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TT Games

LEGO Marvel photo
LEGO Marvel

LEGO Marvel's Avengers pushed back to January 2016

Block quotes
Aug 05
// Steven Hansen
LEGO Marvel's Avengers will miss its fall 2015 release and instead come to North America on January 26 and Europe on January 29. Some real missed holiday sales opportunity there, looks like, especially with it coming to every...

Review: LEGO Jurassic World

Jun 26 // Ben Davis
LEGO Jurassic World (PS4 [reviewed], PS3, PS Vita, Xbox One, Xbox 360, Wii U, 3DS, PC)Developer: Traveller's TalesPublisher: Warner Bros.MSRP: $59.99Released: June 12, 2015 As a huge Jurassic Park fan, LEGO Jurassic World is pretty much exactly what I expected from a dinosaur game themed around children's toys. There is no shortage of humor, plenty of satisfying references to the movies and books, playable dinosaurs, and I get to run around as Ian Malcolm with his shirt torn open. What more could I ask for? LEGO Jurassic World's story is built around the plots of the movies, but while the movies can be tense and thrilling, the game remains silly and lighthearted. Death scenes from the films are played out in a comedic fashion. The LEGO characters are never actually killed; instead, they usually end up sharing a goofy moment with the dinosaur that attacks them. For example, Gennaro can be seen cleaning the T. Rex's teeth with a toilet brush after being pulled from his restroom hiding place, and the raptor tamer who dies in the very first scene of Jurassic Park only loses the precious sausage he was holding onto rather than his legs (there's a weird recurring sausage joke for some reason, which I can't say I really understood). Meanwhile, other parts feature raptors riding motorcycles, wearing fruit hats, and chasing lawn mowers through the long grass, so the dinos are generally more charming than they are terrifying. Of course, for a LEGO game, this was kind of a necessity. [embed]294839:59241:0[/embed] Gameplay is heavily puzzle-based, requiring obstacles to be solved by choosing the specific character required for the task. Most of these obstacles are accompanied by button prompts, and there are numerous quick time events scattered throughout as well. There is also some light combat, whenever the party is attacked by dinosaurs or InGen employees, but it involves little more than punching things until they get dizzy or fall apart. Characters do have health bars, but the only penalty for dying is losing a few studs, so it's not really a big deal. The health bars honestly feel wholly unnecessary, as there aren't any lives and characters already essentially feel invincible. They could have probably scrapped that mechanic entirely. It's possible to play as nearly every character from the Jurassic Park films, even minor characters such as Mr. DNA and that weird boy at the dig site who says raptors look like giant turkeys. Each character has their own unique skills which typically play off of their personalities and roles in the films, all of which will need to be utilized in order to traverse each level. Some characters, like Dr. Grant and Gray Mitchell, are good at building things out of dinosaur bones; characters like Lex Murphy and Kelly Malcolm can scream loud enough to shatter glass; characters like Tim Murphy and Ian Malcolm have items that can illuminate dark areas (night vision goggles and flares, for example); and others like Ellie Sattler and Owen Grady aren't afraid to get dirty and rummage through dino droppings (by diving in head first, no less!). It's necessary to play as many different characters in order to clear all of the puzzles and obstacles in the game. Of course, there's not only human characters, but dinosaurs to control as well. Most dinosaurs are unlocked by collecting amber bricks hidden in every level. They can be summoned via dinosaur creation pads, and sick dinosaurs can be healed in order to join the party as well. The dinosaurs come with their own sets of skills; Triceratops can charge and bash open large objects, Dilophosaurus can melt certain things with its venom, T. Rex can roar loud enough to shatter stuff, and Velociraptors can pull switches and sniff out hidden objects. The craziest option is the enormous Brachiosaurus, which can be used to crush certain platforms with a huge stomp, but it's so gigantic and slow that it's almost hilarious. It's even possible to play as Pteranodons and Mosasaurus, although they're restricted to the aviary and aquarium, respectively. Story mode will take the player through twenty levels centered around many of the most memorable and action-packed scenes from the movies. It's really fun to reenact classic scenes like the very first T. Rex attack, the raptors in the kitchen, the San Diego crisis, and more through the playful lens of the LEGO world. Every level is filled with puzzles to solve, obstacles to overcome, and a set amount of collectibles to find. Many levels implement chase sequences, such as running from the Gallimimus herd, or puzzle-based boss fights, like taking down Indominus Rex. There's nothing too complicated, though, so it should be an easy ride for most players. Upon completing each level in story mode, free play mode will be unlocked, allowing players to choose any character they want and switch to someone else at any time. Many of the collectibles can only be obtained in free play, since the characters in story mode might not have the required abilities, so it's necessary to play each level at least two times in order to find everything. Outside of story mode, players can also freely explore each of the four parks. The parks contain more collectibles to find, sick dinosaurs and workers in peril to help, characters to unlock, photograph locations, races, and more. The parks on Isla Sorna are unfortunately rather small and unexciting, but Isla Nublar's Jurassic Park and Jurassic World are both huge and full of all sorts of attractions and cool areas to discover. Strangely, though, once story mode is completed, free play in the parks takes place entirely during nighttime, which kind of bothered me as some areas just seem much less exciting in the dark. I'd prefer to view these beautiful parks in the bright sunshine. [Edit: Apparently, this can be changed, but only by fast travelling to specially marked areas on the map. Still an odd choice, but at least there are options!] Split-screen co-op is also an option, and players can jump in and out of the game at any time. Co-op can make solving puzzles and overcoming obstacles much easier, as players will not need to switch between characters as often and multiple tasks can be completed at once. For such a light-hearted adventure as LEGO Jurassic World, I can definitely see co-op being a popular option. The best aspect of LEGO Jurassic World for me was all the little nuances and nods to the films which were sprinkled throughout. Idle animations for characters usually highlighted certain aspects of their personalities or referenced specific moments from the movies. For example, Zach Mitchell will put on his headphones and start dancing, Amanda Kirby will test her megaphone (put that thing away!), and Ian Malcolm will run a Chaos Theory experiment by dripping water onto his hand. Many of the trophies also make great references to the movies; I think my favorite is the "Hello John!" trophy which is awarded for having both characters set to John Hammond. I also loved that Mr. DNA was in charge of all the tutorials and loading screen trivia. Aside from borrowing plot, characters, and locations from the movies, LEGO Jurassic World also borrows sound clips. While some new dialogue was recorded specifically for the game (mostly for the Jurassic World section), a lot of the dialogue is taken directly from the films. This can be entertaining at times (hearing Jeff Goldblum's ridiculous laugh on the helicopter never gets old, even when it's coming out of a LEGO character's mouth), but it can also be quite jarring. Since the tone of the movies does not match the tone of the game, the dialogue is often way too tense and emotional for what should be silly, light-hearted scenes. There are also many instances where background noise from the films can be heard in the game's dialogue, which sounds really strange when compared to the newly recorded dialogue. Unfortunately, LEGO Jurassic World is not without its fair share of bugs. During my time with the game, there were several instances where I had to restart a level after a character got stuck between a wall and an object and couldn't move or jump to escape, or after they fell through the ground when I switched away from them. There were also a few instances where, after spawning a dinosaur and taking control of it, I could no longer switch to any other character and was permanently stuck in my dinosaur body. Usually, this meant I lost all progress on that level up to the point where I got stuck, so that was always a bummer. While it may have its flaws, I was still perfectly satisfied with my time in LEGO Jurassic World. Fans of the LEGO games should basically know what to expect, and Jurassic Park fans should be more than happy with the story, cutscenes, characters, and references. It captured all of my favorite Jurassic Park moments and added its own unique sense of humor into the mix, and that's essentially all I really wanted. And if you still need a reason to play this, just remember that is has LEGO Jeff Goldblum. Let's be honest: that's all anyone really needs. [This review is based on a retail build of the game purchased by the reviewer.]
LEGO Jurassic World photo
Hold on to your butts
Another year, another beloved franchise gets the LEGO treatment. This year, blocks and dinosaurs come together in LEGO Jurassic World, a compilation of games spanning the entire Jurassic Park film franchise. Released simultan...

LEGO Avengers photo
LEGO Avengers

Hulk takes a selfie in this LEGO Avengers trailer

Okay, that was great
Jun 09
// Jordan Devore
With LEGO Jurassic World on my mind, I had forgotten that TT Games also has LEGO Marvel's Avengers lined up for this year. It's not releasing until winter, but here's a trailer ahead of E3. Save for a split-second shot of Ul...
LEGO Worlds photo
LEGO Worlds

LEGO's answer to Minecraft is here

(On, ugh, Steam Early Access)
Jun 01
// Jordan Devore
Warner Bros. and TT Games have launched LEGO Worlds -- an open-ended building game with procedurally-generated worlds, rideable creatures, and vehicles -- on Steam Early Access today for $14.99. It's expected to remain there ...

LEGO Jurassic World photo
LEGO Jurassic World

Confirmed! You can play as dinosaurs in LEGO Jurassic World

Feb 04
// Jordan Devore
"Imagine playing as the ominous LEGO T. rex, roaming the grounds of Isla Nublar, smashing LEGO bricks and battling with other dinosaurs -- this game is bound to bring out the kid in all of us," says TT Games managing direc...
LEGO frenzy photo
LEGO frenzy

2015's LEGO game lineup: Avengers, Jurassic World, mobile ports

If it's anything like Marvel Super Heroes, I'm in
Jan 29
// Jordan Devore
This latest round of LEGO games will do wonders for Brett's Gamerscore. Several titles are releasing in 2015, including LEGO Jurassic World, which hits in June and spans all four films, and LEGO Marvel's Avengers, which is ou...

Review: Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham

Jan 05 // Caitlin Cooke
Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham (Xbox 360, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 [reviewed], PlayStation Vita, Wii U, 3DS, PC, iOS)Developer: Traveller's TalesPublisher: Warner Bros. Interactive EntertainmentReleased: November 11, 2014MSRP: $59.99 Lego Batman 3 opens to a familiar plot line: Lex Luthor has his heart set on becoming President of the World, dragging other villains along with him in his quest. The Justice League scrambles to meet them head-to-head, but not before Brainiac steps in to shrink Earth for his marble collection. The game's cast of heroes and villains reluctantly join forces to defeat him in a variety of settings, including shrunken versions of the Earth’s most famous cities and the Lantern worlds. The traditional Lego game formula is present as usual in this edition. Players waltz through a fairly linear level and solve puzzles to move forward while searching for studs and minikits to unlock content. Characters also rotate in and out of levels, ensuring that players don’t get caught in a routine. This mixes things up a bit and keeps the gameplay engaging, especially since most of the main characters have different abilities to explore (ie, Wonder Woman using her bands to deflect lasers or Martian Manhunter shapeshifting). A few main characters can change into various suits on a whim, presenting new gameplay options. Batman can change into his Space Suit to jetpack around and shoot laser beams, or he can squeeze into a Sonar Suit to become invisible. The suits bring a unique and enjoyable element to the gameplay, but leave little room for players to progress through levels on their own. The game telegraphs these necessary wardrobe changes with notifies an icon, prompting the necessary suit to procure. As is typical of the Lego series, there's plenty of content to explore, including over 150 characters to unlock. Beyond Gotham excels with its extras. Most notable are its mini-games, which include Tron-like “hacking” requiring maze navigation around computerized obstacles, and a side-scrolling space shooter reminiscent of Resogun. These distractions were my favorite part of Lego Batman 3, providing a much-needed reprieve from the monotony found within the primary campaign. The levels themselves seemed more open than usual, expanding in scope and size as the game progressed. Although interesting to explore, at times I’d get stuck on cliffs or hang helplessly in midair. Some of the later levels were hampered by wonky camera angles and viewing perspectives, which proved difficult when playing split-screen. At one point, I had to force my second player out of the game so that we could expand the screen to trigger an event. From a two-player perspective, this caused a lot of frustration and only seemed to get worse later in the game. It was also disappointing that the Beyond Gotham didn't showcase an open Gotham world like in its previous installment. At first, the extra content is split up into various hubs: the Batcave, the Watchtower, and the Hall of Justice. After a steep investment in playing through the main plot (around eight hours), Lantern worlds can be unlocked. Each world contains racing trials, quests to unlock characters, and unlockable vehicles to fly around. In a lot of ways, it felt like a step backwards to have a hub-based system, especially when most of it opened up at the end of the game. As noted earlier, anyone looking for a Batman adventure you won’t find one here. Screen-time amongst the characters is divided up fairly well, leaving Batman and Robin in the dust. When they do make an appearance, they’re more focused on bickering back and forth like an old couple than saving the world. Despite this oddity, the dialogue is as crafty and well-written as Lego titles come. Practically all characters have a delightful personality-filled moment with plenty of references thrown about. Particularly amusing was Lego Batman 3's take on Mr Freeze -- full of puns and a intentionally terrible Arnold Schwarzenegger accent. You could say it was ICE to see him. Comic book fans will enjoy the assets used in this game, especially with regard to music. For example, Superman and Wonder Woman's original songs play on loop when they take flight and don’t cease until they land. Every character also (hilariously) sings their own rendition of the 1960s Batman theme song when players rest on the character selection screen. Voice acting is top notch and talent is pulled from Kevin Smith and Conan O’Brien, who play themselves. The latter tends to be a bit annoying after a while, acting as your tutorial guide and spewing out the same information every time you cross paths. Lego Batman 3 is as fun as Lego games come, but it needs to be taken with a dose (or two) of patience. The controls and camera angles are unforgivable at times, but there’s usually a moment of greatness to numb the pain -- like when Robin deploys a mini version of himself in his Techno suit, or when Wonder Woman’s 1970s TV show theme blasts when she takes flight. Fans of the Justice League (or DC comics in general) will get a lot of enjoyment out of this game, but I wouldn’t recommend playing if you’re looking for a Batman adventure. There’s simply too much fun to be had in the DC universe to give it all to one man. As far as Lego games go, it’s not perfect, but it delivers a solid story and a plethora of DC characters to play around with, which is more than ICE can ask for. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Lego Batman 3 review photo
Brainiac's mini-games
Don’t let the name fool you -- this is by no means a Batman game. The Dark Knight may grace the box, but underneath its bat-enameled shell lies a Justice League game at heart. A menagerie of DC heroes and villains combi...

GameStop photo

GameStop Expo 2014 is helping to celebrate Batman's 75th anniversary

Batman still going strong even after all these years
Aug 18
// Brittany Vincent
GameStop is celebrating Batman's 75th year with several events at GameStop Expo 2014. Players can get hands-on early access to LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham by TT Games, for one, and Arkham Knight fans will be able to see and ...
LEGO photo

Bat-Cow is an udder delight in LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham

Blame / praise Hamza for that headline
Jul 25
// Jordan Devore
Now here's a game that really does feel right at home at Comic-Con. TT Games has a new trailer for LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham prepared for the San Diego convention and, better yet, images featuring LEGO Bat-Cow, Batman of ...

Review: LEGO The Hobbit

Apr 27 // Ian Bonds
LEGO The Hobbit (3DS, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PSVita, Xbox 360 [reviewed], Xbox One, WiiU)Developer: TT GamesPublisher: Warner Brothers InteractiveRelease Date: April 8, 2014MSRPP: $29.99 (3DS, Vita), $49.99 (PS3, Xbox 360, WiiU), $59.99 (PS4, Xbox One) The long and short of it is, LEGO The Hobbit only encompasses An Unexpected Journey and The Desolation of Smaug. Apparently, we'll be seeing the final section of the game once the final film is released (though most folk know how the story goes, as I'm sure, like me, you had to read it in grade school). That said, what is found within this game is more hit or miss than previous LEGO titles. You still have your typical romp around the levels, bashing enemies and smashing objects for LEGO studs, a whimsical version of the films recreated with the mini-figures (with voicework directly from the original films, just as in LEGO The Lord of The Rings), and the level design and plot mirror the source material almost to a fault from a pacing standpoint. However this time through, the levels are a bit uneven. There's almost too many things to smash, and not enough enemies to fight. Because of this, some levels can seem short, while still other can drag on far longer than they should. When smashing open items, you can now gather LEGO pieces, or mine them from items via a mini game, which you can save to use to build things later -- which begs the question, why hasn't this been included before now? [embed]273599:53591:0[/embed] Most noticeable, however, is the lack of character diversity. While LEGO The Lord of The Rings had a wide range of characters, each with their own unique abilities, LEGO The Hobbit seems a bit more limited as far as choice, and sadly, this appears to be partially due to the source. The numerous different dwarves are all comical and the film. Here in the game, it's really hard to tell one from the other and despite the game's new addition of listing a character's attributes or abilities on the menu screen, there's not a lot to differentiate one from another. Still, there is a good bit to like about the game as well. If you've enjoyed the many other LEGO adaptations, this one is not without it's charm. The characters and backgrounds match the films well, and the game follows the story of the movies very closely, down to the questionable bonus material padding. Though again, being a bit limited by the original voicework may not allow for the normal LEGO slaptick-type humor, and a few scenes of real tension and whimsy from the films seem to fall a bit flat. Of course, as stated before, the biggest disappointment is that the game isn't actually complete. It's a pretty safe bet that the final section of the game (now called "The Battle of the Five Armies") will be offered via downloadable content, but considering the game itself is being sold at full price without it (especially on the next-gen consoles), I'm wondering if they'll be offering it for free or not. I certainly hope so, as charging for an entire films worth of bonus content would be the most substantial -- and potentially pricey -- LEGO DLC of all. When it comes right down to it, LEGO The Hobbit isn't a terrible game, but it's isn't a terribly good one either. The LEGO formula may be finally getting a bit stagnant, and the new additions, while cool, may be too little, too late. If the final section had been included at retail, I'm not sure my opinion would have swayed much more in either direction, but it certainly is noticeable in it's omission.
LEGO The Hobbit photo
A middle ground Middle Earth
Another month, another LEGO game. These things are starting to be more frequently released than yearly Call of Duty games. And with that frequency comes some caveats, such as this month's title only including the two Hobbit films that have been released thus far. Does that put a damper on the entertainment value found within? Only time -- or reading on -- will tell.

LEGO photo

LEGO The Hobbit sure looks familiar

And that's probably okay
Dec 16
// Jordan Devore
This trailer for LEGO The Hobbit checks all of the usual boxes for these titles. Coming off of LEGO The Lord of the Rings and its rather neat open-ended world, I'm curious to see how this new game will differ. The silliness ...
LEGO photo

This sure does look like a LEGO The Hobbit game

Are ready to revisit Middle-earth?
Nov 22
// Jordan Devore
Over on the Brickset forums, a teaser page for a LEGO The Hobbit game has been found in the instruction booklets for the upcoming LEGO sets based on The Desolation of Smaug. Warner Bros. hasn't announced this yet, but the ad ...
LEGO photo

LEGO Marvel Super Heroes will make Xbox One launch

Good for them
Nov 15
// Jordan Devore
Just days after word got out that LEGO Marvel Super Heroes wouldn't be ready in time for the North American Xbox One launch on November 22, Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment has come back with news that it will, after al...
LEGO Marvel Xbone delay photo
LEGO Marvel Xbone delay

LEGO Marvel won't make its way to Xbox One launch lineup

Still making its way to PS4 this week
Nov 13
// Brett Zeidler
[Update: Warner Bros. notified Destructoid that LEGO Marvel Super Heroes will in fact be an Xbox One launch title. It's going to release in North America on Nov. 22 as originally planned.] In a statement provided to MCV, Warn...

Review: LEGO Marvel Super Heroes

Nov 06 // Brett Zeidler
LEGO Marvel Super Heroes (Xbox 360 [reviewed], Xbox One, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Wii U, 3DS, PC)Developer: Traveller's TalesPublisher: Warner Bros. Interactive EntertainmentReleased: October 22, 2013MSRP: $49.99 The game begins innocently enough, with Silver Surfer being knocked out of the sky, bringing down with him a handful of "Cosmic Bricks." Dr. Doom, enlisting the help of Loki and Magneto, seeks these out to create his, well, Doom Ray...of Doom. So, of course it's up to the heroes of the Marvel universe to put an end to these shenanigans. That's about as far as the narrative goes, really. Not to say this is a bad thing; the story is fine and it does exactly what it needs to: set up the locales and scenarios for the game itself to shine. Players will be taken to the breathtaking Asgard, Savage Land, space, and everywhere in between from various Marvel settings. In fact, no two levels could remotely be described as similar. Canonically, the title takes place almost directly after the events of The Avengers, the events of the film being directly referenced numerous times. More than that, the characters' solo film outtings are also brought up throughout. For example, the Clean Slate Protocol from Iron Man 3 is reused at one point early on to make one of the more lackluster boss battles one of the most memorable, and the shawarma gag is brought up periodically to arguable comedic effect. Of course, all these references would fall flat without the proper delivery, and its in delivery Traveller's Tales are masters of their domain.  Characters are perfectly animated, causing them to look and act exactly as expected. The cutscenes are effectively silly, and have that same Traveller's Tales charm one has come to expect over the years. Just as more recent entries, the entire cast is fully voiced and (for the most part) handled really well. More notably, Clark Gregg, Nolan North, and Stan Lee reprise their well-known roles as S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Phil Coulson, Deadpool, and himself, respectively. Not much more needs to be said about that. The formula for a LEGO game breaks down as follows: play through a level with a set cast of characters, unlock free play for that level, and replay it later with an entire roster of playable characters at one's disposal to reach brand new areas that unlock secrets. Every action is driven by a constant positive-reinforcement structure. Each character has an ability button, a melee button, and (if able) a fly button. The ability button allows Spider-Man to shoot his web, Hulk to smash, and so on. Players will constantly destroy, build, and move LEGOs to collect, interact, and influence the world, just as before. Local co-op is still the only option that's offered, sadly. From a gameplay perspective, these abilities boil down to either a projectile, environmental interaction, or passive ability. But just like LEGOs, it's how these small, simple pieces are built on top of each other in the characters themselves, and how they're mixed in matched in all the game's puzzles, that makes them consistently interesting. Nothing is presented that hasn't been experienced before, but the LEGO titles avoid feeling stale thanks to every title having an entirely new universe to work with that creates a fresh coat of paint and doesn't necessitate the underlying basic structure needing to change. This point is especially true with Marvel Super Heroes. Between story missions, New York City acts as the hub where the player can explore, complete quick side missions provided by civilians, bigger side-missions involving various villains (presented by Deadpool himself), fill out the roster of over 100 characters, unlock new vehicles, or simply just wreak havoc if they so choose. The city feels quite alive (literally, in the case of The Statue of Liberty), and truly larger and more detailed than one would expect it to be. There's something to be said about playing as Iron Man and ripping through the city streets at hyper speed, or skydiving as any character from the S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarrier miles above the city and landing exactly where all the action is in a matter of seconds. It is possible to play the entirety of the story without spending more than ten minutes in the city, but to do so would be missing out on an entire other half (arguably even more than half) of the package. The story can be completed somewhere in the neighborhood of seven to 10 hours, but to truly complete the game would take someone what I estimate to be 30 - 40 hours. LEGO Marvel is not without its annoyances, and they're annoyances that have been a problem in the franchise from the start. Firstly, the hint system is context sensitive and also not context sensitive. It's never consistent. The confusing nature wouldn't be highlighted so much if it weren't for the fact that the text flashes and covers the entirety of the lower third of the screen. This doesn't happen once or twice a mission,  but rather every couple of minutes throughout the entire game. The same hint telling the player that they need a web-slinging character to interact with a certain piece -- despite doing this probably a hundred times before -- will appear just as frequently on the final mission as it did on the first. Other times hints will just pop up seemingly for no reason at all other than just because. There's no reason for the player to not have the option to turn this off at this point in the franchise's life. Another problem stems from the ability button and context-sensitive switch button both being mapped to the same button. Some characters that have a long ability animation such as Black Widow (who turns invisible), become really annoying to use when trying to pull a switch but instead not being close enough and accidentally using her ability. It's a really trivial issue that is more sparingly annoying, but with every button on the controller not being mapped it seems easily fixable and something that shouldn't have been an issue in the first place, yet continues to be one. I enjoyed myself immensely during my playthrough despite these slight problems, both as a huge comic book fan and from the nostalgia-fueled bliss that comes from the presence of LEGOs. Continually seeing that personal favorites of mine like Guardians of the Galaxy, Daredevil, and Deadpool (specifically how he reoccurs throughout the game's story) or hand-picked obscure characters like Howard the Duck and Squirrel Girl were playable inspired me to play more (and continue to) in the end-game just to discover who I could unlock next. If one has a Marvel character in mind, they probably make an appearance here. The game is definitely rooted in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but there's more subtle references to the comics, especially with the entire catalog of material and history Traveller's Tales had the opportunity to use. My favorite example has to be at one point early in the game, where a billboard that features an alternate LEGO rendition of Superior Spider-Man #1's cover appears. Eventually, the player has to use Spider-Man to pull down this wall to a crumbling fall, and I couldn't help but laugh as it can't be anything other than a blatant, harsh jab at the events surrounding that character that took place earlier this year. These types of moments only appeal to a small percentage of players, but it adds all the more personality to an already jam-packed game full of every kind of Marvel fan-service. LEGO Marvel Super Heroes is the Avengers game we've always wanted, and maybe even more than that -- the Marvel game we've always wanted, and I say that well-aware of the fact that Marvel: Ultimate Alliance and Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 are out there. Sure, it's in LEGO form, but whether you're a casual super hero fan or take a trip to the local comic book store every Wednesday, there's no question there's something for everyone here.
LEGO Marvel Review photo
Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Batman (later the entirety of DC), Pirates of the Caribbean, Harry Potter, and The Lord of the Rings -- arguably a majority of the world's largest entertainmen...


Stan Lee is a playable character in LEGO Marvel Heroes

Because of course he is
Sep 05
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
You knew Stan Lee was going to make an appearance in LEGO Marvel Super Heroes. But did you know he was going to be a complete badass? Stan Lee can Hulk out, swing around like Spider-Man, use a laser blast like Cyclops -- He has ALL the powers. He's basically like Rogue, or I don't know, Amazo from the DC Universe if you want to cross comic streams.

LEGO Marvel Super Heroes also coming to Xbox One and PS4

The villains finally get shown off
Aug 21
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Finally, after all this time, we get to see the villains of LEGO Marvel Super Heroes. Magneto, Dr. Doom, Venom, Dr. Octopus, Loki, Green Goblin, and even Galactus himself will all be featured in the game. We get to see some ...
LEGO photo

The LEGO Movie Videogame announced for everything

Of course that's what they're calling it
Jul 16
// Jordan Devore
In today's universe-imploding news, TT Games is working on a new LEGO title based on the upcoming The LEGO Movie which, if you haven't seen the trailer, essentially looks like a big-screen adaptation of the studio's games. Th...

LEGO Marvel Super Heroes is a ton of fun

Jun 06
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
I am so jealous of kids growing up this day and age. They have the coolest videogame consoles, the Internet, iPads, and now LEGO Marvel Super Heroes. Combining Marvel, one of the hottest movie proprieties right now (and not t...
NPD April 2013 photo
NPD April 2013

NPD: Injustice and Dead Island lead sales in April

Total sales down 25% YOY
May 18
// Tony Ponce
[DC zombie sculpts by Casey Love Designs] The NPD Group released US sales data for April 2013 two days ago, but a complete lack of enthusiasm on the part of the Destructoid staff has delayed our posting it. Not our fault! Loo...
LEGO Marvel Super Heroes photo
LEGO Marvel Super Heroes

Galactus is coming for you in LEGO Marvel Super Heroes

Also pre-order bonuses
May 01
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The next game to get the LEGO treatment is Marvel, and this new teaser trailer for LEGO Marvel Super Heroes shows off some of the 100 characters you'll be playing with. The teaser also ends with Galactus's giant shadowing ec...

Preview: First look at LEGO Marvel Super Heroes

Apr 04 // Abel Girmay
LEGO Marvel Super Heroes (Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PC, Wii U, 3DS, PlayStation Vita, DS)Developer: TT GamesPublisher: Warner Bros. Interactive EntertainmentRelease: Fall 2013 The story of LEGO Marvel straddles a similar line to LEGO Batman 2; a comic book-style story with a liberal helping LEGO silliness. Like the recent LEGO City: Undercover, the story here is fully voiced. Speaking with TT Games producer Phil Ring, he said the team "wanted everything to feel alive, and more than what we had in LEGO Batman 2 where characters only spoke in cutscenes. We wanted bosses shouting at you and characters talking with each other, so we're recording a lot more audio for this game." Having a fully-voiced story also affords more opportunities for humor, outside of the physical comedy gags that are common to the series. It works to good effect, too -- the banter between the less than sharp Hulk and the always-on sarcasm of Iron Man played like a Saturday morning cartoon. Less-referenced Marvel entities will be making appearances as well. At the end of the demo, when Iron Man and Hulk help Nick Fury (modeled after the recent Ultimate/Sam Jackson version) take Sandman into custody, you could spot three day workers with Damage Control marked across their uniforms. Ring continued: "If you're a Marvel fan, there's plenty of small references like this you'll get, and if not, then what the hell, it's just three clean up guys in uniform." The script itself will see stewardship by Marvel writer Matt Hoffmeier, so there should be no shortage of Marvel cameos, references, and the like. The moment-to-moment gameplay of LEGO Marvel looks very much like a traditional game from TT. You'll run around the environment, smashing pieces and reconstructing them into new objects to move forward. That said, you do get a host of heroes and abilities to play around with. Full disclosure, our presentation was hands off, so I can't say how well the powers feel, but the combat didn't look particularly amazing. Really, it's those classic problem-solving moments that make better use of the hero license. Going up against Sandman, Iron Man and Hulk need to come up with a way to get past his giant sand wall. Hulk's brute strength won't work and neither will blasters. With a little searching, we get Iron Man to blast a nearby fire hydrant and generator, then have Hulk revert to Bruce Banner to reconstruct the pieces into a giant water cannon to solidify the sand so Hulk can break through it. It's the way each of the characters, and their abilities, play off each other in these puzzle-esque scenarios that gave the LEGO games their charm, and that much looks well intact here. Though TT is staying hush hush on some details, there will be side activities to partake in outside of missions, such as explorable miniature hub area of New York. "There is a hub can go into new areas and explore including some places significant to the Marvel Universe and other like the Statue of Liberty, but it's all miniaturized of's very much a LEGO world," said Ring. Basically, if you've enjoyed LEGO titles in the past, you should be right at home here. There doesn't look to be crazy breaks in series tradition -- just refinements and augments. And if you're a Marvel fan, then I suppose that only sweetens the package.
Marvel Super Heroes photo
A more traditional LEGO experience
Just when you thought they were out of good licenses to adapt for LEGO videogames, they pull one back in. Among others, we've explored the adventures of Indiana Jones, the far away galaxy of Star Wars, and the hallowed halls ...

Review: LEGO City Undercover

Mar 11 // Jim Sterling
LEGO City Undercover (Wii U)Developer: TT GamesPublisher: NintendoReleased: March 18, 2013MSRP: $49.99 LEGO City Undercover takes place in an original open-sandbox world, marking the first big departure from previous LEGO games (though the groundwork was laid in LEGO Batman 2). As maverick cop Chaise McCain, players have free run of the titular LEGO City, a sprawling world of color and distraction, littered with pedestrians to laugh at, cars to commandeer, and collectibles to nab. It's a reasonably large playground, bustling with plenty of life and no small amount of personality. Taking some cues from the likes of Grand Theft Auto and L.A. Noire, McCain roams the city in his search for fugitive criminal Rex Fury, taking on missions and posing as a crook himself to infiltrate LEGO City's underworld and get closer to the target. Undercover's story is littered with silly humor, and even manages to crack a few jokes that made me laugh out loud. A supporting cast of lunatics and hammy villains, not to mention a variety of movie spoofs designed to fly right over the heads of younger players, make for a presentation guaranteed to at least raise a smirk or two.  Presentation is easily Undercover's strongest suite. Its got a great vocal cast, further confirming what a wise decision TT made when it stopped relying solely on visual gags, and an excellent soundtrack consisting of both licensed and original music. LEGO City itself is well designed, and littered with things to collect, building bricks to earn, and "Super Build" constructions upon which to spend them. The ten-hour campaign alone will unlock tons of vehicles and costumes, with hours and hours more on top of that to really keep one invested. The sandbox approach makes for a more dynamic and endearing environment, aided by the ability to jump from car to car, destroy scenery, and ride about on animals.   [embed]248582:47554:0[/embed] It is a bit of a shame, then, that much of LEGO City Undercover's freshness is to be found solely in this surface-level presentation. When it comes time to engage in the game's story mode and actually complete missions, things quickly fall back into the familiar format established in pretty much every other LEGO game. Early missions involve chases through the city and GamePad-infused detective work, but these unique additions largely give way to the same old structure of going from room to room to break things, build things, and complete rudimentary tasks masquerading as puzzles. It's not as if the gameplay is bad, but it's a lot more familiar than first impressions promise, as L.A. Noire-style pursuits and Assassin's Creed-flavored rooftop acrobatics diminish in importance to make way for yet another walled playground of simplistic brick-based hurdles. After a while, LEGO City Undercover is less a sandbox LEGO adventure, and more of an old-fashioned LEGO adventure interrupted by sandbox elements. This is a disappointment, but fortunately the classic framework is still robust enough to make for a consistently entertaining time.  True to its name, Undercover is all about using disguises to get ahead. Over the course of the campaign, Chase will unlock a variety of costumes with their own unique skills. As a robber, he can use a crowbar to open doors, as a farmer he can water potted plants to create climbable surfaces, and as a fireman he can break down barricaded doors with an axe. Quickly switching between these costumes is key to getting through most levels, and naturally each one can be replayed later once players have a full wardrobe, should they wish to reach previously inaccessible areas. It's all clearly signposted, simplistic, child-friendly stuff -- though nonetheless as cathartic and satisfying as all LEGO games tend to be. When it's not treading old ground, Undercover does genuinely please with its new ideas. Whether scaling buildings and performing free-running stunts using simple contextual button presses, tossing foes to the ground and slapping cuffs on them, or spying on unwitting criminals, players get to really have some fun out on the streets. The GamePad is used sparingly and wisely -- mostly to house the map, but occasionally called upon to scan the area for hidden items or secretive dialog. Performing these tasks is as easy as holding the controller up, moving it to the required position, and pressing a button to scan. Not exactly groundbreaking, but as pleasantly unobtrusive a mechanic as one can hope for. The game is at its best when McCain is simply cruising the streets between missions, looking for pigs to fire out of cannons, stunt ramps to ride off, or previously blocked areas that new costumes can access. The controls for driving are stiff enough to give it that "LEGO" feel while remaining elegant enough to stay fun in spite of the mild chaos. Undercover's emphasis on destroying the environment to maintain a score multiplier and earn more building bricks helps balance out any excessive stiffness in the controls -- even if you're in a car that's skidding out of control, you're likely to still be rewarded for it.  Controls are a little less pleasing during missions at times, with a few random and dodgy animations sometimes having Chase fall off ledges or miss platforms through no fault of the player. These instances aren't regular enough to ruin the experience, but do provide occasional irritants throughout. As with any LEGO game, animations are exuberant and physics are over the top -- certainly delightful from a stylistic angle, not always the best choice from a practical one.  A few technical limitations also hold the experience back. Some of the loading times between exterior and interior environments can be agitating in their length, and framerate dips are a common occurrence while navigating the city streets. The slow movement of manual camera controls -- with no option to tweak the sensitivity -- is also a frequent pain. As with every other downside to this game, none of it's a dealbreaker, it's just a bit of a letdown in an otherwise charming package.  For all its faults, charming is absolutely the word best describing LEGO City Undercover. While more could have been done to exploit the sandbox scenario, and while it sticks a bit too nervously to formula than it could have, Undercover is nonetheless a frequently pleasurable, occasionally hilarious little romp in a new LEGO world full of potential. Should TT Games get another chance to revisit this idea, I hope for -- and expect -- a lot more of an expansion on the concept, and a lot more focus on the fresh elements that provide Undercover's highest points. As for this first try, we have a pretty damn good effort that I'd love to see more of.  It is, as they say, a noble start -- the first brick, if you will, in what could become a most piquant creation.
LEGO City Undercover photo
Once around the block
TT Games has enjoyed years of success turning licensed properties into LEGO adventures. In many ways, it seems like quite an easy gig -- simply take an existing license, be it Batman or Lord of the Rings, and give it a makeov...

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