call it a narrative sandbox game," Fargo said. "We've written all of these different threads based upon what you've done in the narrative. You can make any choice spin off in any different way. On top of that, you can shoot anyone you encounter. "I think the elements of 'old-school' [lots of choice and variables] are timeless. All this cause-and-effect gameplay, the subtlety of detail, the nuance of the humor -- good cause and effect is the hallmark of any game. By virtue of the design, when you do something, it turns something else off. I had a very famous game designer in my office a month ago, and he said 'why would you do that, create all that stuff that most people won't encounter?' and I said that's the charm of what it is." Fargo was adamant about allowing players to have total freedom in how they express themselves in Wasteland 2. This mandate is apparent even in the beginning moments. After watching the burial of a fallen Desert Ranger during the opening cinematic, players can choose to desecrate the grave once gameplay starts. Even after warnings from General Vargas, a returning character from the original game, players can choose to proceed with violating the grave. All ally NPC characters in the area will open fire on your squad, ending the game before it even properly begins. While most players will never see this scenario, the developers felt it was important to have so players can choose to express themselves in anyway they see fit. "I think about a sandbox game like Grand Theft Auto as the ultimate sandbox, you can go pump weights, get tattoos, you can jack an airplane. You can do whatever you want, but it doesn't really affect the narrative structure, the missions are exactly the same. There's nothing wrong with it, but it's a different kind of thing." There was a lot of candid talk between Fargo and I about promises from other games with open-ended experiences. While it was clear that he had an enormous respect for the talent at other studios, there was still a feeling of skepticism when discussing the potential that other games aspire towards. In that respect, this is something that Fargo wishes not to fall short on. "A lot of games promise to do it," Fargo said about offering flexibility in choices. "But we're really delivering on all that stuff. The game is so large in scope, you can play this game over and over again for more than ten years. My president is still finding new content even after 700 hundreds hours of gameplay." One of the least-talked-about aspects of game development through Kickstarter is the perpetual state of anxiety the developers are in. With your development under a microscope by fans and press alike, this level of transparency is unprecedented for traditional game development. Unlike developing games through a publisher, you're beholden to your backers. And there's no greater low than getting their buyer's remorse. "The first scary risk for me was that we were committing to talking about and showing things that were not in their final state. You know how when these people come out with a game, and there's this first impression and that you can never get out of this hole of the first impression? That was a risk, and we wanted their feedback, but it worked." Fargo was so anxious about the initial reveal of Wasteland 2's gameplay video back in February 2013 that the potential development of their next title was dependent on the reception to the video. "If the first gameplay demo for Wasteland 2 didn't play well for the fans, then I wouldn't have done the Kickstarter for Torment," Fargo explained. "It's completely, 100% based on trust. For me, I've never had more pressure in my life. I can't imagine what would happen had I not been able to deliver. You'd be done right at that point." Fortunately for them, the video was well received by backers and newcomers alike. Emboldened, they started a second Kickstarter campaign for the successor to Planescape: Torment a month later, which found even greater success. It brought in over $4 million from over 70,000 backers. "When you're utilizing the power of the crowd and really listening to them, it's really powerful because you're vetting the great ideas and getting them from a lot of different sources," Fargo said. "That has paid off great, and Early Access has been an adjunct of that too." With the advent of Steam's Early Access, the extra feedback from direct play has served as a boon for inXile. "Going back to the old days of Fallout, we would just make the game, do our best  instinctively and keep our fingers crossed, but now we're getting it out there and taking all the feedback that you would usually get post-launch. So we got it all moved up to the front without having people beat on it after release." With the rise of the internet and the organization of online communities, the constant communication has served as great tool for the developers, but also a reminder of a shift in power. "Think back in the late '90s, if people had a problem with the game, they'd have to do a letter-writing campaign. The consumers had zero power in the '90s, but now (with social media and the internet), they have all the power." Fargo and his team's collective experience helped them handle the demands of game development, publishing, and communication simultaneously. However, on the morning of our interview with Fargo, the Kickstarter for Areal, which received a lot of press for its development and business practices, had just imploded. This was a rather timely reminder of the results of mismanaged production funded publicly. And Fargo offered some harsh, if helpful, truths about folks looking to get into making a game through Kickstarter for all the wrong reasons. "I've said this before about Kickstarter, it's not the place to cut your teeth and learn how to make a game. I don't think it's good for that," Fargo said. "Because once you've gone out and failed, you're publicly flogging yourself out there. It's gonna be harder to start another project, and it might even hurt you finding a job. Who knows, right? He's the guy who took your money and failed to deliver. You don't want to be that guy. So I think it's a horrible idea for people to cut their teeth on their first project on crowdfunding. However, once you've done production for awhile, then it's easier to do." Fargo is still optimistic about the future of development through crowdsourcing. "That's why Kickstarter is so perfect, because the mid-level developer was disappearing for the most part. You have the big AAA guys, then the small indie-developers making the smaller titles like Goat Simulator and all that stuff. There are games like [Wasteland 2] that can't be made with three or four guys and so [crowdfunding] does allow for games like this to be made." The release of this title means a great deal for all those involved. Not only is it the return of an influential and much-loved title, but it's also a game that feels like a blast from the past that's adapted and accommodated the skills and tricks from the modern day. "We've put our heart and soul into this game, I've put my own money into this, my guys have been working seven days a week, and I haven't even gone on my honeymoon," said Fargo. "My wife wants to kill me, she's been waiting two years for our honeymoon."While the game is now available on Early Access, the official launch of Wasteland 2 should come in September, 26 years after the release of the original. It looks like Kickstarter is about to get another success story. And for inXile Entertainment, that means another shot at making something memorable.
Wasteland 2 photo
Brian Fargo talks fulfilling the trust of fans and the pressures of crowdfunding games
Take a moment and think about your dream game. You've probably been thinking about this for awhile. It's always in the back of your mind. Whenever you see new a title promising to do what your dream game does, you wonder if i...

Wasteland 2 photo
Wasteland 2

Final version of Wasteland 2 likely delayed into September


The delay is due to manufacturing physical versions
Aug 04
// Alasdair Duncan
Another day, another delay. It turns out that Wasteland 2 will be likely be missing the August launch date for a release in the first half of September instead. An update on the game's Kickstarter page revealed the delay is d...
Wasteland 2 photo
Wasteland 2

Scavenge a post-apocalyptic Arizona in Wasteland 2 now via Steam Early Access


Full game headed for release August 2014
May 21
// Brittany Vincent
Wasteland 2 is poised to ship at the end of August 2014, and you can play it right now via the Wasteland 2 Steam Early Access beta. Well, you can play the entire Arizona area of the game. That's still playing, kind of. Right?...
Wasteland 2 photo
Wasteland 2

A regular playthough of Wasteland 2 will take about 50 hours


You won't see all the content on a single playthrough
Apr 14
// Alasdair Duncan
After playing the beta on and off between updates, I've already figured that Wasteland 2 is going to be a big game. Developer inXile thinks it's going to to take at least 50 hours to play though the game which is a pretty big...
Wasteland 2 photo
Wasteland 2

Wasteland 2 will be done 'when it's done'


inXile's long-awaited sequel is still in Early Access
Feb 22
// Alasdair Duncan
Development on inXile's Wasteland 2 continues to rumble on after its release in beta form at the end of 2013. There's still no news on when the game will be complete and an update from inXile head Brian Fargo confirms th...
Wasteland 2 early access photo
Wasteland 2 early access

Steam Early Access: Waste some time with Wasteland 2


Kick dirt in Kickstarter backers' faces
Dec 16
// Steven Hansen
Wasteland 2 finally hit beta for its Kickstarter backers. Those of you who adopted the John Dorian "wait and see" approach, however, are free to cackle embarrassingly at all the chumps who plunked down their coin mad early, b...
Wasteland 2 beta photo
Wasteland 2 beta

Wasteland 2 beta out for backers, coming to Steam soon


Go play it already!
Dec 12
// Joshua Derocher
At last, backers of Wasteland 2 can start playing the beta on PC. If you log into your Ranger Center account, you can get a Steam key to start playing. To be eligible for beta access right now, you have to have been one ...
Get your cRPG on photo
Get your cRPG on

Wasteland 1 re-released on Steam and GOG.com


Wasteland 2 backers will get it for free
Nov 08
// Joshua Derocher
The classic 1988 computer role-playing game, Wasteland, will be available once again for you to purchase starting right now, to play on your modern computers from Steam and GOG.com. inXile, the studio working on Wasteland 2,...
Wasteland 2 reactions photo
Wasteland 2 reactions

Unique snowflakes: Wasteland 2 NPC consider player gender


And more: Wasteland 2 to waste no chance creating meaningful encounters
Aug 12
// Steven Hansen
A cool piece of news regarding the much anticipated Wasteland 2 comes courtesy of Rock, Paper, Shotgun. World building, exploration, and individual experience are pivotal to this style of role-playing game. It seems that Wast...
Wasteland photo
Wasteland

inXile is bringing the original Wasteland to GOG, Steam


Free for backers of Wasteland 2
Aug 09
// Jordan Devore
Now this is a pleasant turn of events. inXile Entertainment plans to sell Wasteland on GOG.com and Steam ahead of the release of its new Wasteland 2. Those of you who contributed to the game's crowdfunding initiative will get...
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The DTOID Show: Wasteland 2, Borderlands 2, & Square Enix


So much DLC!
Jul 23
// Tara Long
Since my intrepid co-host is still off in Hawaii, undoubtedly contracting several deadly strains of bird flu, Adam Sessler stepped in on today's show again to talk about Steam's new exclusive daily challenges for Spelunky, t...
Wasteland photo
Wasteland

Deep Silver to handle Wasteland 2 distribution for inXile


Parternship lets inXile concentrate on making the game
Jul 11
// Jordan Devore
The publisher of Saints Row IV, Metro: Last Light, and Dead Island will be working with inXile Entertainment on the crowdfunded Wasteland 2. Deep Silver will be responsible for the role-playing game's release at retail, quali...
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Aliens disappoints, Demos kill sales, and Toys are fun


The Destructoid Show wants out of this chickensh*t outfit
Feb 12
// Max Scoville
Hello there, boys and girls! It's your creepy uncle Max with another installment of the critically-acclaimed [citation needed] Destructoid Show! Today we talk about Aliens: Colonial Marines, which seems to be the bummer of t...
Wasteland 2 photo
Wasteland 2

Watch the first gameplay footage of Wasteland 2


Demoing the goods of inXile's highly funded Kickstarter project
Feb 09
// Conrad Zimmerman
Interested in seeing what Brian Fargo's team at inXile has been doing with the gobs of money thrown at them by backers of its Wasteland 2 Kickstarter funding campaign? Then you'll enjoy this video which features a full fifte...
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Leaked video of Wasteland 2 shows off isometric view


Sep 06
// Joshua Derocher
A video of Wasteland 2 has been leaked onto YouTube. The video is in Russian, but thanks to my excellent knowledge of Google's translator, I was able to deduce that this is supposedly from a talk given by Bria...

Place Your Bets: Hurrah, dystopia! Edition

Apr 18 // Allistair Pinsof
After Double Fine made over a million in 24 hours on Kickstarter -- a first for the four-year-old site -- there was a consensus that nothing going forward could shock us about future Kickstarter successes. And then Wasteland 2 happened. It's shocking because, unlike Double Fine, inXile are developers of some rather dull, mediocre games. Sure, the 2004 Bard's Tale reboot had its fans, but Hunted: The Demon's Forge was one of the most middling games of last year! Nevertheless, people paid attention to this Kickstarter and happily threw their money at it. Over $3 million if you count PayPal backers! Why did it succeed? Wasteland 2 has the promise of being the Fallout 3 game Interplay teased long ago. It helps that the original Fallout's co-creator, executive producer, and composer are all on board. The real selling point though was the well made, entertaining Kickstarter video that likely won over those not even familiar with Wasteland's history. The Kickstarter page was also well put together: concise, visual, and wonderfully structured. The Verdict: Do we really need another RPG in a dystopia? After Rage, I think I had enough of this aesthetic. Upon Wasteland's release in 1988, it was novel to see a game borrowing so heavily from Mad Max. Now, it's just kind of trite. However, I welcome a new tactical strategy game -- I'm not sure others will feel the same though, looking at the response to the recent Jagged Alliance reboot. Furthermore, I don't get the feeling these guys know how to evolve the genre. They talk about exploration and moral choice as if they were still original prospects in games. Far from it. In the very least, you can trust Wasteland 2 won't likely become vaporware since it's from an established studio. Too bad it's one with a very shaky track record. The name says it all. That is if the word "Shadowrun" meant anything for you to begin with. For a lot of us, it brings us back to days spent with the excellent Super Nintendo Shadowrun -- a cyberpunk RPG based on a pen-and-paper game that featured a futuristic dystopia inhabited by creatures typically found in fantasy novels. It was a meeting place between Gibson and Tolkien, where orcs could run seedy dance clubs and a dragon could run a corporation. It was pretty great. Why did it succeed? Like Wasteland 2, Shadowrun Returns is helmed by its original creator who has a fresh-faced studio behind him. This earns the project a lot of good will. It helps that the group acknowledge that they are against the 2007 Shadowrun FPS -- which, as much as I loved, didn't capture the franchise's essence -- and that the SNES Shadowrun is worth borrowing from. It's also another well made Kickstarter page with a snappy video to boot. The Verdict: I'm worried that the game will be shallow, as they are building it for PC and tablet. I don't see how you can do that without compromising some depth and ideas. However, Harebrained Schemes have proven themselves capable of making a good iOS strategy game with last years Crimson: Steam Pirates (published by Bungie of all companies!) As a Shadowrun fan, I'd be happy just to enter its brilliant world again, even if it means killing cyber-rats for the first hour. So, you just won $42 million dollars! What are you going to do! Make a Kickstarter for a generic fantasy  MMORPG? Uh, really? Well … okay, then. Your World is "a MMORPG Game built by gamers, for gamers and funded by gamers." If that isn't descriptive enough, head over to the developer's website for long, insane outline of the game.The problem is that the lengthy explanation only left me more confused on what exactly this game developer and Mega Milllions lottery winner Ellwood Bartlett wants to achieve. Battles will play like a 2D fighting game? Gladiator foot ball? Cybrogs? Okay, I guess. Cool MMORPG, bro. Will It Succeed? Hell no! If there isn't a law that prevents a multimillionaire lottery winner from asking for $1.1 million for a MMORPG on Kickstarter, there should be. With two weeks left, I don't see this high-asking price being met. That is, unless Bartlett throws his own money in the pot in order to access the $20,000+ already backed. That he got that much for such a poorly conveyed, unoriginal concept is an achievement in itself. The Verdict: Either Barteltt is so far off the deep end that he is onto something brilliant I can't see or he is just crazy. Regardless, I wouldn't bet my money on it. With a name like that, how can you not want to throw money at this project? Before you start writing those $10,000 checks, you should know about its developer Willie Shi and his development studio 8land (which can easily be misread as "Bland," a telling detail). Shi has a long history in game development and as his bio states "He learn new stuffs super lightning fast, He is at least 10 times faster than most programmers/developers." Take a look at his previous projects and you have to wonder how capable he is of pulling off an ambitious FPS where you, uh, shoot animals on an island? My favorite part of the Kickstarter is that he uses a 2002-era looking model of Angelina Jolie as a selling point, despite not having the rights to her likeness. Will It Succeed? Not likely. Unless the fans of Shi's past freemuium iOS masterpieces, including Memory Test Free and Riddles Unlimited, throw down some serious cash for this project, I don't see its half-million asking price being met. The Verdict: lol ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- How do you guys feel about the above Kickstarters? What about Kickstarter in general? Want to suggest some awesome or just plain stupid Kickstarter pages for me to cover? Come Tweet at me, brah!
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At the end of every year, we walk away with a couple words that define it. Though we aren't even halfway through 2012, I have a feeling "Kickstarter" is going to be one of them. Kickstarter is a site where people like you and...

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The DTOID Show: Journey, FEZ, and Wasteland 2!


Mar 31
// Tara Long
Happy Friday, folks! In case you missed it, The Destructoid Show went live earlier today, and in addition to giving out four codes for Waveform on Steam, we also covered a metric shit-ton of news that happened recently - som...
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Hey guys! Here we are again! Today's show, we talk about how Kickstarter is the hottest thing on the web right now, and how Tim Schafer's Double Fine Adventure raised 3.3 million dollars, and how inXile's Wasteland 2 is in th...

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inXile finally sets up a Kickstarter for Wasteland 2


Mar 13
// Jim Sterling
After weeks of talk, inXile Entertainment has finally set up a Kickstarter for Wasteland 2. The so-called "Godfather of post apocalyptic RPGs" is set to return, with a little help from the community.  The plan is for res...

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