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ScrewAttack

Review: Jump'N'Shoot Attack

Mar 26 // Tony Ponce
Jump'N'Shoot Attack (Android, iOS [reviewed], Windows Phone)Developer: FreakZone GamesPublisher: ScrewAttack GamesReleased: March 26, 2015 (Android, iOS) / TBA (Windows Phone)MSRP: $2.59 You are Louise Lightfoot. The President has been captured by mutants. In order to save him, you must follow these specific instructions: Jump. Shoot. Every so often, jump and shoot at the same time. So... Mega Man? Yeah, kinda! Only the commands are more explicit here, since the only two actions at your disposal are jumping and shooting. Jump'N'Shoot Attack is an auto-runner, only less Canabalt and more Rayman Jungle Run and Fiesta Run. There are four worlds split into four stages apiece, and Louise will hoof through each without a care. To jump, tap anywhere on the left half of the screen; to shoot, tap anywhere on the right half. Simple and responsive! [embed]289538:57919:0[/embed] Your gun can be upgraded twice by collecting power-ups -- the first upgrade grants a double shot, while the second bestows the mighty spread shot. Raising the stakes even further is a jetpack item found in certain stages which transforms the action into a deadlier version of Jetpack Joyride. The 16 stages are rather short, so to compensate, they've been packed with enough enemies and obstacles to give your thumbs a proper workout. Between adjusting the height of your jumps to cross narrow platforms and hammering the trigger because your gun is not rapid-fire, you'll be feeling the burn before long! One small mercy is that Louise stops running if she hits a wall, so use the break to regain composure before hopping over and storming onward. For completionists, three gems can be found in each level. As expected, collecting these gems often requires you to skirt closer to death than you'd prefer. Case in point, you may reach a fork in the path, with one branch leading to a gem and the other to a power-up that would make the rest of the level less stressful. As concentrated as the challenge is, however, the overall length is still on the tragically low end -- on my first run, collecting the gems in all but two levels, I finished in just over an hour. There's even an achievement for clearing the game in under 10 minutes! Unless you are a serious achievement or high-score hunter, it's unlikely that you'll return to Jump'N'Shoot Attack once the credits roll. There's a solid foundation that I hope FreakZone will expand upon. Rayman Jungle Run got a free update that added more levels, so perhaps that's a possibility here as well. Could we maybe get some boss battles too? It's a shame to have a game that so clearly draws inspiration from Mega Man and Contra but skimps out on the meaty encounters that highlight those series. So will Jump'N'Shoot Attack spark a mobile renaissance and win over the hardcore masses? Probably not. Is it a solid runner that delivers a tough but responsive platforming experience as promised? Absolutely. Gold star for effort.
Jump'N'Shoot Attack photo
Something, something, Egoraptor reference
Four Christmases ago, I joined the smartphone brigade when I found an iPhone 4S nestled under the tree. Oh boy! I thought. Now I can grab all those iOS games that people can't shut up about! And for a couple of years, I was a...

Depression Quest co-creator looks for what's hidden in Disorder

Feb 13 // Patrick Lindsey
In his 1974 essay What It’s Like to Be a Bat, Thomas Nagel summed this up perfectly. It’s basically impossible to ever really understand what another person is going through on an internal level. The best we can do is derive a close approximation as filtered through our own experiences. This is why, some four decades after their rise in popularity, pretty much the only subject videogames haven’t been able to adequately address is mental health. Depression is nefarious in that it’s insidiously difficult to describe it to someone who hasn’t had that experience themselves. Through a cultural history of failure to understand mental illness, the accident of our own common lexicon, and the private nature of personal health, we tend to collectively conflate depression with being "really sad." This fundamental misunderstanding, almost more than the illness itself, can serve as the biggest obstacle to people living with depression. Thus it makes sense that we try and communicate this essential experience through the more abstract means of art. Disorder (Swagabyte Games, 2015) is far from the first game to explore issues of mental illness. In fact, videogames as a medium have historically had a field day with depictions of mental illness and all the subdued and horrific forms it can take. Up until about five to ten years ago, mental illness was a topic mostly left to horror games, and some problematic tropes came with it. It is only recently that depression has been explored for what it truly is; an utterly mundane if completely pervasive aspect of life. Explaining the effects of depression can be as frustrating as it is fruitless. Rather than trying to overcome this expository hurdle, Disorder attempts to convey the feelings brought on by mental illness visually. Depression is an invisible illness; those afflicted appear normal to the uninformed observer while simultaneously roiling internally from a miasma of chemical imbalances. Thus the world of Disorder is itself set in two ostensibly similar yet fundamentally different “worlds.” This metaphor extends to the game’s very design. Disorder takes the form of a platformer; perhaps the most mundane, nonthreatening, and common type of videogame there is. It’s only when the player comes up against a (literal) wall, unable to move forward, that the hidden world of Disorder shines through. In order to solve puzzles and progress through levels, players have to switch between the “normal” and “disordered” worlds - the former represents the perception of a mentally healthy person, and the latter being a visualization of what the world can look like through the eyes of someone living with depression. The disordered world (I refuse to call it a “dark world”) is drained of color, the lush landscapes repainted a bloated and bruised purple. Formerly innocuous platforms and bounce pads turn into malicious fanged crawling insects, and pathways that were previously available close off. Players complete platforming puzzles by switching back and forth between worlds, in later puzzles often during mid-jump, and grabbing “marbles,” the game’s collectible. (The protagonist explains the marbles’ presence by stating they were a favorite toy of his younger brother, though the temptation to view it as a “lost marbles” reference is as prominent as it is inappropriate.) There is a narrative to Disorder, but it’s as obtuse as it is insignificant. While the developers have designed a devilish series of dynamic platforming challenges, the plot, not to mention its primary delivery method, is anything but. Players labor through multiple jumps, only to reach an area where they are drip-fed bits of narrative through on-screen text. While the story being conveyed is tragic and personal for the person who wrote it, it’s hard to get invested since it runs so contrary to the pace of the rest of the game that it becomes difficult to emotionally invest. That’s not to say that Disorder is a bad game. Far from it. It’s clear it was made with an incredible amount of care and a genuine desire to bridge the gap between those who have experienced depression and those who have not. Its biggest issue is the same as that shared by the majority of other games that have attempted to tackle the subject: it wraps itself up in too many layers of metaphor, either too afraid or unconcerned to deal with the subject matter it presents directly. It’s clear that Disorder is an important game for the developers. Like all art, it exists as an attempt to process difficult events or feelings as much as it does to entertain. But it would be difficult to play through the game and come away with a genuinely in-depth understanding of what depression is about. It rubs up against that age-old conundrum: how can you describe what a strictly internal phenomenon is like through solely external means? Games have been heralded as the new medium of our generation due to the inherent “show-not-tell” capacity mechanical systems can evoke. While Disorder embraces this strength of the medium in some capacities, when it comes to delivering the narrative in a way that players can latch onto and identify with, it sets this goal aside. As a personal statement, Disorder is a beautiful and obviously heartfelt game about loss and coping with understanding. As a piece of art with an intention to communicate nebulous and difficult feelings, it falls flat.
Disorder  photo
A new game from ScrewAttack about clinical depression
All art, or indeed even all communication, is a process of connecting with others through shared experience. Whether we’re trying to express a specific experience, or conversely, reveling in the knowledge that there's ...

Fullscreen acquires ScrewAttack

Mar 28 // Papa Niero
[embed]272608:53177:0[/embed] FULLSCREEN ACQUIRES SCREWATTACK; CONTINUES OVERALL INDEPENDENCE AND GROWTH BY DOUBLING DOWN ON VIDEO GAME CONTENT The New ScrewAttack Network to Provide Audiences, Creators and Brands with Authentic, Video Game-centric Content, Resources and an Expanded Community LOS ANGELES, CA AND DALLAS, TX, March 28, 2014 -- Fullscreen, Inc., the media company powering the creation and sharing of video with the connected generation, today announced that it acquired ScrewAttack, an industry leading video game focused media company. ScrewAttack significantly increases Fullscreen’s presence in the game industry news and entertainment space through a growing YouTube channel, a thriving website, and a strong offline presence by way of their annual SGC conference. As a core gaming brand and community, the newly-formed ScrewAttack Network will serve as the cornerstone of Fullscreen’s leading game community that encompasses thousands of top channels that deliver more than 750MM monthly views each month.  “Our mission has always been to produce and feature the most entertaining game content in the world, whether it be video game news, trailers, gameplay, or original content,” said Craig Skistimas, Founder of ScrewAttack. “Together with Fullscreen, we can amplify our efforts and interact with an even larger part of the video game community to feature content that excites, pleases and entertains.”  “As a leading video game community, ScrewAttack will provide a beachhead for our creator network and support our ongoing programming strategy in gaming”, said Larry Shapiro, Fullscreen’s Head of Talent. “With nearly one million subscribers on YouTube and a passionate and loyal fan base, we are excited to increase our investment in premium, original programming on ScrewAttack alongside their existing franchises like Death Battle.”  All ScrewAttack employees will join Fullscreen and physically remain in Dallas, allowing the team to continue its focus on creating premium content with added resources and reach. The ScrewAttack team adds in-house production capabilities for videos, game development and credible, first-hand editorial coverage of the video game industry. ScrewAttack’s successful merchandising platform and SGC conference, one of the fastest growing video game conventions in the country, will help Fullscreen open a diversified set of touch points with fans both online and offline. “The only way to get credibility with gamers is by truly understanding the art form of games, which is something that can’t be faked. ScrewAttack isn’t just another gaming site or channel, it’s a group of people who are extremely passionate about the space they’re in and it’s that knowledge and dedication that’s allowed them to build an entirely authentic video game community,” said Shapiro. “We believe ScrewAttack’s unique voice and approach to game news, reviews and pop culture will be a great way to establish a consumer-facing brand for game-centric content.” About Fullscreen Fullscreen is a media company powering the creation and sharing of video with the connected generation. Creators and the world’s leading brands benefit from Fullscreen’s technology products and premium services to entertain and engage audiences. Three hundred sixty-five million subscribers generate three billion video views across the Fullscreen’s global network each month. Headquartered in Los Angeles, the company was founded in January 2011 by CEO George Strompolos, a co-creator of the original YouTube Partner Program. Fullscreen’s network includes top creative talent, including: The Fine Brothers, filmmaker Devin Super Tramp, super-group O2L and recording artist Lindsey Stirling. Please visit: fullscreen.net for additional information.
Holy Acquisition Batman photo
Introducing the new ScrewAttack Network which is now a thing
For those of you that follow gaming websites and personalities as closely as you do the games here's a wild one: our friends over at ScrewAttack were acquired today by Fullscreen.  Craig Skistimas and his lovely haired ...

Review: Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures

Sep 26 // Tony Ponce
Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures (3DS, PC [reviewed], Wii U)Developer: FreakZone GamesPublisher: ScrewAttack GamesReleased: September 20, 2013 (PC) / 2014 (3DS, Wii U)MSRP: $14.99Rig: Intel Core i3-380M, 6GB of RAM, GeForce GT 425M, Windows 7 64-bit The games that the Nerd typically plays fall under one of three categories: otherwise decent games that feature relentless difficulty, average games with a number of very curious or backwards design choices, and outright festering ass. The last group is his main claim to fame, but for an official Nerd game to work, it would have to draw inspiration from all three categories while at the same time being enjoyable enough to play over prolonged periods. In other words, FreakZone had to take shit and simultaneously make it not shit. Quite the paradox, but one that FreakZone achieved quite handily. On the surface, Adventures is both an homage to and parody of the AVGN web series. The Nerd and his friends are sucked into the television and transported to Game Land, divided into eight levels inspired by the show's many themes. There is "Assholevania," a send-up of James Rolfe's own love for the Castlevania franchsie; "Beat It & Eat It," a puerile domain filled with the sights and sounds of Atari porn software like Custer's Revenge; "Blizzard of Balls," a wintry hell born out of the AVGN Christmas specials; and others. [embed]262392:50644:0[/embed] Long-time Nerd fans will note many nods and Easter eggs to the show's history in everything from the enemies and items to the obstacles and backgrounds. You consume Rolling Rock to refill health and acquire tokens to summon the Glitch Gremlin or Super Mecha Death Christ. You fly atop the board from Silver Surfer, go toe-to-toe with Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and find Shit Pickle hiding in various locations. Then there's the final stage, a foul monument to one of the Nerd's most despised game companies. Several classic Nintendo games are also paid tribute. In the introductory level, you get instructed by Naggi, the green-hued cousin of Ocarina of Time's Navi, much to the Nerd's displeasure. The disappearing blocks from Mega Man and the giant goblin heads from Air Man's stage in Mega Man 2 feature prominently, as does Doom's Cacodemon, remade out of feces and appropriately dubbed "Cacademon." Even FreakZone's own MANOS is acknowledged with a boss battle pulled straight from that title. But what really gives Adventures the AVGN touch is the running commentary. Every so often, the Nerd will make some kind of rant or observation, although the fact that it's text-based makes it difficult to read during particularly harrowing platforming segments. Whenever you die, the Nerd will spout one of his famous curse-laden analogies (e.g. "This game is rotten fungus coming out of a badger's sphincter!") with keywords randomly generated from a pool of submissions from the game's Facebook page. The current pool isn't all that big, thus many phrases are repeated; perhaps ScrewAttack will continue to update the game with expanded word banks. All the references and potty humor in the world wouldn't be enough if the core game wasn't compelling. Thankfully, there is a solid quest beneath the surface dressing that even those completely unfamiliar with the Nerd's exploits would be able to enjoy. If you happened to have played MANOS, you'll notice that Adventures feels like an extension of that, with many shared elements and environmental hazards -- I wouldn't consider that a knock against this game, though. There's a classic "Nintendo hard" degree of challenge, but it's tempered by very solid controls and enough checkpoints and beer bottles to carry you towards the boss. Oh, and it's got a pretty bangin' soundtrack to keep your fighting spirit high! You begin the game as the Nerd with a multi-directional NES Zapper for a weapon, and careful searching will lead you to three additional party members -- Guitar Guy, who can run fast and shoot wave beams through walls; Mike, with a super high jump and the ability to spot destructible walls and invisible platforms; and Bullshit Man, who can double jump and lob extra powerful lumps of poo. Only by swapping characters on the fly and using their abilities can you reach formerly inaccessible areas filled with 1-ups, health, and weapon upgrades. You may even spot a few NPC cameos, like brentalfloss, Egoraptor, and our very own Jim Sterling and Mr. Destructoid! Every obstacle in the game operates on very simple patterns that can be observed from a distance before being approached. Spikes that emerge from the floor? Fire pillars or laser turrets that trigger at regular intervals? Maces that circle the bricks they are chained to? Just count the seconds and time your progress. Your mistakes are entirely your own. Naturally, the last level throws everything plus the kitchen sink at you at once, but that's what last levels are supposed to do. However, there is one persistent obstacle -- a skull-faced block that causes instant death upon touching -- that caused me great grief. Such blocks appear in clusters and typically blink in and out with the same rhythm as the disappearing blocks. They are everywhere, in every single level without fail, yet they always feel completely out of place. I mean, death blocks that kill you with a mere graze? What's up with that? In a way, death blocks are a quick and easy way to bump up a stage's difficulty without the need to create unique environmental hazards. Sounds rather creatively bereft, no? But if you were the Nerd, wouldn't such an obstacle become the focus of your rage and frustration, the breaking point after which righteous obscenities start flowing like wine? If the designers' goal was to put you in the Nerd's shoes, such an evil element would be necessary to trigger that transformation. Adventures is no insurmountable wall, but neither is it a welcome wagon. On Normal mode, you are given 30 lives and unlimited continues, which should allow anyone with enough drive to at least make it to the final boss within a couple of hours -- whether you can actually beat the final boss is another matter, the god-modding bastard. Beyond that are even tougher difficulty modes that prevent saving between levels and reduce your amount or health and retries. As a pseudo NES-era throwback, it nails the careful balance between cruel and inviting. As a tribute to the Nerd, it does a decent job covering his entire career, although repetitive dialog lessens the humorous impact on repeated playthroughs. As an authentic Nerd "experience"... well... your mileage may vary, but I'd like to think it is. Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures is not a cowa-fucking-piece-of-dog-shit, that's for certain!
AVGN Adventures review photo
He's gonna take you back to the past...
For years, James "Angry Video Game Nerd" Rolfe has suffered the worst that retro gaming could toss at him for the sake of your amusement. Why does he do it? Is he a masochist? Does the rage that burns inside with every sudden...

AVGN Adventures photo
AVGN Adventures

AVGN Adventures diarrhea dumps on Steam on September 23


Console versions will have to wait until next year
Sep 16
// Tony Ponce
I got to play an improved build of Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures at PAX this year, and I can reaffirm that it's going to be one hell of a challenge for those in dire need of classic "Nintendo hard" platforming. It's pure e...
AVGN Adventures photo
AVGN Adventures

Pre-order AVGN Adventures for a chance to be an NPC


You know what's NOT buuuuuuuullllllsh*t?
Aug 25
// Tony Ponce
Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures is up for pre-order on Steam, so if you're jonesin' for some turd blastin' on the PC rather than on the Wii U or 3DS, that's a thing you should do. In fact, do it before 1:00 PM EST on Septem...
WOO-OO! photo
WOO-OO!

ScrewAttack's Craig and I sing DuckTales...


... along with a bunch of other people
Aug 22
// Tony Ponce
There was a special booth at E3 where you could sing the DuckTales theme. Capcom edited the footage into an entertaining montage proving that E3 attendees are all children in adult bodies. ScrewAttack's Stuttering Craig and ...
Ninja Gaiden vs. Strider photo
Ninja Gaiden vs. Strider

Shinobi clash! Ryu Hayabusa vs. Strider Hiryu


The least stealthy ninjas of all time cross blades
Aug 16
// Tony Ponce
Videogame ninjas are seriously the worst ninjas of all time. It's kind of hard to keep hidden in the shadows when there is a trail of blood and limbs running right up to your present location. Still pretty badass, though. Tw...
AVGN Adventures photo
AVGN Adventures

Add your own colorful phrases to AVGN Adventures


"This game is ______ ______ coming from a ______'s ______!"
Jul 02
// Tony Ponce
In my E3 preview of the upcoming comedy platformer Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures, I noted that each time you die a random Nerd phrase appears on screen. Fans of the Nerd's foul-mouthed escapades are quite familiar with the...
Shao Kahn vs. M. Bison photo
Shao Kahn vs. M. Bison

Who would win: Shao Kahn or M. Bison?


Closest thing to Mortal Kombat X Street Fighter we'll ever get
Jun 28
// Tony Ponce
We're never going to get that Mortal Kombat / Street Fighter crossover, so what are we to do? Harness our "Imagination," that's what! ScrewAttack's DEATH BATTLE! pits the big bosses of the MK and SF universes against one ano...
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Sessler & Sterling at ScrewAttack Gaming Convention 2013


"What is Chungus?"
Jun 24
// Jim Sterling
This past weekend, your ol' pal Jim Sterling was in attendance at SGC 2013, and Adam Sessler was there too, representing our friends at Rev3 Games. Naturally, these two titans of games media had to clash and hammer out the b...
AVGN Adventures photo
AVGN Adventures

Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures ISN'T a sh*tload of f*ck


But it will make you curse your mother
Jun 13
// Tony Ponce
Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures is a game that wants you to curse at it. It wants you to flip out and go ballistic and yell at small children. It wants to give you the experience of being the Nerd in more ways than one. AVGN...
AVGN Adventures photo
AVGN Adventures

Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures bound for 3DS, Wii U


Unfortunately, plans for an NES port fell through
May 01
// Tony Ponce
James Rolfe's retrotastic digital quest, Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures, recently passed through Greenlight, securing a spot on Steam's virtual storefront. According to a post on the game's Facebook page, developer ScrewAtt...
AVGN Adventures photo
AVGN Adventures

Check out Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures in action


The parodic platformer has passed through Greenlight and will release on Steam
Apr 17
// Tony Ponce
The Angry Video Game Nerd's assault on all things sh*tty and retro will soon break from the confines of live-action footage and into the digital world. Following last week's teaser trailer, here comes pre-alpha gameplay of A...
AVGN PC Game photo
AVGN PC Game

The Angry Video Game Nerd gets his own game


You're s**tting me! This game is s**tting me!
Apr 08
// Allistair Pinsof
Internet personality, classic game reviewer, and alter-ego of filmmaker James Rolfe, The Angry Video Game Nerd will get his own retro 2D platformer, courtesy of ScrewAttack Games. Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures will come t...
Xbox 720!?!? photo
Xbox 720!?!?

ScrewAttack TOTALLY has the skinny on Xbox 720


Yep, this is the real deal, no lie
Mar 09
// Tony Ponce
While the rest of the world awaits the proper Xbox 720 reveal, ScrewAttack managed to learn all the juicy details and spoil the whole mess. Behold, Microsoft's grand master plan to edge out the PlayStation 4 juuuuuuuuuust sl...
Street Fighter photo
Street Fighter

Street Fighter III's Q is a sexual Kermit the Frog


brentalfloss sings "The Total Destruction"
Feb 18
// Tony Ponce
The enigmatic Q from Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike is a freak. That we know. His Total Destruction technique certainly doesn't leave much room for ambiguity. You do have to wonder what must be going on through his / hers / ...
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Here come the fanboys! Link vs. Cloud in a Death Battle


Jul 13
// Tony Ponce
Uh oh. The latest episode of ScrewAttack's dream fight series, Death Battle, has just been uploaded. Today's combatants are Link from the Zelda series and Cloud from Final Fantasy VII. It's all in good fun, but given the participants this time around... well... I don't expect it to end well. FFVII can be a touchy subject, God damn. DEATH BATTLE! - Link VS Cloud [ScrewAttack]
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The lightning gods: Death Battle pits Thor against Raiden


May 06
// Tony Ponce
The latest in ScrewAttack's "who would win?" series beefs up the manliness following the last episode's flower party. We've got Marvel's Thor locked in mortal combat against Raiden from... Mortal Kombat. Which of these light...

Two fun people were asked to leave PAX East

Apr 08 // Jonathan Holmes
On top of that, right before shooting a very special episode of Talking to Women about Videogames, Jessica Nigri (of Lollipop Chainsaw fame) was asked to leave the show. The way I heard it, she was initially asked to leave the show floor until she had changed out of this particularly revealing outfit. Then after she changed back to her regular Juliet Starling clothes (which she had been wearing for the entirety of day one of the show without issue) she was asked to either change again, or leave the show entirely. Rumor has it that PAX officials suggested that she wear a sweatshirt for the rest of the event, which would make it pretty hard for her to do her job (which is to look exactly like Juilet Starling from Lollipop Chainsaw). Both of these fine people did nothing "wrong" other than show a PG-13 amount of skin in the midst of a show filled with half naked cosplayers and and robot bodybuilders. Is the human body really that awful? What's worse, seeing a man dance in his underwear or having to pay $8 for a small cheeseburger? Why was Jessica's outfit OK on day one, only to have the same outfit considered unacceptable on day 2? Were these two doing anything other than making PAX East a more fun place to be? To that I say, Free Keith Apicary 2012. Free Jessica Nigri 2012. Retake PAX Effect. Otherwise, I guess I'll see you at KAX 2013.
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[Update: I've asked Robert Khoo of Penny Arcade for comment, but he's already commented elsewhere, and is apparently all out of comments at the moment. I also just erased the word "didn't" from a joke in the second paragraph...

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Death Battle returns with some hot Zelda-on-Peach action


Mar 30
// Tony Ponce
The last episode of ScrewAttack's Death Battle released on Christmas Day. Three months seems like plenty of time for Ben and Chad to organize another match, don't you think? Thankfully, future episodes will be arriving at a ...
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MY BOI! Roasted Octorok is a meal fit for a hero


Mar 24
// Tony Ponce
"I'm so hungry, I could eat an Octorok!" VIGIDEN, the ScrewAttack partner show dedicated to Onion-style fake news stories, has taken a taken a break from hardcore journalism to demonstrate culinary magic. Of course, you can't...
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ScrewAttack uncovered a bizarre PSA from the early 90s


Mar 20
// Tony Ponce
Hop into your time-traveling phone booth and go back to the early 90s, when pastels and neon were all the rage and Hulk Hogan was still a real American who fought for the rights of every man. The boys at ScrewAttack were doin...
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So, like, Bobby Kotick is now a director at Coca-Cola


Feb 19
// Tony Ponce
Oh? Did you not hear the news? Earlier this week, the Coca-Cola Company elected Bobby Kotick as a Director of the Company. Coke CEO Muhtar Kent believes that Kotick's experience in the digital avenue will help grow the busin...
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Watch copies of Shaq Fu get blown the f**k up


Feb 15
// Tony Ponce
Chad James of ScrewAttack is a big damn hero. He and his father took a truckload of copies of Shaq Fu, the infamous Shaquille O'Neal fighting game, to the gun range for some target practice. The video that resulted from that...
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What is your favorite videogame romance?


Feb 14
// Tony Ponce
ScrewAttack is in Valentine's Day mode and has made with the lovey-dovey videos. Above is the latest episode of the fairly new The Best EVER! series, and this week's topic is videogame couples. The video focuses on Locke and...
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The Game OverThinker examines the future of piracy


Jan 23
// Tony Ponce
If you visit The Escapist (which you should be doing anyway to check out Jimquisition!), you might have heard of Bob Chipman and his series Escape to the Movies and The Big Picture. Both are really good shows, but I much pref...
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Game Theory has the FINAL word on arrows and knees


Jan 22
// Tony Ponce
Okay, let's put this one to rest, shall we? Enough of this arrow-plus-knee nonsense. Time to cut to the core of the matter, dig up the truth, and swallow our findings no matter what they may be. Game Theory has been around f...
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ScrewAttack asks who or what your favorite retro boss is


Jan 13
// Tony Ponce
With a title that I would have expected our own Chad Concelmo to concoct, ScrewAttack has kicked off a new series entitled The Best EVER! The premise is quite self-explanatory: folks ask SA their opinions on the best "whateve...
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Chun-Li and Cammy have a cat fight


Jan 11
// Tony Ponce
Eddie Lebron and Blue Core Studios have been hard at work on that Sonic film starring Urkel. In their downtime, they whipped up a side Street Fighter film starring Chun-Li and Cammy doing kicks and punches and all that jazz. ...






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