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Fun facts about X-Blades followup Blades of Time


Feb 29
// Jim Sterling
I've been chatting with Anthony DeCicco from The Gamers Hub, who apparently has as soft a spot in his heart as I do for X-Blades and its associated games. Following the release of this weeks' Blades of Time trailer, DeCi...

Preview: Masters of the Broken World

Aug 20 // Maurice Tan
Masters of the Broken World (PC)Developer: Unicorn Games, Snowberry ConnectionPublisher: Snowberry ConnectionRelease date: 2012  The universe is shattered, with Shards of land floating around in space. As a "master," it is up to you to take control of all these masses and bring them together to forge a new world in your image. Meanwhile, others are trying to do the same. Taking control of a Shard yields you bonuses and advances for what was being described as a "tech tree," although some information may have been lost in translation. Either way, you want and need to control all of the Shards. When you select a Shard from this galactic map of sorts, you enter a Total War-esque overworld with a top-down map divided into provinces. You and the AI opponents have one castle that must be defended at all cost, as the player who captures all castles wins control of the Shard. Your castle has nine districts that can each be developed for your military power, economy, etc. If you've played a Heroes of Might & Magic game, it's a bit like that. Completely different from HOMM is how your army works. You are able to recruit up to four heroes, with every hero becoming increasingly more expensive to purchase -- and I'm talking a lot more expensive. Contrary to HOMM, you won't build hundreds of weak-but-inexpensive units; instead, every unit is simply one unit with its own upgrade system. Essentially, they act as mini heroes. Units are of different alignments, and the units you use reflect upon your own alignment. Use creatures like orcs and other monsters -- instead of priests and human units -- and your alignment will shift accordingly. On the Shard's overworld, you can move your hero's army around to other provinces, which pops up a kind of quest and choice screen similar to how King Arthur did it. Some provinces may ally themselves with you by fulfilling a quest somewhere else, others might need to be paid off, and if you want you can just attack them with brute force. When you choose the latter, you will enter a King's Bounty-like form of combat in which the terrain of that province on the overworld defines the terrain in combat. Units line up on opposing sides of a 2D hexagonal map where the terrain gives different bonuses to different units. Archers receive a bonus on hills, mages are better off in forests where they have better defense, and so on. Since you only have one unit that you can become attached to over time, by upgrading and nurturing it, they are much more precious than the kind you just purchase by the dozens in a city barracks. Every unit has three bars: health, stamina, and morale. If you use a unit, its stamina will drop. The consequence is that you can't use one super powerful unit to destroy all enemies while ignoring every other weaker unit. Morale is affected by how the battle progresses, but also by the type of units in your army. Throw "light side" and "dark side" units together, for lack of a better term, and morale will drop.  The classes of heroes you choose can affect stats like army support, diplomacy, and magic. Maybe you'll want a mage to deal a lot of damage (heroes fight in combat themselves), or maybe you'll want a support class that allows you to support larger armies.  If you do go down the dark path with an army full of monsters and keep selecting the "evil" choice in quests, your economy will suffer compared to the more light-side alignment that boosts your economy. After all, nurturing your cities and society does tend to lead to better economies than being feared as a warmongering dictator. You'll have to make your decisions according to your play style and whether you want to field large armies or develop your economy while resolving province requests through diplomacy. Once you take over a province, you can also explore it with your hero. This will reveal things like hidden artifacts and dungeons that boost your economy even more. To top it all off, you can use diplomacy to form alliances on a Shard. Masters of the Broken World seems to pick elements from some of my favorite PC strategy games, improves them, and puts them all in one game. It's a single-player game at the moment, but the producer mentioned that because they self-publish they can take their time to think about what they want to do for the final product. It may take a while before we'll get to play it, but Masters of the Broken World is certainly one of the games at gamescom that I'm looking forward to the most.
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The story behind Masters of the Broken World is a fascinating one. Snowberry Connection, an international independent production fund that has been responsible for games such as Mount & Blade: With Fire & Sw...

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Take a look at a Disciples III: Resurrection video


May 05
// Maurice Tan
Wow, Disciples. Now there is a name I haven't heard of in ages. Disciples III: Resurrection is the sequel to last year's Disciples III: Renaissance. If nothing in that sentence makes any sense to you: they are fantasy strate...
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Cargo: The Quest for Gravity released, looks INSANE


Apr 22
// Jim Sterling
I will admit right now that, even while I'm downloading Cargo: The Quest for Gravity on Steam, I have no idea what it's about. I found out about the game on RPS' recently published impressions piece, but I don't want to read ...
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Freebie alert: Super Soviet Missile Master for iDevices


Feb 05
// Jordan Devore
As promised, The Behemoth has put Super Soviet Missile Mastar out for iPhone and iPad. It's a free download, so you might as well grab the game. In it, you guide a missile away from inconsiderate birds and helicopters so that...
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GSC Game World wants your S.T.A.L.K.E.R. 2 quest ideas


Nov 12
// Jordan Devore
GSC Game World is crowdsourcing S.T.A.L.K.E.R. 2 -- well, a small part of it, anyway. The studio is currently holding a contest in which creative types can submit their quest ideas (up to five) for the impending post-apocalyp...
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They're doing a S.T.A.L.K.E.R. TV series? Sure, why not


Nov 10
// Jordan Devore
Before I say anything, go ahead and watch the teaser for yourself. Basically, it is exactly what you'd think a television show adaptation of the S.T.A.L.K.E.R. series would look like; that was my takeaway. Much like the game...
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Braid's Russian box art grosses me out


Nov 09
// Dale North
Eww! I can't look at it. Get it away. Take it far from here. Take it back to Russia, where it came from. MumboJumbo and Russobit-M/GFI have brought the popular indie game Braid to Russia, says Kotaku, and this is what they ma...
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Rush'n Attack: Ex Patriot has a major problem when it comes to plot. You see, it's not the late 1980s anymore, so the rampant fear of Soviet Russia doesn't hang over us like a red curtain. So Rush'n Attack: Ex Patri...

Preview: Apache: Air Assault

Sep 21 // Ben Perlee
Apache: Air Assault (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360)Develop: Gaijin EntertainmentPublisher: ActivisionTo be released: November 16, 2010 To be clear, usually these sorts of titles appeal to a specific fanbase. While military simulations are always popular, they have a tendency to alienate more casual users by not offering the right sort of experience to appeal to everyone. Thankfully, publisher Activision and Gaijin Entertainment have added variations of difficulty to make the game more enjoyable to different audiences. For those who would rather get in the chopper and not worry about technical maneuvers or careful flight techniques, there is the Training Mode. While it restricts you from performing certain helicopter actions, it does let players go through the entire campaign without too much difficulty. For a greater challenge, there is Realistic Mode, in which players have only three lives. For players who really love helicopter action, there is finally Veteran Mode, offering only one life and finite ammo.  The helicopters themselves are all Apache brand choppers: the Apache AH-64D Longbow, Apache AH-1, Apache AH-64X Experimental Prototype, MQ-8B Fire Scout, and Mi-35 Hind. While only major helicopter nerds will know the variations by name alone, players will find that each one controls and functions differently. Compared to airplanes, these machines need a wider turning radius, can obviously hover, and generally function in a manner very different from other flight simulators. Helicopters unsurprisingly have special abilities, and Apache pilots will be able to maneuver these machines vertically and nearly upside down, for example. These abilities range from hovering to shooting techniques. Dodging missiles is as easy as dropping altitude, yet to gain speed, the player must dive the Apache downward then swing up, much like a glider. There is a lot of flexibility with these vehicles, and it's going to require a minor learning curve even for those players who are comfortable with flight simulators. One impressive feature is how the helicopters handle variations of damage, such as flying with a damaged engine at the expense of mobility. However, certain parts, like the rotor blades, cannot be taken out without bad things happening. You get my drift. While flight simulators don't exactly offer in-depth plots, Apache: Air Assault tells the story of three different Apache crews working for a fictional UN military organization fighting insurgents across the world. I suppose it'll get the job done, but let's admit it, no one will be playing this game for the plot. However, missions themselves are rather dynamic. Objectives will change on the fly, and goals never take more than a few minutes to perform. The first level I was shown, taking place over the plains of Africa, guided us across bluffs and dusty roads while we took out insurgent vehicles. After reducing one insurgent town to rubble (hey, it was filled with no one but guerrilla terrorists, alright?), our Apache had to defend a fellow downed helicopter in a much larger city as insurgents attacked both us and the soldiers on the ground waiting for airlift. Success in this mission involved locking the Apache into a hover position, then switching over to a shooting mode, alternating between a tactical black-and-white vision cam that highlights enemy vehicles and an infrared cam that highlights enemy soldiers as solid white against a field of black. It looks pretty great, and once the rescue crew showed up, the mission became an escort mission. Within 15 minutes, missions varied from taking out targets, defensive aerial battles, and escort challenges. If the whole game can keep up with the variety, fans of flight simulators will have a lot to like. If not, they'll appreciate the free flight mode, with a whole set of variables to keep the gameplay dynamic. With regards to multiplayer, Gaijin Entertainment is taking a cooperative approach. Apache: Air Assault offers 13 multiplayer-exclusive modes with up to four players acting as a squadron to work through more team-based missions. Though online only, the main campaign can be completed as a co-operative team with one player acting as the pilot and the other as the gunner. Coming away from the game, it's clear that fans of air combat games and flight simulators will find a lot to appreciate and enjoy. Clearly, it's not for everyone, but it's a niche title for a niche audience. However, there seems to be a strong amount of polish and focus on making a helicopter title that works. It also helps that it is a great looking game with very lush and realistic geography and a solid draw distance. Hopefully, Gaijin Entertainment and Activision can keep things together and release a quality Apache helicopter simulator when Apache: Air Assault launches this November.
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Apache: Air Assault is a special beast. While it might be considered a helicopter version of Gaijin Entertainment's IL-2 Sturmovik: Birds of Prey, a military aerial simulator released in 2009, it is clearly a differ...

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1C Company brings screenshots of Theatre of War 2: Korea


Jun 07
// Ben Perlee
You know, it's true, for every ten titles of World War II, there is maybe a couple modern fictional military shooters, four "pseudo-realistic" future titles, maybe a Desert Storm game, and if a publisher is feeling particular...
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King's Bounty: Crossworlds expansion oozes bounty


Jun 07
// Ben Perlee
For those who picked up last year's King's Bounty: Armored Princess found a great strategy game with a fairly strong legacy, if not the most mainstream appeal. However, 1C Company has found enough of a core base tha...
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Boy banned from videogames, sledgehammers father to death


Apr 16
// Jim Sterling
A fourteen-year-old boy recently gave his father the Peter Gabriel treatment after he was banned from computer games, battering him to death with a sledgehammer.  The unnamed teen had his keyboard confiscated after being...
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Metro 2033 won't be an open-world game


Dec 16
// Jim Sterling
Metro 2033 may be about post-apocalyptic Russia, but if you thought that would make it the next Fallout 3 or S.T.A.L.K.E.R, you'd be dead wrong. Unlike those games, Metro 2033 is not going the open-world route, giving us some...
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THQ sends me tickets to ride Metro 2033


Oct 26
// Nick Chester
This weekend, I received a nondescript envelope in the mail. Inside the brown envelope I found a letter confirming my trip to ride the Moscow Metro, along with two tickets. I immediately made the connection to THQ's Metro 203...
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IL-2 Sturmovik: Birds of Prey gets a release date


Jul 23
// Jordan Devore
Allow me to go out on a limb here and say that many of you have no idea what IL-2 Sturmovik: Birds of Prey actually is. Don't worry -- we aren't here to judge. The game is a combat flight sim set in World War II, which explai...
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Find out what it's like to be a trucker in Rig'n'Roll


Jun 29
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
"Players will step into the shoes of a young man in the year 2024 as he arrives in California to pursue his dreams of road domination and capture the Californian cargo transportation market. There are miles of highways t...
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Take to the skies in IL-2 Sturmovik: Birds of Prey


Jun 29
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
IL-2 Sturmovik: Birds of Prey is another World War II game by way of 1C Company. This one, however, is flight combat game and looks beautiful. I got to play the game developed by Gaijin Entertainment last Friday, but I'm hold...
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Men of War: Red Tide takes you back to WWII, again


Jun 29
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Men of War: Red Tide is the stand-alone expansion to the original Men of War for the PC. The expansion will introduce a new story, new units, new upgrades, new weapons and there will be over 20 missions for the player to expe...
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Learn medieval Russian battle history in XIII Century! Woo!


Jun 29
// Ben Perlee
It was an interesting gaming situation, sitting down to play a RTS in the Russian Consulate in San Francisco, eating very Slavic food (caviar and pickled asparagus) and trying to keep up with an amazingly complex game. And th...
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Murder ze Nazis in Death to Spies: Moment of Truth


Jun 29
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Death to Spies: Moment of Truth is the upcoming sequel to the original stealth action game from developer Haggard Games. The game follows Semion Strogov, a captain in the Soviet counterintelligence service, SMERSH. SMERSH, by...
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Destructoid at the Russian consulate


Jun 29
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
I've been to some really crazy places in my blogging career. Never did I once imagine that I would end up in the Russian consulate because of it. It was a really swanky event. The food was authentic (right down to the mini pa...
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Counter-Strike argument leads to murder of teen


May 06
// Jim Sterling
A number of deaths have been pinned on Counter-Strike over the years, but never has the venerable online shooter ever been directly involved. That is, until a certain argument in a Novosibirsk Internet café ended on ve...
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From Russia with pixels; the coolest picture you'll see today


From the golden archives
Feb 25
// Earnest Cavalli
[Updated with the 2005 and 2010 version! Remember Nex? This odd illustration still ranks amongst the most popular in the Destructoid Golden Archive; stories which I'm slowly restoring from our old publishing sy...
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Command & Conquer Red Alert 3 coming to PC and Xbox 360


Feb 12
// NO LONGER WORKS AT DESTRUCTOID
Hungarian gaming magazine PC Guru leaked out April's cover a little early it seems. The magazine might be written in a made up language but the words Red Alert 3 come out as a clear indicator that the game will be making its ...
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Russian PS3 ad: Is Sony compensating for something?


Jun 14
// David Houghton
It's good to see that Sony is using its money responsibly in this time of financial hardship. This Russian billboard poster measures an epic 500 meters in length (making the illustrated PlayStation 3 on the end around 2:1...
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Bargain Bin Laden #14: Freedom Fighters


Jun 02
// 8BitBrian
Aaron Linde is busy hunting terrorists with Jack Bauer, so I'm taking over Bargain Bin Laden this week. This week's game, Freedom Fighters, is one that I've actually discussed with Mr. Linde at some length. This i...

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