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2:00 PM on 10.27.2014

Intriguing cyberpunk point-and-click title Murder teased

Peter Moorhead, the designer behind the striking but mostly negatively received pixel art point-and-click adventure game Stranded has released a teaser trailer for his next project, Murder. Moorhead describes the project as ...

Rob Morrow


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Mistwalker Announces Upcoming Terra Battle Concert

Terra Battle concert planning is now underway as the popular mobile-RPG surpasses 1 million downloads in less than a month. For more information on upcoming milestones and recently unlocked milestones, please visit Terra Battle's Download Starter.






Review: Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth photo
Review: Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth
by Darren Nakamura

"Civilization, but set in the future on an alien planet." That is really all Firaxis and 2K needed to say to get people excited for the next entry in the long-running turn-based strategy series. There is a fair amount of new ideas to be found here: new systems to explore, new technology to research, and new obstacles to overcome.

But even with everything new, Civilization: Beyond Earth is still Civilization, but set in the future on an alien planet. And it is exactly as good as that sounds.

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Metrocide is a thinking person's Hotline Miami photo
Metrocide is a thinking person's Hotline Miami
by Rob Morrow

Sydney-based independent studio Flat Earth Games has released its top-down cyberpunk-noir contract killing simulator Metrocide via Steam Early Access at the reduced price of $6.99. The final version of the game, which should be available in around six weeks, will cost $12.99.

To coincide with the title's Early Access launch, game creators Leigh and Rohan Harris have released a second developer walkthrough to demonstrate some of the more complicated hits you'll be tasked with completing in the third zone of the game, Hilldale.

In this latest video, viewable below, anti-hero T.J. Trench is far better equipped than he was in the last. Sporting a high-powered silenced rifle and remotely detonated explosives, T.J. can now take down targets from a safe distance, but there's a catch -- depending on the contract's criteria, visiting the crime scene may be necessary for cashing in on the reward. You may want to think twice before striking from a distance; it's going to be difficult to pick up that briefcase with several heavily armed police drones hovering over the body.

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Review: The Art of Alien: Isolation photo
Review: The Art of Alien: Isolation
by Alasdair Duncan

Alien: Isolation has received a lot of praise over its faithful recreation of the original film's lo-fi take on science fiction. "Truckers in space" was the aesthetic director Ridley Scott set out to capture and the decks and corridors of the shipping vessel Nostromo defined a sci-fi art style for 35 years.

Titan has a new book out showcasing the concept art and illustrations that inspired Isolation but they could have just as easily come from a book showing the ideas behind the original movie.

[Don't forget to enter our competition to win a copy of The Art of Alien: Isolation. Just click here for more info.]

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3:00 PM on 10.16.2014

This Dreadnought video shows you how to actually play Dreadnought

As I learned at PAX Prime, actually knowing how to play Dreadnought is half the battle. It's an enamoring idea to rush in with the quickest ship and fire until either you or your target is dead. If that's your approach,...

Brett Makedonski

9:30 AM on 10.15.2014

The intro cinematic for Civilization: Beyond Earth is actually pretty touching

I have been working on a review for the upcoming sci-fi strategy game Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth, and one of the things I could not wait to talk about is the introductory cinematic. It seems silly, but for a seri...

Darren Nakamura

2:00 PM on 10.14.2014

Tales of Cosmos is a point-and-click starring a space corgi

Sure, there is also a chimpanzee named Professor Gagayev, but we all know that Perseus the Dog is the star here. He's got valor! He reminds me of Missile from Ghost Trick, except I'm pretty sure Perseus is a corgi rather tha...

Darren Nakamura

12:30 PM on 09.30.2014

Metrocide gets a developer walkthrough, Early Access coming in October

Flat Earth Games, comprised of brothers Leigh and Rohan Harris, walk us through the first few minutes of their new top-down, cyberpunk-noir, contract killing simulator, Metrocide. In the grim, futuristic world of Metrocide, ...

Rob Morrow



Civilization: Beyond Earth makes weekends disappear photo
Civilization: Beyond Earth makes weekends disappear
by Darren Nakamura

The Civilization series is famous for playing out in unplanned marathon sessions, where "one more turn" quickly turns into five more turns, which turn into another hour, before the player finally looks away from the screen to see that it is starting to get light outside. Knowing this, I'm not sure what I was thinking starting the preview build of Civilization: Beyond Earth on a Friday night.

By the time I finished for that session, I had played for eight hours straight and it was then four in the morning. Then I went to sleep, woke up four hours later, and started playing again, eventually logging almost a full day's worth of play time in a single weekend.

Yes, this is still Civilization through and through, but there are some new concepts included that impact gameplay in significant ways. Though there are clear connections, Beyond Earth is far more than just a reskinning of Civilization V.

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1:30 PM on 09.18.2014

Bad dog! Outpost 13 basically lets you play as The Thing

This is why you name a dog Fluffy or Fido or Spot. When you go and give it a name like Fenrir, after a mythological wolf monster, it gets taken over by an alien being and wants nothing more than to devour your flesh and bone...

Darren Nakamura

7:00 AM on 09.09.2014

Extrasolar Season 2 is being funded through Kickstarter

I do not envy Lazy 8 Studios with the balancing act it has trying to market Extrasolar. By revealing too little, only a relatively small demographic will ever try out the exoplanet rover simulator. By revealing too much, a t...

Darren Nakamura







Review: Halfway photo
Review: Halfway
by Darren Nakamura

One of the things that is so appealing about science fiction is that it deals with situations that seem fantastical, but are ultimately plausible. Technology today would look like magic to those from years past, and so the technology of the future might seem incredible to us now.

Good science fiction brings up not only these possibilities, but the questions that would show up alongside the possibilities. The nature of these questions can be ethical, social, psychological, philosophical, or just technical. Halfway asks: What happens if you spend too much time in the "in-between" when making a faster-than-light jump?

Halfway answers: "Aliens show up and you shoot them a lot."

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I didn't think Dreadnought's hulking ships could be as fun as they are photo
I didn't think Dreadnought's hulking ships could be as fun as they are
by Brett Makedonski

A very specific connotation pops into your mind when you think about spaceship fighters. Your brain's flooded with thoughts of dogfighting ships zooming around, barrel rolling, and flipping end-over-end to fire unceasing space lasers at equally nimble opponents. That's not what Dreadnought is; not even close, in fact.

Dreadnought -- which is currently only slated for PC -- is a thinker's game, a title for those more adept at thinking two steps ahead rather than those that rely on their twitchy fingers. It's a chess match in space -- a chess match that trades in kings and queens for lumbering, massive ships that actually feel like they have weight to them.

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1:30 PM on 09.02.2014

X-ray hands and digital immortality in Soul Axiom

The idea of replicating human consciousness within a computer program has fascinated me since I was first introduced to the concept. Living on, existing only in cyberspace without the need for a meat body seems lik...

Rob Morrow

5:00 PM on 08.21.2014

Ancient Space is a new space RTS from Paradox Interactive

If you're anxiously waiting for that Homeworld HD remake to arrive, we can console ourselves with another nice-looking space-based RTS game in Ancient Space which will dock with us later in the autumn for PC and Mac. Develop...

Alasdair Duncan



Alien: Isolation is haunting and uncompromisingly scary photo
Alien: Isolation is haunting and uncompromisingly scary
by Alessandro Fillari

Though it was initially seen as "Jaws-in-space," the legacy for Alien is certainly much more pristine than the one with the giant shark. Originally released in 1979, the first Alien would eventually become a much-loved horror film that spawned a major movie franchise. And while the sequels would get more attention and prominence among fans, the original still holds a special place in the hearts of fans.

After the release of some rather disappointing Alien titles, and with the Cameron interpretation of Alien as the de-facto standard for the franchise, the developers at Creative Assembly believed it was about time fans went back to the roots of the series. Just a week before gamescom, Sega invited Destructoid out to get some quality time with Alien: Isolation, and to speak with the game's creative lead, Alistair Hope. During our time, we got to learn just how different horror is when faced off with something out of your league.

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