Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around
hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

Shooters

Halo 5 photo
Halo 5

Someone created Peach's castle in Halo 5


Brick by brick
Jan 25
// Chris Carter
Someone re-created Peach's Castle from Mario 64 in Halo 5. That's good! Due to the object limit though there's no interior. That's bad! The resourceful Bearskopff has taken to Halo 5's Forge mode to craft his own version...
Garden Warfare 2 photo
Garden Warfare 2

These are the loyalty rewards for Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare 2


Based on your Garden Warfare 1 rank
Jan 21
// Jordan Devore
When you first play the final version of Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare 2 (how'd you like the beta?), you're going to want to look out for the mailbox in the hub world -- that's where you can import your characters and pr...
Overwatch photo
Overwatch

The Overwatch beta will return with a new mode and more maps


Expected to reappear in mid-February
Jan 21
// Jordan Devore
Blizzard took its closed beta for Overwatch offline in December to pore over player feedback, tighten the balance, and continue working on new features. It will return a little later than some were expecting -- January is now...
Tom Clancy's The Division photo
Tom Clancy's The Division

You'll be able to preload The Division beta 48 hours in advance


Love this feature
Jan 21
// Chris Carter
When the PC beta for The Division is apparently going to weigh in at 26GB, you'll appreciate the fact that you can preload it. Ubisoft has confirmed that players will be able to preload 48 hours in advance, in fact, so plan a...
At least he doesn't vape photo
At least he doesn't vape

Epic's Paragon introduces a pipe-smoking Ivan Ooze


New characters unveiled
Jan 20
// Steven Hansen
There is some barrier to entry for the (wildly successful) MOBA genre. Epic's (Gears of War) shot at the genre, Paragon, is coming to consoles (PS4 and PC) and is a pulled in third-person game following MOBA principles, whic...
Bombshell photo
Bombshell

Bombshell from 3D Realms is out next week, costs $35


First in a decade from the publisher
Jan 20
// Chris Carter
3D Realms reminded us yesterday that Bombshell is the first 3D Realms game to go gold in over a decade. While the jury is still out on this rather elusive title, I'm glad they're still around having grown up with th...
Metal Gear Online photo
Metal Gear Online

Metal Gear Online's PC beta is already over, officially launches today


That was fast
Jan 19
// Chris Carter
Last we heard, Metal Gear Online's PC beta was pulled due to an exploit last week, but in the middle of researching when a fix would happen, I found out the thing already launched! According to a post on Steam from the develo...

Review: Resident Evil 0 HD Remaster

Jan 18 // Chris Carter
Resident Evil Zero HD Remaster (PC, PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: CapcomPublisher: CapcomReleased: January 19, 2016MSRP: $19.99 Zero begins with a rather interesting setpiece: a moving train. Rebecca Chambers, a member of S.T.A.R.S., is sent to investigate crimes in the Arklay Mountains -- conveniently located (and thus, linked) near Raccoon City and the original game's mansion. Here she meets Billy Coen, an alleged murderer and ex-Marine, and starts an "unlikely" partnership. You can probably tell from the setup that the tale is a pastiche of cheesy horror not unlike past games, but it's done just as effectively as before. Sure, the story never really makes much sense, even after the final credits roll, but you'll have a good time while you're along for the ride. Rebecca and Billy have a fun dynamic that is extended throughout Zero. The former can combine herbs and story-related chemicals, and the latter can take more of a beating and move heavy objects. It's not an original concept even for the era it was released in, but it works. This is mostly because of the "zap" partner system that allows both characters to be on-screen at the same time. You can opt to have your AI partner attack or stay idle, which is great if you don't want them wasting ammo. Swapping is as easy as pressing a button to start a second-long heartbeat transition to the other character. You can also control the AI with the right analog stick, which comes in handy for moving them out of harm's way. This idea is used in many different ways that chop up the game's pacing for the better. In some zones, Rebecca and Billy are split, working separately to exchange key items with one another through special devices like service elevators. In other areas, they're working in tandem to solve those wonderful box puzzles, where Billy is moving cubes and Rebecca is operating a device of some sort. Given that so many of Resident Evil's puzzles feature solutions born out of just one avatar, I like that Capcom went with something different here. There's another huge difference when it comes to Zero and all of the games before it: item management. In the past, players would mostly store their items in a magical gamey storage box of sorts, where you could access your armory and inventory wherever a box was located. Now, you can place items on the ground and store them anywhere on the map, no questions asked (well, outside of the single room item limit, which is inexplicably still in this remake). For instance, if you want to split a few typewriter ribbons off a stack of 10 and place them in a save room, you can. The same goes for weapons and herbs, or any key items you may pick up. [embed]332496:61804:0[/embed] Items now show up on the map, so there's no guessing as to where you put them. It's a more challenging system, for sure -- you don't have the infinite box to rely on, and sometimes you'll have to run through gauntlets of enemies if you happen to stash a key item and are required to run back for it. Its use does start to grate mid-way through the game, as it can get rather tedious to juggle everything. The mechanic isn't really re-used, but it helps cement Zero's unique identity (for better and worse) along with zapping, and the level designs mostly accommodate it. This is an old-school Resident Evil game at heart, back when "survival" was still a key factor of the series. Zero features limited ammo, save ribbons, and a lot of decision making, mostly in regards to inventory management. This is especially true given the zapping, because at any moment one character may be forced to fight a boss without the help of another, so ensuring that both cast members are fully equipped is key to your success. In terms of the actual "Remaster" moniker, a lot of the technical details are the same as before. The visuals and framerate have been updated, there's a new non-tank modern control method available, and you can swap between 16:9 and 4:3 resolution (even on consoles) -- but the cheesy FMVs remain untouched. Capcom really could bring back every entry pre-Resident Evil 4 just like this and I'd be happy. Thankfully though, it's slightly more than just a straight touch-up due to the addition of Wesker mode. In this special gametype only found in the remake (that's acquired by beating the game once), Billy is shoved to the side in favor of Wesker, who operates as Rebecca's partner throughout the game. This mode is meant to be silly. Wesker can use his superhuman powers he's flaunted since Code Veronica, including the ability to quickly dash across the room, and use a special energy attack to pop zombie's heads off. He can also mix herbs and doesn't have many limitations. They didn't go the full mile -- Billy is still present in cutscenes, as is his voice -- but it's a meaty enough change.  All of the old unlocks are also present, including additional costumes, weapons, and the Mercenaries-like "Leech Hunter." The latter is a mini-game of sorts that tasks players with escaping a modified version of the Research Center, and gets tougher as you play it. It's not as memorable as some of the true Mercenary modes in other games, but it's worth clearing at least once and should adequately test the mettle of series veterans. As a whole, Resident Evil Zero isn't one of my favorite entries, but with the amount of care that went into this remake, like Resident Evil HD Remaster before it, I'm really coming around. In fact, just get both if you don't have them already. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Resident Evil 0 HD review photo
Welcome, Wesker
For whatever reason, I didn't end up completing Resident Evil Zero back when it was released in 2002 -- in fact, it took me 10 years to truly dive into it. I think it just flew under the radar, but thankfully Capcom has opted...

The Division photo
The Division

New York's hippest borough axed from The Division's launch


[Twirls mustache passive-aggressively]
Jan 18
// Brett Makedonski
Jay-Z's gonna be pissed. Brooklyn goes hard, but not as far as Ubisoft's next Tom Clancy game is concerned. In fact, it doesn't go at all. In an interview with The Examiner, developer Massive Entertainment reveals that t...

Review: The Bug Butcher

Jan 18 // Jordan Devore
The Bug Butcher (Mac, Linux, Windows [reviewed])Developer: Awfully Nice StudiosPublisher: Awfully Nice StudiosRelease: January 19, 2016MSRP: $7.99 When I close my eyes, I now see aliens splitting apart into smaller aliens, again and again, until there is nothing left. I can picture exactly how they will move; when they'll strike. Clearly, this game has seeped into my mind. It only took a few short hours. As the titular exterminator, you're called into a research facility to clean up an infestation of creepy crawlers. Each of the 30 levels has the same basic premise -- "the only good bug is a dead bug!" -- but varying stage hazards, gimmicks, and enemy types keep the action engaging. Even after going back through most of the levels several times now, I'm yearning for more. It's all so very satisfying, and the scoring system and character upgrades further incentivize repeated playthroughs. I'll happily oblige. Every alien has a distinct look and movement pattern, but there are constants. They always enter the screen from above, telegraphing their descent so you aren't caught off guard. This is a game that rarely, if ever, feels "cheap." The majority of the bugs bounce around, touching down for a split second before going airborne again. Others hover from side to side, or stick to the ceiling. One pest crawls on the ground, waiting to pounce like a Facehugger. After taking enough damage, most will split into smaller beings that can quickly fill the room if left unchecked. This is important because, crucially, you can only shoot straight up. Positioning is everything. [embed]334931:61897:0[/embed] You'll have to keep an eye out for items that temporarily boost your damage or speed, and weapons like a laser beam, lightning gun, or rocket launcher. None of these last long, but they all pack a hefty punch and are enjoyable to wield. By keeping your combo up, you can also earn one-time-use abilities to, say, become invincible or freeze every alien in place if you're in a bind. Vanquished bugs litter the floor with coins, and there's a score-based, end-of-level payout. In the main Arcade mode, you can buy passive perks and permanent upgrades to make any weapons or abilities you might encounter mid-battle more useful. (To be clear: you always begin levels with your standard machine gun. Which is fine! It's quite good.) You're only able to equip a single perk at a time and, between the three choices, I prefer the one that lets you take a hit without dropping your combo. There's also Panic mode, playable alone or with a friend in split-screen, in which you try to survive for as long as possible. You can keep fighting until you're either out of health or out of time. For me, it's invariably the former. I have no problem scrambling to grab time extensions, but in doing so, I become too reckless. At any point, it's possible to pause the action to buy upgrades for your current run. Unlike in Arcade mode, these purchases aren't persistent across levels. The Bug Butcher gets chaotic, but rarely is it frustrating. Even when the screen is packed with enemies, you still have this overall awareness of where you should be standing, and when. The difficulty curve is spot on. It does a stellar job of making you feel mostly in control -- and, at times, over-powered -- without letting you sleepwalk to victory. You'll have to work for those high scores. I loved the responsive controls, and that's a big factor when examining an action-heavy game like this, but the presentation is also commendable. The art and sound design play pivotal roles. Bugs are squishy, just as you'd expect, while power-ups serve as a visual and auditory jolt of energy. The thumping electronic soundtrack is unrelenting, further helping to keep you in The Zone. If there's a major complaint to be made about The Bug Butcher, it's that there simply isn't more of it. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
The Bug Butcher review photo
Do your part!
When I first heard about The Bug Butcher last year, I thought it looked like a nice modern take on the bubble-popping shooter Super Pang. But I held off. I have a regrettable history of playing games in Steam Early Access onl...

The Division photo
The Division

This is how big the map in The Division is


But is it big enough for you? (TWSS)
Jan 18
// Vikki Blake
If you’d been wondering just how big The Division’s post-apocalyptic world is going to be, I have some news for you. YouTuber Arrekz has shared a new video which details the borders of the shooter’s playgrou...

The sweet annihilation of Nuclear Throne

Jan 17 // Nic Rowen
Nuclear Throne is about mutants and freaks obliterating each other in a fucked up biohazard of a world over a supposed seat on a likely meaningless throne. It's about winning the right to lord over a dead world. It's about twitch reflexes, the honing and sharpening of the most mechanical and merciless of gamer reactions. That dead-eye arcade stare that comes from quickly identifying the most pressing threat and eliminating it as quickly as possible with minimal resource usage. It's about repeating that process about a thousand times, trying to get ever so slightly better at it every time you try. It's about dying, quickly and cheaply. It's about a health bar that is so fragile as to be essentially meaningless. Bullets that gouge three pips of health out of a bar of eight and don't even have the decency to make you flicker for a second. One-hit kills from bosses. One-hit kills from mutant sewer rats. One-hit kills from cars accidentally exploding too close, the clumsy use of a plasma cannon, or getting a little too curious about a mysterious crystal. It hardly matters, most games of Nuclear Throne take anywhere between five and fifteen minutes. Another try is just a click away. Nuclear Throne isn't a game about learning from the mistakes of the past, it's about doubling down on them. Fucked up the planet with nuclear hellfire and warfare? Well, guess we better slaughter each other by the dozen to fight over a fancy chair. Get killed by a random grenade? Mash that "retry" button to jump right back in and eat another one. Die immediately trying to figure out how to play as Melty, the incredibly squishy pile of walking goo? Play as him another 20 times in a row until it's late and your eyes sting, and you know you'll hate yourself in the morning. To me, Nuclear Throne is the game I turn to when I'm not in the mood to learn from my mistakes, when I'd rather wallow in them. When I want to pile them on top of each other again and again until I can make myself a comfortable pile of failure to sit on. I've read that Luftrausers, Vlambeer's previous game, was made while the team was angry. That the fury of having one of their other games ripped-off in the Apple marketplace and the long, bitter process of trying to resolve that issue crept its way into Luftrausers and became the black core of its angry heart. That the unrelenting aggression of both the enemies and the player (motivated by a strict score-attack combo system to keep fighting at all costs) was a result of how they felt at the time. It's not hard to extend the logic and imagine how those feeling influenced the rest of the game. The ultra minimalist design, the obsession with cutting out every superfluous element of the game, reveals a design team wasn't just uninterested in niceties, but hostile to them. One of the iconic ship abilities in Luftrausers is a suicide bomb that triggers a skull-shaped nuclear explosion when the player dies, clearing out every enemy left on the screen. It's pure schadenfreude -- they might as well made the nuclear cloud a middle finger. In many ways, Nuclear Throne seems just as angry. It's hyper-aggressive and utterly merciless. The kind of game where you are expected to die. Failure is the default state and winning is the rare, precious exception (and all it does is toss you back into an even harder NG+). The game is hostile to the player, with disorienting screen shake accompanying every explosion, dick-bag cheap shots from off-screen enemies, monsters disguised as ammo boxes -- the kind of tricks you'd expect to see in something like I Wanna Be the Guy. But it's also a whole lot of fun. Nuclear Throne celebrates nihilism. It finds the joy in self-obliteration. Every aspect of the design speaks to a willful disregard for safety, a rejection of self-preservation. While ammo and health are precious commodities, half the weapons you can pick up are more dangerous to you than they are the enemy, and the rest gleefully waste ammunition. Suicidal choices like the disc gun with it's bouncing buzzsaw blades that are 100% guaranteed to ricochet back at you, radiation grenades that leave dense clouds of toxic smoke for you to walk into, blood sledgehammers that gamble health for a more powerful swing -- madness in a game where you're always a hair's breadth from death. There is dumb shit like the triple and quad machine guns, which flood the screen with firepower while evaporating your ammo reserve in the blink of an eye. Great fun for about seven seconds or so. Or Y.V's “Brrrpt” upgrade that lets him fire a weapon four times per trigger pull combined with something like the “precision” crossbow. Completely wasteful, entirely satisfying. Nuclear Throne seems like the kind of game the War Boys from Mad Max would enjoy. Then you have the little details. The loading screen messages that alternate between poignant and asinine, constantly pointing out how pointless and nihilistic the situation is only to laugh at it. The grotesquely cute design of the characters, little monsters you can't help but love. Chicken, an avian-samurai so committed to carnage that she'll keep fighting for a few seconds even after losing her head. Or my personal favorite character, the Robot, who's special ability is that he can devour spare guns to restore health and ammo. He is a being that literally subsists on violence, but that doesn't stop him from being cute as a button. I play a lot of different games for many different reasons. There are some games that I play for the story, or the world, the Fallouts and Dragon Ages of the world. I like fighting games and multiplayer first-person shooters to test my skills against other players, and MOBAs as an excuse to play with friends. But you know what? Sometimes I'm not in the mood to go scavenge around for copper wire or perform fetch quests for peasants. Sometimes the last thing I would want to do is go online and put up with trash talking morons or try to put on a happy face for my friends. Sometimes at the end of the day I'm tired and sad. I don't have the energy to invest in some 80 hour RPG or the focus to deal with online bullshit. I just want to blow everything up. I want to get killed. I want to do it over and over again until I feel like all the bile and frustration of the day has been expunged. That's a valid reason to play games as well. As the industry moves further into huge triple A multiplayer titles and massive open-world adventures, and many indies become increasingly story driven and emotional charged, I feel like that desire for mindless, cathartic, healing obliteration is getting lost in the shuffle. It makes me thankful for Nuclear Throne and its sweet embrace of annihilation.
Nuclear Throne photo
I DEMAND A CROWN
It may not seem like it, but most post-apocalyptic narratives are fundamentally optimistic. They might be set against a godforsaken backdrop of radioactive fallout with roaming packs of cannibalistic thrill-killers, but beyon...

EDF Mission Pack 1 photo
EDF Mission Pack 1

Earth Defense Force 4.1 has some new missions


The first DLC level pack is out
Jan 15
// Jordan Devore
Unsurprisingly, Earth Defense Force 4.1: The Shadow of New Despair is getting extra missions post-release. The first DLC pack, Time of the Mutants, released this week on PlayStation Network. It's $9.99 for 26 levels. A second...
Half-Life photo
Half-Life

A sequel to Half-Life: Opposing Force is coming to Steam next month


Fan-made, but with Valve's blessing
Jan 15
// Brett Makedonski
Before Half-Life 2, the Black Mesa universe gave birth to three Half-Life spin-offs: Opposing Force, Blue Shift, and Decay (and where Gearbox Software got its start). The average person might not know this because they w...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

I thought this Fallout 4 cosplay was an in-game shot for a second


You okay Nick?
Jan 15
// Chris Carter
Whenever a massive AAA game is out, it garners hundreds of thousands of fans, and rallies them to a general cause. Because of this, so many artistic creations are born, including this amazing Nick Valentine cosplay from Fallo...

Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare 2 is off to a great start, based on the beta

Jan 15 // Chris Carter
The biggest change I noticed immediately was the hub world, which the game grants you access to right from the start. It essentially consists of two giant bases (one for Plants, the other for Zombies), with a giant battlefield in the middle. Right now in the beta quests aren't enabled, but it was fun to just roam around in, as there's plenty of canon fodder to destroy and new areas to discover. Players can level-up in the hub it seems, breaking up some of the monotony of playing online over and over. You can also instantly switch allegiances and see how the other side lives. I'm hopeful for this element of the game in the finished version. In terms of the new classes, I'm rather impressed. Each army has three new playstyles, all of which add their own unique imprint to the metagame. On the Plant side I really enjoyed the Rose, which functions as a mage archetype, complete with a polymorph spell. The Citron, a tank-like character is a real game-changer with its shield, which can block sniper shots with ease for both you and your party. Kernel Corn is a bruiser of sorts, with limited mobility and the power to call in airstrikes. The Zombies have a lot of utility as well with the Imp, who is fast and fragile, but dual wields pistols and can call in the devastating mech power-up. Captain Deadbeard suits the Zombie playstyle just fine as a wildcard, who is more of a jack of all trades/master of none type deal, with long and short range abilities. Super Brainz is probably the wackiest of them all though, as he's a melee character that's seemingly based off of Bizarro with a host of different moves, including a hadoken. Of course, all the old favorites return, with four variants for every character, including the new classes. While microtransactions are in at launch this time (they weren't in the first game, but were added later), they seem to be par for the course, which basically means you can ignore them. Players will be able to buy coins for real cash, but those coins are handily awarded by playing the game, and according to EA "nothing you can't earn can be bought." The beta kicked off as of yesterday, and you can join in on the festivities until January 18. It's limited to just multiplayer and several modes, but the finished version will bring back the wave-based "Garden Ops" mode, as well as split-screen for "all game modes," as well as the ability for the second player to earn their own upgrades on their account. Barring a tiny amount of lag in a few of my matches, things seem to be going very smoothly.
Plants vs. Zombies photo
Plants or Zombies
It's a damn shame that Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare wasn't more popular. I mean, it did well enough for EA to greenlight a sequel, but many of my friends weren't keen on it because it looked too silly. Little did t...

The Division photo
The Division

Here's when you can play the next The Division beta


Ubisoft confirms beta testing weekend
Jan 15
// Vikki Blake
Ubisoft has confirmed that The Division’s next beta will start on January 28, 2016. According to a recent tweet, the closed beta test will be available on Xbox One from January 28 and on PC and PlayStation 4 from Januar...
Custom Hydra Splatling photo
Custom Hydra Splatling

Splatoon is getting its final new weapon tomorrow


Custom Hydra Splatling
Jan 14
// Steven Hansen
Nintendo has been lovely about bringing new content to Splatoon over the last six or so months, but tomorrow's new addition, the Custom Hydra Splatling, will be the last weapon added to the paint-based multiplayer shooter, according to the company. Let your ink be fast and true.
Garden Warfare 2 photo
Garden Warfare 2

The Garden Warfare 2 open beta starts today


January 14 - 18 on Xbox One and PS4
Jan 14
// Jordan Devore
The Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare 2 beta begins today. If you have an Xbox One or PlayStation 4, just head to your respective storefront and download away. It should be live in most if not all regions by this afternoon. ...
The Division photo
The Division

This new The Division trailer looks incredible


Well, I think it does anyway
Jan 13
// Vikki Blake
After a trailer accidentally went up too early, and then was pulled, and was then mirrored and shared and Streisanded all over the place, Ubisoft has now officially released yesterday’s leaked trailer for The Division. ...
Metal Gear Online photo
Metal Gear Online

Metal Gear Online entering limited PC beta today


Get your croc mask on
Jan 12
// Chris Carter
Metal Gear Online may have a number of issues preventing it from achieving greatness, but it's still a decent diversion, and a nice bonus on top of Metal Gear Solid V. Now it's headed off of consoles, as MGO is entering ...
Homefront photo
Homefront

The leak was right, as Homefront: The Revolution is set for May 17


Official
Jan 12
// Chris Carter
Well, Deep Silver likely felt that it needed to spill the beans after the release date for Homefront: The Revolution was uncovered by way of a Target pre-order card, so here it is -- the official announcement, in video f...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Danny Trejo apparently plays Fallout 4 as himself


Machete Kills
Jan 12
// Chris Carter
Danny Trejo, who was in films such as Con Air, Desperado, and more recently, Machete, plays Fallout...as himself. This hilarious revelation comes by way of Twitter, where the actor posted a picture of his in-game avatar,...
Destiny photo
Destiny

PSA: Destiny's Nightfall is broken at the moment


Hey, get the door
Jan 12
// Chris Carter
[Update: Bungie has rectified the issue as of this afternoon.] As if there already wasn't a reason to do the Nightfall (hello useless multiple 290ish Ghost rewards!), Destiny's weekly event is now broken this week. After the ...
The Division photo
The Division

I think this Division trailer is telling us to not lick our money


You're not my supervisor!
Jan 11
// Brett Makedonski
There's no small irony in Ubisoft, a company that very much likes getting money, releasing a trailer advising of the perils of handling money. Don't handle money, don't lick money, don't eat money. Do you want diseases? 'Cau...
Gears 4 photo
Gears 4

We might get Gears of War 4 a little sooner than anticipated


Buona Sera
Jan 11
// Brett Makedonski
There's a good chance that we'll be fragging Locusts and rolling into chest-high walls a bit earlier this year than we thought. Microsoft has stealthily moved the launch window for Gears of War 4 up by a month or two. As...
Grand Theft Auto V photo
Grand Theft Auto V

Grand Theft Auto Online servers still down on PlayStation 4


Server functionality remains 'limited'
Jan 11
// Vikki Blake
PlayStation 4 servers for Grand Theft Auto Online has been offline for several hours. Rockstar's status page acknowledges on the official site that the issue persists, but does not give an indication as to why the s...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Jesus, this Fallout 4 Deathclaw video


What was I saying?
Jan 11
// Chris Carter
While I'm not one to normally endear myself to Fallout 4's cavalcade of glitches (hello auto-save deletions), there are a number of them that really hit the spot. Most notably, the "hey this conversation is fucked" concept i...
Splatoon photo
Splatoon

Next week's Splatfest is all about time travel


MARTY
Jan 08
// Zack Furniss
Splatoon wants to know: do you prefer The Flintstones or The Jetsons? Well, not really. They want to know what you would do if you could travel through time. Would you go backward or forward? I'd probably go back and tel...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Make Fallout 4 look a little more like Borderlands with this mod


There a few mods on top of this too
Jan 08
// Chris Carter
PC gaming sure is great. Modder Reddit_is_wrong managed to craft his own visual overhaul mod for Fallout 4, and it brings the style more inline with Borderlands' cel-shading. Sure it isn't an exact 1:1 replica, but it looks c...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...