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4:00 AM on 10.02.2013

This Team Fortress 2 mod is a Star Fox deathmatch mode

As if the range of things people do with Team Fortress 2 wasn't already expansive enough, now there's a mod in the works which transforms the game into a aerial combat exercise featuring ships and graphical elements tha...

Conrad Zimmerman


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How a sneaky UK studio wound up making Star Fox photo
How a sneaky UK studio wound up making Star Fox
by Tony Ponce

As much as we see Nintendo as a very insular company these days, it was much more so way back during the NES and SNES eras. If you tried to challenge Nintendo's power, you were met with intense scorn at the very least or litigation at the very worst. That's why the story of small British studio Argonaut Software is so bizarre -- Argonaut broke the copyright protection on Game Boy and was rewarded with a three-game Nintendo-publishing contract.

This past week, Eurogamer posted a write-up about Argonaut's time with Nintendo and the fruits of the team's labor. The first thing Argonaut's technical wizards did was develop a 3D prototype for the NES called "NESglider," a spiritual successor to an Argonaut Amiga / Atari ST game, Starglider. They then ported the demo to SNES and promised the Kyoto higher-ups that they could improve the 3D effect more than ten-fold if they designed a radical new 3D microprocessor. The microprocessor became known as the Super FX chip, and the first game to use it was none other than Star Fox -- renamed Starwing in Europe to avoid a trademark dispute with the German company StarVox.

Argonaut later made Stunt Race FX and Star Fox 2 for Nintendo, although the latter wound up getting canceled despite being essentially finished. Key members from the Argonaut team actually became full-time Nintendo employees: Dylan Cuthbert, today the head of PixelJunk studio Q-Games; Giles Goddard, today the head of Steel Diver studio Vitei; and programmer Krister Wombell. Unfortunately, relations between the two companies ended after Argonaut pitched a 3D platformer starring Yoshi, upsetting Nintendo which had yet to allow an outside studio to use its own IP. So Argonaut retooled and published it through Fox Interactive as Croc: Legend of the Gobbos, the company's biggest game in terms of both sales and royalties.

I urge you to give the full article a read. I was especially surprised by Argonaut's idea for a virtual reality system that could have beat the pants off the Virtual Boy and then some!

Born slippy: the making of Star Fox [Eurogamer]

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6:00 PM on 06.22.2013

Nintendo increasing staff to forge more games and new IPs

Would you like to see a new Metroid, Wave Race, or Star Fox game? Perhaps some Chibi-Robo love? Hell, maybe even a new IP? Well, apparently nothing is out of the question with Nintendo as they look to build and strengthen the...

Wesley Ruscher



My ultimate gaming tradition of Old School Day photo
My ultimate gaming tradition of Old School Day
by Taylor Stein

Gamers are a diverse breed. From PC aficionados and console fanatics, to retro devotees and casual admirers, there is no one-size-fits-all model of videogame hobbyist. Though we possess many differences, like game preferences, level of devotion, and platform of choice, we can all unite under a common flag of shared interest. There is one event, however, that my family celebrates. A monthly tradition that I believe just about every gaming fan can appreciate. I call it Old School Day.

Old School, Retro, or Classic Day as the name suggests, is a celebration of your personal gaming past. This holiday of sorts should not be compared to the feeling on Christmas morning or the anticipation of New Years Eve, Old School Day is simply in a league of its own. Whether you have been hooked on virtual adventures since childhood, or if you're a current-gen convert, the first experiences that characterize an activity like gaming are special and worthy of remembrance.

Exactly how the gaming festivity is commemorated is completely up to you. There is one stipulation, however, simply that a hectic work week, argument with the misses, and any other stressor of life takes a back seat for a few hours in pursuit of videogame nostalgia.

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The power of videogames can bring the family together photo
The power of videogames can bring the family together
by Taylor Stein

Not every hobby is created equally nor is every pastime equally respected. As a gaming enthusiast, videogames represent the epitome of entertainment in my eyes. They alone reign atop my personal pedestal of happiness, a special zone that dictates everything from individual spending habits, conversational topics, and recreational choices. While I acknowledge gaming as an art; a vehicle to combine innovative ideas from cinema, literature, and music, not everyone sees it that way. My parents never quite understood the sheer awesomeness of videogames and I'd bet that most of your parents don't either.

Parents come in all shapes, manners, and styles: stamp-collecting dads, karaoke-singing moms, and every possible combination of cool, strange, love-to-hate characteristics in between. To complement the diversity of parenthood, attitudes about gaming are varied as well. There is no one-size-fits-all sentiment in the league of moms and dads. But rather, a mosaic of admiration, consent, censure, and disapproval that constitutes two overall attitudes, a general acceptance of videogames, or a dismissal of videogames.

Join me as I attempt to understand the complicated relationship between parents and videogames.

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1:30 PM on 10.18.2012

Nintendo Download: Vic Viper Edition

Today is a decent day to be a 3DS owner, as a heap of stuff is headed your way. First off we have Sparkle Snapshots 3D (3DS eShop, $5.99) and Gradius (3DS VC, $4.99) headed to the eShop, along with a Moshi Monsters Moshlings ...

Chris Carter

6:30 PM on 08.10.2012

Poke Balls are a carjacker's best friend

Mike from the YouTube team Warialasky is up to his ol' shenanigans, once again using videogame items to be a right d*ck in the real world. Above, he uses a supply of Poké Balls to jack any vehicle he has his heart set...

Tony Ponce

8:00 AM on 08.05.2012

Start your morning off with some Star Fox facts

The Did You Know Gaming series is a pretty wonderful look at the lesser known facts of your favorite videogames. The latest episode of the YouTube show takes a look at the Star Fox series, and reveals a pretty dark item from...

Hamza CTZ Aziz

10:30 AM on 07.10.2012

Miyamoto wants a Wii U Metroid and Star Fox most of all

IGN had a moment with Miyamoto himself, and quizzed him on potential franchises he would like to see on the Wii U. Out of all of the great series and IPs that Nintendo has to offer, Miyamoto focused on just two: Metroid and S...

Chris Carter

8:00 AM on 04.28.2012

Star Fox for SNES gets a spit-shine in this fan video

[Update: The video has been re-uploaded with Fox's name corrected and some added voice samples.] How awesome would it be if the next Star Fox had character models that looked exactly like the puppets used in the original's p...

Tony Ponce

10:30 AM on 01.21.2012

Do a drum roll! Star Fox gets the VGdrum treatment

He-who-bangs-the-drums, NukaCola, comes out strong with his latest VGdrum cover. His target this week? Star Fox on the Super Nintendo, a.k.a. the game with the geometry and shapes and animal fighter pilots, so adorable! They...

Tony Ponce





12:41 PM on 11.03.2011

Everyone: Google 'Do a barrel roll' immediately

Just do it! Love you, Google.

Dale North

4:00 AM on 09.23.2011

Introducing Lights Out, a Destructoid newsreel

In recent months, I've taken to giving myself a break in the day by playing a few rounds of Team Fortress 2. When some of my colleagues began to join me, I knew I had yet another opportunity to take something I was enjoying ...

Conrad Zimmerman

11:45 AM on 09.22.2011

No online in Star Fox 64 3D because of time and money

Those who bought a Nintendo 3DS may wonder why their system -- which perfectly allows for online gaming -- hasn't got any online games. Crucially, they may wonder why a multiplayer-focused release like Star Fox 64 3...

Jim Sterling



Review: Star Fox 64 3D photo
Review: Star Fox 64 3D
by Jonathan Holmes

The N64 is my least favorite console of all time, but I still feel the need to own one, mostly for Star Fox 64. It's easily one of my favorite games on the console, way ahead of Super Mario 64 and Ocarina of Time. That's partly because those two titles were 3D adaptations (and in some ways, deformations) of already near-perfect 2D experiences I'd grown to love on the SNES.

As a huge fan of Mario and Link's SNES titles, seeing characters that I'd grown to love as colorful, detailed 2D sprites transformed into chunky, low-texture polygon models felt like a huge downgrade. Star Fox on the SNES was already as chunky and low poly as it gets, so by comparison, Star Fox 64 looked amazing. The game fully embraced the technical limitations of the N64 by crafting a world where it made sense for everything to be made from basic geometric shapes.

There was no attempt at realism, or recreation of sprite-based characters; just N64 graphics doing what they do best. Like with the Katamari Damacy games, and now Minecraft, Star Fox 64 presented a world that was built from the ground up to be made from simple shapes. That's just the start of why I love the game.

Now Star Fox 64 is back on the 3DS, and once again, the game adapts to the strengths and limitations of its destination console, and make them work in its favor.

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2:15 PM on 08.28.2011

Star Fox, Kid Icarus, Link/Sonic porn, and more now in 3D

One of my favorite features of the 3DS is the ability to explore the world of mainstream media in 3D. Unfortunately, other than the still expanding Nintendo Video (which has some good stuff from college humor and few quality ...

Jonathan Holmes