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Along with Project P-100, one of the biggest surprises at the Nintendo booth at E3 was Game & Wario. I would have definitely been less disappointed with Nintendo's on-site press conference if the...

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Dr. Wily makes necessary preparations in WarioWare D.I.Y.


Aug 20
// Tony Ponce
Let's see now...there have been ten main games, one side story, and five handheld titles in the classic Mega Man series. Dr. Wily builds one or two fortresses for each outing, and they always crumble to the ground in the end...

Review: WarioWare D.I.Y./WarioWare D.I.Y. Showcase

Apr 30 // Jonathan Holmes
WarioWare D.I.Y. (DS)Developer: Intelligent Systems/NintendoPublisher: NintendoReleased: March 28, 2010MSRP: $34.99 If you're not familiar with the series, you should know that WarioWare is all about five-second comedy "microgames." Sudden surprises, bizarre premises, and unreasonable demands are series trademarks. There's one microgame that shows up in most of the games in the series that tells you to "PICK!", then presents you with a black-and-white drawing of a nose and a finger. The finger is moving left to right, and with just a few seconds to spare, you have to win. But how do you win? Oh yeah, "PICK!" Press the button when the finger is aligned with a nostril! Take too long to figure that out, or press the button at the wrong time and miss the nostril, and it's instant failure. Press it at the right time, it's finger in the hole and near-instant gratification. Historically, the WarioWare games feature crude, humble, and creepy-but-amusing visual design. WarioWare is videogame equivalent of the Spike and Mike or The Animation Show indie animation festivals. That hasn't changed with WarioWare D.I.Y. The difference is that now, you can finally enter the festival yourself. The game comes complete with comics, built-in songs, and over 90 microgames packed in. Some of them are pretty good (particularly those based on other Nintendo series like Pikmin and Metroid: Zero Mission), but their main purpose is to give you ideas and examples to guide you towards making your own stuff. Making games is the star of show, but there are music and comic creation tools. It feels a lot like a sequel to Mario Paint on the SNES, except now you can share your creations in the game's virtual world, and with the real world, via both local connections and Wi-Fi. Wario is the first to introduce you to the game creation tools, as he asks you to finish the graphics for a game that he's been working on. This works as both a tutorial on using the game's drawing tools, and an opportunity for comedy. I've long been of the opinion that comedy games only work when they allow the player to be funny, as opposed to just presenting the player with a bunch of pre-scripted jokes. That's exactly what happens here. Wario doesn't tell you of the context in which your graphics will be used in-game, which results in something like Mad Libs for videogames. Whatever you come up with for graphics will likely look funny in the unexpected context into which Wario inserts them. Trust me, it's funnier to play than to read about. The music creator isn't as funny, but it's still pretty awesome. It's easy to use, and has a fairly large bank of instruments and sound effects to rely on. You get four tracks and a percussion section to work with, and you can make songs up to 4 minutes long. Suck at laying notes down by hand? Try the "hum" option. It allows you to place notes in real time by singing into the DS microphone. It's not perfect, but if you've got decent pitch, it will give you a head start on laying down some tracks. If you have no ideas for songs at all, you can just ask the game to write music for you and your games. On top of all that, you can also stick in wacky sound effects and add filters to your songs. Like most Nintendo apps, they do their best to make this music maker fun, even if you suck at using it. The comic creator is probably my favorite app in the WarioWare D.I.Y. package. It allows you to create a four-panel black-and-white comic. You get the basic pencil and fill tools, and built-in graphics if you need them. Where it might take you hours to create a finished game, and a little less for a full-length song, you can put together a pretty funny comic in a matter of minutes.  That's not to say the microgame creator is bad by comparison. It's surprisingly painless to create animated characters (with up to four frames of animation each), backgrounds, and AI programs. You can also edit other games (acquired in-game or from people online) and tweak them any way you'd like. This is the easiest game creation tool I've used yet. The problems come from the limits put on the player/developer. Sometimes they're understandable, but other times they feel a little excessive. There are only fourteen colors to choose from, which is a bummer. As a result, every game you make or play with D.I.Y. will look like a low-end GBA title at best. The upside is, the limited colors force you to learn how to shade in the old-school checkerboard pixel manner. There are even palettes set to automatically lay down the checkerboard pattern for you in different color combinations. Still, it's hard to understand why they didn't give us the option to use a few more colors, and go checkerboard if that's what we wanted. The same goes for the lack of control options available for user-created games. You can't set any of your games to be controlled with the D-pad and buttons, or even by clicking and dragging objects on-screen à la The Legend of Zelda: The Spirit Tracks or Nintendogs. It's all point-and-tap for every game. Clever developers will find ways around this, by laying D-pad and button icons down on the touch screen itself or using other tricks, but why should they have to? There are also serious limits put on the game's online distribution functionality. Friend Codes are required, which isn't that big of a deal if you have the Internet and are willing to go to WarioWare fansite forums to find some friends. The real problem comes from how games are exchanged. You can only put two games, one record, and one comic in your storeroom at any one time. That may sound like a lot, but considering that it's not uncommon to find someone online who wants to give you ten games at a time, it's a pain. You've got to ask them to drop two games in their store room, go grab the games, tell the person you got them, ask them to take those two games out and put two new ones in, and so forth. The game also doesn't allow you to store a whole lot of microgames on your cartridge -- just 90 in total. It may sound like a lot, but most microgames are over in just 5 seconds. 90 x 5 seconds = "Wanh, I want more cookies, Mama!" I get that the developers wanted to limit the player's development tools so they'd rely on ingenuity and comedy to create great microgames, as opposed to toiling away for hours at making the next Super Mario 3. I just think they went a little far with the limits. The original WarioWare was controlled with the D-pad and buttons, and later WarioWare games featured a variety of other control options, as well as a full 256-color palette. None of that limited the comedic effect or ingenuity found in the microgames in those titles. Still, the pros far outweigh the cons in this game. Making your own WarioWare game is even more fun than it looks. It's especially cool to download the game's multitudes of free DLC microgames and stack them up against your own creations. So far, we've gotten games created by the likes of Cave Story's Pixel, World of Goo's Ron Carmel, Metroid's Yoshio Sakamoto, Super Smash Bros.' Masahiro Sakurai, Super Meat Boy's Edmund McMillen, and Bit.Trip RUNNER's Alex Neuse. There is a strange sort of "living the dream" joy in creating your own, potentially superior game, and sandwiching it in between the games of these great developers. Speaking of which, if you want to try out my debut microgame, F*ck Face, drop me a PM. I'll hook you up. Oh yeah, a score... Score: 8 -- Great (8s are impressive efforts with a few noticeable problems holding them back. Won't astound everyone, but is worth your time and cash.) WarioWare D.I.Y. Showcase (WiiWare)Developer: Intelligent Systems/NintendoPublisher: NintendoReleased: March 29, 2010MSRP: 800 Wii Points WarioWare D.I.Y. Showcase is a relatively cheap application that allows you to download WarioWare D.I.Y. DLC and upload games, comics, and songs directly from the DS version of the game. It also contains some new comics, songs, and over 70 new microgames. There are no game creation tools here, but for just $8, I didn't expect something on par with the $35 DS game. There are some advantages to using D.I.Y. Showcase on the Wii over D.I.Y. on the DS. For starters, you can send games you've created directly to anyone who also has Showcase on their Wii. No storeroom shenanigans involved; just pick the game, record, or comic you want to send, pick who you want to send it to, and you're off. It's a feature that really should have been in the DS version, but at least it's here. Another cool feature is the ability to take songs from D.I.Y. DS and transform them into playable levels in Balloon Fight. For those who don't know, Balloon Fight is a simple 2D side-scrolling flight game from Nintendo's first years in the home console market. In WarioWare D.I.Y. Showcase, any record can be played as a level, where each note can be collected for points as the player flies from left to right. Each time you collect a note, the note plays. It's like Balloon Fight meets Guitar Hero. Though it's impossible to play a level well enough to play back the song perfectly, it's still a fun and weird enough challenge to give it a try. The other big advantage to D.I.Y. Showcase over D.I.Y. DS is the ability to play games in local competitive multiplayer with up to four people. You can't play games you've created in this mode -- only games that came packed in with the program. It's still a cool bonus that adds dimension to the sometimes repetitive microgame action, while also working as the perfect "gateway game" to those in the family who might not immediately take to the microgame concept. My two big problems with the "game" come from what it comes packed with, and what it can pack. As with D.I.Y. on the DS, D.I.Y. Showcase comes with some built-in microgames. There are 72 in all, and as with D.I.Y. DS, they're not all that great. The storage problem also comes up again. You can only store 72 games. Why so few? None of that really matters, though, because having D.I.Y. Showcase means I can play F*ck Face on the big screen. It's purely a vanity thing, but it's still amazing to hold a controller in your hand, look at your TV, and play something that came out of your own brain. That alone was worth my $8. Score: 8.5 -- Great (8s are impressive efforts with a few noticeable problems holding them back. Won't astound everyone, but is worth your time and cash.) [UPDATE: Reader Rabspat noticed that I have something wrong here. You can in fact use D.I.Y. Showcase's multi-player mode to play your own microgames. In this mode, you play a mixed-up combination of pre-made microgames with the homemade microgames, and the order is random. As such, I didn't actually get to any homemade microgames on my first few plays of this mode. Chalk it up to bad luck and crappy research. My mistake! Adding 0.5 to the score!- Jonathan Holmes, Staff]
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At first I wanted to start this review with a "Do you like to do it yourself" reference to The 40-Year-Old Virgin, but then I thought, "Is that how I really want to be remembered in the annals of Internet history? As a peddle...

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Watch Gaijin Games make a WarioWare D.I.Y. microgame


Apr 14
// Jordan Devore
I must say, covering WarioWare D.I.Y. has been nothing but delightful -- and I haven't even gotten around to picking up a copy of the game yet. "Fire Bad!" by Alex Neuse of Gaijin Games is the latest of the developer-created...
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Tips & tricks with advanced WarioWare D.I.Y. tutorials


Apr 07
// Jordan Devore
And with that, the super helpful, nicely-produced WarioWare D.I.Y. tutorial videos from Nintendo of America Treehouse have come to a close. Since the game has been out in the wild for a while now, this final set delves into ...
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Watch Ron Carmel make his WarioWare DIY game Suck Goo


Apr 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
Ron Carmel, co-creator of the highly successful WiiWare and PC title World of Goo, has made a WarioWare D.I.Y. microgame. Suck Goo might be simplistic (even by WarioWare standards) but that's exactly the sort ...
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Cave Story creator's WarioWare D.I.Y. game, Ikachan


Apr 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
As you may be aware already, I love Cave Story. This video is of the WarioWare D.I.Y. microgame that Pixel, genius behind Cave Story, has made available to download. The Ikachan microgame is based on a mechanic from a P...
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More of those helpful WarioWare D.I.Y. tutorial videos


Mar 22
// Jordan Devore
With less than a week left until WarioWare D.I.Y. hits retail, my curiosity for the game has grown tremendously each passing day. More than the main game itself, I'm curious to see if I have what it takes to make a halfway d...
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Developers getting in on the WarioWare D.I.Y. fun


Mar 22
// Jordan Devore
As Matt showed us over the weekend, WarioWare D.I.Y. is going to be the next big thing for creative types. This is made even more clear by today's announcement that a handful of big-name developers will be contributing to the...
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WarioWare D.I.Y. can get really, really violent


Mar 21
// Matthew Razak
What is all this talk about Nintendo not making adult games? The video above clearly shows that WarioWare D.I.Y. is heavily gunning for "Most Violent Game of the Year," and at the moment seems to have a healthy lead in the "...
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Tutorial Time: Learn to make games in WarioWare D.I.Y.


Mar 17
// Dale North
I passed along a preview of upcoming Nintendo DS game WarioWare D.I.Y. earlier this month, and in it I mentioned that I'm very excited about the tools the game provides to make your own microgame. I'm sure the game itself wi...
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WarioWare D.I.Y. has my imagination running wild


Feb 25
// Dale North
At Nintendo's media summit, held in San Francisco today, I had a chance to see the localized version of upcoming DS/DSi game WarioWare D.I.Y. in action. After getting a full demonstration on how it worked, my imagination is r...
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Make 'em hard! Nipple-flicking Nintendo DS boob minigame


May 07
// Dale North
Do you know about the Japanese Nintendo DS game Made in Ore (Made in Me)? Bukkake, remember? If you don't, know that it's a game in the WarioWare series that lets players create their own minigames, complete with tools to mak...
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Surprise: Japanese use Made in Ore to make bukkake porn


May 02
// Colette Bennett
If I've said it once, I've said it a thousand times: if you want something sick and twisted, leave it to Japan. Americans didn't do too shabby of a job showing off what perverts we can be during the whole Sporn debacle, but g...
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Fan-made WarioWare hits the DS and WiiWare with Made in Ore


Apr 14
// Jonathan Holmes
The world will become a better place on April 29th, as that's the day Made in Ore and Asobu Made in Ore will see a simultaneous release on the DS and WiiWare (in Japan). Nintendo just launched websites dedicated to the two ga...

Destructoid review: WarioWare: Snapped!

Apr 08 // Jonathan Holmes
WarioWare: Snapped! (DSiWare)Developer: Intelligent SystemsPublisher: NintendoReleased: April 3, 2009MSRP: 500 DSi PointsFor the eleven minutes I actually spent playing WarioWare: Snapped!, I had a generally fine time. The approximately two hours I spent trying to get the game to properly recognize my face and hands? Not so much.The game is basically a glorified tech demo for the DSi's camera. In theory, there is nothing wrong with that. Wii Sports was a tech demo, not even a glorified one, and it still managed to sell Wii consoles and make millions of people very happy. The difference is, Wii Sports controls pretty well. The controls for Wario Ware: Snapped! are fair at best, and a nightmare at worst. The game consists of twenty micro-games and one playable credits sequence. The first few games control better than the rest, as they work extra hard to teach you how to think about controling a game. It does take a few minutes to adjust to playing a game that requires no buttons or controler of any kind. You'll use your hands and head to grab a few coins; you'll pretend to be a wet dog and shake your head like nuts until you're dry. You don't actually see your face and hands on-screen while you're playing, just a sillhouette. It works well to let you know what the game sees, and what it's reacting to, while not forcing you to look at your own face the entire time. That happens later. After you play through five micro-games, WarioWare: Snapped! shows you an animated highlight reel of all the stupid faces you made while playing. It's not so bad; cute and quirky in the WarioWare style, but notably more easy and shallow than any other game in the series. Unlike past WarioWare titles, if you lose a micro-game in WarioWare: Snapped!, there is absolutely no penalty; you just go on to the next one. There are four sets of five micro-games to play, and you can literally lose every single one and still make it to the end. There is one penalty for failing a micro-game; you won't get to look at yourself acting like a jackass. The game only shows you the highlight reels of the micro-games you succeed in. For some, this may feel like a punishment, but personally, I actually liked not having to watch myself look like a dick after trying my damndest to play a game that becomes practically unplayable. Those first five micro-games are forgiving, but as the game goes on, they get more and more impossible to play. The last five require you to play with another person. For those keeping track, that's more or less a fourth of the total game. This is where the game really starts to punish you. If it loses the ability to recognize either you or the person you're playing with, the game just quits on you. No pause until it can recognize you again, no"move onto the next one" option; just instant death. It's just not forgivable for a game to kill you for its own inability to let you control it. I mean, imagine that you have a dog that you're trying to teach tricks to, and every time it screws up, it hits you on the nose with a newspaper. Is that a dog you'd keep around? In fact, the only times I didn't succeed in WarioWare: Snapped! was when the game was doing it wrong. Unlike other games in the series, you get what feels like forever to complete each micro-game. It's almost impossible to not do them right, as long as the game can see you properly. Those last co-op games took me forever to beat. I had to go into three different rooms, and eventually ended up scrunched up against my toilet with a friend, staring at my DSi, trying to get the game to look at me right.  It was then that I said aloud, "I don't think this game could be any less fun if it tried."Things did get a little better from there, though. The game's credits sequence is by far its best attribute. Unlike the rest of the game, you can actually play the credits for high scores, the controls always work, and it actually takes some skill to play.You control a little flying rollercoaster car, and your goal is to ram into the names of the guys who made the game as they come flying at you. It sort of feels like a simplified version of Bit.Trip Beat, but with the camera set from the back. There are even enemies to avoid, and cakes to collect. It's this credits sequence that will keep me playing that game off and on for the next few days. The rest of the game will be something I revisit much less often, probably only when showing the DSi off to people that don't own one, or in a few years when I've totally forgotten everything about the game and play it again out of sheer ignorance. That's pretty bad for a WarioWare game. Every other title in the series is worth revisiting at least every couple of months. I wish the same could be said for WarioWare: Snapped!. A great credits sequence isn't enough to keep the game from getting a...Score: 4.0 -- Below Average (4s have some high points, but they soon give way to glaring faults. Not the worst games, but are difficult to recommend.)
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The DSi is officially out in stores, and so far the thing is selling like crazy. It's strange for a console that has so few true exclusives at launch to be so hot. Thus far, the only games you can only play on the DSi are a h...

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Iwata snaps


Apr 05
// Matthew Razak
Have you ever wanted to see the CEO of one of the most successful companies in the world look like a total idiot? Here's your chance. Iwata sits down and plays with the upcoming Wario Ware Snapped! showing off the game's came...
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GDC 09: How silly you'll look playing WarioWare: Snapped!


Mar 26
// Nick Chester
So you thought Nintendo's Bill Trinen looked nuts playing Rock N' Roll Climber? Forget that -- it's old news. The new hontesss for looking like a nutjob while playing a game is WarioWare: Snapped!One of the first available ga...
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GDC 09: Nintendo talks DSi reservations, WarioWare Snapped


Mar 25
// Jordan Devore
WarioWare Snapped! (DSiWare), Nintendo's latest insane yet oh so fun to play collection of wacky mini-games, was shown off during Satoru Iwata's keynote address at this year's GDC.Joining oh so many other portable games that ...
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WarioWare:Photograph on the way to DSiWare


Nov 03
// Colette Bennett
I'm a big fan of the WarioWare games, if only for the fact that they are incredibly strange (and remind me a little bit of Rhythm Tengoku). Imagine my delight, then, to hear that Nintendo has plenty of WarioWare coming to the...

Destructoid review: Wario Land: Shake It

Sep 26 // Jonathan Holmes
Wario Land: Shake It (Wii)Developed by Good FeelPublished by NintendoReleased on September 22, 2008If you've already bought Mega Man 9, I can save you the effort of reading the rest of this and just tell you -- Wario Land: Shake it is the anti-Mega Man 9. If you love the idea of old-school, 2D platformers but hate the way they look and how hard they are to play, then Wario Land: Shake It may be the game for you. It's the best in Nintendo's "lite" series of non-Mario plaformers (including games like Super Princess Peach and Yoshi's Story), but it's also about as far from hardcore as you can get. First, I can tell you that the game looks amazing. Wario looked great as a sprite and as polygon based character model, but he definitely looks at his best when hand-drawn. The animation of Wario and the enemies he fights looks as good as any I've seen in a 2D videogame. Everything from the tiniest goon to the screen-filling bosses looks absolutely fantastic, and that's the #1 reason to play the game. These graphics are also the reason the game wouldn't have been possible on WiiWare, given the Wii's lack of a hard drive. While playing Wario Land: Shake it with a group of game-hating friends this past week, I was amazed at how well it went over. That was mostly due to the graphics. The characters are so expressive that even game haters couldn't help but be charmed by it. The sight of Wario stomping a cute little pirate blob, grabbing him by the face, and shaking him to death was enough to get them all to yell "I love this game!", though none of them actually wanted to play it. As much as I may love Mega Man 9's 8-bit look, I must admit that Wario Land: Shake It has it beat in terms of winning over strangers. The game's music is also a draw. It's a bit heavy-handed at times, but it works. All the songs sound like they are being played by real instruments, which goes a long way with the kind of meatheads (er... I mean, "people") that still think that videogame music is just a bunch of "bleeps and bloops". While some of the tracks are no more memorable than the music you may hear while on hold with your cable company, other songs actually evoke the funky days gone by of Fat Albert and His Junkyard band. It's all a little over-the-top, but it's never grating.The developers of Wario Land: Shake It must have caught on to the fact that their game's music ain't half bad, because a large part of the game's reward system involves unlocking its soundtrack. Each level in the game has achievement-esque tasks called "missions", stuff like "Don't take any damage for the whole level" or "Collect X amount of gold". Most of these goals are extremely difficult to pull off on the first try. These missions are a kinder, gentler way to enact the tried and true "this game's too short, let's add an Easter Egg hunt at the end" Nintendo trickery that gamers have had to put up with since the N64 days. Sadly, Wario Land: Shake It desperately needs this padding in the game length department. It is perhaps the easiest first-party Wii game to date. The game is split into five different maps, containing 17 regular levels, 12 secret levels, and 6 boss fights. If you skip all the secret levels, the whole thing could be over in about five hours. The secret levels are found pretty much at random by smashing different areas with Wario's new special ground pound move (performed by shaking the Wii Remote). With a FAQ, I'm sure they'd all be easy to find, but if you tough it out on your own, it will be a long time before you find them all. As for special moves, Wario starts this game completely and utterly over-powered. Traditionally, 2D platformers have been anything but "power fantasies". Mario, Sonic, Arthur from Ghosts and Goblins, Ladd from Bionic Commando -- if any of these guys get hit once or twice without the proper equipment, they'll be pushing up daisies, potentially forced to start their level, or even their whole game, over. Not so for Wario. He can run up and belly bump most enemies in the game and not get hurt. He's got unlimited lives. He's got that ground pound attack that stuns anything on the screen that's touching the floor. He can stomp enemies, tackle them, or pick them up and throw them. Wario, as a playable character in Wario Land: Shake It, is tougher than any boss that 2D Mario ever fought. Even as the game progresses to the tougher levels, there is rarely a time you have to actively worry about dying.  So if the game doesn't keep you occupied with any sort of need to keep your player from dying, what does it do to keep you busy? Surprisingly, it's a whole lot of 2D Metroid-style area exploration and environment interactions. While the game doesn't have the same sense of exploring a huge, nearly limitless world, which the Metroid games have, Wario Land: Shake It does feature the same sort of combing of the environment, searching for secrets. You'll be constantly trying to find stuff by smashing bricks, crawling through holes, making speed-boosted running jumps, basically looking for any and every potential path to an otherwise inaccessible area.There is even a toned-down version of "shine sparking" in the game, which adds some much-needed depth to the game's otherwise straightforward gameplay. Also taken from the world of Metroid is the need to backtrack and escape a level before a timer runs out, except in Wario Land: Shake it, this happens at the end of each and every level. It was during these sequences and the boss battles that I died the most -- not from enemy attacks, but just from taking too long. Even then, death still doesn't mean a lot. You get to restart instantly from the point that the timer started, and Wario's got that infinite lives thing going anyway.  Surprisingly, my one major complaint about Wario Land: Shake it is its lack of personality. You'd think that a Wario game would be filled with weird humor and slightly disturbing insanity, but if anything, Wario Land: Shake it is a tad dry in the style department. Even the relatively tame Super Paper Mario featured more interesting enemies and environments. By contrast, everything about Wario Land: Shake It screams "playing it safe." There are no wacky references to other Nintendo games, no creepy zombie suits or wacky disguises. There isn't even any farting. This lack of strange antics is in itself strange. For Wario, it's normal to be weird. His other hit franchise, the WarioWare series, has made itself famous for its panache for the unpredictable and surreal. To see Wario not even try to act messed up is pretty messed up, and pretty disappointing. I can wholeheartedly recommend the full-price purchase of Wario Land: Shake It to only three groups of people: kids between 5-10 years old, die-hard fans of hand-drawn animation, and people who love "easy but smart" 2D platformers. The game is top-notch in terms of its look, its controls, and its level design. Then why is it that I kept wanting to stop playing it in favor of another go at Tornado Man's Time Attack challenge in Mega Man 9? It's because by comparison, Mega Man 9 is like a brush with death, an edge-of-your-seat thrill ride on a brand new roller coaster, whereas Wario Land : Shake It is more like a leisurely, risk-free hop in the tea cups. If the game had Wario start out with half the amount of special moves, wasn't so resistant to letting you die, and had some of that trademark Wario weirdness, then I'd be more apt to recommend it to everybody. It's a shame, because I really want Wario Land: Shake It to succeed, if not just to send the message to developers that home-console, hand-drawn 2D action/platformers didn't have to die along with the Sega Saturn. Guess I'll just have to hope for Muramasa to turn out good enough make that point...Score: 7.5 -- Good (7s are solid games that definitely have an audience. Might lack replay value, could be too short or there are some hard-to-ignore faults, but the experience is fun.)
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You know who's no one's all-time favorite videogame character? That's right, it's Wario. This Bizarro purple-nosed man-thing has been around for over fifteen years, and over that time some people have grown to like him, many ...

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Nintendo gets clever on YouTube with some viral marketing with Wario


Sep 23
// Colette Bennett
If you're confused what you're actually seeing in the pic above, check out this link of footage from Wario Land: Shake it!. Looks pretty cool so far ... uh ... what the ... what just happened?Nintendo just got a little more c...
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E3 08: New Wario Land: Shake It screens are absolutely gorgeous


Jul 16
// Chad Concelmo
After yesterday's widely panned Nintendo press conference (seriously, go back and read these comments -- yikes!), we were given a press kit with a bunch of Nintendo assets to look over. While most of these press releases and ...
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New detailed look at Wario Land: Shake It! Waggle waggle waggle


Jul 09
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Nintendo has released a new trailer giving a more detailed look at Wario Land: Shake It! The video goes through the basics of the game and shows just how much the Wiimote’s motion sensing will play a factor in the game....
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First footage of Wario Land: Shake It! makes me a happy shark


Jul 04
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
 I had mixed feelings when Wario Land: Shake It! was first announced for the Wii. The last DS Wario adventure title was such garbage that I feared Nintendo would continue to ruin one of my favorite characters of all time...
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Wahhh-ree-oh!: Nintendo reveals Wario Land: Shake It! for Wii


Jun 25
// Nick Chester
We first brought you news of this upcoming side-scroller back in May, but today Nintendo has officially revealed Wario Land: Shake It! for North American release.The game appears to mix classic side-scrolling platforming with...
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Wii platformer Wario Land Shake details unveiled


May 29
// Dale North
I know: the text is in Japanese, the pictures are blurry, and there's only one page to look at. It's all we've got for now. But it's enough to get fans of Nintendo 2D platformers excited, myself included. Wiifanboy points us ...
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The Smash DOJO!! recap: Brawl is turning into Pokemon ... sorta


Dec 28
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The week started off really weird and made me realize something about the DOJO (which I'll tell you at the end of the post). Wario's different costumes were shown off. He has his classic yellow and purple overalls as well as ...
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The Smash DOJO!! recap: Wario-Man is here to save the day


Nov 30
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Monday began with a very detailed look at the controls for Brawl. This is the first time in the Smash games where you'll actually be able to configure which button does what move on all forms of the controller options. It's a...
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Fake game Friday: Prince of Persia Wario Within


May 18
// Anthony Burch
Another minimalist fake game this week: it's by Fana7ic, and I'll be totally honest with you: all he gave us was the title, and, in a way, that's enough.It's Prince of Persia: Wario Within. Imagine all the dex...

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