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The Legend of Zelda

Blind gamer photo
Blind gamer

Watch this blind gamer beat The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time


Think you can win with your eyes closed?
Jan 04
// Ben Davis
Terry Garrett has been playing The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time since 2011, and five years later (with long breaks in between) he has finally managed to finish the game. Oh yeah, did I mention he's blind? Garrett has adap...
Deals photo
Deals

New 3DS XL and Hyrule Gold Edition on sale for $175 at GameStop


Amazon price matching regular versions
Dec 29
// Dealzon
While these aren't selling like mad compared to the Majora's Mask version, GameStop's exclusive Nintendo New 3DS XL Hyrule Gold Edition is now on sale for $25 off at uh... GameStop. The regular plain vanilla red/black version...
Deals photo
Deals

GameStop has a bunch of strategy guides at half-off (Twilight Princess HD, etc.)


Yep, people still buy them
Dec 27
// Dealzon
So GameStop has a bunch of strategy guides on sale at half off. Before you dismiss the sale completely, some of these are actually pretty neat as far as collector items go, and we can definitely see how die-hard fans of a ser...
Wolf Link photo
Wolf Link

You won't need to buy the Twilight Princess remaster to get that sweet Wolf Link amiibo


Err, Midna amiibo to some of you
Dec 21
// Brett Makedonski
One of the better-looking amiibo that has been revealed is the Wolf Link amiibo with Midna riding on his back. The problem is that since its announcement alongside a remaster of Twilight Princess, the amiibo has tethered to a...
Hyrule Warriors photo
Hyrule Warriors

Hyrule Warriors Legends sure is shaping up


It's far more than a basic port
Dec 11
// Jordan Devore
Slowly but surely, I'm coming around on Hyrule Warriors Legends. I put over a hundred hours into the original game on Wii U. I loved it. But I eventually hit that point where all of a sudden I didn't even want to think about ...
Hyrule Warriors photo
Hyrule Warriors

Hyrule Warriors Legends will have a Tamagotchi-like 'My Fairy' mechanic


I'll take it
Dec 10
// Chris Carter
More details are coming out of the woodwork for Hyrule Warriors Legends, which is set to arrive in January in Japan, and March elsewhere. Evidently there will be a "My Fairy" system for Adventure Mode, which should give ...
Yasssssssssssss! photo
Yasssssssssssss!

Linkle might be coming to future Zelda titles


The Adventures of Linkle, please!
Dec 08
// Jed Whitaker
"I'm sure we will keep [Linkle] in mind when thinking about future titles," Nintendo producer Eiji Aonuma told IGN. "I had a chance to give feedback on Linkle during development, but the satisfying action of using a crossbow,...

The 'Nintendo in-print' Holiday gift guide

Dec 04 // Jonathan Holmes
Rhythm Zinegoku A quick disclaimer: I contributed a couple of pieces to this collection, as did former Destructoid editors Topher Cantler and Colette Bennett. I didn't get paid for my work though, and I don't get a cut of the sales either. In fact, I had to buy my two copies of the zine with my own bucks. You'll get no complaints from me about that, though. As a diehard Rhythm Heaven/Tengoku fan, this collection was a must-have for me from day one. Every stage from the first three games is represented in some way or another, so regardless of which is your favorite, you're sure to see plenty of familiar faces. The biggest star artist here is probably Natasha Allegri, creator of Fiona and Cake and Bee and Puppycat, though there are plenty of other contributors that fans of the series may recognize. The zine is currently out of stock, but it should be available for purchase again any second now, so keep your eyes peeled. [embed]322553:61380:0[/embed] Legends of Localization Book 1: The Legend of Zelda Clyde Mandelin is probably best known for spearheading the fan translation of Mother 3, so it's no surprise that he's partnered with Fangamer to create a series of books dedicated to examining the process of translation and localization. He's started off with the Legend of Zelda series, and it's not just the video games he's looking at. There is plenty about the Zelda board games, the breakfast cereal, and other bits of related merchandise that make up part of the franchise's massive history. Though these diversions into the obscure make for plenty of enlightening moments, the book does well to regularly return its focus to the original Legend of Zelda. So much was done to transport that seminal title from its first home on the Famicom Disk System to the Nintendo Entertainment System and the Western audience that played there, with much of that work inadvertently helping to spawn the lore and literal "legend" that makes up the series today. It's hard to imagine an invested Zelda fan being disappointed with what Mandelin and his team have produced. Nintendo Force: Iwata tribute issue Here's another one I contributed to, but again, Nintendo Force's sales numbers don't affect me financially in any way. I work for the magazine because it's really fun to share my interest in Nintendo's past, present, and future with the Nintendo fan community. This issue is without a doubt our greatest success in meeting that goal to date.  While we were all deeply saddened when Nintendo president Satoru Iwata passed away earlier this year, his passing did a lot to bring fans of his work together. Case in point, with this tribute issue, we worked our butts off to compile a detailed history of Iwata's career in game development, all while reflecting on exactly why he was such a great role model to gamers and game developers. I'm not totally happy with my personal output for this issue (there are at least two sentences on one page that still look wonky to me), but I have no hesitation in recommending every other page of it to diehard Nintendo fans (and I think I only worked on like four pages, so it's easy enough to skip over my stuff if you want). Splatoon Ikasu Artbook Splatoon has been out for less than a year, and it's already developed a larger fan base than some Nintendo franchises that have been around for ten times as long. While many were hoping that the game's popularity here in the U.S. would lead Nintendo of America to publish the official Splatoon Ikasu Artbook outside of Japan, it's looking like their hopes may have been in vain.  Thankfully, importing it is easy enough, and the only bits that really require literacy in Japanese to fully appreciate are the Twitter logs and comic strips in the back. My biggest gripe with the book is there are a ton of pages dedicated to showing off renders of clothes and weapons that are taken directly from the game. That feels a bit like a waste of space. That said, the bulk of the book's 320 pages are filled with rare or unique storyboards, character design documents, and visual plans that have plenty to offer Splatoon fans everywhere.  The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past Nintendo Power manga Shotaro Ishinomori is most famous for creating Kamen Rider and Cyborg 009, but he's also one of the creative minds that helped shape the Legend of Zelda series as it moved beyond its first few entries. While we don't know exactly how influential his A Link to the Past manga was for the games that followed it, there are plenty of ideas that debuted here before going on to become mainstays of the Zelda series. The core story more or less follows the events of A Link to the Past on the SNES, but the manga also marks the first time the Zelda series depicted a fairy as a ball of glowing light that helps lead Link forward in his adventures. It's also the first time Link ever traveled under the light of a death-faced moon, his face hidden behind a Zora mask, while working to infiltrate a monster's fortress. To tell more may lead to spoilers, but trust that there are plenty of eye-opening ideas here, new and old, for Zelda fans to chew on.  Good Nintentions Jeremy Parish is one of the most passionate, well-informed video game experts in the industry today. He's been writing about games for over ten years, covering everything from level design analysis to current game news to charting the history of gaming as a whole. He's already put out a number of books, but Good Nintentions is probably his biggest and best work in print to date.  Though the title doesn't make it totally clear, the subject of the book is the Nintendo Entertainment System. Literally everything about the console is examined, from its inception, its eventual demise, and everything in between, including detailed descriptions of of over 200 NES games and their developers. Few are able to keep a keen eye on the past, present, and future of gaming as well as Parish, so those interested in any and all eras of the medium would do well to check out his work. Second Quest There's been plenty of chatter lately about the idea of a Legend of Zelda title that stars a woman. Second Quest, a Kickstarter-funded comic book from writer Tevis Thompson and artist David Hellman, gave the idea a detailed look earlier this year with a story that deftly turns multiple Zelda conventions on their heads. If "history is written by the victors," then it's fair to guess that the legend of Zelda, Link, and Ganon may be skewed towards demonizing the losers of those conflicts. Second Quest tells the story of a young woman who discovers that guess to be true, and in doing so, sets forth alone on a journey to the unknown.  Though the story doesn't technically star Zelda or Link (likely due to obvious copyright issues), Second Quest still manages to think on two characters, and many other Legend of Zelda mainstays, in multiple thought-provoking ways. Concepts of sexism, matriarchy, xenophobia, religion and myth as method of societal control, and other more sophisticated sociological concepts are explored, but not at the expense of telling a tense and thoughtful standalone story. While only those true Zelda experts will likely get more out of all the parallels between Second Quest and The Legend of Zelda series, the only real prerequisite to enjoying this story is an interest in lovingly crafted, hand-drawn fantasy comics.  [embed]322553:61381:0[/embed] A Guide to Village Life Animal Crossing is like knitting. Both involve relaxing, repetitive interactions with soft, warm materials that can eventually lead to the creation of something much more substantial. While the series has never gone the literal route of Kirby's Epic Yarn or Yoshi's Woolly World, any fan of the games will tell you that playing Animal Crossing can feel just as comforting as a putting on a hand-made sweater.  It's that hand-crafted feeling that makes Kari Fry's A Guide to Village Life such a perfect fit for the series. This 256-page hand-drawn catalog of the flora, fauna, villagers, and other Animal Crossing attractions is about as affectionate of a love letter as any video game could hope to receive. If you also love Animal Crossing, you'll find a lot to relate to here. 
Shopper's guide photo
'Buy my book!' ~ Jay Sherman
While much of modern society has moved on to the world of "electrons and information", there are two demographics that still eat up the printed page: kids and old people. Interestingly enough, these are also the two age group...

Linkle photo
Linkle

More Linkle footage from Hyrule Warriors is exactly what today needed


She looks pretty badass
Dec 03
// Laura Kate Dale
Ever since we learned that Linkle was going to be a playable character in Hyrule Warriors Legends on the 3DS I've been excitedly glued to my computer waiting to see more of her in action. Finally, weeks of pressing my face ag...
Legend of Zelda photo
Legend of Zelda

Halo artist re-imagines a realistic Legend of Zelda hero


Link Larkin hair
Dec 01
// Chris Carter
It's always interesting seeing things from a new set of eyes. In this case, it's a re-imagining of Link from Halo artist Kyle Hefley, who currently works for 343 Industries, handling character designs. This art is more o...
Hyrule Warriors Legends photo
Hyrule Warriors Legends

Watch Skull Kid do his thing in Hyrule Warriors Legends


Yes!
Nov 26
// Chris Carter
One of my most anticipated new features of Hyrule Warriors Legends, an expansion of sorts for the original Warriors, is Skull Kid. The new attacks shown in the video look amazing, and include moon abilities, as well as a fig...
Twilight Princess photo
Twilight Princess

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess Wii U will likely support Wiimote and Nunchuk controls


And the GamePad
Nov 25
// Chris Carter
Well this is interesting. Fans have been speculating as to the control schemes that will be supported in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD, and according to the official Nintendo Sweden landing site, we're in for some...
Hyrule Warriors photo
Hyrule Warriors

They finally gave Ganondorf a trident in Hyrule Warriors Legends


A (Tri)force to be reckoned with
Nov 24
// Brett Makedonski
Ganondorf wasn't given a trident in Hyrule Warriors for Wii U. That seems like a missed opportunity of sorts. It was his weapon of choice in some of the best Zelda games ever made. That misstep is being rectified w...

Does it matter if Link is a boy or a girl?

Nov 20 // Jonathan Holmes
[Art by  Kuvshinov-Ilya] To its credit, Nintendo has done an admirable job of concocting a way to help fans to imagine Link as both a specific person and an abstract concept at the same time. He's actually not always named Link. You, the player, choose his name before starting each of his games. He also never speaks, further solidifying him as non-character who's only purpose is to act as doorway for the player into the game world. Yet, by leaning hard on both the reincarnation myth and the use of multiple timelines, Nintendo has managed to shape Link into a series of individual characters in the minds of many. In doing so, it has squelched most of complaints the character/non-character used to attract, though it took them a little while to get there. Many fans were outraged when the Wind Waker radically changed who Link was and how he was drawn. A lot of these fans had become extremely attached to a singular idea of who Link was and how he should look. This new Link broke from those ideas, causing their suspension of disbelief to break along with it. It's no surprise then that it was fans who originally came up with the theory that the Zelda series takes place over multiple timelines. They were clearly more invested in believing that Link was real than Nintendo was. Strangely enough, it looks like a lot of those diehard fans are also against the idea of Link ever being a woman. Their devotion to their head canon feels similar to how some Catholics hold tight to their traditional gender divisions. Just a few days ago, a diehard Zelda fan was telling me that making Link a woman would be "pointless," and if someone wants to play a game starring a woman, that there are plenty of other choices out there. I pushed back with the idea that what's pointless to them may mean a lot to someone else. To counter that obvious point, they put on their best empathy-face and said that the Zelda series should not have to bend to the preferences of fans. It's the exactly line of thinking I've heard from well meaning but overly dogmatic Catholics over the years, who advise folks who want to bear confession to a female priest to simply abandon Catholicism in favor of Unitarian Universalism or some other wacky new faith.  [Art by Liart] Nintendo itself has been relatively inconsistent in explaining if Link has to be a man or not. The director of the recently released Triforce Heroes said for that game's story, it wouldn't fit the mythology for the leads to be women. So that's one answer. On the other hand, Eiji Aonuma, producer of the Zelda series as a whole, has never ruled out that we'd get a woman iteration of Link someday, stating that he was going to wait and see how the playable women characters in Hyrule Warriors were received before making that decision. I'm guessing the fact that Hyrule Warriors sold pretty darn well is one of the reasons Linkle went from being a rejected concept sketch to a full-blown character (who may or may not be a reincarnation of Link). In the absence of official word from Nintendo, fans have created their own schema around the question of Link's inherent maleness, just as they they created the split-timeline long before it was adopted as canon. The one I hear the most is that Zelda must always be a woman (because it's the Legend of Zelda, not the Legend of Zeldo) and therefore Link must be a man, as the potential for heterosexual romance between the two leads is a key part of the Zelda's legend. Of course, Nintendo has never explicitly stated any of that. Why would it? As a company that wants to appeal to as many potential customers as possible, it'd have little reason to insult its queer fans or cut itself off from the option of a female Link someday. Linkle is clearly a move towards testing those waters, though it won't likely jump all the way in until it is sure it will be profitable. It's a direction it has been publicly headed in for a while, driven in no small part by the stats showing how women are becoming a larger and larger part of Nintendo's customer base.  It's arguable that the company has been moving towards giving players the option to chose the gender of the green clad Hylian hero for years now.  [embed]321406:61194:0[/embed] It wouldn't even be the first time, technically. Some of the Satellaview Legand of Zelda games allowed for players to chose the gender of their character. So does every modern Fire Emblem, Pokémon, and Animal Crossing game, as will Xenoblade Chronicles X when it's released outside of Japan next month. It's not just in the RPGs either. Nintendo's latest hit character, the Inkling, also comes in boy or girl shapes. In fact, the vast majority of Nintendo's Wii U titles allow you to play as a woman some or all of the time. It could be that the publisher finally noticed that Monster Hunter, Mass Effect, Fallout 4 (the potentially biggest entertainment release of the year) and countless other modern Action-RPGs have let the player decide the gender of their "link" to the game world without suffering any loss in sales. Maybe they are on the cusp of allowing today's Legend of Zelda players to do the same.  That said, it's clear that many people would be upset if Nintendo began providing players with that level of choice. Ironically, a lot of these players are also harshly critical of Nintendo for not keeping up with the times when it comes to cross-buy purchases across consoles games and other consumer friendly practices. What we demand out of our game publishers says a lot about us, and will eventually determine what those publishers end up producing. My guess is that like everything with business, the question of how much Link's gender matters will be answered not in some political debate, but in dollar signs. 
Linkle photo
Linkle: The new Samus or a next Waluigi?
Linkle's debut as a playable character in Hyrule Warriors Legends seems to mean something big to a lot of people, but I guess that's par for course. Regardless of how long it's been since you actually played a Legend of Zelda...

Deals photo
Deals

Twilight Princess HD + amiibo still available at GameStop for pre-order


Amazon & Best Buy "sold out"
Nov 15
// Dealzon
Announced on Thursday's Nintendo Direct, The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD is heading to the Wii U next spring. While the package with the Wolf Link amiibo figure quickly went up for pre-order on Amazon and ...
Wolf Link photo
Wolf Link

A bunch of up-close pictures of that sweet Wolf Link amiibo


Nice moves, Puppy Link
Nov 13
// Brett Makedonski
It's Friday and you should all be gearing up for the weekend. I'm not the type who's going to make you think a bunch when it's the non-thinking part of the week. I'm not a monster. So, I just want you to use your eyeballs and...
Looks better, duh photo
Looks better, duh

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD graphical comparison


Wii U vs. GameCube / Wii
Nov 12
// Jed Whitaker
Check out the above video that compares The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD's graphics to the original releases for Wii and GameCube from 2006. I can't believe it has been nine years already, and it is hard to bel...
Hyrule Warriors photo
Hyrule Warriors

Linkle confirmed for Hyrule Warriors


I hope Zeldathan is next
Nov 12
// Jonathan Holmes
Looks like those eagle-eyed internet sleuths were right. Linkle, the woman version of Link who was previously revealed as a cut character from the game, will be making it to the upcoming 3DS re-release of Hyrule Warriors as ...
Zelda photo
Zelda

Zelda: Tri Force Heroes gets a lot deeper next month


And it's free
Nov 12
// Brett Makedonski
Your Tri Force Heroes co-op adventuring will grow considerably come December 2. Nintendo just announced during its Direct that the Den of Trials update is coming soon for free. According to Nintendo's Bill Trinen, D...
Twilight Princess HD photo
Twilight Princess HD

Twilight Princess HD's Wolf Link amiibo looks hot


Coming March 4, 2016
Nov 12
// Kyle MacGregor
Nintendo just announced a new amiibo depicting Wolf Link (and Midna) from Twilight Princess. The figure will launch in North America on March 4, 2016 bundled alongside Twilight Princess HD, which can be pre-ordered today, and...
Twilight Princess HD photo
Twilight Princess HD

Zelda: Twilight Princess HD confirmed for Wii U


It's a bit of a wait, though
Nov 12
// Jordan Devore
After a short message about the tragic passing of Nintendo president Satoru Iwata earlier this year, Nintendo of America's Reggie Fils-Aimé dove right into some news in today's Nintendo Direct presentation. First up, T...
MonHun X photo
MonHun X

Monster Hunter X has nods to Wind Waker and Macross Delta


Link with a tail and whiskers!
Nov 09
// Jordan Devore
Capcom has a habit of putting crossover characters, outfits, and weapons in Monster Hunter and that amusing trend continues with Monster Hunter X. The upcoming 3DS game has tie-ins with The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker and Macross Delta. Here's a look at them.
Hyrule Warriors Legends photo
Hyrule Warriors Legends

Watch Tetra kick some tail in Legend of Zelda: Hyrule Warriors 3DS


Hyrule Warriors Legends
Nov 05
// Steven Hansen
Pulling a reverse Smash Bros., Hyrule Warriors launched on the Wii U last year and is getting an updated version on 3DS, Hyrule Warrios Legends, sometime next year. It's January 21 in Japan, first quarter 2016 for America an...
Legend of Zelda wrist photo
Legend of Zelda wrist

You can play Super Mario 64 or Ocarina of Time on a watch


You shouldn't, but you could
Nov 02
// Steven Hansen
While on one hand I don't understand purchasing a smart watch or most "wearable" tech, on the other, I have to admit amusement at one of these devices -- an older model, to boot -- being capable of running N64 games. YouTube...

Video game ghost stories #2: The faces

Oct 30 // Ben Davis
"What's this? Green clothes... White fairy... Sir, could you, by chance, be a forest fairy? Oh my! My name is Tingle! I think I am the same as you, sir. A forest fairy! Alas, though I am already age 35, no fairy has come to me yet..." Link was very put off by Tingle's appearance. The grotesque features, the ill-fitting clothes, the overt jealousy of Link's fairy companion. He decided it was best to avoid this strange man for now. After reclaiming his lost ocarina, Link used its mysterious powers to travel back in time a few days and spoke with the Happy Mask salesman again. The man upheld his promise to return Link to his former self. He played a somber tune, and Link's body began to shift and change rather violently. It was not exactly a pleasant experience. As he left the leafy form behind, Link felt in his heart the soul of a Deku Scrub passing on to the afterlife. When he came to, he noticed a mask lying on the ground in front of him. A mask resembling the face of a Deku Scrub. With this mask, he would be able to switch between forms at will. Continuing on his journey, Link took to the snowy mountains. Just outside of the Goron village, he caught a glimpse of Tingle floating in the distance. Link decided to try and pass him by. He hadn't spoken to Tingle yet since going back in time, so the man shouldn't recognize him anyway. But as he trudged past through the snow... "Hello, Mr. Fairy! How nice it is to meet again out here in the mountains. You do not look yourself, though... You appear to have changed bodies! How can this be?" Link was taken aback. How did Tingle know who he was? He was certain he hadn't spoken to Tingle since the dawn of the first day. And he recognized Link even though he was no longer a Deku Scrub. Perturbed, Link gave Tingle a suspicious glance and continued on his way. In the mountains, Link met the ghost of a Goron which led him back to its grave. The ghost was restless, but after playing the Happy Mask salesman's somber tune, it seemed to be at peace. Once again, Link felt in his heart the soul of the Goron passing to the afterlife, leaving behind a mask in its place. He tried on the mask, and felt his body being ripped and molded into a new form. He could feel a remnant of the soul of the departed Goron pulsing through the mask as he admired his new body. Leaving the grave, Link was once again assaulted by the pesky 35-year-old. "Mr. Fairy! You have changed bodies once again! I am unsure how you have obtained this power to become a Goron or a Deku Scrub at will, but I must know. If I could become a true forest fairy... You must teach me your secret, Mr. Fairy!" Link barely acknowledged Tingle as he left the mountain in a hurry, eager to be far away from the unsettling middle-aged man. Returning to the first day once again, Link made his way to the Great Bay coast only to discover a Zora in distress out in the waves. He quickly dove in and dragged the body back to the beach, but it was too late. The Zora gave its final breath, and died right there in front of Link. He decided to play the somber tune once more and acquired the Zora mask. Remnants of the Zora's soul pulsed through Link's body as he donned the mask, transforming into a slender, aquatic form. Suddenly, he noticed Tingle floating in the air a short distance away. Was he being followed? Tingle approached with a shocked expression on his face. "I saw what you did, Mr. Fairy. You took that dead Zora's face. It made you turn into a Zora! Interesting. How interesting!" Link noticed a peculiar glint in Tingle's eye that sent a shiver down his spine. Why was Tingle looking at him like that? He thought about trying to explain that it was a mask and not the Zora's actual face, but he couldn't find the words. Instead, he backed away awkwardly, turning to leave as Tingle continued to look him up and down. Some time later, Link arrived at Ikana Canyon. Soon this whole ordeal would be over, and he could finally return to Hyrule. Unfortunately for Link, he would have to deal with the fairy fanatic once again. It seemed as though Tingle was able to be everywhere at once. Or maybe he really was following Link wherever he went... He approached and spoke in an unusually grim tone. "Mr. Fairy, I know now how I can finally become a real forest fairy. I've watched you do it time and time again. You took their faces. You wear their faces to inhabit their bodies. This is the key to your secret power, and it will soon be my power to wield as well." Link hesitated for a moment, caught off guard by Tingle's sudden malicious attitude. The man's expression told Link he was dead serious. He reached a shaky hand out towards Link's face, cackling excitedly. "Mr. Fairy... give me your face." Link turned and ran as fast as he could. Ducking behind a dilapidated hut, he whipped out the ocarina and hurriedly played the Song of Time. Back in the clock tower, Link fell to the ground, gasping for breath. He thought he would just stay put inside for a while. It was the best hiding place he could think of. Nobody ever seemed to enter the tower, aside from the Happy Mask salesman. And speak of the devil... "Ah, perfect timing! I just got done speaking with a client who is willing to pay an exorbitant price for a certain mask. However, this mask is not yet in my possession. But it shouldn't be too difficult to acquire. In fact, its source is standing right in front of me. All I need is... a little something from YOU."
Video game ghost stories photo
Counting down until Halloween
Link made his way out of the clock tower, still in Deku Scrub form thanks to the Skull Kid. He just needed to find a way to return to his regular body. The Happy Mask salesman apparently knows the secret. Wandering around Clo...

So awkward. Such cringe. photo
So awkward. Such cringe.

Nintendo of America's localization of Zelda: Tri Force Heroes added memes


Are you okay with this?
Oct 27
// Jed Whitaker
I've been playing and enjoying The Legend of Zelda: Tri Force Heroes a great deal on my 3DS, but some people are up in arms over Nintendo of America's localization of the game.
Everybody do the twist photo
Everybody do the twist

Nintendo teases open-world twist for the next Zelda


Directed by M. Night
Oct 23
// Jed Whitaker
Speaking to IGN, Eiji Aonuma revealed he has a twist planned for the upcoming Zelda title for Wii U, based on feedback received from Skyward Sword. "We actually had some feedback from Skyward Sword, where people were say...
Zelda photo
Zelda

Zelda: Tri Force Heroes is in the same timeline as A Link Between Worlds


Whoa
Oct 23
// Chris Carter
Well, this is interesting. Fans asked Nintendo repeatedly where Tri Force Heroes falls on the Zelda timeline, and the developers actually had an answer for them. Taking to Twitter, the official Nintendo account note...
Zelda easy bake oven photo
Zelda easy bake oven

The Legend of Zelda Maker is a real (unofficial) thing


You can download it now for free
Oct 22
// Jed Whitaker
People have been hoping that the success of Super Mario Maker leads to more "Maker" titles for other Nintendo franchises. Well good news for Zelda fans: your wait is over, sort of. A fan-created The Legend of Zelda...

Review: The Legend of Zelda: Tri Force Heroes

Oct 21 // Chris Carter
The Legend of Zelda: Tri Force Heroes (3DS)Developer: Nintendo EPD, GrezzoPublisher: NintendoMSRP: $39.99Released: October 23, 2015 This time around, Tri Force takes place in the kingdom of Hytopia, bordering the desolate Drablands, home of an evil witch. Said witch is jealous of the princess' beauty, so she casts a spell on her to hide it forever, with a skin-tight suit that won't come off. Only chosen heroes can enter the Drablands and break the curse, which is obviously where you come in. It's not the most original setup, but I like it. The new setting and cast of characters (including the depressed king) help make Tri Force more interesting. Although the general setup of the game involves level-based dungeon crawling for loot, there is a hub world, and bits of story woven in along the way. The town hosts a costume shop (more on that later), a daily chest-picking minigame, a Miiverse gallery, and a few extra NPCs to talk to as well as several secrets. It will only take you a few minutes to trod through, but it has enough character to get by. Link (or more appropriately, the "hero") has a few abilities at his disposal right away -- dashing, swordplay, and picking up items. The rest will have to be acquired by way of dungeon items (such as traditional arrows and bombs) or costumes. The latter will grant you special abilities, mostly in the form of boosting items or powers, and can be crafted at the aforementioned shop. It's important to note that this is the basis for the entire game, which is provided in a Skinner box fashion similar to MMOs or other dungeon crawlers. The multiplayer element adds new mechanics entirely, most notably the "totem" system. Here, you'll be able to pick up one or two Links (or in turn, get picked up), which will allow players to access greater heights, or slash their sword and use items at the top. Often times you'll have to create a stack of just two Links while the other player hits a switch, and so on, leading to some interesting puzzles that have the mark of a classic Zelda game, with the obvious Tri Force teamwork twist. [embed]315403:60732:0[/embed] Your loop will consist of entering dungeons, besting them, and then choosing from a selection of chests at the end. You'll be granted materials, which can be pieced together to create new costumes, and thus, a new strategy with which to approach each level. You can of course "beat the game" straight through and not experiment, but the spirit of Tri Force is decidedly Diablo-like in nature, leading players to return to levels constantly -- if you dislike that type of gameplay, I'm warning you now. Strangely, the online component is very advanced for a Nintendo game. Online play is available with full matchmaking capabilities, as well as friend-specific lobbies, and a robust offline component that allows for download play. Hell, there's even a blacklist function so you can block people online who ruin games. There's no voice chat of course, but the emote system and intuitive nature of the dungeons don't require it in the slightest. In fact I actually prefer some of the cuter emotes, like the cheerleader dance that gets progressively larger on-screen the faster you tap it. I had the chance to play online numerous times with strangers, and it was a pleasurable experience to say the least. The game often allows players to shine individually, but divvies out unique items to everyone, forcing all members to work in tandem. For instance, one game I was the only person with a bow, so I had to hit far away switches and enemies while my teammates carried me to the appropriate height. Meanwhile, they had to clear blocks with bombs so I could reach those switches and back them up with my sword. It was a rush, and that feeling didn't really let up through the entire campaign as I played through it with teammates. Bosses are even more fun, as they provide for an array of different strategies that involve anything from splitting up to working as a totemic unit. Each zone mixes up the theme and new mechanics just enough to keep you interested, especially if you're learning all of these concepts for the very first time with two other people. Plus, it feels good to save the day with a new costume you just picked up earlier that afternoon. Solo play however isn't nearly as fun. Whereas Four Swords and Four Swords Adventures had plenty of concessions for those who decided to play by themselves, Tri Force Heroes is the exact opposite. Here, you'll have to deal with "Doppels," which are copies of your character -- they emulate the other two players. To transfer your essence into another Doppel, you'll have to tap their portrait on the touch screen. It's not only a pain to have to do this manually without a button shortcut, but it essentially amounts to doing each level three times over as you'll have to get to a location, select another Doppel, and repeat. Very early on you'll learn that picking up Doppels in a totem formation and moving as a group is a way to go, but puzzles are often so complex that you need to break up frequently, and thus, control the Doppels individually again. It's puzzling why Nintendo didn't create a new campaign just for single-player folk. I mean, to play by yourself you have to enter a completely different room in the castle, so it already had the groundwork to be its own game type. I would outright suggest that you avoid Tri Force Heroes if you plan on going at it alone. The good news is that the online portion works wonderfully, and with download play, you can get a local three-person game running up in no time. If you don't fit that criteria though, you can probably pass on Link's newest adventure. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Zelda review photo
It's dangerous to go alone
People often say Zelda never innovates, but I'd argue that they haven't been paying attention to the many unique games in the series. Titles like Minish Cap feel completely different while maintaining the class...


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