hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

Torchlight

Torchlight II for Mac photo
Torchlight II for Mac

Years later, Torchlight II is almost ready for Mac


Releasing Monday, February 2
Jan 29
// Jordan Devore
You mean to tell me 2012's action-RPG Torchlight II isn't already available for Mac? Oh. I see. Well, props to Runic Games for not abandoning the task, then. Maybe I'll play it on my next flight. The Mac version of Torchligh...
Torchlight II photo
Torchlight II

Torchlight II is free on Steam this weekend


You should definitely play it
Jan 10
// Chris Carter
Torchlight II is still chugging along, and this weekend, you can play it for free on Steam. Said free weekend starts now, and ends on Sunday at 1PM Pacific. I never really got all that into Torchlight II, but it's a really gr...
Torchlight 2 photo
Torchlight 2

Torchlight II reaches two million copies sold


Runic CEO Max Schafer is excited
Jul 25
// Chris Carter
Runic CEO Max Schafer has announced today that Torchlight II has reached two million sales -- nice! In addition to a few celebratory comments on sales, Shafer adds, "I'd just like to say a big thank you to all the players who...

GOG.com photo
GOG.com

Act fast: Torchlight goes free on GOG.com


Add this to your library
Jun 18
// Jordan Devore
Runic Games' action-RPG Torchlight is free for 48 hours on GOG.com as part of a "#NoDRM" promotion. If you've somehow managed to avoid the game all these years -- impressive work -- you might as well take part. The offer last...
Torchlight II mods photo
Torchlight II mods

Torchlight II mod tools have been released!


Steam Workshop integration is music to my ears
Apr 01
// Patrick Hancock
After what feels like forever, the Torchlight II mod tools, nicknamed GUTS, have finally been released. In order to access the GUTS editor, simply go to your install folder and open up the "Editor" executable. Since modd...

Games to play with your boyfriend on Valentine's Day

Feb 14 // Caitlin Cooke
Portal 2 Who doesn't love to play adorable robots that can hug and high-five each other all day long? Atlas and P-body are like mini versions of your relationship, only they’re more prone to falling off ledges! For those of you new to the co-op portion of the game, GLaDOS, your evil (or maybe just misunderstood) A.I. guide leads you and your partner through various rooms in order to retrieve data disks for a certain unknown but most likely evil purpose. Portal 2 is a great way to bond with your boyfriend, especially if you’re both into puzzle-solving hijinks! Saints Row: The Third Nothing says “I love you” like taunting your boyfriend with a big fat purple dildo. Saints Row: The Third is the sandbox game you wished for and finally received -- it’s fantastically silly, loads of fun, and extremely self-aware. To be honest, I haven’t played through much of the game because I’m too busy doing stupid stuff like skydiving out of airplanes and crashing parties, but from what I've seen it’s the perfect game to play with that someone special. So, what are you waiting for? THQ isn't getting any younger…oh wait. Torchlight II Surprisingly, killing lots of things can be delightfully romantic. Created by members of the original Diablo II team, Torchlight II pays homage to those long lost yet reawakened hack-n-slash dungeon-running games. The music will give you all kinds of nostalgic lady boners, and you even get to choose your own pet, ranging from a panther to a random made-up animal like the Chakawary, featured above. As an added bonus, you and your boyfriend no longer need to fight over loot -- you both get your own! Gone are the days of “No, honey, YOU take One-eyed Willy’s Other Eye!” Scott Pilgrim vs. the World: The Game This Valentine’s Day, you and your boyfriend should wreck the s*@$ out of Ramona’s 7 evil exes. Why? Because nothing says romance like kicking some side-scrolling ass to amazing chiptune music, that’s why! Even if you haven’t read the Scott Pilgrim graphic novels (which if you haven’t, you totally should) the game is a blast. The sprites are adorable and the game puts a totally unique spin on traditional side scrolling beat-em-ups by just being…completely silly. My personal favorite characters to play are Scott and Kim - they were meant to be together anyway, right? Sonic & All Stars Racing Transformed Go back to your roots and share something special with your significant other, like your favorite Sega characters! AiAi, Beat, B.D. Joe, Tails are just some of the few playable characters which you can level up. Even better, the levels in this game are insanely immersive -- in addition to your standard driving you can also fly and float your way through the track (which, by the way, often falls to pieces during the last lap). Racing Transformed will soon win your heart and become your go to "kick your boyfriend's ass" game.  You Don’t Know Jack Boyfriend doesn't game much? You Don’t Know Jack is the ticket - everyone loves a super difficult, zany trivia game. The only catch is that you’ll probably end up as an ex-couple by the end of it. Every round contains 10 questions plus a few bonus rounds, and a “Wrong Answer of the Game” in which you have to keep your eyes peeled for an answer related to the “sponsor” (which can be anything from Banana Toasters to Granny’s Roach Butter). Overall YDKJ is a quick and fun way to enjoy each other's company this V-day. Plus, who doesn't love a game where you get to screw your significant other? Honorable Mention: Having your boyfriend cuddle up and watch you play Condemned…in the dark. 
Games to play w/ your boo photo
Romance is just a game away!
Valentine's Day isn't always about getting taken out to dinner and receiving fancy treats and trinkets. Okay, well maybe it is, but who's to say that you can't get a little gaming on the side? Consider spending some quality time with your boyfriend by reeling him into the following co-op games. If he resists, consider your future with him wisely...

Torchlight II mod photo
Torchlight II mod

Torchlight II mod adds another class and way more


More monsters, items, and quests!
Jan 30
// Patrick Hancock
The SynergiesMOD for Torchlight II is ridiculous. Here, just look at all that it adds: 108 Elite monsters, 6 Rare dragons, 28 Raid dungeons, 11 unique World Bosses, 4 Sets of Legendary Armor, 16 new Tier-1 Legendary Wea...

Review: Torchlight II

Sep 24 // Aerox
Torchlight II (PC)Developer: Runic GamesPublisher: Perfect WorldRelease: September 20, 2012 MSRP: $19.99 It's been a few years since the end of the first Torchlight, and, surprise surprise, the world is in danger again. A corrupted Alchemist (likely the playable character from the original game) has destroyed the town of Torchlight, stolen Ordrak's Heart, and it's up to you to chase him around the world and stop him before he drains the energy out of the Elemental Guardians that keep balance in the world. How will you save the world? You will click. On everything. You will click on a bunch of monsters, and you'll click on some chests and some urns, and you'll click on all the massive amount of loot that spews forth from everything you touch, and sometimes you'll even mis-click on a poorly placed UI element. You'll happily click away, you'll have a lot of fun doing it, and you'll suddenly look up and realize you've been clicking non-stop for three hours and you didn't realize how late it was and you really should go to bed but there's another dungeon you need to click your way through so maybe you'll just do one more quest and then you'll finally stop clicking and go to bed. Maybe. Your primary method of slaughtering enemies will be with your class skills, and Torchlight II's skill system will be familiar to those who've played the original game, although it's gotten some minor tweaks. Each of the four playable classes still has three skill trees, with each tree containing seven active skills and three passives. At each level, you get five attribute points to place into one of the main attributes (strength, dexterity, focus, and vitality), and one skill point to place in one of your skill trees. Unlike the original game, there are no skills shared among all the classes anymore -- each class has a unique set of 30 abilities. As long as you meet the level requirements for a skill (which naturally increase as you train a specific skill), you can put a point into it, regardless of how many previous points you have in skills that come before it or in the overall tree. It's pretty straightforward, and on the whole each class's skills seem varied and, for the most part, useful. Even the early skills can hold their own as long as you keep investing points into them (my Embermage beat the game almost entirely using Prismatic Bolt, the first skill in his Storm tree). Unfortunately, there's not a lot of room to experiment -- you can only refund the last three skill points you spent, and the cost to do so is rather high. One to three points in a skill is, I found, not enough to really get a feel for how the skill will perform at later levels. I often found myself hoarding points or just investing in passives -- I was hesitant to commit, out of a fear of having to restart my character because of bad skill choices. Another new mechanic is the addition of the Charge bar -- a meter that fills when you're murdering things and decays when you're not, conferring class-dependent bonuses. Embermages receive 12 seconds of mana-free casting and a damage burst when their bar is filled, while Outlanders receive small boosts to a variety of stats depending on how full their bar is. Engineers get charge "points" that make certain skills and abilities more powerful, and Berserkers get guaranteed critical hits for six seconds whenever their bar is maxed. It's an interesting mechanic that not only adds depth to each class, but also encourages you to move forward and keep murdering things. You'll fight your way through four acts (really three acts and a short final dungeon), each with its own feel and theme. The locales are nicely detailed and feel varied, and I never found myself getting bored of an area before I was on to the next, even when full clearing the area. Full clearing is something you'll want to do -- missing a sidequest or a dungeon can quickly put you behind the level curve, and you'll either have to go back and find what you missed or rerun previous areas to catch up before you can progress. The most notable new feature in the game is multiplayer -- something fans of the original game had been clamoring for. While the multiplayer system is primitive, consisting simply of a friends list, a list of games around your level range, and no chat lobby, it gets the job done, and as expected, Torchlight II is great to play with your friends. Any loot that drops in-game is unique to your character, so you don't have to worry about ninjalooters or fighting over the unique item that just dropped. It's a good thing, too, since you'll see a lot of uniques drop. Loot is plentiful, and as your work your way through the game you'll be showered in upgrades, which follow the standard loot rarity rating of common - magic - rare - unique - legendary. Whereas Diablo III was criticized for the scarcity of powerful items and upgrades, Torchlight II almost suffers from the opposite issue, with uniques dropping at a pace of roughly one every half-hour or so. I hesitate to call it a "problem," especially since trading is tough/non-existent given the lack of a chat lobby in multiplayer, but I will admit to being a bit annoyed after getting three of the exact same unique helmets in the span of thirty minutes. I've yet to find a legendary though -- the most powerful, rarest items that only show up starting at level 50 -- so even though I ended my first playthrough with something like 35 unique items, there's still better, more exclusive loot to aim for. And it's easy to want to aim for better loot after completing the game, since Torchlight II gives you a few options to keep things fresh. There's a standard New Game+ mode, allowing you to begin again with everything starting at Level 50, and there's also the Mapworks, which enables you to spend gold to purchase maps that allow you to enter various random dungeons, each with their own level range and special modifiers that mix things up. These complaints are relatively minor, though, especially in light of the game as a whole. It's addictive, it's got character, and it's really, really cheap for the product you're getting. I can guarantee you'll notice some problems as you play through it, and you'll probably wish the UI had a bit more polish and that the multiplayer system was a bit more robust, but you'll find these issues don't detract much from the overall experience. When you consider that the mod tools are already available, and what we saw with the first game, it's likely many of these issues will be modded out somewhere down the line. If you're a fan of hack 'n slashes, loot fests, or dungeon crawlers, definitely pick up Torchlight II. It's absolutely worth your time and money, and should hold your attention for quite a while. There are portions of the game that could certainly use a little bit of polish, but it's unlikely these problems will turn you off from the game entirely. Grab the game, grab some friends, and get to clicking. Did I mention it's only $20?
 photo

Torchlight II was, unfortunately, subject to a number of delays. Originally set for release back in 2011, it's only now become available for purchase. I'm happy to say the wait was worth it. It's a bit rough around the edges,...

 photo

Torchlight II's OST will set you back all of $0


Sep 18
// Tony Ponce
Looking forward to Torchlight II's release in a couple of days? How about the game's soundtrack, composed by Matt Uelmen of Diablo and Diablo II fame? Originally, the OST was released back in June in limited quantities, as Ja...

Exclusive: Torchlight II OST highlights with Matt Uelmen

Sep 05 // Jayson Napolitano
"Enclave Night"[embed]231498:44413[/embed]This is the "night" theme from the opening town in Torchlight II. This particular mix (which is unique, but close to the in-game mix) starts with the classical guitar placed in a way that should be familiar to adventurers who have faced the curse of ember at least once before.As I listen to this now, I realize how much of an impression the early-nineties ambient movement made on me. Those whispering synth textures (mostly courtesy of Spectrasonics' spectacular Omnisphere, featured on hundreds of soundtracks in the past year or two) remind me more than a little of albums like "U. F. Orb" from that era, and other similar works. It seems to fit the mood of the Estherians - despite being enslaved by rifle-toting bandits, stalked by armored ten-foot bears and rumors of some turning into something resembling calamari, they seem to have a genuinely placid and even condescending demeanor."Wasteland"[embed]231498:44414[/embed]Here's a unique teaser mix of a few tracks from the deserts and salty barrens of Act 2. I couldn't resist being somewhat literal minded and using shakers, maracas, and the such, along with a few of the usual suspects in terms of near-asian instruments. But the real influence in the left-hand piano stabs is obviously the action soundtrack king of the era I was born into, Lalo Schifrin. His background in Latin instrumental music was the perfect means to redefine action music, and I'd like to think I subconsciously absorbed a little of it."Dungeons"[embed]231498:44415[/embed]And, one last unique mix, including a couple of minutes from some of the very last interiors in the game in the last half which didn't make it onto the promotional soundtrack CD. The medley begins with some live string glissandi effects from my session in Bratislava, which made for a good fit in a mysterious level involving a journal and infected dog somewhere in the frigid snows of Act 1. The track transitions through material from the corrupted temples also featured in that act, and ends with some of the noisier and more pounding music I made from dungeons near the climax of the game. The usual suspects - drums, screams and heavily distorted instruments - make their customary appearance. Does the sad fate of the pooch in the Ice Cavern portend some truly monstrous, Lovecraftian horror awaiting?
 photo

Torchlight II's release is right around the corner, and after hearing how well it's coming together from our hands-on at PAX last week, I've been anxiously waiting to hear composer Matt Uelmen's music in-game. We already revi...

 photo

PAX: 30 minutes of Torchlight II left me craving for more


One last look at the action-RPG before launch
Sep 03
// Jordan Devore
Confession: I never did finish the original Torchlight. For whatever reason, the game failed to grab me -- maybe it was the pacing, the lack of co-op support, or something else entirely. Whatever the case might be, I'll fini...
 photo

Torchlight 2 finally dated for September 20


Three more weeks!
Aug 31
// Jim Sterling
Runic Games has finally announced Torchlight 2's release date, lighting fires in the souls of those hoping it'll be better than Diablo III. You'll be able to shoot your guns and swing your swords in Torchlight's beautiful wor...
 photo

iOS MMO shamelessly rips off Torchlight


Jul 17
// Jim Sterling
Armed Heroes, a mobile MMORPG, is the latest game on iTunes to be caught shamelessly stealing stuff from other studios. The victim this time is Torchlight, with Runic Games' Travis Baldree calling out the thieving party -- EG...

Diablo III is blatantly better than Torchlight II

Jun 22 // Jim Sterling
A Better Breed of Player Recently, Activision installed a new system where those buying the game digitally would be forced to enter a "review process" for up to 72 hours, during which time they can only play a restricted version of the game and interact only with other restricted players. This vetting process may have been considered controversial by some, but I consider it a wonderful new addition to the game that will weed out wrongdoers. Consider Activision your friendly neighborhood bouncer, turning away the underdressed and underfunded while allowing only the cream of society to cross the velvet rope. By making players wait in a glorified paddock for three days, the impatient and angry will also go away to play something else, meaning that potential troublemakers effectively remove themselves from the equation. This leads to a better gaming atmosphere, free from ne'er-do-wells and rich in intelligent, committed players. Compare this to Torchlight II, where basically anybody will be allowed to play. Who knows what kind of riff raff will stroll through the door while Runic sleeps at its post? Drug addicts? Coldblooded killers such as Toby Soprano from television's Dexter? Illegal immigrants? I'm sorry, but there's a reason why airports have metal detectors and a man paid to stick his hand up the anus of foreign-looking people. It's called FREEDOM FRIES, guys. Ever heard of it?  Always Online DRM (Digital Rights Merriment)  Some people would consider Diablo III's always-online DRM requirements to be a negative thing, but those people are lying to themselves just like my mother did when she looked at herself in the mirror every single morning and told herself she had to drown him. Fact of the matter is, it isn't 1933 anymore -- criminals are a very real part of society these days, and businesses need to protect themselves. It is the only way they can continue to serve you the kind of great quality products we know and love, such as Band Hero and games similar to Band Hero.  Diablo III uses the real-money auction house, a hot new feature that finally turns everybody's favorite hack n' slash RPG into an authentic eBay simulator. Just like the real eBay, Activision needs to shield itself and its consumers from fraud and cheaters. If the game allowed players to play offline, they could hack the game, duplicate items, and ruin the carefully crafted economy that players have been demanding since Battle Chess. Thanks to the always-on DRM, nobody has been able to ever cheat in Diablo III, making the auction house 100% trustworthy.  So ask yourself, how on EARTH is Torchlight II planning to protect its own real-money auction house from cheaters? Huh? Huh? I guarantee that Torchlight II's economy is going to tank just like the American one did thanks to Mitt Romney's social ectoplasmic policies. Call me a stickler for security, but I won't be using Runic's virtual eBay anytime soon! Yes, sometimes the entire game goes down for maintenance and you can't play it offline, but let me present you with this little morsel of a concept -- you can't use a toilet when a janitor is fixing it, can you? No, didn't think so. Let the janitors fix your toilets, and let Blizzard fix your Diablo III. LOGIC! General Chat When playing computer games, I like to feel that I am connected to a vast world of fellow players who are arranging keyboard symbols in such a way that they vaguely resembles penises. Sometimes games can be dark and morbid, and who doesn't like to have their mood lightened? Thanks to Diablo III, I never feel like I am alone because I have a chatroom constantly flickering in the side of the screen and distracting me from the game's super serious world of darkness. It gives me that spoonful of smiles I need to keep on clicking! This is what we in the business call "immersion." I think it's great that Activision patched it so that the chat would be forced upon players the moment they start the game. That way players would have penises and insults greeting them the moment they start their latest session, which in turn is guaranteed to make them grin and therefore have a better time. It's simple psychology, which is why Diablo III is going to have lots of happy players while Torchlight II, which makes you play with people in order to see their comedy penises, is likely going to have a high suicide rate among users.  Diablo III Does Choice Correctly  With Diablo III, you don't have to worry about allocating skill points, creating your own characters, or tailoring a play style to suit your talents. All of that has been taken care of for you, allowing you more time to actually play the game rather than slave over talent trees and menus.  It's a streamlined and elegant approach to gaming. First of all, leveling up works out all those fiddly stats for you, upgrading your character as it sees fit. Secondly, you only ever need to find loot with your character's primary stat and/or Vitality, allowing you to quickly select the right tools for the job and play eBay with the rest of it. Thirdly, the game's higher difficulty levels bottleneck you into one particular playstyle so you eventually stop wasting time experimenting with garbage. The game even hides the option to fully customize your character's abilities in a sub-menu, removing the easy temptation to do anything other than just have fun! Runic Games isn't about fun. Runic Games would rather force you to agonize over skill point allocation and make tough choices about how you want to play. It takes its overwhelmingly exhausting choices so far that you even have to choose a hair color for your character! Hair colors! Sorry, but in the real world, we're stuck with the hair color we're born with and we have to all live with it! We neither get to, nor want to, start messing around with what The Lord Jesus Christ in Heaven gave us at birth.  I hate choice. I still remember when I was asked if I wanted to terminate life support for father and I just couldn't decide whether it would be more fun to get rid of him or keep him in a state of permanent vegetation. From that day forth I vowed never to be forced to make a decision ever again, and I'll be damned if Torchlight II is the one to see me break my oath.  Oh, and in case you're wondering, I eventually opted to have the doctors turn the switch halfway and just keep it hovering there. I assume it kept him in some state of spooky undeath.  No LAN Play Why the Hell are people bitching about there being no LAN play in Diablo III? Do you know when people played games via LAN? 1963, probably! Diablo III doesn't need LAN play because it is on the cutting edge of the technological wave, surfing into tomorrow on a board made of science and wearing the Bermuda shorts of discovery. Diablo III doesn't support LAN because it doesn't need to support LAN.  What the Hell are you thinking, Torchlight II? Yeah, sure, yeah, let's all play Torchlight II locally like a couple of geekatrons from the History Channel. While we're at it, why not play on our zoetropes and spin a hula hoop across the street with a fucking stick? Oh hey, Runic Games, do you guys need your pills and your wheelchairs, you bunch of stupid granddads?  Face facts, readers. Nobody plays LAN anymore. No games have supported LAN since about 1992. Torchlight II is a crusty old fart compared to the sleek and polished Diablo III, which uses real Internet like a real game.  Torchlight II Has Too Many Colors  Seriously, have you seen screenshots of Torchlight II? It's like the Teletubbies shat all over a box of Candy Corn and shoved it up a Care Bear's ass. In any given screenshot I've counted no less than twenty-nine colors, which is about seven colors too many for a game like this. Compare it to the refined color scheme of Diablo III, as grim and dark as it has always been, with no complaints ever had about its art style. The difference is clear.  Let's get this straight -- videogames should never look like cartoons, unless they're the Skeleton Warriors game for Sony PlayStation which was, admittedly, based on a cartoon. Outside of that one exception, however, I want my games looking serious, gothic, and as close to colorless as you can get without being a 1920s public safety announcement. At times, Diablo III is so dark that it sucks all the natural sunlight out of my room and plunges the entire street into perpetual night. Going from that to the Lucky Charms horseshit that is Torchlight II makes me vomit blood. Black blood. Because I'm a real hardcore gamer.  Ultimately, only real hardcore gamers play Diablo III, vetted as they are, dedicated as they will be, and grateful as they remain. Torchlight II, with its childish visuals, dated mechanics, impregnable interface and frankly shameless willingness to let anybody play the game is due to fail. Hard and fast. If you're some sort of idiotic chicken-baby, then perhaps you might have fun playing that ridiculous nonsense, but us mature adults who actually want to play the straight dope will stick with Diablo III, thanks!  It is just blatantly better, and you don't even know.
 photo

Diablo III launched a few scant months ago, but its PR snafus and controversial business decisions have soured a fair few players. Meanwhile, Runic Games has sat back and capitalized, as jilted dungeon crawlers look toward To...

Six things Torchlight II does better than Diablo III

May 22 // Patrick Hancock
Offline/LAN play  I'm not sure if you knew this, but you can't play Diablo III without an Internet connection. Crazy, right? Normally, this isn't an issue for me, but when Blizzard's servers go down it doesn't matter how great my Internet connection is. I almost exclusively play Diablo III multiplayer, but the fact that the game's playability relies entirely on a connection to their servers is an awful idea. There's no playing Diablo III on a plane or a long car ride, ever. I understand why they did it, but I still don't agree with it. Torchlight II, however, is a saving grace for those long trips. Not only can you play offline, but you can also play over a LAN connection! It feels a bit bizarre to be toting this as such a great feature in the year 2012, yet here we are. Now that that's out of the way, let's move on. [embed]227799:43729[/embed] Pets are better than mercenaries  My absolute favorite feature of Torchlight II may be the pet that accompanies your hero. You can now choose from eight different pets, each of them COMPLETELY ADORABLE. Naming your pet is one of the toughest decisions you'll make when playing Torchlight II. It has to be something that reflects the animal and the personality you give it in your brain. They're obviously better than the mercenaries in Diablo III, but if you don't believe me I'll get more specific. Mercenaries often talk to your character in Diablo III, and while these are pretty enjoyable to listen to, they can repeat and instantly soil the experience. Pets are silent warriors, removing that issue altogether. Mercenaries can hold some of your inventory for you, but pets can take that inventory and go sell it back at town, allowing you to continue adventuring. Oh, and while they are there, they can also pick up some scrolls or potions for you if you need them. This allows you to pick up each and every item, unlike Diablo III which gives absolutely no reason for picking up an item that isn't magical or unique. There's a special connection that humans have with animals, something that cannot be matched by other humans. This was evidently clear when I was constantly monitoring Slobbers' (my bulldog's name in Torchlight II) health, while I never once glanced at what's-his-name's health in Diablo III. When it comes down to it, pets are just better than mercenaries. Matt Uelmen Matt Uelmen may not be a common name to you, but if you played Diablo II for all of middle school like I did, you know of his work as a composer. He was one of the geniuses behind the music of Diablo II and its expansion, Lord of Destruction. The music in Diablo II is perfect for adventuring and meandering around the many large areas. You might not immediately notice it, but after playing for a while you start to notice just how fitting the music is. Well, guess who's over at Runic Games making the music for the Torchlight series? That's right, Mr. Uelmen is! In fact, I'd say that the music of Torchlight II definitely has a similar vibe to Diablo II at times. It's great music to have in the background as you walk across the vast landscapes. Diablo III's music isn't bad by comparison, but the game and the music have a different tone when compared to Torchlight II. Skills! Attributes! Points! Before I begin: I don't particularly mind the skill system that Diablo III has put in place. It definitely allows for way more experimentation; at least once you turn on Elective Mode. However, there's just some sort of magic that's taken away once leveling up is done automatically for you. Your freedom of choice is gone. Leveling up in Diablo III is much more hands-off than its predecessor, since you don't actually do anything as you gain experience. Torchlight II satiates that need to drop points into skills and attributes. This offers way more specialization and fine tuning of your character as you progress, something that you just can't do in Blizzard's latest hellish jaunt. Oh, and no worries -- Torchlight II has a respec option, allowing you to undo all of your points and redistribute them how you like. (EDIT: This has been changed since the beta -- you can now only respec the last three points. Sort of a "try before you buy" mentality) For example, in Diablo II, I created a throwing Barbarian. I absolutely love trying to make "gimped" character builds work out. Diablo III has a throwing skill for the Barbarian, but it's hard to specialize in it. I can use it more often (albeit limited by my Frenzy meter), but other than that I'm just like everyone else. The single-player experience As mentioned before, I primarily have multiplayer experiences while playing Diablo games. Playing Diablo III alone feels like you're missing out. Playing with others is Blizzard's clear intention, with single-player feeling more like an obligation on their part. Of course there's always the possibility that you can't play single-player at all because the servers are down or you're not connected to the Internet. Torchlight II's single-player just feels more refined. Perhaps the pet adds more to the solo experience than I thought, or maybe the game's structure is simple better laid out for a lone rider. You also don't need to play through the entire game once to unlock a harder difficulty. If you want a real challenge, you can start on the hardest difficulty with a level-one character. All that I can say for certain is that I never got the feeling like I was missing out while playing Torchlight II alone like I do when I play Diablo III. If you're going it alone, your choice of RPG should always be Torchlight II. Mods! Mods are what make the PC world go 'round. Half-Life mods have spawned entire series of world-class games; DayZ has recently re-invigorated ArmA II sales exponentially; Minecraft mods have shaped the game as we know it today. Putting a game's tools in the hands of the creative masses will almost always result in great things. Even the terrible mods are often entertaining for at least a little while. It's impossible to tell what kind of mods will come out of the Torchlight II community, but I have some pretty high hopes. Hell, even if it merely ends up spawning more well-crafted dungeons I'd be completely content. The possibility of mods will always keep me interested in a game well past its campaign mode. The fact that Torchlight II will allow for mods goes to show just how much of a "love letter" this game is to its fans. Allowing for mods allows players to change certain aspects of the game they may not like, and the developers realize that not every decision they make will please everyone. There's absolutely no reason why you can't play and enjoy both Diablo III and Torchlight II. Each of them excel in different areas unmatched by the other. If your loot lust is as strong as mine, you'll take any opportunity you can to kill things and watch precious items spew out of their corpses like a beautiful fountain of rare and unique items. Torchlight II has a cheaper price, wonderful art, and a splendid sense of humor. Will Torchlight II be better than Diablo III when it comes down to brass tacks? Maybe, but only time will tell. Whether you're disappointed with what Diablo III brought to the table or you just loved the first Torchlight, Torchlight II will not disappoint.
 photo

When I received an invite to the Torchlight II beta, I let out a noise that can only be described as a "yelp." It was a happy noise, one that I wasn't quite sure I was capable of making. "This will be a great time killer unti...

 photo

Live show: Torchlight 2 beta key giveaway on Mash Tactics


May 21
// Bill Zoeker
Light the fires, because Mash Tactics is crawling the dungeons in the Torchlight 2 beta today. King Foom will be hacking, slashing, looting, and burning through the closed beta of this upcoming RPG. But, you can grab some loo...
 photo

The DTOID Show: Dead Space 3, Torchlight 2, & Bioshock


May 09
// Max Scoville
Hello my pretties. Here we are again with another episode of The Destructoid Show.  Today, Wolfenstein 3D celebrates it's 20th anniversary with a free browser game and a free iPhone version. Bioshock Infinite is unf...
 photo

The DTOID Show: PAX East is over, have a recap!


Apr 10
// Tara Long
I may not have been in attendance this year, but that doesn't mean we don't have plenty of news to recap from this year's wonderful-but-slightly-less-so-because-I-wasn't-there PAX East! First up, Gearbox announced a new char...

PAX: Torchlight II is like Torchlight, but better

Apr 09 // Joshua Derocher
Torchlight II (PC, Mac)Developer: Runic GamesPublisher: Runic GamesRelease: Summer 2012 Pets are much better this time around. You can pick between owning a ferret, a chakawary (a little dragonlike guy), a cat, a bulldog, a panther, and a wolf. They are all adorable and I could just stare at their cute little animations all day. They still serve as your combat partners and can go back to town to sell loot. Now, you can also give them a shopping list to bring things back with them. That's right, your pet can bring back health and mana potions, town portal scrolls, and identification scrolls. There are a lot of very nice little changes to the interface that help to make the overall game experience better. Unidentified items can be identified by simply right-clicking them, meaning you don't have to click on a scroll and then click on the item. Loot names can also be toggled on and off instead of having to hold down ALT when you want to see things. There are more tweaks like this that don't really bring any drastic changes to the gameplay, but they do eliminate extra clicks and make information easier to access, which is always a good thing to see. All of the maps are randomly generated in Torchlight II. The overworld areas and dungeons are always different, so the replay factor is almost infinite. There are even random quests scattered around, such as soldiers who need help fighting back wolves. If you save him, you'll gain experience, a few coins, and he'll give you some loot. Even though it's all random, it doesn't feel like it; if you told me that someone designed these levels, I would believe you. The camp area I started in reminded me of one of Titan Quest's zones. Whatever magic Runic is crafting behind the scenes works well. The newest feature that Runic has revealed about Torchlight II is the charge bar. This bar fills up during combat, and it drains when you're not fighting. Upon filling it up, you can use a special ability that is unique to every class. Engineers have more powerful attacks, Berserkers have every attack become a critical hit, Outlanders can move faster, and the Embermage is able to cast spells without draining mana.  I saved the best for last; the multiplayer. It's good. Unlike Dungeon Siege III, players will gain full rewards no matter what. You can be playing alone, host a game, or join someone else's game with the same character and earn just as much XP and loot all the time. You can start a quest in your game and finish it in your friend's. You can even help your friends complete quests you don't have. You'll still get XP, gold, and some loot, but you won't get any unique quest-related drops from bosses unless you also have that quest. Joining another person's game doesn't mean that you really have to play with that person. Players can run off wherever they want to. Playing together is much more fun, of course, but the game doesn't force you to do that. In the time I spent with the game, I played a ranged Outlander while another player joined me as a melee Berserker. He could get up close while I stood back and shot from a distance. The game scales how tough the monsters are according to how many players are there and what levels everyone is at. Torchlight II is shaping up to be one of the better games of 2012. It will face some tough competition from Diablo III, but don't skip over it or think of it as "the cheap Diablo." From what I've seen, Torchlight II is a very good game and it's just as polished and enjoyable as Diablo III. The random content will actually give it more replayability, and its lower price makes it easier to fit the game into your budget. I won't tell you to pick this over Diablo III, but don't ignore it, either. If you like action RPGs, you need to get Torchlight II.
 photo

The original Torchlight is an awesome game and there isn't much to complain about. It's fun to look at and incredibly addicting. Torchlight II thankfully doesn't stray too far away from the classic gameplay, but it does feel noticeably more streamlined. It's also bigger -- three times the size of the first game, in fact -- so you'll get to enjoy many dozens of hours happily gathering loot.

 photo

Torchlight 2 tiptoeing around Diablo III's release


Apr 09
// Chris Carter
May 15th. Judgement day. The day that nearly every PC gamer will shun their family, friends, and workmates to plant themselves behind their glowing screen of goodness to destroy the Prince of Darkness one more time. But not e...
 photo

The team behind Torchlight opposes SOPA


Jan 12
// Harry Monogenis
Runic Games, the studio that gave us that bundle of action-RPG fun that was Torchlight, has today let its forum users know the company's official stance on SOPA, something that not a lot of game companies have been brave enou...
 photo

Space Marine, Limbo, and more are on sale at Steam


Dec 22
// Jordan Devore
The Steam Holiday Sale is still going strong, and looking at my friends' activity, it's working -- they're getting us to play games we've only barely bothered to touch. A few of the daily deals today are worth pointing out: ...
 photo

The DTOID Show: MGS 5?! Killzone 4?! Max Payne 3?!


Nov 18
// Max Scoville
Hey! Yesterday afternoon we did another one of our wacky live Destructoid Shows today. I didn't do anything bad with a piñata (not on camera, anyway) but we did fire off our finest and most succulent tidbits of video g...
 photo

Torchlight II has a good excuse for slipping into 2012


Nov 17
// Jordan Devore
Those of you in search of legendary loot will have to continue waiting patiently. Though Torchlight II was promised as coming out by the end of this year, Runic Games has confirmed this is no longer the case. Company co-found...

Hands-on: Torchlight II

Sep 08 // Daniel Starkey
[embed]210031:40751[/embed] Those familiar with the first title in the series will have no trouble with the new content. This really just is Torchlight with tighter graphics a MUCH bigger world, spells, items, talents, and content. And that's definitely not a bad thing. I started my playtime with the Outlander, having a natural inclination for rogues. I had access to about a dozen different abilities that had some nice variation and gorgeous animations. Within a few minutes, I set off to challenge a boss in the area and had relatively little trouble. I don't know what difficulty I was on, but I could see the game being a bit too easy, especially if baddies don't scale with the number of players. The Embermage was fairly intuitive as well, and I had a lot of fun with rudimentary adventuring. A lot of work has gone into making sure Torchlight 2 has replayability. When your characters hit the level cap (I was told to expect it to be around 50), they can confer buffs and perks to new characters. There's a match-making system, full modding support, and suite of other features to to ensure you get your money's worth, all for the paltry sum of $20. Torchlight 2 is due out later this year. If you haven't played the first one, it's $15 on Steam, and it's really good, especially if you like dungeon crawlers.
 photo

By now, I'm sure many of you are already familiar with Torchlight, the inaugural opus of developer Runic Games. It was a class-based action RPG/dungeon-crawler that bears an uncanny resemblance to a hypothetical hybrid of Dia...

 photo

The Jimquisition: The Beautiful Irony of PC Gaming


Sep 05
// Jim Sterling
Beauty is only skin deep, and a pretty face can only go so far. Fortunately, I am both beautiful and wise, so I'm basically the perfect lifeform. In a way, I consider myself to be very much like PC gaming -- visually stunnin...
 photo

Torchlight 2 gets its final class and price


Aug 26
// Liam Fisher
Torchlight 2 already looks set to surpass its predecessor in nearly every way with a larger world, more loot, and new classes. Today Runic has finally announced the fourth class joining the already established trio of the En...

That's So MMO!: Pandas in the Mist

Aug 06 // David Moore
“Pandas to the rescue!” A number of juicy World of Warcraft stories have cropped up. Firstly, MMO Champion uncovered a Blizzard-filed game copyright for the title “Mists of Pandaria.” Speculation is running wild that this may be the name of the next WoW expansion and feature a playable Pandaren race (yes, anthropomorphic pandas.) All may become known at BlizzCon in October. Speaking of BlizzCon, virtual tickets for the big show are now on sale for $39.99 USD (WoW and StarCraft II in-game items included). Also of note, WoW players raised $1.9 million for Japan earthquake relief by buying in-game Cenarion Hatchling pets. Finally, CEO Mike Morhaime says WoW has lost 300k subscribers in the period covering May to July. Will pandas with attitudes be enough to bring fleeing subscribers back?   “Greek Peek” Curious about the mythical it’s-actually-been-released-after-six-years Gods & Heroes? Satisfy your curiosity with Heatwave Interactive’s new three-day free-trial offer. The Heatwave team has also recently added a new Scout class for those who'd like to infuse their Strider fantasies with the “Power of the Gods”.   “TERAble news” En Masse Entertainment’s fast-action MMO TERA has had its release date pushed from this Fall into Spring 2012. North American producer Chris “Chager” Hager says “When the beta phase starts in early 2012, TERA will be operating like a well-oiled machine.” Remember folks, that MMO you’re anticipating will be delayed at least once. Factor that into your stress management plan.   “Flickering 'Light” Being a big fan of single-player hack ‘n’ slash dungeon crawler Torchlight I was greatly excited back in 2009 when Runic Games announced an MMO follow-up. Due to the surprising success of Torchlight, the devs instead focused on getting Torchlight II done ASAP. TL II brings small scale multiplayer into the mix but isn’t massive by any means. In an interview with Eurogamer, Runic CEO Max Schaefer says the MMO is still far off and may be delayed yet again if Torchlight II rocks the sales charts like the original. I love me some Torchlight--but I demand my MMO version NOW!   “Winter brings ‘Fall” Red 5, who have been developing the massive sci fi shooter Firefall for many a long year, have finally announced a December release date for the game. An “expanded” Beta will be on offer following Pax Prime in late August. Jetpack over and sign up.   “Spandex Spendthrifts” NCsoft’s long-running City of Heroes title recently announced it was going free-to-play when the “Freedom” update launches later this year. Now, Paragon Studios are giving up secrets regarding the free game’s upcoming Cash Shop, or, Paragon Market. New costumes (‘natch!), power sets and character slots will all be available for purchase. Just remember to stay away from the capes. You’ll end up caught in a jet turbine or sucked into a vortex!   “Loving the Alien” How would you like a free Star Trek Online client, 60 days of subscription time and a Tribble pet? If you answered “Make it so” you’ll want to beam down to the Alienware Web Site and sign up for an Alienware Arena account. Yes, that’s free too. The trouble with this Tribble? You’ll need to be a brand new STO player to qualify. Hurry though. At the time of this writing only 1k giveaway packages were left.   That’s going to do it for this week cats & kittens. Keep on leveling up and keep it logged-in.   ----- David Moore has run the site gamebunny.com for the past ten years and co-runs torwars.com, a site focused on all things Star Wars: The Old Republic.
 photo

Hello MMO groovers. It’s time for another healthy helping of the latest massively multiplayer news. While things have been relatively quiet leading up to PAX Prime and Gamescom, I have found a number of newsy nuggets to foist upon you.

 photo

The DTOID Show: Nolan North, Skyrim, and Torchlight LIVE!


Aug 05
// Max Scoville
[The Destructoid Show gives a rundown of all the top news from Destructoid.com every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Subscribe to us on YouTube, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.] Hello my special ...
 photo

Torchlight 2 exceeds XBLA memory limit


Aug 04
// Liam Fisher
Runic Games' 2009 action RPG Torchlight was a bit of a success on the PC. It's XBLA release was equally successful and many had assumed that the upcoming sequel would also find it's way to consoles. However, it seems that Tor...

  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter!
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -