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Five Nights 4 photo
Five Nights 4

Five Nights at Freddy's 4 released early


Surprise! But not really!
Jul 23
// Jordan Devore
The new and almost certainly not final installment of Five Nights at Freddy's has released a couple of weeks earlier than expected. It's available for $7.99 on Steam. Given the events of the last game, Five Nights at Freddy's...
Feist lives! photo
Feist lives!

Hot damn! Feist hits Steam soon and it looks phenomenal


I had feared the worst
Jul 21
// Jordan Devore
"Feist isn't dead! Aiming for a 2011 release." That was a headline I wrote in January of 2011 and, no, I wasn't talking about the singer. I was referencing an enchanting, long-in-development game about a creature who must esc...
KotOR II update photo
KotOR II update

Knights of the Old Republic II is now even better on Steam


New update, playable on Mac and Linux
Jul 21
// Jordan Devore
Aspyr has a real pleasant surprise for Star Wars fans today. The company released an update for Knights of the Old Republic II on Steam that helps ensure the Obsidian Entertainment-developed RPG will live on for another decad...
ESO photo
ESO

$12 Elder Scrolls Online deal returns in GMG Summer Sale encore


All 1,400+ game deals return as well
Jul 21
// Dealzon
Update: Interestingly enough GMG is limiting copies of ESO to 1 per customer. Remember that $12 ESO deal from 9 days ago? We sure do -- the game actually went "out of stock" halfway through the sale last week. (Yep, digital p...
Big Fish Legend photo
Big Fish Legend

Game on Steam rumoured to have been stolen by seller


All looks a bit fishy
Jul 21
// Joe Parlock
[Update: It appears as though this may well have been an unfortunate misunderstanding, as the save location on the version of Big Fish Legend available from Alawar actually mentions Igry.ru. This screenshot showing the locati...
Steam Early Access photo
Steam Early Access

Remember Pang? The Bug Butcher sure does


Calling all Buster Bros.
Jul 20
// Jordan Devore
Capcom's good old bubble-popping shooter Super Buster Bros. (Super Pang outside of America) lives on as the inspiration for The Bug Butcher, a newly-released game on Steam Early Access. As the butcher, you'll avoid attacks an...

Review: The Magic Circle

Jul 20 // Nic Rowen
The Magic Circle (PC)Developer: QuestionPublisher: QuestionMSRP: $19.99Released: July 9, 2015  The Magic Circle (the aforementioned meta-game inside of this real life title) is Ishmael “Starfather” Gilder's brainchild. The long awaited sequel to his beloved fantasy game 20 years in the making, mocked as vaporware by detractors and seen as the holy grail by his fans. A monochromatic fantasy world (that was a Doom-like sci-fi game for the first ten years of development) and probably the worst game ever made. Until you come along that is. Inserted into the game as a nameless play-tester, you see the drama play out in front of you. A world made of patchwork fixes and temporary assets while the developers, represented as giant floating eyes, loom overhead, changing things by whim. If the project wasn't already doomed by constant redesigns, oversized egos, and feature-creep, things take a surreal turn when something reaches out to you. Something that lives inside the game. Something that seems vaguely sinister, with its own agenda, an axe to grind against “the gods” as he calls the developers. What is it? A rampant A.I. that's somehow grown deep inside the mess of code? A machine spirit? You don't find out its exact nature until fairly deep into the game, and even then there is room for interpretation. What's important is what it shows you, how to get elbow deep into the guts of the code and rewrite it to your liking. How to use a simple but powerful editor to take the legs off one creature and stick them onto another. How to turn an enemy into a friend into an enemy of your other enemies. How to remake the world to your design. Then he sets you loose, a poltergeist in the programming, hacking in features, resurrecting cut content. Sometimes you play the part of a technological necromancer, finding content in the limbo of vaporware and dragging it back into the game. More often, you're Dr. Frankenstein, ripping bits and pieces off of creatures and stitching them back together to make your own beautiful little monster babies. The result has a pleasing effect, satellite dishes and broken bits of star ships poking out of the cliched castle walls of Ishmeal's would-be opus, an army of weaponized mushroom men following at your heel. Once the tutorials are over and the rather unorthodox premise established, the middle chunk of the game opens up into a sandbox that has you solving puzzles and indirectly slaying monsters by breaking all the rules. The flexibility of the editor, what you can do with a few swapped abilities here, a slight behavioral shift there, is astounding. Many of the puzzles (such as they are) can be solved in so many ways that I was almost always unsure if I did it the “right” way, or if I just bent and broke things until the pieces all fell where I hoped they would. I love that feeling, it's beautiful when games that are confident enough in themselves to not only let that happen, but applaud the player for doing so. There is a light tone to the whole affair. The various developers are chatty, with some great performances turned in from James Urbaniak (better known as Dr. Venture from the Venture Bros.), Ashley Burch, and others. There are audio diaries to discover, developer commentaries from a defunct version of the game to collect, and change logs detailing the carnage of the development process scattered around, all of which reveal not only what a comedy of errors The Magic Circle has become, but also the various neurosis and flaws of the team members. The comedic tone of the writing and performances feed right back into the gameplay. Silly decisions abound, like the developers (the real ones) always went with the fun idea rather than the easy or clear one. For example, there is no upper limit on how many creatures you can have following around you at once, so things can, and likely will, easily devolve into chaos as you walk around with a fire-spewing zoo trailing behind you. Similarly, there are no limits on how you can swap abilities so it's easy to make truly ridiculous creatures, like a flying demon puppy with a railgun mouth. But aside from the obvious circus-show of zaniness, there are tons of small jokes and clever winks. Little details like picking up copies of your own avatar to increase your health (represented by placeholder art that looks like a cylinder with arms). Being able to re-name every creature you hack so you can make your own fun. At one point I ended up changing the name of the game to “Duke Nukem Presents The Magic Circle” and I giggled at my handiwork off and on for the rest of the night. It's just fun to tinker around in. The objectives of the game are purposely vague -- you need to wrest control of the title away from its current creators, how you're supposed to accomplish that as a disembodied phantom inside the game isn't clearly laid out – but they don't have to be. Exploring the half-built world of The Magic Circle, this pitiful thing, marked with the visible scars of development notes, vestigial remains of deleted content still clinging to it, concept art hastily plastered over the seams, is the meat of the experience. One you wouldn't want to rush through even if you knew exactly what you were supposed to do. And one, that even with a healthy amount of goofing around and experimentation, is over too soon. The sandbox is tiny, and once the game enters its final chapters there is no coming back to it. While The Magic Circle has a compelling third act and some neat surprises to throw at the player (sometimes with the intent of harm), it's hard not to feel like the game is a little thin on the whole. While the central conceit is fun, you don't spend as much time playing with it as you'd hope. The runtime is already short, and a good chunk of it is taken up with monologues that occasionally veer into full on lectures as well as multiple epilogues. For a game that is about grand ideas betrayed by shaky execution, it's tempting to explain the lack of substantive content as more sneaky meta-commentary, but while the idea makes me smirk, I don't think it's good enough to give the game a free-pass. But The Magic Circle isn't just about the gameplay, it has a message. A whole lot to say about what it's like to make games in the modern video game industry. The stresses it places on people, the incorrect assumptions creators have about their work, and the untamed expectations of a judgmental audience. Despite being a commentary on the industry, The Magic Circle isn't gauche enough to single out a specific target. Ishmeal is a composite of several flawed, egotistical developers who are big on hype, hazy on details, and always ready to blame someone else for their shortcomings. There are shades of Molyneux in the mix, flickers of Cage, a sprinkling of Garriot, and a heady musk of Romero to round it out. Coda, an ardent fan of Ishmeal's former works who worms her way onto the team, represents the new era of the participant fan; The streamer, the wiki editor, the super-secret pre-beta fan tester, and all the good and ill that's come along with that shift. Her passion and reverence for the virtual worlds she's dedicated her life to is engaging and even a little familiar -- we're all enthusiasts around here. But, her obsessiveness and the sheer gall of her skewed priorities quickly become unsettling. Beneath all the fan-girl glee is a shrewd, nasty sense of undeserved entitlement and ownership, the sort of overly-invested fan that will send shamelessly ego-stroking love letters to a developer one day and thinly veiled death threats the next. Less well defined is Evelyn Maze, a former eSports celebrity who is unwillingly tied to Ishmeal's sinking boat through contractual chains (a clumsy way of explaining her combativeness while dodging the question of “why doesn't she just quit?”). She represents the “games are for playing” kind of gamer who has no patience for cut-scenes and a thirst for competition. A philosophy which directly collides with the “Starfather's” vision of a story-heavy RPG yarn with no combat. As Maze is the unofficial second-in-command of the studio's disorganized hierarchy (that seems to work like a hippie-commune as run by Joseph Stalin) her and Ishmeal's constant bickering results in a lot of flushed efforts and confusion on the part of the team, right in line with some of the horror stories we've heard about the industry the real world. And somewhere in there is you, simultaneously gawking at the car crash while pouring more gasoline on it. Are you just another player in this world? A different sort of creator? Are you sabotaging this whole thing, or just giving it the sharp kick it needs? The problem with talking about a game that aims to surprise is it's hard to get specific without ruining the experience. But I guarantee, in the near future a lot of ink is going to be spilled about The Magic Circle. The final third of the game goes to some weird places that demand to be dissected. The message is a little muddled, with so many accusing fingers thrust in so many directions that I'm sure different people will come to radically different conclusions of what it all means. But it's a message worth hearing, and a world worth exploring, if you care about video games and the people that make them. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
The Magic Circle Review photo
The medium is the message
The Magic Circle is a game set inside of a game, where you bend and break the rules to make it another game entirely. This is all in service of makings a meta-contextual statement about the game making industry and the tension between the creator and the audience. Still with me after that? Then you're probably The Magic Circle's target audience.

Review: Tembo the Badass Elephant

Jul 20 // Chris Carter
Tembo the Badass Elephant (PC, PS4 [reviewed], Xbox One)Developer: Game FreakPublisher: SegaReleased: July 21, 2015MSRP: $14.99 Tembo has a rather short little setup, and from there, doesn't really give you any further exposition until the very end. What you see is what you get in essence, which is a Rambo-inspired elephant laying waste to an enemy dictator, who controls the Phantom Force army. It sports a charming little visual style that reminds me of Regular Show and a few other Cartoon Network properties. It even has effects like a literal "BADA BADA" phrase appearing while dashing about, and despite the low key setup it's a very bright and loud game, mostly in an endearing way. The basic gist is that you'll be able to jump, dash, and float in the air momentarily like Yoshi, with the added ability to shoot water from your trunk. More advanced moves involve uppercuts, slides, butt stomps, and a cannonball dive spin with a bounce. As you progress you'll start to learn more nuances, almost like you're fitting Tembo through various keyholes with your moveset. There are no real explicit puzzles, but it sure feels puzzle-esque if you're going for flawless runs. For instance, select levels can be completed without losing any momentum whatsoever, and it's a blast to dash, dive-kick, and slide your way through the entire thing. There's even a modified charge that you can utilize by holding down the water button, which can put out flames while running. It's pretty much the perfect amount of depth, allowing newcomers to pick up and play Tembo while giving hardcore platforming fans room to experiment a bit. [embed]296063:59600:0[/embed] The level design is fairly open-ended, tasking you with finding hidden civilizations scattered across the map, and killing as many enemies as possible -- both of which have separate goals that are tracked. Mini-bosses and a few full-on Big Bads are peppered into progression, but I would consider it more of a traditional platformer than a real action game -- especially with how muted and easy these encounters are. There's many more instances of timing and running than fighting, which is something you mostly happen to do while jumping around. Game Freak keeps things exciting with hazards, well-placed enemies, and lots of explosions, which will keep you on your toes constantly. Tembo has 17 stages, which last a few hours -- if you play very well, that is. Now, here's where my big holdup is with Tembo -- gating. In order to progress past certain stages, you need to kill a certain amount of enemies. Each stage has a death counter of sorts, which requires you to rescue most of the civilians trapped within a level, as well as actually seek out and defeat most of the enemy forces. It incentivizes actually killing foes, which is neat, but it ultimately ends up causing frustration and forcing players to replay levels over and over. While it is cool that levels do split off into branching paths, several of them have points of no return. If you happen to just choose a particular path, you may be locked out of say, 50 kill points or so -- which can easily be the difference between unlocking new levels and being forced to replay. It's maddening in some cases, and at one point I was held back by six points. Now, I did like returning to some levels to try to "master" them per se, but that should be a player choice -- not something that gates main story progression. Tembo the Badass Elephant is a really enjoyable game at its core, but it can get tiring to replay the same stage five times over just to grind out a few kills to see the next set of levels. It's an odd design choice for sure, but most of you will probably enjoy dashing through unsuspecting Phantom Soldiers and butt stomping them into oblivion regardless. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Badass Elephant review photo
They drew first blood
When someone told me that the developer of Pokemon was creating an action platformer called Tembo the Badass Elephant, I knew I had to give it a shot. While a few of the design choices are a bit odd, they don't overshadow the sum of its parts.

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Friday Night Fights - Horses are Sexy


Game with the Horsetoid Community!
Jul 17
// Mike Martin
One day there was a promiscuous pony, and that little whorse decided to cross the road. He had heard someone shout "HAY!" and wanted to see who it was. The voice seemed to come from down an alleyway. The little whorse grew sc...
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Win one of 10 copies!
Thanks to our friends at Fugitive Games (Sorry I took so long Alex!), we have 10 copies of Into the Stars for you lovely folks to win! What is Into the Stars you ask? Here's the synopsis from the Steam page: "Take the role of...

Deadpool photo
Deadpool

Deadpool is inexplicably back on Steam after it was removed a year ago


Ok, I'll take it
Jul 16
// Chris Carter
I was pleasantly surprised by High Moon's Deadpool game. Sure it wasn't the most polished action game, but it was mostly true to the character, and was a decent enough little romp. Then... it was gone. One day it just va...
Five Nights 4 trailer photo
Five Nights 4 trailer

Five Nights at Freddy's 4 trailer brings the horror home


Check under the bed
Jul 14
// Nic Rowen
At the end of the the last Five Night's game, Freddy's Fright, the horror funhouse based on the infamous, and defunct, Freddy Fazbear murder-pizzeria burnt to the ground. It seemed like a fine place to wrap up the series -- ...
1979 Revolution photo
1979 Revolution

1979 Revolution explores the Iranian revolution


And not from an American perspective!
Jul 13
// Steven Hansen
West Asia (the "Middle East") doesn't get great screen time in games. Mostly it's a setting for contemporary American war stories rather than for stories of the people who live there. 1979 Revolution changes that, setting yo...
Sol Divide photo
Sol Divide

Sol Divide makes the trek from PS1 to Steam


Console Classics
Jul 13
// Steven Hansen
Out of left field this All Star week: Sol Divide has come to Steam. Looks like an emulation of the PS1 port, and early user reviews suggest it works pretty good. But where did this come from? Well, the publisher is listed as ...
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Nep Nep Ahoy!
Our friends at Idea Factory International have been kind enough to hook us up with 4 copies of Hyperdimension Neptunia Re;Birth 2! 2 for Steam and 2 for Vita! How awesome is that? What is Hyperdimension you ask? Well here is ...

Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

High Strangeness sold better on Wii U than Steam


Sup Holmes every Sunday at 4pm EST!
Jul 12
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] Two Sunday's ago on Sup Ho...

Review: Quiplash

Jul 12 // Nic Rowen
Quiplash (PC [reviewed], PS4, Xbox One, iOS)Developer: Jackbox Games Inc.Publisher: Jackbox Games Inc.MSRP: $9.99Released: June 30, 2015 Quiplash is the latest title from the party-game maestros at Jackbox Games. It represents what they learned from the success of the Jackbox Party Pack and how they observed people using it. It takes the pick-up-and-go ease of those games to a whole new level by cutting out every superfluous element of the experience and leaving nothing but goofs and japes. Quiplash works by getting three-to-eight players together, asking a few leading questions to different sets of players, and getting the audience to vote on which answer they think is funniest. Then it's off to the next round for more of the same. It's a quick no-fuss-no-muss mainlining of jokes, with each game taking roughly ten minutes start to finish. When I first started playing it, I was worried that that they cut too much, that without some kind of a framework the game would devolve into chaos. But surprisingly, it works. It's a much more egalitarian game than the other Jackbox titles, one that is easier to rope people into. There's no baggage, no time commitment, and no stakes except you and your friends' amusement. This lack of consequence and ease of use is a godsend when playing with mixed company, making it an even more appealing party choice over the other Jackbox games. While You Don't Know Jack is hilarious, it can lead to some sore feelings if one person in the room is the perpetual dunce. Fibbage is fantastic, but with the relatively small pool of questions, veterans have a distinct advantage. And while I personally believe Drawful is at its best when nobody knows how to draw worth a damn, it tends to be intimidating to people who's artistic skills might rival a chimps. Quiplash is just a vehicle for jokes. A vehicle you can ride as long as you like, or hop off on a whim to go find something in the kitchen or chat with someone. Just like the Jackbox Party Pack games, it is ridiculously easy to get an entire living room of people into a game of Quiplash. All a person needs is a device with a web-browser like a cellphone or tablet, and a questionable moral fiber to get in on the action. But Quiplash takes it one step further. Seeing the popularity of their other games on streaming services such as Twitch, Jackbox Games designed Quiplash with streaming in mind from the ground up. While only eight players are able to provide answers and gags, an audience of up to 10,000 can vote on which goof tickled them best. There is no registration or buy-in necessary. You could try it right now but simply searching Twitter or Twitch for an active game and punching the room number into jackbox.tv. While there is nothing overtly offensive about Quiplash, comparisons to the adult party game Cards Against Humanity are almost unavoidable. The two games definitely share the same naughty head-space, with CAH offering a selection of deliciously offensive punchlines, while Quiplash spoon-feeds the room questions that are guaranteed to rouse the profane 14-year-old lurking inside of every normally responsible adult. However, because Quiplash depends on the creativity of it's players, you don't run into the diminishing returns a well-worn deck of CAH suffers from. I mean, “Glenn Beck Catching His Scrotum on a Curtain Hook” is a great line the first (dozen) times you hear it, but nothing can retain its shock value forever. This dependency on player creativity is both a blessing and a curse. Playing with a group of quick-witted people who know each others tastes or how to push each others' buttons can yield tremendous results. Earlier this week, a “low-key” get together with some friends turned into a all-night booze-fueled Quiplash binge that left me sore with laughter the next day. It was fantastic. Jumping into a few online games provided a mixed, and decidedly less amusing, time. While some of the streams I joined were fairly funny, a depressing number of them seemed to be a competition of who could staple together the most vulgar combination of “poop, jizz, butts, poop, ur mom” in an answer, no matter what the question was. But, since the commitment level to a game of Quiplash is roughly zero, it's easy to just up and bounce if a particular online room seems lame. If that rough time is happening in your own living room however, things might get trickier. Maybe get better friends? “Accidentally” set the room on fire? Or you could strap them down Clockwork Orange style, peel their eyes open and make them watch episodes of Louie and old Kids in the Hall sketches until they generate a sense of humor. I'm a reasonable man after all. Quiplash is a drum-fed machine gun of jokes. It's quick, it's snappy, and I'm hard pressed to think of a better time one could buy for $10 without breaking a few laws. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Quiplash Review photo
Crowd-pleaser
Quiplash is what you get when Fibbage and Drawful get a few drinks in them and stop screwing around. When you strip down the flimsy excuse of a lying/trivia game, remove your friends embarrassing chicken-scratch doodles, and leave nothing but raw, undiluted, punch-lines. It's a party game that is so minimalist, it's almost not there. Thankfully, with the right group of people, it's also hilarious.

$8 Dishonored GOTY in day numero dos of GMG Summer Sale

Jul 11 // Dealzon
GMG Summer Sale Day 2 Use coupon: DEALZO-NGMGSA-LESVVC Dishonored & Doom Dishonored: GOTY Edition (Steam) — $8.16  (list price $30) <- free mystery game Dishonored (Steam) — $4  (list price $20) Doom 3: BFG Edition (Steam) — $4  (list price $20) Doom Classic Complete (Steam) — $3  (list price $15) FPS Goodies Half-Life & Counter Strike Series Shadow Warrior (Steam) — $4.80  (list price $40) Quake 4 (Steam) — $4  (list price $20) Brink (Steam) — $4  (list price $20) Rise of the Triad (Steam) — $3  (list price $15) Day of Defeat: Source (Steam) — $2  (list price $10) Duke Nukem 3D: Megaton Edition (Steam) — $2  (list price $10) Return to Castle Wolfenstein (Steam) — $2  (list price $10) Shadow Warrior Classic Redux (Steam) — $1.20  (list price $10) More Top Picks Kick-Ass 2 (Steam) — $13.40  (list price $25) DieselStormers (Steam) — $12.16  (list price $19) Primal Carnage: Extinction (Steam) — $8  (list price $20) Chivalry: Medieval Warfare (Steam) — $4  (list price $25) Chivalry: Deadliest Warrior (Steam) — $2.40  (list price $15) Hotline Miami (Steam) — $2  (list price $10) Top Weekend Deals Elite: Dangerous (Steam) — $40.19  (list price $60) <- match Steam Summer Sale The Witcher III: Wild Hunt (DRM-Free) — $29.99  (list price $60) Dark Souls II: Scholar of the First Sin (Steam) — $24.99  (list price $50) Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare (Steam) — $22.99  (list price $60) Console Hardware Deals PS4 TLOU Bundle + PS Plus 3 Mo. + Extra Controller — $399.99 Xbox One Halo Master Chief Bundle + $40 Gift Card — $349  (list price $399) PlayStation TV — $39.99  (list price $80) Wii Fit U + Wii Balance Board + Fit Meter — $39.99  (list price $70) Sony Playstation Silver Wired Headset — $19.99  (list price $40) Recent Releases 07/21: F1 2015 (Steam) — $35.49  (list price $55) 06/23: Devil May Cry 4: Special Edition (Steam) — $17.99  (list price $25) 06/23: Batman: Arkham Knight (Xbox One) — $44.99  (list price $60) 06/16: Xbox One 1TB Halo: Master Chief Bundle + $40 Gift Card — $399 PC Game Deals Project Cars (Steam) — $34.99  (list price $50) Far Cry 4 (Uplay) — $23.99  (list price $60) Europa Universalis IV: Conquest Collection (Steam) — $14.99  (list price $60) Spintires (Steam) — $10.49  (list price $30) Metro Redux Bundle (Steam) — $8.99  (list price $45) Zuma's Revenge — FREE  (list price $5) Console Game Deals Battlefield: Hardline (PS3, Xbox One, PS4, Xbox 360) — $39.99  (list price $60) Dark Souls II: Scholar of the First Sin (PS4, Xbox One) — $39.99  (list price $60) Destiny (PS4, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PS3) — $19.99  (list price $40) Dragon Age: Inquisition - Pre-owned (Xbox One, PS4) — $17.99  (list price $60) Borderlands 2 (PS3) — $3.99  (list price $15) PS4 MLB 15 The Show (PS4) — $39.99  (list price $60) Disney Infinity: Marvel Super Heroes 2.0 Starter Pack (PS4) — $34.99  (list $60) Lara Croft and The Temple of Osiris (PS4) — $19.99  (list price $30) Madden NFL 25 (PS4) — $14.99  (list price $30) Xbox One The Elder Scrolls Online: Tamriel Unlimited (Xbox One) — $44.99  (list price $60) The Witcher III: Wild Hunt (Xbox One) — $44.99  (list price $60) Disney Infinity: Toy Box Starter Pack 2.0 Edition (Xbox One) — $34.99  (list $60) Halo: The Master Chief Collection (Xbox One) — $24.99  (list price $60) Laptop Deals 15.4" Apple MacBook Pro i7-4770HQ, 16GB, 256GB SSD — $1,819  (list $1,999) 15.6" Asus i7-4720HQ, 12GB, GTX 950M, 1080p — $749  (list $1,000) 15.6" Acer Aspire V3 i7-5500U, 8GB, GT 840M, 1080p — $579.99  (list $760) 15.6" Lenovo Z50 i7-4510U, 8GB, 1080p — $499  (list $950) Game deals from Dealzon. Sales from certain retailers help support Destructoid.
Weekend deals photo
Jumpin' good deals
The weekend arrives and GMG's 2015 Summer Sale chugs on to day two. Some decent pickings this round with Dishonored GOTY for only $8 (plus you get a freebie mystery game). Hotline Miami 2 also hit a historic low pri...

FNF photo
FNF

Friday Night Fights - Cars Playing Soccer!


Game with the Dtoid Community!
Jul 10
// Mike Martin
I am pretty damn addicted to Rocket League at the moment (It's sad that's the last article about it from us, c'mon guys). Soccer with jet powered cars.... just works. It's the most insane, competitive fun, that I've had in a ...
Deals photo
Deals

Green Man Gaming Summer Sale discharge with zombie deals


Totally PG-13 deals
Jul 10
// Dealzon
Digital retailer Green Man Gaming just kicked off its 2015 Summer Sale and the Day One batch of deals looks fairly decent if you're a horror/zombie game fan. Until July 23, there are new batches of deals every 24 hours, ...
The Magic Circle photo
The Magic Circle

The Magic Circle launch trailer pokes fun at games industry egoism


'Trailers are just lies set to music'
Jul 09
// Alessandro Fillari
Back in January, I had the pleasure of checking out The Magic Circle, a charming and funny adventure title that poked fun at the chaotic, often insane challenges of game development. There's a launch trailer to set the mood ...
Depth photo
Depth

Depth celebrates Shark Week with free-to-play weekend


Free content update also available
Jul 07
// Ben Davis
Depth, the terrifying underwater multiplayer game which pits sharks against divers, is rolling out a ton of neat stuff this week for Shark Week. Beginning Thursday at 10:00am PT, Depth will be free to play on Steam for the we...
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Team Fortress 2sdays: I'm Back Baby!


Vacation is Over!
Jul 07
// Mike Martin
So it’s been a while, and during my absence I’ve gotten a new job, become a kid and a squid, fought for the glorious team dog, learned two programming languages in a single weekend, became a 5th edition druid, and...
The Binding of Isaac photo
The Binding of Isaac

Binding of Isaac: Rebirth hits Xbox One, Wii U, and New 3DS July 23


Poo and tears for everyone!
Jul 07
// Zack Furniss
Rejoice, fans of fetuses and feces! The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth will be coming to the Xbox One, Wii U, and New 3DS on July 23. Please note the new there, as it will not be available on the older model. It's wonder...
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Thanks to Opium Pulses' & Flying Bundle
Thanks to our friends over at Opium Pulses'  and the good folks at Flying Bundle, we have three copies of their Stay Positive bundle to giveaway! The bundle is a collection of positively rated games, hand picked by Opium...

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Friday Night Fights - All About Andy


He asked for it....
Jul 03
// Mike Martin
What can any single one of us say about the greatness of M. Randall Antoinette of Dixonia III? What could we say that does him justice, I mean? Andy is larger than any one achievement, act, or even nipple. Andy is a God among...
Card Hunter on Steam photo
Card Hunter on Steam

Browser-based tactical card RPG Card Hunter headed to Steam


New expansion coming soon too
Jul 02
// Darren Nakamura
Somehow I have missed out on Card Hunter for the past couple years. It released in 2013 and Destructoid's reviews patriarch Chris Carter loved it. I don't know how it wasn't on my radar; it has a lot going for it I'm into. I...
Badman photo
Badman

Warner Bros. reportedly well aware PC Batman: Arkham Knight was hot garbage


Duh
Jul 02
// Steven Hansen
"I will say that it’s pretty rich for WB to act like they had no idea the game was in such a horrible state," an anonymous quality assurance tester on Arkham Knight told Kotaku. "It’s been like this for months and...
Huge TF2 update photo
Huge TF2 update

Team Fortress 2 becomes Counter-Strike tomorrow


New map, mechanics, and balance changes
Jul 01
// Patrick Hancock
Team Fortress 2 gets a new update tomorrow called the Gun Mettle Update. To summarize, the game is taking on many ideas from its much more popular cohort, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. First of all, weapon skins...
Dead or Alive photo
Dead or Alive

Dead or Alive 5 PC still doesn't have working online multiplayer


Embarrassing
Jul 01
// Jordan Devore
Team Ninja was supposed to enable online multiplayer for the PC port of Dead or Alive 5 Last Round by the end of June, months after the game debuted on Steam. Hasn't happened. "[D]ue to major issues found during the beta test...

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