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Left 4 Dead photo
Left 4 Dead

Left 4 Dead survivors return for Zombie Army Trilogy


Typical Valve
Aug 20
// Jordan Devore
The survivors of the Left 4 Dead series are back for a cameo in Zombie Army Trilogy on PC. Folks who own Rebellion's Nazi zombie-shooting game can download a free update through Steam that adds Bill, Francis, L...

Review: RymdResa

Aug 20 // Conrad Zimmerman
RymdResa (Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: MorgondagPublisher: MorgondagRelease Date: August 20, 2015MSRP: $11.99 RymdResa tells a story of humanity seeking new life for itself in the cosmos, told in three parts. As the game begins, Earth has been destroyed by an asteroid and the player is an explorer roaming a seemingly limitless, procedurally generated universe in search of a planet to colonize and ensure mankind's survival. Successive chapters have the player collecting resources and undertaking a larger journey to a separate universe, each expanding the gameplay with different mechanics and challenges. Early on, the game is about survival and that survival feels very much at risk. This is when RymdResa is at its most entertaining. Launched into space with the only most basic of ships, the player must conserve and protect their resources while traveling to nine sectors or they will die, lost and forgotten. Resources, in this case, means fuel, which doesn't deplete over time of its own accord, only used when the ship's thrusters are employed. Other things you encounter in space do affect your resource count, however. Collisions, mines and attacks from passing ships to can cause a considerable loss, and that's likely to happen quite a bit due to some design aspects working together to make it very difficult to understand how fast your ship is moving and predict collisions. The empty space environment provides little visual context to give that information to the player and a narrow, never changing view distance from the ship makes it such that when objects appear on the screen, they are as likely to fly right into you before a reaction is even possible as creep into the frame. [embed]307050:60067:0[/embed] Frustrating as this is (and it truly is), it also does reinforce the fragility of the player's situation and forces them to take it slow, further dragging out the empty gaps and feeding into the game's overlying thematic tone of helpless melancholy. RymdResa is not subtle about what the game wants the player to feel. Cutscene narration preceding chapters and diary pods produced within them ooze nostalgic regret and longing, delivered by a distant, electronically distorted voice that sounds more like a morose robot than a human. This first chapter in which the player is at their weakest captures that spirit most effectively, but it fades with time and progress. Even the most disastrous attempt to complete a voyage is rewarded in some ways. Players earn skill points with experience levels that can improve the efficiency of resource collection, provide the ability to interact with more environmental objects and help ships to perform better, and these levels carry over across all missions once earned. Spacepoints are constantly being added and subtracted, acting as a form of currency that can be spent to launch voyages with the game's seven other ships, and items to outfit those ships are carried in a general inventory accessible at all times. With these systems, by the time the player makes it through the first chapter and on to the second, they're probably pretty far along in their experience development (which caps out at 40 levels). And, suddenly, the stakes are pretty much gone. A seemingly constant accumulation of items to customize ships begins to provide all manner of attribute bonuses (introducing a whole different problem of inventory maintenance within a system desperate for sorting tools and a constant need to sell off useless junk to make room), so that while you're never invincible, it sure can feel that way. It soon becomes the default to quit a voyage out of a sense of not having anything to do rather than because of a failure to accomplish something. Chapters after the first have objectives which can be approached in a non-linear fashion and incremental progress an ultimately unsuccessful mission accomplishes is retained, removing all sense of urgency. What happens in them isn't all that interesting either, as the player collects "materials" (like resources, but green and serving no function outside of the second chapter's main objective) and faces down inscrutable guardians in a series of two-choice dialogue events where it's rarely clear that there is a right or wrong answer, but you're punished for choosing the wrong one anyway. Vast as the explorable region of the game is, which uses a grid-based system of sectors to indicate player location (the number of which may well be limitless and impossible to chart due to procedural generation), there isn't much one can reliably do within all of that space. In some ways, exploration off the beaten path is thoroughly discouraged despite the many opportunities presented. Teleporters dotted seemingly at random will send you off to a far flung sector, but what's to do once you're there? Drift back through possibly many hundreds of sectors, the vast majority of which will have nothing in them or wander off in some other random direction and hope maybe you come across anything of interest that way. I never have, and it's clear that there's more to this game that I have not experienced. A collection of "Research Notes" is referenced with a menu and there's a whole mechanic designed around using them to craft... something. I've never found one and wouldn't know where to start looking for them. Some people are going to dig into this game, absorb its extremely passive gameplay and have a curiosity which leads them to discover these things that I have not. I'm sure of that. If ambiguity and self-directed discovery are aspects of games you appreciate when they exist, and can handle one where you'll spend most of your time not doing anything, you're the audience RymdResa is looking for. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
RymdResa Review photo
The big empty
"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitchhiker's Guide ...

Team Fortress 2 update photo
Team Fortress 2 update

Team Fortress 2 gets the ball rolling with a new sports-themed game mode


Created by Bad Robot, of all companies
Aug 19
// Ben Davis
Ready for another off-the-wall Team Fortress 2 update? After the addition of bumper cars from last Halloween, it seems anything is possible with this game. Now the multiplayer shooter is getting another shot in the arm with a...
Heat Signature access photo
Heat Signature access

Gunpoint Exclusive Edition now grants access to Heat Signature


Tom Francis is a kind god
Aug 18
// Patrick Hancock
Tom Francis, creator of Gunpoint, is letting certain people alpha test his upcoming game, Heat Signature. Anyone who owns the "Exclusive Edition" of Gunpoint on Steam has access to the new game until August 30. While Mr....
Infinite nest photo
Infinite nest

Trippy widening gyre Circa Infinity dated for September 9


Woah
Aug 14
// Steven Hansen
I know what you're thinking: Circa Infinity is coming out September 9? Competing with Metal Gear Solid V, but coming up a week late? Seems like a tragic misstep. But perhaps not. Maybe a light, digestible game such as this is just what people need to cleanse their palates of The Phantom Pain's inscrutable weirdness.
Ty the Tasmanian Tiger photo
Ty the Tasmanian Tiger

Ty the Tasmanian Tiger 4 releasing on Steam September 18, first three games are also coming to PC


Well ain't that bonza, mate?
Aug 14
// Joe Parlock
Wow, Ty the Tasmanian Tiger is something I haven’t thought about in 10 years. I always thought it was a weird attempt to piggyback on the success Spyro and Crash Bandicoot had during the  generation before. Th...
Deals photo
Deals

Civ: Beyond Earth - Rising Tide pre-order deal shores up free Steam weekend


More to do in Civ: BE
Aug 13
// Dealzon
Update: GMG's deal dropped another $3 to account for the 10% off instant savings. Pre-orders for Civilization: Beyond Earth - Rising Tide (the first expansion) went live today, and you know what that means... deals coupl...
Deals photo
Deals

There's a big Devolver Digital sale on Steam


Hotline, Shadow Warrior, Talos Principle
Aug 13
// Jordan Devore
Devolver Digital has come a long way these past few years. The publisher is holding a weekend sale on Steam that covers Serious Sam and Hotline Miami, sure, but also a wide array of games including Titan Souls, Broforce, OlliOlli, Xeodrifter, and Hatoful Boyfriend. Movies, too. The discounts are up to 90 percent off and valid until Monday, August 17. Devolver Digital Publisher Weekend [Steam]
Half-off bread photo
Half-off bread

Team Fortress 2 also Am Bread, too


Free update and half-off sale
Aug 13
// Steven Hansen
By some cruel crust of fate, I still have not played I Am Bread, though all I would like to do is to go to bread. The game's rye sense of humor is on display here with a Team Fortress 2 level developed in conjunction with Valve and offered as a free update on Steam. The game's also half off in celebration ($6.50), if you have the dough.
Ark sale photo
Ark sale

Amazon has Ark: Survival Evolved cheaper than it has ever been


Even cheaper than that Steam sale
Aug 13
// Brett Makedonski
Anyone in the market for some more dinosaurs in their video games might be happy to know that Amazon has Ark: Survival Evolved discounted deeper than it has ever been before. The Early Access title has been on digital st...
Skyrim modding photo
Skyrim modding

Skyrim Script Extender is now on Steam, so you can easily fix Skyrim


Weird it's not on the Workshop though
Aug 13
// Joe Parlock
If you’ve done any level of Skyrim modding, you’ve probably come across Skyrim Script Extender. It’s an add-on which massively increases what mods can impact, and a lot of more intensive game-changing mods r...
Finger me daddy photo
Finger me daddy

Super Meat Boy's designer will let us get Fingered for cheap on August 18


New game on Steam for $1.87
Aug 12
// Jed Whitaker
Edmund McMillen, the designer of Super Meat Boy, has announced that his new game Fingered will release on Steam next Tuesday for $1.87, and it looks pretty awesome. The game was created in collaboration with James Id, t...
Terraria photo
Terraria

Terraria hits Mac and Linux at long last


PC save files are compatible
Aug 12
// Jordan Devore
Several years later, Terraria is still going strong. After a round of open beta testing, the Mac and Linux versions of the popular sandbox game have launched. If you're a Windows player, you won't need to pay for these new po...
Steamboy photo
Steamboy

Portable 'Steamboy' Steam machine coming late 2016


$300 pre-sale price
Aug 12
// Steven Hansen
Do you have $300 and less cents? Want to replace that Nvidia Shield that catches fire and is basically a big 'ol Ouya? The first batch of "Steam machines" -- computers with living room form factors meant to rival traditional ...
Humble Bundle photo
Humble Bundle

The Humble Namco Bundle bonus games are, uh, yeah


Star Trek and Beware Planet Earth!
Aug 11
// Jordan Devore
I said I'd hold off on the Humble Bandai Namco Bundle until the bonus games were announced, and that was for the best. The package now includes Digital Extremes' middling Star Trek and a tower defense game called Beware Planet Earth! for folks who pay more than the average. No thanks! If you don't own Pac-Man Championship Edition DX+, strongly consider chipping in for that.
Layers of Fear photo
Layers of Fear

Layers of Fear explores the horror of painting


Coming soon to PC
Aug 11
// Jordan Devore
Before watching this trailer for Layers of Fear, you should know that it's a horror game about a painter who has lost his sanity, and "each move of the camera can change your surroundings." There. Go watch it.
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Steam discounts Japanese indies for Comiket 88


Doujin deals abound
Aug 10
// Kyle MacGregor
Valve is always looking for an excuse to throw a sale, and this week Steam has deep discounts on Japanese indie games. The occasion? This summer's Comiket is taking place over the weekend. Comiket (Comic Market) is a biannual...
Stasis photo
Stasis

Stasis shows sci-fi horror from a different perspective


Isometric adventure game releasing soon
Aug 10
// Jordan Devore
More sci-fi horror games? Sign us up. This one, Stasis, was made possible thanks to crowdfunding. It's an isometric point-and-click adventure game with shades of Event Horizon (cue mental images of a sliced-up Sam Neill). Ahe...
The Phantom Pain photo
The Phantom Pain

Metal Gear Solid V 1080p PS4, 900p Xbox One and PC system requirements


4K Phantom Pain on PC
Aug 10
// Steven Hansen
Buried in last last week's PS4/PS3/360/One/PC comparison shots of Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain (they all look great!) are the underlying technical performance of the five versions. The PS3 and 360 versions both run at...
 photo

Friday Night Fights - We Will Not Fall!


Game with the Dtoid Community!
Aug 07
// Mike Martin
There's been changes lately and some problems in the forums as I'm sure some of you are aware. Even with the forums closing, FNF will not go quietly into the night though. We will stand, we will fight and we will fuck. Give m...

Dungeon League turns RPG action into a bloodsport

Aug 07 // Alessandro Fillari
[embed]297396:59857:0[/embed] After a dungeon master expresses disappointment with seeing that heroes have lost interest in his labyrinths full of traps and other dangers, he decides to turn his creations into a competitive sport in order to attract adventurers seeking gold and glory. With the creation of the Dungeon League, travelers from all over flock to his randomly conjured deathtraps in order to acquire gold, defeat the opposition, and come out on top. Designed with local multiplayer in mind, Dungeon League re-contextualizes the dungeon-crawl setting and shapes it into an old-school RPG battle arena. From the standard deathmatch variants, territory capture, to the more unusual race gametype, which tasks players with dashing through checkpoints around the dungeon while taking swipes at the opposition, the game does a lot of cool things to the roguelike gameplay system. As you acquire gold and experience, you can level up between matches, upgrade skills, and buy new items from the league vendors. In traditional roguelike and MOBA fashion, character growth is all from the ground up in every game, so you'll have to prioritize which areas you want to focus on. In case it wasn't clear, Dungeon League is very self-aware with its approach to the dungeon crawler. There are several different classes to choose from -- such as the traditional archetypes like Warrior, Rogue, and Archer -- to more bizarre classes such as the rainbow-spewing Unicorn. It's a rush to fight through dungeons filled with nasty traps while cutting down hoards of monsters that get stronger with each stage. It'll take a lot to stay a step ahead of the opposing side and become the champion of the Dungeon League, so choose your class wisely. It's not often we get a unique take on the dungeon crawler, especially one that doesn't take itself too seriously. I liked how lighthearted things are in Dungeon League despite all the over-the-top action and bloodshed, and had a blast battling it out with friends. While there are some single-player options where you can battle waves of monsters, the real draw here is multiplayer, and Dungeon League is quite clever in its design. If you're looking for something a bit different that channels the old-school RPG aesthetic, then this is one you'll want to keep an eye on. Dungeon League [Steam Early Access]
Dungeon League photo
Out now on Steam Early Access
What happens when you turn hardcore RPG gameplay, with hints of roguelike elements, into a sport? Imagine having to grind and acquire loot in order to score points and one-up your competition. Sounds pretty wild for an action...

Microsoft on GFWL photo
Microsoft on GFWL

Microsoft: 'Our goal right now isn't to do anything else other than support Steam'


Haha Games for Windows Live
Aug 07
// Chris Carter
Speaking to PC Gamer, Microsoft had a bit to say about the ol' Games for Windows Live and Steam feud. After shuttering the former down in favor of not screwing over its consumers with a bad service, they quickly shifted gears...
Humble Bundle photo
Humble Bundle

Humble Namco Bundle has Dark Souls, Enslaved


Good gift-giving potential
Aug 04
// Jordan Devore
Humble Bundle and Bandai Namco have partnered for a sale on some older games that are still well worth playing. If nothing else, I'd say this is a great way to give the gift of Pac-Man CE. Name your price: Pac-Man Championsh...
Metal Gear Solid V photo
Metal Gear Solid V

MGSV: The Phantom Pain for PC moved up, Metal Gear Online delayed


MGO on PC set for January 2016
Aug 03
// Alessandro Fillari
With less than thirty days until Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain's release, Konami has still been keeping things close to the vest. Which is amazing, considering that the recent extended gameplay demos and videos show...

Review: Magic Duels: Origins

Jul 31 // Caitlin Cooke
Magic Duels: Origins (PC [reviewed], iOS)Developer: Stainless Games Ltd.Publisher: Wizards of the Coast LLCReleased: July 29, 2015MSRP: Free As its name implies, the story mode within Magic Duels: Origins centers on the early lives of well-known Planeswalkers in the series -- including Jace, Chandra, and Liliana. Each backstory is broken down into five chapters, which detail coming-of-age moments in their lives before becoming full-fledged Planeswalkers. Chapters begin with a short prologue and art piece which set the stage for the upcoming duel, and upon completion end in a similar vein. Battle Mode is the main attraction, containing the normal modes you’d find in any Magic game -- Versus battle (vs Human), Solo battle (vs AI), and Two-headed Giant (2v2). Solo battles come in three flavors -- easy, medium, hard -- however, you’re not able to select your AI opponent (the deck is random). It’s also unclear how the matching system works for the Versus battle system, since the servers were down the majority of the time and I wasn’t able to test it out. I also found it unfortunate that there are no extra fun modes present, as was common in the DoTP series (like Planechase or Archenemy), which I personally miss. In Origin’s free-to-play model, players collect coins via completion of Story and Battle duels or by shelling out cash. Coins are then used to trade in for booster packs, which are added to your overall collection. A single booster pack runs for 150 coins, which equals roughly $2.00 if you were to purchase the coins yourself. You can also buy coins in bulk at a discount, going all the way up to 7,500 coins for $39.99. Origins makes it surprisingly easy to collect coins -- completing a Planeswalker’s story (5 duels) is enough to get you a pack, or dueling a random human roughly 7 times could net the same amount. Quests, which are essentially achievements, rotate in and out and dish out coins when certain stipulations are met (for example: win two duels with a forest/mountain combo deck, put 20 +1/+1 counters on a creature, et cetera). After only a few hours of playing through some of the story, a few battles, and earning Quest achievements, I had enough coins to unlock 3 or 4 packs. I was surprised that the built-in cards were fairly solid (and a lot of new ones, to boot). Origins also features Planeswalker cards, an added layer of challenge which is also a first for Magic’s online games. It didn’t take me long to build some decent decks after opening a few booster packs, although with 251 total cards and only 6 cards in a pack collecting them all seems daunting. Deck-building has come a long way since the Duels of the Planeswalkers series was first introduced. In Origins, the two options are to build everything from scratch or to use the deck wizard. Building a deck from scratch gives players pretty much any freedom they need when building a deck -- it even has a nice filter system, allowing players to sort by parameters including rarity, type, and cost. Swapping cards in and out is pretty seamless, and I like that I could go through my booster cards to pick out the ones I want and have the game do the math and complete the rest of the deck for me. The deck wizard is much more restrictive, but probably the best option for brand new players. After selecting mana types, it walks players through three steps and explains which cards to choose along the way. Being a casual player who doesn’t really enjoy building decks, I actually found the deck wizard to be even more overwhelming than the “build from scratch” option. It’s oddly restrictive, as it doesn’t really give you much room to look at your available cards -- each step only displays a handful of cards to choose from at any given time. Although Origins has a number of viable options for deck-building, there were a few strange occurrences I noticed when building decks. When using autocomplete in the deck-builder, sometimes odd choices would be made -- for example, a lone forest land card would be slotted in when no forest mana was needed, or a card that calls for enchantments when none were found in the deck. Origins also makes it difficult to rebuild a deck if it was originally made with the wizard, as you’re not able to switch freely between modes. This means that if you get new cards in your booster pack that you want to add to your decks built with the wizard, you’re pretty much out of luck. My attempts to join a multiplayer duel over the course of two days were pretty much thwarted with network errors, which is a real bummer seeing how playing with actual people is the crux of playing Magic. I also found that occasionally the game would boot me out of the server entirely, rendering my account virtually useless. Hopefully Stainless will be able to sort out the server issues, as the game does not allow you to collect or spend coins, even in Story mode or AI battles. This is quite frustrating since the main purpose of the game is to collect these coins to spend them on booster packs and improve your deck. I also found it disappointing that you’re not able to earn coins via playing with friends. I’m assuming this is because it would be much easier to cheat the system, however, even giving small rewards via Quests, or a small amount of coins seems like it would encourage more friendly duels versus people taking advantage. Despite their servers not being ready, I feel Magic Duels: Origins brings the best of both worlds together, finally: a fun way to learn and play Magic with the competitiveness of collecting and putting together strong decks for duels in a fairly balanced system. I’m giving it the benefit of the doubt, hoping that the server issues improve with time, but in the meantime playing through the story and battling AI is still entertaining. Those new to Magic will find it easy to dive in and learn the intricacies of deck-building, while more experienced players should finally have the customization and card variety they’ve been asking for. Nothing beats the real thing (playing in person) for a lot of expert Magic players; however, I feel like this is a big step in the right direction. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the developer.]
Magic Duels: Origins photo
Free-to-play done right
My addiction to Magic began with the first Duels of the Planeswalkers game for the 360 back in 2009. Although it had its shortcomings (mana tapping, anyone?), the DoTP series created an accessible way for new (or rusty) playe...

Shadow of Mordor photo
Shadow of Mordor

Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor is now on Mac and Linux


Say Uruk-Hai to the new players
Jul 31
// Joe Parlock
Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor was by far one of the best games of 2014. With great combat, abilities, and a really interesting Nemesis system, I was really surprised by what I was expecting to be a pretty generic Batman: Ark...
Race the Sun photo
Race the Sun

Race the Sun is fantastic, fun, and free today on PC


Can't beat that price
Jul 30
// Brett Makedonski
They say that going solar-powered is a cheap and efficient use of renewable energy. Solar-powered endless runner Race the Sun is the most cost-effective it'll ever be, but for today only. Like the game, it's over when t...
Flywrench photo
Flywrench

Flywrench is flapping its way to Steam


From the makers of Nidhogg
Jul 30
// Jordan Devore
I know Flywrench more for its cameo in Super Meat Boy than its own game. You too? Let's be pals. Messhof is retooling Flywrench for a release on Steam (Windows, Mac) "in a month" and I'm so down for the Daedelus-curated sound...
FNAF dev is a nice guy photo
FNAF dev is a nice guy

Five Nights at Freddy's dev delivers motivational speech


Five Nights and seven bears ago...
Jul 29
// Jed Whitaker
Love it or hate it, the Five Nights at Freddy's series is a roaring success, and is surely raking in even more cash after the recently released fourth game. Developer Scott Cawthon has taken to the Steam Community forums to answer the haters and inspire his fans. 
Rocket League free map photo
Rocket League free map

Take a gander at the upcoming Rocket League map


Inspired by Utopia from SARPBC
Jul 28
// Patrick Hancock
Rocket League is taking off like a, well, rocket I guess. The simple complexity seems to really be jiving with a lot of people, and I couldn't be happier. As a big fan of Supersonic Acrobatic Rocket-Powered Battle-Cars, ...

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