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Transformers!

Splatoon photo
Splatoon

Decepticons dominate in Splatoon's latest Splatfest


Autobots, you don't have the touch
Aug 30
// Jonathan Holmes
Yesterday's North American Spatfest was a unique event, featuring the first of hopefully many brand tie-ins with an outside property. Splatoon's transforming squid kids were tasked to join either team Autobot or team Deceptic...
Transformers: Devastation photo
Transformers: Devastation

Watch Comic-Con footage of Platinum's Transformers game


Where's Transformers Animated 2??
Jul 09
// Mike Cosimano
Today, Hasbro announced the release date for Transformers: Devastation at its SDCC Generations panel. The game will be released on pretty much everything on October 6, 2015. Coincidentally, that will be the day I retreat into...
Transformers: Devastation photo
Transformers: Devastation

We saw Transformers at E3, and it looks rad


[feat. Polygon's Nick Robinson]
Jun 22
// Mike Cosimano
I'm going to cover Transformers: Devastation until either the game is cancelled or I have a physical copy in my grubby dork hands. I hope you have all come to terms with this, as I have not. More Than Meets the Eye is on...

Transformers: Devastation made me feel like a kid again

Jun 18 // Mike Cosimano
[embed]294389:59150:0[/embed] Transformers: Devastation takes place during Season 2 of the cartoon, right before the 1986 film. That's just one example of the attention to detail Platinum has applied to the game. They've even based generic enemies on the obscure Jumpstarter figures, a visual reference that earned a sizable grin. All your favorite characters are back too, with their original voices. Peter Cullen is unlikely to relinquish the Optimus Prime crown any time soon (despite having been outclassed by both David Kaye and Garry Chalk years ago), so he's still hanging around. Dan Gilvezan, the original Bumblebee, is back in the game too, delivering a solid performance. However, the death of Chris Latta has deprived us of Wheeljack, resulting in a competent sound-alike. The game has five playable characters: Optimus Prime, Bumblebee, Sideswipe, Grimlock, and Wheeljack. During the demo, we got our hands on Optimus Prime and Bumblebee. Although the characters feel different, there's a consistent undercurrent there -- a good sign of a solid combat system. Although this may come as no surprise to Platinum fans, Devastation's combat is simultaneously flashy and responsive. Even Bumblebee's light attack looks like it hits hard. Transformation is even incorporated; during a combo, players can transform into a car and ram into their foes, only to transform back and keep the combo rolling. This even works in midair. For example, during an enormous boss fight with the combiner Devastator, Optimus rocketed toward Devastator's head in truck mode before turning into a robot and smashing the Decepticon's face in with his Energon axe. This kind of spectacle is exactly what I was imagining on the floor of my living room, all those years ago. There's one thing in particular that stood out to me when I saw the game, and I think it perfectly encapsulates just what makes Devastation special. Optimus has a special attack where he transforms into a truck, summons his trailer from nowhere, drifts it into his foe, and then transforms back as the trailer disappears. Optimus Prime's disappearing trailer is a Transformers inside joke that's been turned into an attack in this real video game. Yeah, Transformers: Devastation plays like a dream. But it's nice to see one of my favorite franchises treated with the respect I believe it deserves. This truly is the Year of Cosimano.
Transformers: Devastation photo
Combiner Wars
Much like every other adult with an unhealthy love of The Transformers, I spent a good portion of my formative years on the floor, plastic robots in hand, crafting elaborate scenarios from whole cloth that would pit my diminu...


Splatoon Transformer photo
Splatoon Transformer

This Splatoon Transformer is more than meets the eye


Beast Wars 2: Back in the Habit
Jun 12
// Mike Cosimano
I like Transformers a lot, and although I haven't played Splatoon yet, I dig that game's style. So a mix between Nintendo's latest brainchild and Hasbro's favorite son was bound to be a Mike Cosimano Favorite. A fan arti...

What if videogame consoles were Transformers?

Mar 28 // Mike Cosimano
Megatron: Xbox One In Dark Cybertron, IDW's first major Transformers-only crossover event, Decepticon leader Megatron did the impossible: he switched sides and joined the Autobots. Megatron has gone from trying to conquer the universe to exploring it with the wacky spacefaring cast of More than Meets the Eye (currently the best ongoing series in comics). It felt like a real stretch at the time (because it's a simple change in character that is going to sell a lot of comic books, like Bucky Cap or Lady Thor) but the issues released since then have justified his change of heart. Many Transformers stories have tried to make the audience feel sympathy for Megatron, but none have ever been so successful. More than Meets the Eye successfully reconciles the 'violent despot' characterization we all know and love with the new 'tired old revolutionary' Megatron used to soften his previous deeds, crafting a new version of the character that feels absolutely definitive -- against all odds. This reminds me of the Xbox One. When the console was first revealed, there was a sizable amount of justified backlash. It was a device for busy rich people: expensive, packed with irrelevant features, saddled with baffling limitations, and bearing a hidden $60 per year cost. Everyone was worried they wouldn't be able to play their single-player games if their Internet went down, or that the evil camera would watch them have sex in front of their television. Both fears were not totally unfounded, leading to an enormous backlash and low pre-order numbers. In order to save the system, Microsoft had to pull an about-face, reversing almost every controversial decision. Since then, we've seen the Xbox One drop the Kinect along with $100 off the MSRP, reach out to indies with the ID@Xbox program, and chase weird exclusives like Phantom Dust. Ever since Phil Spencer took over the Xbox division, the company has made positive strides towards fixing its reputation. It's not hard to see the parallels between Megatron (as written by James Roberts), Megatron (the character in More than Meets the Eye), and Phil Spencer's work on the Xbox brand. When you want to make a change, be it financially motivated, a creative decision, or an emotionally motivated faction change, there has to be some revisionism. You have to convince yourself that the past doesn't matter, and then you have to perform the Herculean task of convincing everyone else of the same. For the moment, it's almost impossible to tell whether Megatron or Microsoft were successful. We won't know how successful the Xbox One will be until well into the life cycle of the Xbox Two, and I honestly don't know where Megatron's character development could go from here. Either way, I'm looking forward to both. Tailgate: Wii U Tailgate is a relic. Not long after coming online, he fell into a sinkhole on Cybertron, only escaping his predicament after a six-million-year-long power nap. Physically, he is older than almost every character in More than Meets the Eye, but he approaches the Lost Light's various adventures with a childlike enthusiasm. Which makes sense -- he's technically two weeks old when the comic begins. Tailgate used his age to fabricate a series of stories, even claiming he was a bomb disposal expert. He's gone through some real trials over the course of the comic -- including almost dying of old age and saving half of the Cybertronian race in one week -- but he's come into his own, accepting his true role as a waste disposal 'bot and letting go of his tall tales. It's hard to hear the word 'relic' and not give the Wii U a little side-eye. When the console launched, it was months away from being outdated, with online decisions that were utterly baffling in the Xbox Live era and a launch library that was primarily a series of efforts at reclaiming old glories and ports nobody asked for. Hell, look at the name of the thing -- Wii U. Smarter people than me have been pointing this out since the console was revealed, but I'll be damned if that isn't the most transparent attempt to move units I've ever seen. The Wii U smacked of an old man trying to convince the kids he was cool, not realizing he was a kid at heart the whole time. All he had to do was embrace his inner child and the people would come running. There's something futile about chasing old glories, especially when they're made up. Nintendo has never been good with third parties. Remember that "historic partnership" between EA and Nintendo? Remember when Call of Duty: Ghosts coming to Wii U was a big deal? Where's Advanced Warfare? Where's Battlefield 4? The Wii U was a joke back when it was trying to be just another videogame console; another machine for you to enjoy those big tentpole releases. Today, it's genuinely beloved, even if the rampant amiibo shortage threatens to overshadow Nintendo's recent successes. Is the Wii U selling well? Of course not, that door closed when it launched with a crappy Mass Effect port and didn't have a killer app until a year into the console's life cycle. And Tailgate lost any chance of becoming an Old Cybertronian legend the second he fell unconscious. But we've got Mario Kart 8 now, and Tailgate defeated a genocidal despot by sticking a finger in his robo-brain. (God, I love these comics.) Accept your limitations, and use them to move forward. Can't wait for whatever NX is! Drift: PlayStation 4 Everybody on the Internet goes through a phase where they make an awesome self-insert character for their favorite thing. You know the type: mysterious, silent, unkillable, tortured past, maybe a bit of a dark streak? We've all done it! Be honest with yourself. Maybe post your original character in the comments. Now, imagine a world where you were paid to make that character an official part of your favorite thing. Hell, the character even gets a toy! And the best part? The character will be just as badass as you imagined: no watering down. That's Drift. And -- surprise surprise! -- when he premiered in the pages of the mega-event All Hail Megatron, everyone realized he was a cynical attempt at making a new fan-favorite character. Thankfully, he was redeemed in More than Meets the Eye, recast as a lovable hippie. Now, Drift is actually a fan favorite, despite being universally disliked when he first appeared. (Ironically, we've actually come full circle with the super racist Drift in the fourth Transformers movie) And, let's be real, nobody really liked the PlayStation 3 when it first came out either. It cost too much, the infamous "PS3 HAS NO GAMEZ" meme had a ring of truth to it (even though Resistance and Metal Gear Solid 4 were great) -- everything about the console reeked of post-PS2 swagger. But, much like the Wii U, the PS3 stumbled out of the gate. Compare that to the PS4, a console that came out swinging, easily taking and holding the lead. Now, I can't verify this for myself, but I've heard enough talk from enough different people that it makes sense: the PlayStation 4 is a Sony Computer Entertainment of America joint. That's why you're seeing people like Adam Boyes and Mark Cerny take the stage during E3 press conferences, and that's why the company is going after Western nostalgia properties like Grim Fandango. This change in power seems to be working: the PS3 never saw positive press the likes of which we saw when Jack Tretton confirmed the PS4 could play used games. Sometimes, it's smart to let go of the wheel and let somebody else take over. I'm not saying Shane McCarthy (the creator of Drift) is a terrible writer, or that Sony Japan doesn't know how to make a console. The PlayStation 2 is the best console of all time! But every so often, giving control of your creation to someone with a different vision works out best for all involved. It's just a simple matter of seeing that maybe you aren't the right person for this job. I mean, the PlayStation 4 has sold twenty million consoles so far, and Drift's resurgence in popularity got him another mini-series. Leaving your pride at the door works, as it turns out. Maybe that's the crux of all three of these consoles: pride. The Xbox One isn't trying to shove terrible ideas down our throats, the Wii U is no longer convinced it can be something it's not, and the PS4 isn't asking for $600. In many ways, success is about letting go of that pride, learning to accept your limitations and playing to your strengths. And it may have taken a little while, but I feel like each console is currently taking that to heart. I like where these consoles are at right now, and I think we've got a fantastic generation ahead of us. Also, Transformers are great. Thank you.
Transformers photo
Blast(er) Processing
This isn't clickbait. This isn't some article cashing in on hypothetical fan art of an Xbox turning into Megatron or a post about those awesome Mega Drive/PlayStation Transformers. This is my life, you fools. I've spent time ...

Ladykiller in a Bind photo
'COSIMANOOOOOOOOOO' - Christine Love
We like to keep things family-friendly here at Destructoid Dot Com, so you can imagine the quandary we found ourselves saddled with once Christine Love dropped a steamy NSFW trailer for her new game My Twin Brother Made...

Review: Transformers Prime: The Game

Dec 04 // Jim Sterling
Transformers Prime: The Game (Wii, Wii U [reviewed])Developer: NowproPublisher: ActivisionRelease: October 4 (Wii), October 18 (Wii U)MSRP: $39.99 (Wii) $49.99 (Wii U) Transformers Prime is about as basic as a game can get. Its levels typically run between two and four minutes, consisting either of remedial brawling or on-rails vehicular sections. Usually you get about forty to sixty seconds of gameplay buffered by brief and pointless cutscenes, themselves lasting seconds long. The lengthiest stage clocked in at around seven minutes, and only because the final boss' health meter took a long time to drain. The battle itself was as good as won several minutes before then -- watching the health bar reduce was little more than busywork.  Easy, lasting maybe two hours long, Transformers Prime's campaign almost goes out of its way to look, sound, and play like the cheap, disposable cash-in it is. It exists for the sole purpose of making money from fans, and does nothing to hide its intentions. At only a mere 120 minutes, Prime is too long, for as repetitive and slow as it is, a running time of thirty minutes could only improve one's sentiments toward it.  Starring one of several predetermined Autobots, each level consists mostly of simplistic button-mashing combat across a series of tiny, unfurnished arenas. Characters perform uncomplicated attacks consisting of pressing either the A or Y button up to three times in various combinations, and can lock to fire a barrage of weak gunfire with the shoulder buttons, or double tap to charge a slightly stronger blast. An obligatory power meter fills with each attack, allowing a temporary "upgrade" mode which delivers more powerful blows. Due to the lousy targeting, attacks frequently miss, or pass harmlessly through opponents. This doesn't matter, because the game is so easy you'll barely feel pressure to keep up the attack. In fact, some fights can be won simply by locking on and holding the fire button until everything's dead.  [embed]239846:45976[/embed] Every so often, you'll encounter a boss battle against one of the Decepticons, who try to scupper your progress with predictable and repeated attack patterns, or shields that are broken by transforming into a vehicle before performing a melee attack to turn into robot form with a powerful smash. There are also linear vehicular chases which require the GamePad to be tilted left and right in order to avoid sparse obstacles. The motion control is as responsive as the vehicles are fast -- not very. There are many mobile racing games with tighter controls and better paced action, available at a fraction of the price.  Is Transformers Prime for children? Probably. Is it unnecessarily cruel to review it? Perhaps. It did, however, arrive unbidden at my doorstep and so I'm duty bound to do something with it. I don't want to write this review. Do you even want to read it? Like the aforementioned final boss of this game, this review was over as soon as it began, and the droning, monotonous attack simply keeps occurring as a matter of formality. With each word, Transformers Prime's health bar drains, our own remains so full of life that we could only fail if we chose to consciously do so. It's at this point the metaphor falls apart.  There is a multiplayer mode, but before you ask who would waste their time going online with it, don't bother -- not even Activision bothered. The multiplayer mode is local only, pitting two players against each other in mindless brawling battles. A range of both Autobots and Decepticons can be chosen, though their attacks are all randomly imbalanced and the vehicle modes of flying transformers are useless, given how it's impossible to target opponents as a jet. Balance, of course, was not the goal here -- like the game itself, this mode exists for no reason other than its own sake.  Graphically, things look terrible, and I suspect Prime's little more than a sloppily upscaled version of the Wii alternative. It certainly looks like it, with its lack of textures, threadbare environments, and unimpressive animation. Not only is this game a cheap licensed brawler, it's a cheap HD port of a cheap licensed brawler. Now that's some serious respect for the Wii U.  The highest praise one can afford this game is that it's playable. It's not broken, nor is it really that offensive. It's just a condensed exercise in bromidic game design, a brief waste of time squirted out of some mercenary developer's squalid hole. It's not terrible enough to be memorable, not good enough to justify your attention, it's just sat there, a stale dumpling on a dirty plate. I would hope even children are more discerning in their tastes than this, but we cannot know that for sure. All I know is, if your idea of a brilliant joke is hearing a robot say "scrap" instead of "crap" every few minutes, Transformers Prime is for you. Not only does it perform that exact joke with that same regularity, your laughing at it qualifies you as stupid enough to think Prime is worth money. 
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Sloptimus Slime
I'll admit, I've struggled to keep up with the Transformers brand since Generation One. I've played the High Moon Studios games, and loved them, but the TV shows have been something of a blur to me -- be it Armada, Animated, ...

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Fall of Cybertron PC won't come to Australia


Aug 22
// Jim Sterling
In Australia, Transformers: Fall of Cybertron will not be getting a PC release. Aussie gamers will instead have to stick with consoles, nothing at all, or Plan B.  When PC Gamer asked Activision for a reason, it got a very abrupt, "No info. It's just not available."  Well, that sucks for Australian PC gamers. Still, they've gotta be getting used to these regular screwjobs by now.

Review: Transformers: Fall of Cybertron

Aug 21 // Jim Sterling
Transformers: Fall of Cybertron (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: High Moon StudiosPublisher: ActivisionReleased: August 21, 2012 MSRP: $59.99 Following the events of War for Cybertron, the Transformers' titular planet is on the brink of collapse. The battle between the Autobots and Decepticons has drained Cybertron of its energon resources, and the Autobots decide to impose self-exile and find a new world on which to start over. Naturally, Megatron won't have any of that, and will go out of his way to keep Optimus Prime grounded, out of little more than petty spite.   While events certainly occur, there's very little story in Fall of Cybertron. Despite retelling the story of the Transformers before they came to Earth and heavily revising the origins of Grimlock and the Dinobots, the narrative campaign feels somewhat rushed, as important exposition is gotten over quickly. Each focal character gets one or maybe two chapters in order to say what they have to say. Unlike War for Cybertron, which had some nice build and was paced very well, the plot of Fall flits too easily between Autobot and Decepticon characters, never focusing on a single plot point long enough for it to have any gravitas.  There are definitely some great moments on par with the original game. The Starscream coronation scene is a definite highlight (yes, the infamous dialog exchange takes place!) and the level involving Grimlock and his classic T-Rex transformation is a delightfully empowering jaunt. I also love that High Moon included a genuinely creepy take on the my personal favorites, the Insecticons, though the purist in me still sneers at High Moon giving Shrapnel's speech impediment to Kickback -- a criticism that should have no relevance to any sane human with real priorities.  [embed]233524:44798[/embed] Still, the campaign is left wanting in comparison to the first. The gameplay is still solid, with the same great controls for both robot and vehicular forms, and I love the new upgrade system, in which players can purchase and enhance a variety of weapons and perks from Teletraan 1 outlets -- you can even rate each upgrade online to help new players find the best stuff. However, the newer, more open environments aren't so much liberating as they are repetitive, arena-like areas that lack any sense of atmosphere. The weapons also seem to feel far less effective, especially when going up against masses of shotgun-toting enemies that can reduce player characters to scrap in seconds. Combat was always going to be clunky by the very nature of the robots involved, but this time around it feels unfocused, possessed of a certain anarchy that is more overwhelming than enjoyably chaotic.  The game's final level is truly the highlight of the show, switching from Autobot to Decepticon in a fluid way as players jump from bot to bot in an epic battle aboard Prime's Ark. The elegance and scale of this battle is a thing of beauty, and something I wish there could have been more of. When High Moon pulls out all the stops, it still manages to create something awesome. Sadly, it does it with less frequency in Fall as it did in War, and the result is a single-player mode that feels rather unsatisfying. Still good, and still tossing out enough references and jokes to make the average Transformers fan smile, but nevertheless a little disappointing.  Multiplayer is still the game's biggest selling point, and it's as great as ever -- mostly because it's almost exactly the same as last time. Yet again, players get to choose between four distinct classes -- the hard-hitting Titan, healing Scientist, tactical Destroyer and stealthy Scout. Aside from some weapon changes and ability tweaks, these classes play pretty much as they did the last time, each one respectively turning into a tank, plane, truck and car, while fulfilling their archetypal battlefield roles. There are a number of competitive modes to choose, from simple deathmatches and capture-the-flag bouts to the one fresh addition, headhunter. In headhunter, players need to kill and collect the fallen "sparks" of their enemies, and bring them to an ever-changing location in order to score points. It's more or less a dog-tag mode with a Cybertronian twist.  Unlike single-player, the busy combat and disorderly flow of each match are positive traits. If you can get a full match together, each round is a tumultuous clash of metal and explosions. Each class is really well balanced, with a skilled scout able to take down a hulking tank if used correctly, and the new maps are just the right size to take advantage of vehicular motion without being so big that it's a dull slog to the next kill zone. Of course, if you played the first game, you'd know this already, because the exact same praise for the multiplayer in War for Cybertron applies here -- whether that's good or bad hinges on how much you want to enjoy the same great taste twice.  Character creation is expanded, with a lot of armor pieces to mix and match, and a greater range of color schemes, as well as a variety of custom loadouts and gear that can be gradually unlocked as players earn XP and rank up. Despite the enhanced variety, it still feels very restricted, with pre-set two-tone color schemes and armor pieces based largely on named characters from the single-player campaign. Still, it is an improvement, and one of the few genuine attempts to evolve Fall beyond the first game. I guess that's something.  Yet again, the jewel in Cybertron's crown is Escalation. This is a co-op survival mode for up to four players that again doesn't do much different from last time. The player team is faced with waves of increasingly brutal enemy robots, and can earn cash to spend on upgrades, as well as unlockable doors that expand the arena and grant access to more powerful gear. This remains the most fun aspect of the game, but it feels a little downgraded from last time. First of all, there's less of a recognizable variety of enemies, due to the fact that even when varied, a lot of the opponents behave and look the same. What's more, the range of playable characters has been restricted in order to enforce a more class-oriented approach to team-building. This time around, players have to pick one of four pre-set characters rather than the wider range seen last time. Each one possesses certain skills -- such as healing or ammo replenishment -- in order to encourage more strategy. It's a noble idea that does indeed add a slight tactical bent to the onslaught, but it's come at the cost of personal choice and the previously endearing ability to grab your favorite character.  Transformers: Fall of Cybertron has a lot of what made the original game so great, but it suffers from generation loss, relinquishing a portion of its quality in the cloning process. The decision to give players more of the same is made less palatable by the fact that its story is nowhere near as engaging and the multiplayer has not expanded in any way -- and even been scaled back in the case of Escalation. If you choose to play it, you will certainly have a lot of fun. However, you will miss practically nothing by choosing to skip this installment. That's not to say you shouldn't get it -- just don't expect a must-see revelation.  As such, Fall of Cybertron is a step down from High Moon's encouraging start -- not bad at all and more than capable of providing entertainment, but unable to reach the heights of that which came before.
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Transformers: War for Cybertron was one of my top multiplayer games of 2010. Something about it just worked surprisingly well, and High Moon Studios deserved oodles of kudos for providing the Transformers license with an orig...

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Transformers: Fall of Cybertron demo out now


Jul 31
// Jim Sterling
It's Tuesday, and that means it's time to be a robot and smash other robots. A demo for Transformers: Fall of Cybertron is available to download from Xbox Live Arcade right now. Those waiting for the PlayStation Network demo ...
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Transformers: Fall of Cybertron trailer and screenshots


Jul 25
// Jim Sterling
Here's a great big wad of assets for High Moon Studios' Transformers: Fall of Cybertron. There's a whole bunch of screenshots showing off aspects of both the single-player and online sectors, while the trailer above details ...
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Although I was not scheduled to try Transformers: Fall of Cybertron, this fan of High Moon Studios' previous offering couldn't resist grabbing some hands-on time with the game at E3, finally test driving Grimlock and seeing i...

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Transformers: Fall of Cybertron inspires new Bruticus toy


Feb 14
// Jim Sterling
Transformers: Fall of Cybertron will feature a reimagining of the Combaticons and their combined alter-ego, Bruticus. Naturally, Hasbro is at the ready with a pocketful of plastic, and plans to release five new figures that c...
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I'm now prepared to survive the Fall of Cybertron


Dec 17
// Jim Sterling
When this turned up and I opened the package, my wife said, "They sent you a lunchbox? You're an asshole." That's a fair enough assessment, I suppose.  Anyway, I got this mad tat in the mail today. It's a steel box conta...
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Transformers: Fall of Cybertron trailer AW F*CK GRIMLOCK!


Oct 14
// Jim Sterling
A teaser trailer has been unleashed for Transformers: Fall of Cybertron. It's short, it's full of static, but it says absolutely everything you need to know. Click on the video above and drown in pure, unadulterated badassery.  I am officially fully erect right now, and I'm not even a big Dinobot fan! This game is going to make me do terrible things to myself.

Fall of Cybertron: Shockwave, Dinobots, INSECTICONS!

Oct 12 // Jim Sterling
Graphics are apparently amazing this time around. Alpha build looks like a finished War for Cybertron already. More varied environments. Players will travel a ruined and broken Cybertron during bright daylight as well as night. Some battlefields will be very wide and open. Many more enemies onscreen. Optimus Prime seen holding back a whole horde of Decepticons with a turret. Multiplayer to feature deeper customization options, including interchangeable armor parts and more varied color options for both robot and vehicle modes. Abilities are far more important in the single-player mode. Optimus Prime and Megatron getting visually overhauled. Optimus looks more like his G1 version, while Megatron has spiky, Energon-infused armor.  Story has Decepticons overrunning Cybertron.  One mission sees Jazz using a wrist-mounted grappling hook to zip across various access points, similar to Spider-Man in recent games.  Shockwave to play a key role.  Dinobots are screwed around with by Shockwave, explaining why they already turn into dinosaurs. The Insecticons revealed as another of Shockwave's experiments.  Concept art shows Grimlock fighting an army of Kickbacks, Shrapnels and Bombshells, implying that the Insecticons' cloning ability will create swarms of generic enemies to fight.  Starscream has a price put on his head by the Decepticons and accidentally frees the Dinobots while escaping Cybertron.  Grimlock is a playable character. Unlike other characters, his style is almost entirely focused on melee. His transformation is apparently quite painful to watch, described as resembling Bruce Banner turning into the Hulk. He fights with his barbed tail, fire breath, and bites.  Metroplex, the huge Autobot city, will be playable. He can step on squads of Decepticons. All five of the Combaticons will be playable and yes, they will form to create BRUTICUS, BITCH! Prime can call orbital strikes, possibly from Metroplex.
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Some upcoming details for Transformers: Fall of Cybertron have hit the Internet (by way of NeoGAF) and there are some very exciting things on the cards. It seems somebody at High Moon Studios responded to all my harassme...

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Activision has today revealed (via Game Informer, which is basically just a big press release these days) Transformers: Fall of Cybertron, a sequel to last year's War for Cybertron. Oh, and Dinobat fans are in for a treat, be...

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[Update: S'all done, folks. The winners have been contacted by way of private message on Destructoid.] Razer was kind enough to throw some awesome-looking Transformers 3 DeathAdder mice our way. Sadly, we don't get to keep th...

Review: Transformers: Dark of the Moon

Jun 23 // Jim Sterling
Transformers: Dark of the Moon (Wii, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: High Moon StudiosPublisher: ActivisionReleased: June 14, 2011MSRP: $59.99 After the success of Transformers: War for Cybertron last year, it would appear that High Moon Studios has become the go-to developer for Transformers games, and with good reason. War for Cybertron was a great game with a fun campaign and excellent multiplayer. It's hardly surprising that with this interactive accompaniment to Michael Bay's latest travesty, High Moon sought to change very little about its last effort.  Unfortunately, simply copying War for Cybertron's gameplay doesn't automatically make for a great game, especially when it's clear to even a dullard that it was quickly squirted out in order to release alongside the film. That's very much the feeling Dark of the Moon gives me -- a very rushed, less spectacular War for Cybertron.  What this means is that Dark of the Moon is easily the best game based on the "Bayformers" license to be made, despite not being great in the least.    [embed]204456:39625[/embed] The campaign is playable and pleasantly painless, yet you'll be lucky if you feel anything more than boredom while trudging through it. One major problem is that the game presents itself a cover shooter, but there's no actual cover system and the levels often consist of wide, open areas or constricted corridors with very little to stand behind. Most combat situations are fairly straightforward, based upon the "throwing a bunch of enemies at you and pretending that's a challenge" school of design, and level design overall feels bland, grey and flat.  Each level is dedicated to a different Transformer. You'll start the game as Bumblebee, progress as Ironhide, and get stealthy with Mirage. You'll then switch to the Decepticon side to play Soundwave, Starscream and Megatron, before ending with Optimus Prime. All told, the campaign takes a handful of hours to beat and feature a range of fairly straightforward, mundane levels with a fair few frustrating sections. The Starscream and Mirage stages are particularly tiresome, respectively based as they are around dodgy flight mechanics and sluggish stealth gameplay. Every Transformer has access to dual weapons and a pair of special abilities in their robot forms, with two further weapons and a unique ability in vehicle form. These are all fairly standard armaments and powers -- assault rifles and plasma cannons are augmented by shockwave blasts, cloaking devices and special guns. One ability recharges on its own while another requires Energon from fallen enemies, and I've just bored myself talking about it. High Moon did a decent job of making each Transformer feel unique, though again, the range of powers and the overall gameplay feels rather dreary compared to Cybertron. The theme of sub-par War for Cybertron gameplay extends to the multiplayer as well. At its core, the multiplayer offering is almost identical to the one found in High Moon's previous game. There are four character classes designated by vehicle design, though the "Scientist" class has been changed to the "Hunter" class and made worse in the process, oddly. As with War for Cybertron, players get a limited customization ability for characters and can unlock a variety of new abilities and weapons.  The same issues found in the campaign pop up on the multiplayer as well -- namely a mundane level design and the feeling that High Moon quickly pieced it together from bits of its previous title. It's certainly not bad, but it's yet again nowhere near as compelling as what the studio offered in its last Transformers game. The fact that nothing new was added -- and in fact features a more boring range of weapons and maps -- serves to create a multiplayer experience that really has no reason to exist.  Although the game isn't visually ugly, the grey color palette and awful designs of the robots themselves (the movie versions look like computers that were exploded and put back together by horses) make for unpleasant viewing. At the very least, the voices aren't too bad, with several of the voice actors taken from Cybertron rather than the films themselves.  At the end of the day, Transformers: Dark of the Moon is just another licensed game, made a fraction more enjoyable due to its aping of a superior title. Essentially a rushed, less exciting version of War for Cybetron, this quick cash-in is better than most Hollywood money grabs, but that's really not saying too much. Only the most hardcore fans of Michael Bay's Transformers movies need to really bother playing it, and even then, they can probably be doing something more productive with their time. 
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Before the review begins, I feel it's my duty to warn anybody who considers purchasing this -- there's barely any mention of the Moon at all. In fact, the Moon appears in the campaign's end credits more than it appears in the game itself.  Transformers: Dark of the Moon is a big lie.

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Transformers: Dark of the Moon almost here


Jun 14
// Conrad Zimmerman
And now, a launch trailer for Transformers: Dark of the Moon. There is a fight which has just begun. some new evil has arisen. You get the general idea. This is likely going to be a pretty cool game if you're into the plot e...

Preview: Transformers: Dark of the Moon

May 26 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
Transformers: Dark of the Moon (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii, 3DS)Developer: High Moon StudiosPublisher: ActivisionTo be released: June 14, 2011 The first two levels I demoed saw me playing as Bumblebee and Ironhide -- they had to repeal Decepticon attacks against humans. Basically, I was running around cities shooting at no-name Decepticons until reaching the end of the stages. The third Autobot-focused level was a stealth section due to main character Mirage suffering some damage that leaves him without his weapons other than his blades. Because of this, Mirage has to slowly creep through the stage and try to take out enemies from behind. The final section I played saw me siding with the Decepticons as Megatron. He was badly damaged at the end of the last movie and this stage puts you in the role of the big bad robot as he's slowly trying to rebuild himself. Dark of the Moon will have you jumping between Autobot and Decepticon characters and the levels will be built around what makes each specific Transformer special. So, expect a flying-focused level when you play as Starscream, for instance. One promising level will see you switching between Soundwave and Laserbeak as they work together. The basic formula of all the levels is that you have to mindlessly shoot at nameless robots until making it to the end of the stage where there may or may not be some kind of boss fight. The overall sections I demoed were fairly generic, but playing as Megatron was at least somewhat satisfying; I secretly cheered for the bad guys. As for the multiplayer, it has a very Call of Duty vibe to it. There are the staple game modes, support for up to ten players, different classes, upgrades, abilities, leveling up and even killstreaks. There are four classes to choose from with each being associated to a specific Decepticon or Autobot. Scout class will include Bumblebee, Commander class sees you playing as Optimus Prime or Megatron, Warrior class features Ironhide and the Flying class features Starscream. There are other robots to play as, but none that High Moon or Activision wanted to divulge yet. I definitely had a load more fun in multiplayer because I was fighting actual known robots and not dealing with waves of generic ones. Above all else, flying around as Starscream was ridiculously fun. I loved his transforming sequence, especially when I was getting surrounded by enemies. Battle getting too hot? Transform into a jet and get the hell out of there! Plus, the Flying class is basically like a sniper and I love being the sniper in any shooter. Finally, I gave a quick test drive of Transformers 3DS and it's largely the same as the big brother console versions, except you're limited to only automobile and Stealth Force mode. If this were a car combat franchise then it would have been fine. But this is Transformers. The whole appeal of the Transformers franchise is that THEY'RE TRANSFORMING ROBOTS.
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Transformers: Dark of the Moon the videogame is a prologue to the upcoming movie and helps to setup some of the events and characters you'll see in the upcoming Michael Bay explosion-fest. Now that developer High Moon Studio...

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Hasbro, Jagex announce Transformers online game for 2012


Mar 14
// Jim Sterling
Hasbro has announced that a brand new online Transformers game is in the works, developed by RuneScape studio Jagex Limited.  Unlike most licensed MMOs, this isn't going to stay restricted to various countries you've nev...
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First details on High Moon's Transformers: DotM game


Feb 11
// Jordan Devore
The sequel to the commercially and critically well-received Transformers: War for Cybertron is still under way. Prior to that, though, there will be another licensed game; it shares the name of its movie counterpart: Transfor...
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Transformers: War for Cybertron sequel announced


Nov 13
// Jim Sterling
If you've been reading Destructoid for any length of time, you'll likely know that Transformers: War for Cybertron gets quite a bit of love around these parts ... at least from me. So, it's very pleasant news indeed that High...
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[Update: All codes given out via Twitter!] We're giving away 20 codes for the Map/Character Pack 2 for Transformers: War for Cybertron on the PlayStation 3! All you need to do follow us on Twitter and retweet the @Dtoid tweet associated with this post. We'll be randomly selecting 20 winners to give the codes to by the end of the day. Good luck!

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Stan Bush wants to put his 'touch' on next Transformers


Sep 09
// Nick Chester
Musician Stan Bush and Transformers are inseparable. Arguably Bush's brightest time in the spotlight was when his tracks "The Touch" and "Dare" appeared in the 1986 animated film, Transformers: The Movie. His legend has never...
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Transformers: War for Cybertron gets more DLC


Sep 07
// Jim Sterling
Yet more downloadable content has been made available for Transformers: War for Cybertron. The new map & characters pack includes Zeta Prime and Dead End as playable characters. Still no Insecticons!  Two new Escalat...
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Transformers MMO announced and it's not launching here


Aug 03
// Jim Sterling
NetDragon has announced an MMO for Transformers, which would be exciting news if the game was scheduled to come out in North America. Unfortunately, the game is only currently planned for Asia, North Africa, Russia and the Mi...
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Win a DLC code for Transformers: War for Cybertron


Jul 31
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
[Update: Contest closed! Winners were FalconReaper, Dreamweaver, kalel52, famousafterdeath, LuccaLover, Capn Yesterday, KensouADV, Kraid, Teta and buhssuht!] Transformers: War for Cybertron is hosting a double XP multiplayer...

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