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Rising Star

One Upon Light photo
One Upon Light

One Upon Light coming to PS4 in October

Stay away from the light, Carolanne!
Sep 15
// Vikki Blake
The very beautiful, if weirdly titled, One Upon Light will be coming to the PS4 in Europe and North America in October. The "devious" top-down puzzler inverts your natural inclination to move towards the light, making the bri...

Zombie Vikings brings humorous brawler action to the Norse landscape

Aug 20 // Alessandro Fillari
[embed]307158:60071:0[/embed] Zombie Vikings (PS4)Developer: Zoink! GamesPublisher: Rising Star GamesRelease Date: Autumn 2015 Set in a very goofy interpretation of the Viking era, the Norse god Odin has his last good eye stolen by the mischievous trickster Loki, and must unearth four undead viking warriors to chase after the rogue god and return his eye. Loki plans to use the eye for his own nefarious purposes, such the awful and evil act of playing beer pong, and Odin wants revenge. Over the course of their journey through the Norse lands, the Zombie Vikings will battle waves of monsters, creatures, and other oddities that will put their brawling skills to the test. But with their new zombie powers, they'll be able to match up to the monsters that await, while also coming to terms with their troubled past lives. Right from the opening cutscene, the game sets itself up as a humorous and cartoonish take on Norse mythology, and it was pleasing to see a game have some fun with the material. The art style is essentially like a 2D animated cartoon, complete with interludes where the characters bicker and talk amongst themselves. With the main story written by Zack Weindersmith, the creator of the Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal webcomic, Zombie Vikings blends together brawler action with comedy. Over 90 minutes worth of cutscenes are spread across the thirty levels, and the story goes in places you'd least expect. While some of the jokes are hit-or-miss, it's refreshing to see a brawler revel in its own ridiculousness. The game continually ramps up in oddball comedy, and it's all the better for it. As one of the four vikings, you'll battle through several stages utilizing unique character skills and weapons which alter your performance. In similar vein to Castle Crashers, gold acquired from your journey can be spent on upgrades and new gear. As you travel through the land and complete stages, you can head back to old areas and tackle new challenges and side-quests that open up, yielding greater rewards. While there isn't a leveling system or any other RPG mechanics, the items you can deck your character out with are plentiful, and allow for a great level of customization. Which is great, because each character has their own special playstyle. During my session, I mostly stuck with Seagurd, a viking who's corpse somehow fused with an octopus. Thankfully, it's not just for show, as he's able to use the tentacles for spin attacks and charged-up power moves which turn the small octopus on his torso into a massive monster that damages all nearby enemies. The other characters make up the more standard strength, speed, and technique archetypes for brawlers, and each of them not only shows a lot of creativity in their design, but also feels very different one another. Moreover, you can use certain skills together in unison, such as throwing your friends across the field and into a mob of foes where they can unleash a power attack. This adds another layer of strategy to combat, which can make the co-op nature of the game all the more appealing. You haven't lived until you've seen four undead vikings stack on top of each other and rush deep into battle. I'm a big fan of the brawler genre, and Zombie Vikings has got a lot going for it. Norse mythology is often ignored in gaming, so it's a real pleasure to be able to explore the lands while battling monsters straight from lore, albeit in a really goofy, comedic way. The guys at Zoink! Games made a really fun title. Those looking for a four-player co-op beat-'em-up that doesn't take itself too seriously will be intrigued by this one.
Zombie Vikings preview photo
Are you a bad enough dude to stop Loki?
When people think of the beat-'em-up genre, they most likely recall the dimly-light streets of an urban metropolis filled with thugs and other roughnecks looking to cause trouble. While there are some other notable titles tha...

Poncho is a mind-melting retro journey through post-robopocalypse

Aug 20 // Alessandro Fillari
[embed]307084:60068:0[/embed] Poncho (PC [previewed], PS4, PS Vita, Wii U)Developer: Delve InteractivePublisher: Rising Star GamesRelease Date: September 24, 2015MSRP: $14.99 After the apocalypse, humanity has been wiped out by an unknown scourge, and all that is left are machines. With mother nature having retaken the earth, the machines developed their own society and culture in the ruins of the old world. But one day, a poncho-wearing robot longs to discover his origins, and seeks out his creator. Using perspective-warping abilities and his own platforming skills, the resourceful little robot will travel through the landscape and encounter other machines trying to find purpose in the new world. Over the course of his adventure, he'll not only discover the meaning his own creation, but also the truth behind mankind's destruction. In recent years, retro-throwback games such as Fez have become common. What these titles share is an increased focus on subversion and playing with genre conventions, all the while crafting a compelling story that goes beyond what many would expect from the genre they're paying homage to. Poncho is no different. With the ability to travel between different planes of the level -- from the foreground, background, and middleground -- the poncho-wearing robot will have to tackle challenging puzzles and action set-pieces. The developers cite classic platformers such as Super Mario World and Sonic the Hedgehog, which had richly detailed backgrounds, as inspiration. I was surprised by how quickly Poncho ramped in difficulty. Initially, it's a very atmospheric game that focuses on storytelling, but once you're let loose into the various stages, things take quite a turn. While there are no enemies or bosses to battle, the challenges come from figuring out how to navigate the multi-layered levels with the perspectives-jumping abilities. With platforms, switches, and other obstacles that call for quick jumps between the different areas of the stages, there's tricky twitch-based gameplay to the platforming and some genuine three-dimensional thinking to the puzzles. It's trippy while still playing on the 2D plane.  With its release approaching, I got in some quality time from the current build of the game. As you acquire new abilities and skills from schematics, you'll be able to travel back to past stages and explore new areas. These abilities, such as the robot stomp, open a number of new avenues of exploration. This mechanic did a lot to make me understand the true scope of Poncho. It's very much a throwback platformer with modern puzzle gameplay dynamics. There were several moments where I felt I was stuck, but once I figured things out, I was left immensely satisfied.  If you're itching for a puzzle-platformer that plays with the genre's tropes and conventions, then keep an eye out for this little title. While on the surface it looks like a rather humble platforming jaunt through a post-apocylyptic world filled with robots, Poncho quickly goes into mindfuck territory, and it'll raise questions you'll be dying to get answers to.
Poncho preview photo
Out on September 24
Last year, we got a sneak peek at a rather peculiar puzzle-platformer named Poncho. Launching on Kickstarter and debuting at EGX for attendees, it showed a lot of promise in exploring the earth after humans went extinct. Unfo...

La-Mulana EX photo
La-Mulana EX

La-Mulana EX is nirvana for punishing game enthusiasts

Alternatively, 'Spelunking for Masochists'
Apr 04
// Jason Faulkner
There's a certain thrill to a game that punishes you for attempting to best it, as Bloodborne and Souls series fans can attest to. That's why there happen to be so many of them cropping up here and there, especially over the ...

Beyblade photo

Beyblade Evolution invading Nintendo World Store

Let it rip New York style
Oct 29
// Wesley Ruscher
Rising Star Games, publisher of Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut, is throwing a special launch event today at the Nintendo World Store in New York city for their new 3DS title Beyblade Evolution. The event, which begins at 3 p.m EST and is open to the public, will provide hands-on play, in-depth demos from game experts, and hourly prize giveaways.

Deadly Premonition: Director's Cut: UE now on PSN

Download the FK out of it
Oct 19
// Ian Bonds
Deadly Premonition, Jim Sterling's favorite game of all time is now available on PlayStation Network, containing all the material from the Director's Cut that was released earlier this year plus all the previously released do...
Deadly Premonition photo
Deadly Premonition

Deadly Premonition 'Visual Companion' ebook released

They sure do know how to milk a success
Oct 14
// Conrad Zimmerman
Fans of Deadly Premonition are being offered a new "Visual Companion" ebook through the iTunes store today. The supplement features more than 350 pages of material, including some of Swery65's notes, and an assortment of...
Deadly Premonition to PC photo
Deadly Premonition to PC

Deadly Premonition: Director's Cut on PC this Halloween

Call me York
Sep 03
// Steven Hansen
Deadly Premonition: Director's Cut achieved a Steam release through Greenlight.The weird, Twin Peaks-y murder mystery Jim so famously awarded a 10/10 review got its prettied up Director's Cut on PS3, though the original game ...

Deadly Premonition: Director's Cut on Steam Greenlight

PC ... in the coffee
Jul 18
// Jim Sterling
Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut is eyeing a PC release via the wondrous passage of Steam Greenlight. At last, computer gamers can experience the delirious delights of Agent York Morgan and his hunt for the Raincoat Kil...

Review: Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut

May 04 // Jim Sterling
Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut (PS3)Developer: Access GamesPublisher: Rising Star GamesReleased: April 30, 2013MSRP: $39.99 High definition graphics may be a given in most games, but only in Deadly Premonition could they be repackaged as a compelling new extra. By far the most obviously noticeable change in the Director's Cut is the fresh lick of paint applied to the visuals, with a greater level of clarity and color. While the game can never be described as looking "good" no matter what you do to it, this new version at least looks better on modern televisions -- though your mileage may vary.  The biggest key to your liking the new graphics is in whether or not you appreciate the removal of the color filter. The original version of the game has a drab greenish filter overlaying everything, leading to a game that appeared muted and muddy. Some fans appreciated the filter, and have reacted poorly to the new look. Personally, I quite like the filter gone. It allows me to enjoy York's various unlockable suits a lot more, and gives Greenvale's environments a lot more vibrancy than there was before.  [embed]253011:48507:0[/embed] Sadly, any upgrade to the visuals has come at a nasty cost, with The Director's Cut suffering a disappointing hit to its framerate. Things now run at 30fps at best, and dips below even that during densely populated areas, or periods of rainfall. Turning the camera can now make one feel queasy, and while I don't find that it utterly destroys my enjoyment of the game, it does damage it, which saddens me greatly.  The game's sound is similarly inferior, though not to the same degree. Occasionally, audio can stutter, especially when saving or loading content, and some of the dialog seems less clear than it used to be.  Fortunately, the controls have not suffered for any of their alterations. York controls more fluidly, combat has changed the aiming controls to bring it more in line with "proper" third-person shooters, and overall getting around Greenvale is faster and more efficient. Though it's a controversial change, fighting enemies has become easier, with monsters taking less damage to go down. This is actually a far greater improvement than some would give it credit for. Deadly Premonition was never difficult, and its combat is far from the actual focus of the experience. Enemies were hurdles, not challenges, so reducing the time it takes to put them away makes the game's horror sequences far less tedious and keeps the action moving. Overall, you've got a game that retains all its humor and silliness at a snappier pace, and I've found it only contributes to my overall enjoyment of York's misadventures.  As far as extra content goes, there's really not a lot. A few extra cutscenes have been woven into the investigation, and nothing playable has been added. There's the promise of new chapters being brought in as downloadable content, but having to buy extra stuff is hardly a substitute for a retail package that, in terms of narrative value, offers very little to someone who has already played the original game on Xbox 360. It's nice to see a little extra, but it's a little extra that could have been tossed onto YouTube -- and probably has been already.  Outside of that, the PS3 version allows for PlayStation Move support and 3D glasses, both of which are more ancillary, temporary distractions than product sellers in their own right. The 3D in particular is something best checked out once and never again, given the game's dodgy framerate. Unless you really, really want to throw up, it's a good idea to keep away.  Compared to what it could -- nay, should -- be, The Director's Cut is a bit of a letdown for fans of the game. However, it should be noted that the brilliant core of Deadly Premonition, the stuff that makes it the compelling, divisive, utterly beguiling thing that it is, remains intact. Framerate dips and dodgy sound do little to unravel the carefully constructed parade of artistic weirdness that is Swery 65's crown jewel of game development.  This is still a game in which you must command your player character to "look with interest" at a cup of coffee. This is still a game in which a federal agent speaks to a magic voice in his head in plain view of everybody. This is still a game in which urinating into a murder victim's skull before using it as a soup spoon is a charming dinner anecdote. Where musical dissonance becomes so normal, you're confused when the soundtrack fits the action. Where "mysterious capitalists" whisper in the ears of rhyming servants. Where survival horror and farce comedy become a shameless whole. Where the full game is stranger than anything like I've made it sound.  For those new to Greenvale, this is going to still be a treat, provided you've got a very open mind. If you're one of these people, this is a game about an FBI agent tracking down mysterious red seeds found in murder cases, and comes to a Twin Peaks-inspired town to investigate. It starts as a bargain basement Resident Evil 4 knock-off, then suddenly turns into an open world populated by NPCs that run on daily schedules, offering time-sensitive sidequests that can reward players with anything from flamethrowers to magical dolls.  This is a clunky and convoluted game, but in such a way that it only adds to the overall shoddy charm. To say it's a rough game is to put it mildly, but it's a roughness that exudes character. What would fail in most games contributes flawlessly to the success of this one. Above all, it's an overwhelmingly entertaining, raucously funny game. Due in part to deliberate design, and thanks in part to accident, Deadly Premonition is responsible for more laughter in my house than any other videogame ever created. That sounds hyperbolic, but it's damn true.  The foundation of Deadly Premonition, the stuff that matters, is still absolutely perfect as far as I am concerned. It is true, of course, that this perfection has been scarred somewhat by the faults found in The Director's Cut, and there's no denying that longtime fans may not be getting what they hoped for in this package. To newcomers or the severely dedicated, however, this is still a bloody great time, and remains one of those games that truly, desperately, must be experienced to be believed. Its core greatness cannot be stopped, No matter how much the rate of frames dropped.Though not abundant, extras are nice, I'd say it is worth the asking price.  So says Mr. Stewart!
Deadly Premonition photo
Return of the Zach
Deadly Premonition may be the most well known review I've ever written. It's certainly one of the most debated 10/10 scores I've ever awarded -- though I've not awarded too many. It's a score I stand by wholeheartedly, and De...

Deadly Premonition DC photo
Deadly Premonition DC

Sip the Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut launch vid

Isn't it time you drank the Coffee?
Apr 24
// Dale North
I'm a tea drinker, but I'm drinking coffee this morning in honor of this new launch trailer for Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut. Burned my lips but it felt so good. We're about a week away from the game's April 30 lau...
Did you hear that Zach photo
Did you hear that Zach

Deadly Premonition PS3's pre-order bonuses detailed

From releasing into obscurity to retail-specific pre-order bonuses!
Mar 29
// Steven Hansen
Deadly Premonition: Director's Cut comes out next month (4/30) on PS3 and it will offer retailer-specific pre-order bonuses, which is a little bit of an oddity for a game getting its unexpected second life. Almost takes the s...
Deadly Premonition photo
Deadly Premonition

Deadly Premonition looks better than ever

Director's cut trailer shows fancy HD graphics
Mar 22
// Conrad Zimmerman
Spoiler alert: Rising Star Games has released a new trailer for Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut which shows off the remastered game's updated graphics. It does, however, blatantly reveal one rather significant el...

Talking Deadly Premonition: Directorís Cut with SWERY

Jan 29 // Steven Hansen
Deadly Premonition: The Director’s Cut (PlayStation 3) Developer: Access Games Publisher: Rising Star Games Release: April 2013 From the onset, things are looking good. We funnel into a room and shake hands with SWERY and Tomio Kanazawa, who does SWERY’s more laborious translating. Kanazawa is a producer and the Vice President of Toybox Inc., where he works with Harvest Moon creator Toybox founder Yasuhiro Wada. The two know each other from Marvelous, where Kanazawa was a producer and Wada the eventual CEO. Marvelous published Deadly Premonition in Japan. There’s more than a little luck to the game’s perseverance and eventual release. Kanazawa and SWERY have been working together for some time now and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. At first glance the two seem rather juxtaposed. Kanazawa sits upright in a sensible black blazer and fields questions. SWERY is laid back on the couch as if at a Roman banquet, his eyebrows contorting with life behind black, thick framed glasses. But their great relationship quickly becomes evident. Later in the interview, after talking Revenge of the Killer Tomatoes and even more obscure 80’s flick Gotcha! while driving around in Deadly Premonition, Destructoid video personality and generally debonair gent Spencer Hayes (expect an on camera interview soon) asked if any new in car diatribes were among the game’s new additions. SWERY’s eyebrows emoted further still as Kanazawa explained how SWERY had written a bunch more but, “I had to say ‘no,’ there was not enough time,” he offered, a tad bereft. “He was so upset,” Kanazawa continued, laughing. “He still complains,” Kanazawa smiled as SWERY, who plans to add those lost dialogue pieces to his blog post release, presumably complained a bit more. While driving around we were shown one of the new additions, a response to criticism of the game. The minimap caught flack for being too small in relation to the large environment. Though it looked rather massive on the enormous set the game was being demoed on, it was a surprise to see a translucent version of the minimap then expand further over much of the screen while York was still driving. Cool. The first thing that struck me when I took a look toward the TV was Deadly Premonition’s remarkable sharp, clean title menu. When you start a new game, gone is the difficulty option, the harder iterations of which previously kept some players from completing or continuing with the game. SWERY wants people to play the game, wholly and to the end. The visual upgrade is obvious. As we open up to a mutilated corpse of a girl eerily strung up on a tree, details that were previously lost are for the first time seen, like a clear demarcation of tears on the ghastly face. Mind, it isn’t an entirely rebuilt game. It still shows age and budget, but it also looks damn good. This is a proper director’s cut, of course, not just an HD rebuild. 3D and PlayStation Move support have both been integrated into the game. In the realm of controls, the default scheme has been remapped to better match the expected third-person shooter scheme (right analog to aim and so on; you’re still stuck in one place when shooting). “This game is too unique,” SWERY offered. There’s a concerted effort to appeal to a new audience as well as possible (better visuals, slightly more standardized controls) without compromising the game. Additional scenes, from SWERY, have been added to Director’s Cut. There is a new prologue, for instance, that then cuts right into the introduction fans are familiar with. SWERY also wrote an epilogue that he says will address certain concerns over narrative elements. “It was not difficult to write the new ending,” he said, noting that after three months of discussion he was able to write it in a week.  The pair insists that the additional content was handled so as to “not destroy the original story.” The DLC will not be story-based, either, though further details are being kept under wraps. There haven’t been too many fundamental additions in terms of gameplay beyond fixes and the like, either. When asked if there were any new weapons, Kanazawa responded with a negative, mentioning there were already so many unique weapons, “like a guitar, like a rock star,” at which point SWERY, behind him, pantomimes Pete Townshend going to town on a guitar. With a custom moniker like SWERY (or SWERY65), you might expect a bit of the rock star persona in the chap, but there’s no hint of ego here. Just a calm fluidity, affable nature, a penchant for obscure American culture, and those wild eyebrows that add life to every expression. At one point during the demo SWERY gracefully, silently elevated himself from his laid back position and opened the inexplicably closed air conditioning vent in the slowly overheating room and laid back down. It was strangely cool (pun intended), and relished. Speaking of relish, he loves hamburgers. SWERY’s simultaneously placid and plucky demeanor are a fit for Deadly Premonition’s peaceful, small town vibes. In talking about the town and why he chose to set the game there, he mentioned how its peaceful nature contrasted sharply with the horrific depravity occurring there. Making the normal seem alien is an effective horror tool. “Something you are always watching in your normal life begins turning into horrible things,” Kanazawa translated. But don’t call it a survival horror game. “Sometimes the game is categorized as survival horror but he did not mean for it fall into this genre,” Kanazawa explained. “Solving the mystery is the main part of the game,” he added, likening it to the detective story it is in spite of more otherworldly horror elements. Of course, just breathing in the daily life of the town is a main part of the game, by which you’re breathing in a part of SWERY. There is a squirrel obsessed character in the game because squirrels are uncommon in Japan, but we’re filthy with them. Similarly, one of the times SWERY was here researching for Deadly Premonition he stumbled upon a scene in which two individuals sat separate from each other at a cartoonishly long table. That scene made it straight into the game. If you haven’t played Deadly Premonition yet -- and even if you have -- you owe it to yourself to pick up the Director’s Cut. It’s unlike anything out there and brimming with personality. That the game even exists defies credulity. Countless times the duo was told to stop making it. It was almost cancelled multiple times. It was almost given a rating that would’ve made it unsellable. It had little appeal to the Japanese audience and did poorly there. In spite of this, Deadly Premonition and its creators have persevered. And now we’re getting a full-fledged director’s cut. Do you feel that, Zach? That’s a heartwarming success story in an occasionally bleakly unoriginal industry. It feels good.
Deadly Premonition photo
Gazing into an abyss of hamburgers, eyebrows, and coffee
Destructoid’s love affair with the inimitable, idiosyncratic Deadly Premonition is a point of public record. Jim’s infamous, glowing, 10/10 review turned a lot of people onto the game -- myself included -- and for...

Under Defeat Contest photo
Free helicopter pew pew for you you!
[Update: Contest over! Winners have been PM'd.] Our friends at Rising Star Games have given us 20 PSN codes for Under Defeat HD to hand out to the Destructoid community! We thought the game was pretty good, so why not try it ...

Review: Under Defeat HD

Nov 28 // Allistair Pinsof
Under Defeat HD: Deluxe Edition (PlayStation 3)Developer: G.Rev.Publisher: Rising Star GamesRelease: November 27, 2012 (retail), December 4, 2012 (PSN)MSRP: $29.99In alternate history of World War II, Under Defeat lets players control Nazi pilots who conquer the Western Allies -- albeit, this US release of the game removes some of the more obvious connections to the Nazi party. Under Defeat was released onto the Dreamcast in 2006, one year into what we once called “next-gen”. And yet, neither of these things is what makes Under Defeat such an oddity in its genre. Rather, it’s Under Defeat’s obtuse controls that make it a standout title. In its original arcade release, Under Defeat is played with a joystick and two buttons. The helicopter scroll up and down, a bit slower than in other shooters but those typically feature jets. The kicker is that going left and right changes the angle of the helicopter. You hold fire to lock into an angle, allowing you to diagonally shoot enemies from afar. This sounds simple but successfully dodging while providing fire is one hell of a challenge, even in the game’s opening stage. You could lock into a traditional forward facing position at all times, but Under Defeat encourages working the angles since that’s where enemies often come from. [embed]239449:45923[/embed]Getting used to Under Defeat’s controls is both the game's blessing and curse. Learning to control the helicopter can be exhilarating or frustrating, depending on circumstances. The original offered two control options, one where going left or right would angle you toward that direction and another option that would angle you away from that direction (allowing for quick return fire). I never felt comfortable with either but I eventually settled on angling toward the direction I’m going since A) it’s what the top scoring players on YouTube do and B) it’s called “Normal”.The problem with this entire system is that it requires absolute control that the PlayStation 3’s thumbstick can’t provide. There is an option to increase sensitivity but none to decrease. Go figure. I became adept enough to reach the final boss on Normal difficulty, but I never became comfortable. I imagine the game feels much better with a good arcade stick. It’s as if cult favorite shmup developer G.Rev knew this because it included a new dual stick control option for this HD update. This makes moving and firing a breeze to the extent that it takes away the main appeal of the game: overcoming the unwieldy nature of the helicopter.The dual stick controls have another major pitfall through the game’s options. Options, as in those little robots that hover around your ship and automatically fire at enemies (NOT settings). There are no upgrades in Under Defeat and the only pick-ups are options that come in three varieties: vulcan (fast, weak), bomb (slow, strong), and cannon (between the two; my favorite). Your option will only be used temporarily and you can only summon it by not firing, letting a meter fill up. There is a cooldown period after use, which is barely noticeable with the vulcan but a death trap with the bomb. These options are pretty finicky with picking a target, so you’ll have to position them in front of an enemy. If they don’t have a target to shoot, they won’t be of much help. Flying your ship in the direction of an enemy, sending an option their way, quickly piloting across the screen, and then flanking is something you’ll do a lot in Under Defeat and it’s pretty awesome. What’s not awesome is doing this with the dual stick option, since the direction of the option isn’t dictated by the right stick (gun fire) but the left stick (movement). It’s a silly thing to overlook.Under Defeat HD brings the Japanese cult hit to 16:9 ratio with higher polygon models and a remixed soundtrack. G. Rev did a fantastic job in not changing the feel of the game while providing more space to traverse. I wish the original score were an option in this New Order mode, but the remixes aren’t bad at all. This new coat of paint isn’t enough to prevent Under Defeat from being its same, old drab self. I know its a military shooter and all, but couldn’t have G.Rev put some more personality and color into these stages? This is a difficult game which means you’ll be seeing the same areas a lot. I grew so tired of them and I bet you will, too. As with Akai Katana, Rising Star Games has published a quality shoot-em-up on consoles with stellar packaging. Unlike Akai Katana, Under Defeat is no instant classic and it doesn’t feel well suited for a controller. It’s also a much slower and cheaper game, full of gotcha bosses and enemy attacks that make me pine for Cave’s bullet hell -- at least I can see the hurt that is coming my way. There is also the problem of gun fire blending too easily with explosions and there are always explosions in Under Defeat.Warts and all, Under Defeat is a capable, unique shoot-em-up given new life in this HD update. Its ridiculous controls will divide players, forming a hate-love relationship with the game. Under Defeat feels like trying to rub your stomach and pat your head at the same time. It’s a fun, awkward exercise that some may grow tired of all too soon.
Helicopters are complex, unwieldy machines. In games, their difficulties are either flat-out ignored (Twin Cobra) or make for one of the steepest learning curves you’ll ever face (Battlefield 2). Under Defeat is a ba...


A first glimpse of Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut

Catch a few precious seconds after all the marketing quotes
Oct 31
// Conrad Zimmerman
Rising Star games dropped a little tease of Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut today, and what a tiny morsel it is. Following about a minute of quotes about the release from fine publications such as Giant Bomb, EGM and ...

Deadly Premonition Director's Cut coming early 2013

Re-release of cult hit to improve gameplay and add new features
Oct 16
// Conrad Zimmerman
Rising Star Games has confirmed today their intention to publish a "Director's Cut" edition of the 2010 small-town suspense thriller, Deadly Premonition, early in 2013 for PlayStation 3. This new version will feature updated ...

Virtue's Last Reward gets Euro trailer, you lucky dogs

Oct 05
// Tony Ponce
Behold! The first English trailer for Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward! It may not be super amazing, but at least it's evidence that our Euro brethren have something to look forward to! As you may recall, Nine Hours, Nine P...

Rejoice shoot-em-up fans: Under Defeat HD is set for PSN!

Aug 22
// Allistair Pinsof
If I made a list of Japan-only shooters that are most deserving of a western release, G. Rev’s one-of-a-kind helicopter shooter Under Defeat would be at the top of the list. Well, maybe it’s time I cross it off.Fo...

Rising Star bringing Carrier Command to the US in Q3 2012

Jun 29
// Brett Zeidler
Remember that cult-hit game Carrier Command from the 80's? Yeah, neither do I. To be fair, I wasn't even born yet. They don't call me the resident baby at Destructoid for nothing! Anyway, if you're not in the know, Bohe...

Things aren't looking so good for Cave Interactive

May 17
// Kyle MacGregor
Sorry all you bored PlayStation Vita owners! While Cave Interactive announced its support for Sony's new portable at TGS last year that's not happening anymore. The latest issue of Famitsu magazine listed both titles amidst a...

Cave shooter Akai Katana descending onto the Xbox 360

May 05
// Kyle MacGregor
Good news fellow STG enthusiasts! Cave's side-scrolling bullet-hell adventure Akai Katana is making its way to the Xbox 360, courtesy of Rising Star Games. Publishers of everything awesomely Japanese on the other side o...

Operation Rainfall to pitch Pandora's Tower to publishers

Apr 22
// Brett Zeidler
After using two similar campaigns with Xenoblade Chronicles and The Last Story, Operation Rainfall is trying something new with their approach to get Pandora's Tower published in the US. In addition to fans ral...

Bit.Trip Complete & Saga now releasing March 16th for EU

Feb 18
// Kyle MacGregor
Bit.Trip Complete and Saga were released several months ago here in North America, but across the pond there are still plenty of fans eagerly awaiting their release. Fortunately, Europeans don't have much longer to wait,...

Don't buy Deadly Premonition on Games on Demand yet!

Jul 06
// Jim Sterling
Deadly Premonition arrived on Games on Demand today, but publisher Rising Star is urging European customers not to buy it yet. It's supposed to be available for £14.99 on Xbox Live, but went up for the exorbitant p...

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