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DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 17 - Hippos and Zippos


The tube is a scary place
Aug 28
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). This week UK Editor Laura Dale is joined by Joe Parlock and Vikki Blake to talk about Gravity Ghost, Brighton amiibo news, Zombi, and our regular selection of terrible dad jokes. Have a listen on iTunes or direct download.

The top five most British games you'll ever lay eyes on

Aug 26 // Joe Parlock
#5: Bloodborne Bloodborne was a sign of great change over at From Software. After its run of massively popular Souls games, it wanted to try something really different. It wanted to move away from the formula that made From the huge success it was, and show the world the average, day-to-day lives of people living in Birmingham. Audiences were cautious of the idea at first: bringing the Midlands to life seemed like an odd choice for a Japanese developer to tackle. Over the course of the development process, we learned just how seriously Miyazaki was taking the project: he’d binge-watched every episode of Crossroads, a task no human being should be able to survive. But it all paid off: when it finally launched, everyone instantly understood how important the game would be. From the Werewolves of Snow Hill Station to the Dog Vicar of the Bullring, Brum really does come to life in videogame form. Treading over the broken cobbles and forcing my way through the rusted gates, it was just like I was there. Some players complained about the difficulty of the game, but frankly if you haven’t been devoured by a giant spider when going to Birmingham’s Selfridges, you’ve not truly experienced the city. #4: Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture Shropshire was an absolutely inspired choice of a location for The Chinese Room’s newest storytelling game Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture. The county is very rarely a setting in games, and it has a rich history thanks to its influence and contribution to the industrial revolution. Shropshire is everything you could think about Britain neatly compressed into a nice, little place full. But that’s not the true reason why it’s such a great setting for Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture. The real reason is it’s the closest thing to a post-apocalypse you’ll find in the Western hemisphere! That’s right, after the AI incursion at Ironbridge in 1886, nobody has lived there! Every single human being you see in Shropshire is just a steam-powered Stepford-esque bio-machinations, who have left the county to go to ruin! Pubs and charity shops have combined into one weird amalgamation that’s not quite as good as either, and you can bet your entire family a new museum is popping up as you read this. Shropshire is an utterly bizarre, yet pretty, place. For the lens to be focused so intently on it in Rapture means we may soon finally find a way to reclaim our land from the androids. #3: Killing Floor Killing Floor might be a slightly controversial inclusion on this list, because it doesn’t paint our glorious isles in quite the best light. However, I think something us Brits have always been good at is introspection. From a National Trust café to a beach in Benidorm, we always act with the utmost class and decorum, but Killing Floor shows a darker side to our nation: British football. Killing Floor is about a world overrun by, and I quote, “bloody Millwall fans”. Set in the streets of London, you must survive against the hordes of football fans being kicked out of the pub. Killing Floor’s recreation of modern day football is so realistic, the attention to detail is simply amazing. I can smell the cheese and onion Walkers crisps and stale beer just thinking about it. In a positive light though, Killing Floor manages to be incredibly inclusive of its image of football fans. The world likes to paint the sport as a load of rowdy old geezers who can’t keep their drinks down in their moth-eaten Aston Villa t-shirts, but it simply isn’t like that in 2015. Men with chainsaws for arms and invisible women have become way more accepted in recent years! Even Spider-hybrids have found their place! Unfortunately, scary fire-shooting people have still been fighting for their place for a while now… but there’s certainly progress. Also, we have a lot of guns. That is some Britain is absolutely known for: how many great big, piss-off guns we all carry around at all times. Sometimes it’s a hassle trying to carry my shopping from Morrison’s with an AK-47 in the way, but that’s Britain for you. Killing Floor’s unblinking view of how many fully-automatic shotguns and flamethrowers even your common Londoner has is something we need to really understand about our culture. Thanks, Tripwire. #2: The Beatles: Rock Band It was twenty years ago today that Sergeant Pepper taught the band to play. They’ve been going in and out of style, but none the less they’ve been marching through the streets of Liverpool, ensuring all of Britain’s children are behaving as they should. If they are not learning the songs of their grandparents, or worshiping the great Lucy in the Sky with their Diamonds, Pepper’s mighty Walrus will take them away to a place nobody knows. This is how it has been for the past fifty years, and it is the way it shall always be. Of course, there have been attempts to destroy the great influence our Lord and Master Ringo Starr has had on us. The Oasis Movement of the '90s was the biggest threat, but problems among management meant it stood no chance against the Lonely Hearts Club Band. And this is why The Beatles: Rock Band is on our list. No one changed the face of Britain as much as Lord Starr did, and the great idea of incorporating the children’s mandatory daily reverence into a video game meant for those wealthy enough to afford the little plastic instruments, life is good. Well not good, but it’s getting better. #1: Sir, You Are Being Hunted You thought Everybody’s Gone to Rapture was our only way of fighting back against the robots? Oh heavens no, we also have Sir, You Are Being Hunted. Not only does Sir helpfully remind the British public to respect the god damn class institution that has been in place for centuries, it also provides handy-dandy training on how to survive should you find yourself in somewhere like Shropshire! Sir is a program to help remind those crawling in the shattered darkness that Britain still exists: with tweed shops, and union jacks plopped onto absolutely every item inconceivable. Digestive biscuits, far too many churches, parish halls, smokestacks, tea, tea, tea. If this doesn’t remind you of home, I don’t know what will. There’s even fox hunting! You remember fox hunting, right? That thing only rich people do because getting away with shooting poor people would be more hassle than it’s worth?  Of course, in this case you’re the fox… but never mind that, developer Big Robot is still working out the kinks. Sir, You Are Being Hunted is more than a game. It’s our message unto the world that no matter what they do to us, we will survive. A nice strawberry trifle here, an 8 out of 10 Cats Does Countdown there, and we will all keep calm and carry on. What is left of us must carry on. Oh god we must.
Blighty photo
God save Ringo and his Robot Army
Britain, Britain, Britain! Over the years we’ve been known for a lot: tea, monocles, the Queen, imperialism, and at one point… video games. We had it all, from the Sinclair ZX Spectrum to Rockstar Games, Britain ...

Competition photo
Live music, geeks and gaming
Hey, you like video game music right? Let's hope you live in or near the UK, because Video Games Live is going to be coming back to our merry old isles early next year. The video game music concert spectacular will be running...

UK Industry photo
UK Industry

UK tax relief has 'positive impact' on UK games development


It's not the most generous tax relief in the world, apparently
Aug 24
// Vikki Blake
Though the UK games industry still needs to be "on par" with the British film industry, tax relief is already having a positive impact on the UK games industry. "In 2014 the European Commission gave the green light and the ta...

DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 16 - Big Pause


Commit a crime on vampires
Aug 21
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). This week UK Editor Laura Dale is joined by Joe Parlock and Vikki Blake to talk about Volume, The Sun, games about chronic fatigue and a whole bunch of terrible dad jokes. Have a listen on iTunes or direct download.
Video Games Live photo
Video Games Live

Video Games Live returning to UK in 2016


Video game tunes played LIVE
Aug 20
// Laura Kate Dale
Hey, you like video game music right? Let's hope you live in or near the UK, because Video Games Live is going to be coming back to our merry old isles early next year. The video game music concert spectacular will be running...
DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 15 - Past Your Eyes


Get outta that milk my boy
Aug 14
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). This week UK Editor Laura Dale is joined by Joe Parlock to talk about ...
gamescom trailer photo
gamescom trailer

Soul Axiom is looking good and weird


Hey Soul Axiom...
Aug 10
// Steven Hansen
While I've known Soul Axiom to be a distinct game, the mix of games with Souls in the name and Axiom Verge this year has muddled my brain up. Soul Axiom is looking like it will muddle my brain up, too, from this surreal trai...
Electronic Arts photo
Electronic Arts

EA moves UK release dates to align with mainland Europe


24 hours early!
Aug 07
// Vikki Blake
Electronics Arts will align its UK release dates with the rest of Europe. This means that rather having to wait for the industry-standard of a Friday here on old Blighty, we'll be able to snag our PAL UK copies a whole day ea...
SCE UK photo
SCE UK

Sony Computer Entertainment UK's boss Fergal Gara resigns


Warwick Light will be replacing him
Jul 31
// Joe Parlock
Sony Computer Entertainment UK’s boss Fergal Gara has stepped down from the position, so he can “pursue a new professional venture”, according to MCV UK. Since becoming the vice president and managing direct...
Senran Kagura photo
Senran Kagura

You can grab Senran Kagura 2: Deep Crimson in Europe next month


It's almost time to fight some boobs
Jul 30
// Laura Kate Dale
Senran Kagura 2: Deep Crimson is one of those games that probably know full well already if you're interested in buying or not. My job is to let you know when you can do that, if you want to do that. The newest Senran Kagura ...
Senran Kagura photo
Senran Kagura

Senran Kagura Estival Versus coming to Europe Early 2016


Booooooooooooooooooobs
Jul 28
// Laura Kate Dale
Boooooooooooooooobs are coming to Europe. Most of you who read Destructoid will have probably at some point come across the Senran Kagura video game series at some point in your life. Why do people know about it? Because it's...
DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 14 - The Weight of What You Did


How could you?
Jul 24
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). This week UK Editor Laura Dale is joined by Joe Parlock and Vikki Blake to talk about Fallout butt plugs, Randy Pilchard and Vikki actually playing a game that wasn't Destiny. Have a listen on iTunes or Direct Download.

My trip to the National Videogame Arcade

Jul 24 // Joe Parlock
For a building all about video games, there’s none of the pomp and flash that comes with your normal conventions – no mention of big publishers or upcoming games, the entire affair feels very non-commercial which is a nice change to the normal games-related places I find myself in, and that helps go a way to make gaming more accessible for people who may not be involved in the scene. Instead, many of the games on display are independent, or even built out of wood and paint to be exclusively shown at the NVA. There’s very much a DIY-feel to the place, and according to Iain that’s intentional. There is an emphasis on ensuring guests understand nothing simply magically appears, but instead has effort and work put into it.  For example, there is a game where players must try and hit buttons on a wall to match up items on a screen. The entire thing was built and painted on-site, and is intentionally imperfect to show the work that went into building it. This DIY approach doesn’t only apply to the building, but also to the games on display. Mission Command, a game made exclusively for the Arcade, takes up an entire room. Under the guidance of an NVA staff member, the room spreads out the different parts of game development into different stations, where all the changes made can be seen in real-time on the screen. Set out like a two-player Asteroids, while one person is piloting the ship, another may be designing the ship in real-time using a grid of pixel-like lights off to the side. Behind them, someone might be drawing on a whiteboard an enemy which will then appear on the screen as well. When the room is full, the game being played is practically entirely built by those in the room at that time, and works to teach visitors all about animations, enemy design, physics, and control schemes in a simple way free of techno-babble. According to Iain, the room can become incredibly hectic when full (the arcade was closed on the day I visited, and so was empty), but it still seems like an excellent way to put game development into practice without bogging people down with coding and engines and the usual barriers to entry. Tucked away behind Mission Command was a small, messy room. With toys, skipping ropes, and lots of little plastic bits and bobs strewn across the floor, Room Racers is another example of the NVA’s emphasis on showing the basics of game development in an accessible way. Made to teach people about level design, the aim is to place toys and objects onto the floor to shape a racing track for those playing the game. Put a skipping rope on the ground, and cars projected on the floor won’t be able to drive through them. Smash the car with a tennis racket and they’ll be trapped underneath it. To do it, Room Racers has a PlayStation 3 Eye mounted on the ceiling and maps out the stage using the contrast of the toys on the white surface. Sometimes it doesn’t go entirely according to plan, with glitches and bugs inevitable, but that is apparently just part of the process at the NVA. Should a game or piece of hardware break, Iain said it’s not uncommon for NVA staff members to try and fix it on-site for guests to see just how it’s done and yet again show games aren’t these perfect, randomly occurring things, but instead are made by normal people. The next floor up was something a bit different: the Arcade’s first exhibition, Jump!. The Jump! exhibition was made explicitly to introduce one of the most basic concepts from games in great detail to those who have little experience with them – jumping. The entrance to the exhibition is a wall of screens, each showing characters, such as Mario, Sonic, and a Spelunky character, jumping to explain how different games animate them differently. Inside, there were lots of different playable games revolved around jumping such asCanabalt, but the game I got to play was a small chest of drawers called the Jump-o-Tron. By turning knobs and pushing buttons, I could program a character’s entire jump pattern from the strength to the angle, before sending them on their journey through the sky. According to Iain, Jump-o-Tron is a particularly popular part of the exhibition, with lots of people spending quite some time just watching their jumper fly through the sky. Once they’ve finally hit the ground, a receipt is printed out from the machine with information all about the jump as a small souvenir. Also in the Jump! exhibition was a large wall covered in screens, each showing a different type of jump in action: Double-jumps, wall jumping, single jumps and more are all lined up to show people no two jumps are ever the exact same. Next to it, levels from Sonic and Mario are able to be explored without the pressure of actually playing the game and potentially failing, allowing people to see how the theory guests had just learned applies to real games. It was a really cool way of getting guests to think about some of the more abstract elements of level design after going through games like Room Racer on the previous floor. By showing this behind-the-scenes view of gaming without the barrier to entry we as a gaming community so often forget does exist, Iain hopes the NVA will be able to inspire kids to become game developers. He mentioned how if a kid is interested in football or dance, there are clubs that parents can sign them up to, but for game development there isn’t anything like that. The NVA seems to be about showing people gaming isn’t just being sat in a dark bedroom hammering away at a keyboard, but instead aims to bring the positives and the social aspects of gaming culture to the forefront. The NVA serves as a springboard to convince parents and the general public that there is an actual industry and careers available in making games. Despite all this, there is still something to be appreciated about seeing a hobby you’ve poured years of your life into laid out so simply. Even though I know full well what a jump is, or how a level is designed, seeing it all put so clearly and interactively still made me think about games in a way I’ve never really done before. So when I say the NVA does aim some of its stuff towards non-gaming guests, don’t take that to mean it’s not for people who like games. It provides a new perspective on the medium, which is really important. Of course, there is stuff that seems like it’s for a more dedicated gaming audience too. Up on the third floor is an exhibition called “A History of Videogames in 100 Objects”. Lining the walls of the room are a series of glass cabinets filled with memorabilia and oddities from gaming’s short history. Sega Saturns, test builds of the PlayStation 2, and even Hideo Kojima’s old Konami business card can all be seen. I have to admit I did spend a fair amount of time geeking out in that room. Iain explained to me it isn’t the 100 most important bits of gaming history, but is instead trying to show a more complete and widespread view of the medium and the culture surrounding it. Many of the items have been donated by guests and locals, and so it’s one of the most changeable rooms in the arcade – each time, there may be some new items on display. It’s also a really nice way of introducing the history of games to the same people who were just taught what a jump is one floor below. Iain told me that this room is one of the most popular, particularly among adult guests who can spend a long time looking over all of the many different bits and bobs. Also on the third floor is a room full of different controllers and peripherals from gaming’s history, all usable. There’s Donkey Konga bongos, Steel Battalion in all its intimidating glory, and of course my old friend the Street Fighter arcade stick. It’s meant to be a way to show guests the many ways they can interact with games, but it also doubles as an extra room to nerd out over for those into gaming. All in all, I had a really great time at the NVA. While a lot of the arcade is aimed more towards people who have little experience with games, it was absolutely brilliant being able to just enjoy and be impressed by games as a medium without the hype, the advertising, and the pomp that comes with your more standard game conventions. It’s a place that felt really optimistic about games. It wants to inspire people to be creative and get involved in the scene, run by people who are clearly knowledgeable about games too: Minecraft weekends and FIFA tournaments take place there, as well as indie developers coming to show their games in a Toast Bar, all in an environment which is accessible to “outsiders” really makes the National Videogame Arcade feel like a cultural hub for games rather than your standard arcade. They’re planning on altering and adding to the venue the coming months and years, but for the few months it’s been open, I was really impressed by what I saw. If you’re interested in visiting the National Videogame Arcade, please visit their website. Take your Gran and watch her totally wreck you on a Nidhogg arcade cabinet.
National Videogame Arcade photo
Guest starring my blurry camera
Last week, I was given a tour of the National Videogame Arcade in Nottingham, England by the Director, Iain Simons. Going in, I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect. I knew it wasn’t your bog-standard arcade with T...

DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 13 - Main Stream


We're all ill
Jul 17
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). This week UK Editor Laura Dale is joined by Joe Parlock and Vikki Blake to talk about the sad news of Iwata's passing, as well as telling a bunch of terrible jokes about lettuce. Have a listen on iTunes or Direct Download.
Playstation Now UK photo
Playstation Now UK

PlayStation Now is finally available in the UK


The beta has begun
Jul 16
// Laura Kate Dale
Attention UK PS3 and PS4 owners with a fast internet connection, PlayStation Now is finally available for you to try. It's time to stream games over the Internet in what is likely to be lower than native quality and with addi...
DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 12 - CAN YOU FART DO IT NOW


Time travelling Jesus
Jul 11
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). This week UK Editor Laura Dale is joined by Joe Parlock and Vikki Blake to talk about terrible kids jokes, Joe's first Zelda game, Doctor Who Lego and Vikki's gaming addiction. Have a listen on iTunes or Direct Download.
BBC  photo
BBC

Every UK 11-year-old is getting a BBC micro-computer


Go to school, get a cool tech gadget
Jul 09
// Laura Kate Dale
Back in the 1980s the BBC made a huge push to get a cheap, affordable computer into as many UK schools as possible with the BBC Micro. The initiative was a huge success, with almost 80% of schools buying one of the machines a...
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Thanks to Opium Pulses' & Flying Bundle
Thanks to our friends over at Opium Pulses'  and the good folks at Flying Bundle, we have three copies of their Stay Positive bundle to giveaway! The bundle is a collection of positively rated games, hand picked by Opium...

DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 11 - Con Descending


A fallen bookcase of jokes
Jul 05
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). This week UK Editor Laura Dale is joined by Joe Parlock and Vikki Blake to talk about possible Sony SNES consoles and how to steal lunch from a game developer. Have a listen on iTunes or Direct Download. 
UK sales photo
UK sales

Batman: Arkham Knight has best 2015 week one UK sales


Beat out Witcher 3 and Arkham City
Jun 29
// Steven Hansen
A reminder that Arkham Knight has "Batman" in the name and no volley of excoriating 7/10 reviews (or broken PC ports) can do it harm: Rocksteady's new Batman is the top-selling game of 2015 in the UK by its first week sales, ...
DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 10 - Dad Jokes Jingle


On The Busses
Jun 27
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). This week UK Editor Laura Dale is joined by Joe Parlock and Vikki Blake to shout a bunch of words about Destiny being a bit crap. Have a listen on iTunes or Direct Download.   
DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 9 - Killager


Time to butcher E3
Jun 12
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). This week UK Editor Laura Dale is joined by Joe Parlock and Vikki Blake to shout a bunch of words about E3. Have a listen on iTunes or Direct Download. 
DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 8 - The Lost Episode


Yeah, this took some recovering
Jun 11
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). So, this episode of DestrUKtoid really should have gone up last week. Pre E...
DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 7 - Now this is where the sick comes in


Vomit ERRRRYWHERE
May 29
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). Destructoid UK Editor Laura Dale is joined this week by Joe Parlock an...
Allison Road photo
Allison Road

Is Allison Road the spiritual successor to P.T.?


I SAID, LOOK BEHIND YOU
May 29
// Vikki Blake
Though Konami wants to "scorch the earth" and deny that P.T. was possibly the best game reveal in the history of forever (do I still sound bitter?), there are some determined to keep the dream -- or nightmare -- alive. Christ...
DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 6 - Hot Orc Twins


It's a really crazy show...
May 22
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). Destructoid UK Editor Laura Dale is joined this week by Joe Parlock an...
DestrUKtoid photo
DestrUKtoid

DestrUKtoid Episode 5 - supercalifragilisticexpialidocious


Dum diddle um diddle eye
May 19
// Laura Kate Dale
The UK, it exists and Destructoid now has writers there. Great British Pounds. Eastenders. Steptoe and Son. The Destructoid UK Podcast (DestrUKtoid). Destructoid UK Editor Laura Dale is joined this week by Joe Parlock an...
Grand Theft Auto V photo
Grand Theft Auto V

GTA 5 physical sales top 5 million in UK alone


And that's not even counting downloads
May 18
// Vikki Blake
Grand Theft Auto V has sold over 5 million copies in the UK. The figures are confirmed by chart company GfK Chart-Track and don't even include download sales (meaning the squillions of recent Steam purchas...
Syndicate photo
Syndicate

First historical inaccuracies spotted in Assassin's Creed: Syndicate


Only likely to bother train enthusiasts
May 18
// Laura Kate Dale
Eagle eyed Reddit users have been pouring over last week's Assassin's Creed: Syndicate trailer with a fine tooth comb and have started spotting some of the game's first historical inaccuracies over the weekend. Perhaps the mo...

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